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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 29, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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the headlines — covid cases injapan surge as local media report infections across the country have exceeded 10,000 cases for the first time and top medical advisers urge the goverment to issue stronger warnings about the virus. president biden has pleaded with more americans to have coronavirus jabs, setting out measures targeting millions of federal employees and contractors. a public inquiry into the murder of a maltese investigative journalist, daphne caruana galizia, has found that the state bore responsibility for her death. the report said the government had failed to recognise risks to her life and take reasonable steps to avoid them. a global education summit in london has raised $4 billion for education in poor countries, but charities say the amount is less than was hoped for, calling it "underwhelming".
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are lucy fisher, the deputy political editor at the telegraph, and liam thorp, who's the political editor of the liverpool echo. welcome to liam for the first time. good to see you again, lucy. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the metro reports that google is demanding its staff are fully vaccinated before returning to the office as ministers say they are "looking carefully" at whether new employment laws are needed. while the daily mail has foreign secretary dominic raab appearing to back the idea of workers having to prove their vaccination status. the daily telegraph says one in four patients classed as a "covid hospitalisation" is actually being treated for other reasons, prompting claims that the public has been misled.
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the i reports that a new "amber watchlist" would allow the government to switch popular destinations, such as spain, to the red list at short notice, requiring holiday—makers to go into mandatory hotel quarantine. the daily mirror highlights comments to the bbc from england's deputy chief medical officer, jonathan van—tam, that the vaccine roll—out has saved an estimated 60,000 lives and prevented 22 million infections. according to the financial times, the conservative party has received £18 million from 154 donors with property interests since borisjohnson became prime minister two years ago. and the guardian reports an all—party committee of mps saying police and governments have done too little to stamp out racial injustice in the ranks, with the failings being "systemic" and leading to "unjustified inequalities". so, let's begin. lucy at first, if you would.
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covid—19 case number is misleading. this is an interesting story. when it gets as many people have been talking about ever since those fatality numbers started to appear regularly. i fatality numbers started to appear reuularl . ~ ,, ., . regularly. i think you are right. we had to delete _ regularly. i think you are right. we had to delete data _ regularly. i think you are right. we had to delete data since _ regularly. i think you are right. we had to delete data since march - regularly. i think you are right. we l had to delete data since march 2020 showing us the new hospitalisations for covid—19, and this story, which is based on official nhs data published today, shows that perhaps some of that data has been misleading because one in four patients with covid was not actually admitted to be inpatient for that reason. so they might have had any other kind of medical concerns such as a broken leg and is only because every patient is automatically tested that they caught the covid symptoms also i think this is really important because a lot of the government's keep strategy around and justification for restrictions
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in the past year and more has been to protect the nhs to avoid overwhelming the health service with covid cases. i think this data seems to suggest that some of that might have been a little bit inflated, the information they were looking at. liam, what do you make of this story? liam, what do you make of this sto ? �* ., , �* , story? i'm not sure it's quite the dramatic mystic _ story? i'm not sure it's quite the dramatic mystic elation - story? i'm not sure it's quite the dramatic mystic elation being i story? i'm not sure it's quite the i dramatic mystic elation being made out. dramatic mystic elation being made out we _ dramatic mystic elation being made out. we are still site the vast majority— out. we are still site the vast majority of the people are primarily in the _ majority of the people are primarily in the hospital with covid. and if the other— in the hospital with covid. and if the other people are in the hospital for other_ the other people are in the hospital for other reasons, they have also -ot for other reasons, they have also got covid — for other reasons, they have also got covid in — for other reasons, they have also got covid in hospital. we don't know if that— got covid in hospital. we don't know if that made them differently more ill but_ if that made them differently more ill but what is not wrong and what has not _ ill but what is not wrong and what has not been over dramatised if the pressure _ has not been over dramatised if the pressure of— has not been over dramatised if the pressure of the nhs has faced. that is a chief_ pressure of the nhs has faced. that is a chief metric here. what has been _ is a chief metric here. what has been taken _ is a chief metric here. what has been taken to protect the nhs? they are still— been taken to protect the nhs? they are still in— been taken to protect the nhs? they are still in hospital and silting up resources — are still in hospital and silting up resources and need to be looked after— resources and need to be looked after and — resources and need to be looked after and still putting pressure on the services. we saw those scenes in january _ the services. we saw those scenes in january. these doctors were not
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lying _ january. these doctors were not lying but — january. these doctors were not lying but the situation they were facing _ lying but the situation they were facing 50— lying but the situation they were facing. so i'm not sure that it's a case _ facing. so i'm not sure that it's a case of— facing. so i'm not sure that it's a case of people being misled. there have been— case of people being misled. there have been problems with statistics. we have _ have been problems with statistics. we have seen in the calculations of how the _ we have seen in the calculations of how the data has been dumb of the one thing that has been true all the law as _ one thing that has been true all the law as when the pressure we have seen _ law as when the pressure we have seen on _ law as when the pressure we have seen on the — law as when the pressure we have seen on the nhs and we are seeing it now. seen on the nhs and we are seeing it how i_ seen on the nhs and we are seeing it now. , , , ., , seen on the nhs and we are seeing it now. , ., . ., now. i suppose you could also echo the criticism _ now. i suppose you could also echo the criticism on _ now. i suppose you could also echo the criticism on the _ now. i suppose you could also echo the criticism on the fidelity - the criticism on the fidelity numbers as well because people are listed as their death within 28 days of receiving a positive test for covid. but of course they might have died for another reason, but the figures are all lumped together, perhaps inevitably impress will ever know clearly easily and it were hospitalised with covid how many people died from it. can you take us onto the next related story, also on the front of the telegraph. this the next dominic raab comments about vaccination and employment? itrui’ith next dominic raab comments about vaccination and employment? with saw the idea of vaccine _ vaccination and employment? with saw the idea of vaccine passports _ the idea of vaccine passports floated — the idea of vaccine passports floated by borisjohnson the idea of vaccine passports floated by boris johnson a couple
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the idea of vaccine passports floated by borisjohnson a couple of weeks _ floated by borisjohnson a couple of weeks ago. it is a contentious one of course — weeks ago. it is a contentious one of course. many people are very unhappy— of course. many people are very unhappy with it. or if there are others — unhappy with it. or if there are others who think that it is a wise idea~ _ others who think that it is a wise idea what — others who think that it is a wise idea. what dominic raab here is saying _ idea. what dominic raab here is saying is— idea. what dominic raab here is saying is he sort of agrees with these _ saying is he sort of agrees with these private companies, we have heard _ these private companies, we have heard already from the likes of netfiix — heard already from the likes of netflix and pimlico plumbers and they have all said basically it is no they have all said basically it is hojab. — they have all said basically it is hojab. ho _ they have all said basically it is no jab, nojob. they were not the people _ no jab, nojob. they were not the paupie to — no jab, nojob. they were not the people to come back to work without the double _ people to come back to work without the double jab. and dominic raab as of today— the double jab. and dominic raab as of today that he thinks it is a smart— of today that he thinks it is a smart policy essentially for companies to insist on people being double _ companies to insist on people being double jab— companies to insist on people being double jab before they come back to an office _ double jab before they come back to an office. obviously this is different when they're working from home _ different when they're working from home lrut— different when they're working from home but as we start to return to offices, _ home but as we start to return to offices, with the government wants people _ offices, with the government wants people to _ offices, with the government wants people to be double jab. at the end of the _ people to be double jab. at the end of the day, — people to be double jab. at the end of the day, we know that that is the way to— of the day, we know that that is the way to stop — of the day, we know that that is the way to stop the virus, the way to stop the — way to stop the virus, the way to stop the spread of the virus and to achieve _ stop the spread of the virus and to achieve the — stop the spread of the virus and to achieve the hurt and unity we are all after— achieve the hurt and unity we are all after and when we go back to the offices and _ all after and when we go back to the offices and in particular the ottoman wintertime, that will be a real risk— ottoman wintertime, that will be a real risk given people are not vaccinated. some people disagree with what— vaccinated. some people disagree with what the foreign secretary said they warit—
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with what the foreign secretary said they want people to be double jab to they want people to be double jab to the point _ they want people to be double jab to the point i _ they want people to be double jab to the point i would make people who said this _ the point i would make people who said this is — the point i would make people who said this is against the liberties, ithink— said this is against the liberties, i think private companies should be allowed _ i think private companies should be allowed to— i think private companies should be allowed to make their own decisions on this _ allowed to make their own decisions on this. that is what google are clearly— on this. that is what google are clearly dealing and netflix and other— clearly dealing and netflix and other companies, so i don't really understand — other companies, so i don't really understand the problem with that. i understand the problem with that. wonder understand the problem with that. i wonder what you make of this and also it does seem to be a shift in the political rhetoric, notjust here but internationally with joe biden to not here but internationally withjoe biden to not think here but internationally with joe biden to not think you will have to be vaccinated if you are a federal worker or contractor and talking about this is a nonpandemic but of the unvaccinated. the carrots to do is appearing fast.— is appearing fast. yes, it seems to be significant _ is appearing fast. yes, it seems to be significant stepping _ is appearing fast. yes, it seems to be significant stepping up - is appearing fast. yes, it seems to be significant stepping up on - is appearing fast. yes, it seems to be significant stepping up on the l be significant stepping up on the rhetoric today from dominic raab saying on the airwaves with this message endorsing the policy of those companies like google, facebook, netflix that have said they will require all employees to have the double vaccination to
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return to the workplace. so, yeah, i think it is a significant move for the government to make. it is a global move. i think certainly talking to people in government, they are watching very carefully what the us is doing, what canada is doing, with european nations are doing, with european nations are doing when it comes to covid—i9 passports are so far the uk has been at the lax end of scale. but i think certainly it's been noted as dominic raab himself pointed out that in france since the president announced a very narrow scheme for covid passports for nightclubs and large events like we are going to see introduced in the uk, since he announced it that will be rolled out far and wide to all sorts of entertainment settings, transports such as long—distance trains and planes, shops, restaurants from next month, the vaccination rate in france has shot up. so interestingly there are a lot of mps and even some ministers who think the government is talking a strong game it on this
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but it's one of dangling the threat of covid passports and hope people will voluntarily get them without having to actually ever make them mandatory because that is controversial and brings in a lot of other ethical dilemmas. also controversial and brings in a lot of other ethical dilemmas.— other ethical dilemmas. also the front -a~e other ethical dilemmas. also the front page of _ other ethical dilemmas. also the front page of the _ other ethical dilemmas. also the front page of the metro - other ethical dilemmas. also the front page of the metro as - other ethical dilemmas. also the front page of the metro as we i other ethical dilemmas. also the | front page of the metro as we are showing viewers there. do you want to take us onto the mirrored front page? this is all part of i guess the information campaign the government is waging. this is jonathan van tam quoted saying in the course of the interviews that he did here on the bbc news channel withjeremy vine on radio to that members of the public answering their questions about vaccination. yes, well he sent out the great news that the coronavirus vaccines have prevented 60,000 deaths and stopped 22 million infections, which isjust fantastic news. as he himself drew attention to, it really is a huge
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deal that the vaccine has been quite so successful. i think it's really interesting that he has become a bit of a national treasure throughout this pandemic was wheeled out. he is really trusted as a communicator and is evidently went on to the news beat programme on bbc earlier to talk and talk at the 18 to 25—year—olds with a message please get a vaccine. a third of that age group has still not yet had even a single dose and the government is getting increasingly concerned about the take—up rate among young people, so i think we will hear lots more from jonathan van tam and other trusted communicators in the coming days and weeks reallyjust trying to get that number pushed up especially with a warning that it is only with a really high level of the population vaccinated that we can avoid another lot down in the winter when we are looking to see cases rise again. do when we are looking to see cases rise again-— rise again. do you think those firures rise again. do you think those figures are — rise again. do you think those figures are helpful _ rise again. do you think those figures are helpful or- rise again. do you think those figures are helpful or let - rise again. do you think those figures are helpful or let go . rise again. do you think those - figures are helpful or let go marked in the box marked government stats
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in the box marked government stats in the box marked government stats in the cup publics mind? i in the box marked government stats in the cup publics mind?— in the cup publics mind? i would arree in the cup publics mind? i would agree with _ in the cup publics mind? i would agree with lucy _ in the cup publics mind? i would agree with lucy on _ in the cup publics mind? i would agree with lucy on this - in the cup publics mind? i would agree with lucy on this and - in the cup publics mind? i would agree with lucy on this and i - in the cup publics mind? i would i agree with lucy on this and i think jvt is— agree with lucy on this and i think jvt is carved out a bit of initial himself— jvt is carved out a bit of initial himself is— jvt is carved out a bit of initial himself is somewhat a bit of an arms length _ himself is somewhat a bit of an arms length from — himself is somewhat a bit of an arms length from the government. his football— length from the government. his football and transport metaphors and made a _ football and transport metaphors and made a bit _ football and transport metaphors and made a bit of a cult figure and when i made a bit of a cult figure and when i look— made a bit of a cult figure and when i look at _ made a bit of a cult figure and when i look at the — made a bit of a cult figure and when i look at the feedback on social media — i look at the feedback on social media and other sources, is always him at _ media and other sources, is always him at the — media and other sources, is always him at the press conferences it seems — him at the press conferences it seems to— him at the press conferences it seems to be the most trusted and peopie _ seems to be the most trusted and people seem to believe him and i think— people seem to believe him and i think that — people seem to believe him and i think that this will help. i saw peopie — think that this will help. i saw people commenting on this today and peopie _ people commenting on this today and people tweeting about these numbers today and _ people tweeting about these numbers today and sort of saying i did not realise _ today and sort of saying i did not realise that it had had that kind of effect _ realise that it had had that kind of effect. about those numbers, we lost around _ effect. about those numbers, we lost around 130,000 people injust how devastating adding 50,000 on top of that would have been. and talking about— that would have been. and talking about the — that would have been. and talking about the pressure earlier and that would _ about the pressure earlier and that would be _ about the pressure earlier and that would be unthinkable really. so i think— would be unthinkable really. so i think it _ would be unthinkable really. so i think it does help it as we said it is so _ think it does help it as we said it is so essential that these people do come _ is so essential that these people do come forward for the jab because the
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bil come forward for the jab because the big risk— come forward for the jab because the big risk now— come forward for the jab because the big risk now to all of this is that the mixing _ big risk now to all of this is that the mixing of vaccinated and unvaccinated people creates a potential opportunity for a vaccine resistant— potential opportunity for a vaccine resistant variant to emerge and if that happens and we are all really in a bad _ that happens and we are all really in a bad situation and pretty really going _ in a bad situation and pretty really going into — in a bad situation and pretty really going into the winter. sol in a bad situation and pretty really going into the winter. so i think of it and _ going into the winter. so i think of it and it _ going into the winter. so i think of it and it can— going into the winter. so i think of it and it can be done to encourage the young — it and it can be done to encourage the young to come 40 the vaccine, we know it _ the young to come 40 the vaccine, we know it safe _ the young to come 40 the vaccine, we know it safe in the right thing to do commit — know it safe in the right thing to do commit we just need to do what we can. do commit we 'ust need to do what we can. , , ., , ., can. interesting story for the business _ can. interesting story for the business pages _ can. interesting story for the business pages it _ can. interesting story for the business pages it appears i can. interesting story for the business pages it appears on can. interesting story for the - business pages it appears on the front of the telegraph with news in brief at the bottom about astrazeneca's is or is about the viability of its vaccine business. they have had a tough time with politicians this year. is itjust about the politics? politicians this year. is it 'ust about the politics?* politicians this year. is it 'ust about the politics? honestly the acid a huge _ about the politics? honestly the acid a huge impact _ about the politics? honestly the acid a huge impact and - about the politics? honestly the acid a huge impact and we - about the politics? honestly the acid a huge impact and we know about the politics? honestly the - acid a huge impact and we know that it's had _ acid a huge impact and we know that it's had real— acid a huge impact and we know that it's had real issues with the eu. there _ it's had real issues with the eu. there was— it's had real issues with the eu. there was the french president making — there was the french president making some quite kneejerk decisions and we _ making some quite kneejerk decisions and we have seen in recent studies that actually they were wrong decisions and that the vaccine is
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totally— decisions and that the vaccine is totally safe. looking at the numbers. but obviously it has been bruised _ numbers. but obviously it has been bruised by— numbers. but obviously it has been bruised by that in a way that pfizer and modernity have not been. and this story— and modernity have not been. and this story is — and modernity have not been. and this story is saying that they are raising _ this story is saying that they are raising doubts upon the long—term viability— raising doubts upon the long—term viability of — raising doubts upon the long—term viability of what is essentially a not—for—profit vaccine roll—out. and it is considering turning its unit into a _ it is considering turning its unit into a profit—making hub, which is worrving _ into a profit—making hub, which is worrying news considering what we 'ust worrying news considering what we just discussed with potentially needing these vaccines for a while into the _ needing these vaccines for a while into the future and will need booster— into the future and will need boosterjabs. sub it is a concern and obviously astrazeneca art making these _ and obviously astrazeneca art making these noises now about know what is going _ these noises now about know what is going to _ these noises now about know what is going to happen next but it is clearly— going to happen next but it is clearly damaged by some of the political— clearly damaged by some of the political interventions that been made — political interventions that been made. . , political interventions that been made- yes. _ political interventions that been made-- yes. i— political interventions that been made.- yes, i think - political interventions that been made. lucy. yes, ithink that political interventions that been made. lucy. yes, i think that is made. lucy. yes, ithink that is riuht. made. lucy. yes, ithink that is riht. it made. lucy. yes, ithink that is right- it has _ made. lucy. yes, ithink that is right. it has been _ made. lucy. yes, ithink that is right. it has been problematic. made. lit}: yes, i think that is right. it has been problematic for astrazeneca that doubt has been cast on both the efficacy of the vaccine and the idea around it causing blood clots which has been shown to be
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hugely overblown beyond the evidence. and then the commercial element, if your team to see how it proceeds. element, if your team to see how it roceeds. �* , ., proceeds. indeed it well. let's move on to the front _ proceeds. indeed it well. let's move on to the front of _ proceeds. indeed it well. let's move on to the front of the _ proceeds. indeed it well. let's move on to the front of the guardian, - on to the front of the guardian, lucy, if you would. this is a top story on it, the kind of gap still between the rhetoric about racial inclusion and policing and the reality, at least according to this committee of mps._ reality, at least according to this committee of mps. yes, and damning headhne committee of mps. yes, and damning headline about _ committee of mps. yes, and damning headline about failing _ committee of mps. yes, and damning headline about failing by _ committee of mps. yes, and damning headline about failing by both - committee of mps. yes, and damning headline about failing by both the - headline about failing by both the police themselves and the government to step out racial injustice in the ranks. this report says that failing to being systematic and also points out disappointment that this is 22 years now since the mcpherson landmark report into white stephen lawrence's killers were left to go free, first blamed institutional racism in the police. so i think that there is a lot of work to do
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and one number that really caught my eye is the fact that while black and minority ethnic police officers make up minority ethnic police officers make up 7% of the force, that's only half of the proportion that they make up of the proportion that they make up of the proportion that they make up of the population in the uk. a really long way to go in terms of recruitment until we see the police fairly reflect the population that they are there to serve. is fairly reflect the population that they are there to serve.- they are there to serve. is this kind of mood _ they are there to serve. is this kind of mood among _ they are there to serve. is this kind of mood among the - they are there to serve. is this kind of mood among the mpsl they are there to serve. is this i kind of mood among the mps and obviously it is a national biometric committee, is it kind of would you say it reflected in liverpool? yes. say it reflected in liverpool? yes, we have seen _ say it reflected in liverpool? yes, we have seen issues _ say it reflected in liverpool? yes, we have seen issues in _ say it reflected in liverpool? yes, we have seen issues in liverpool and we have seen issues in liverpool and we have _ we have seen issues in liverpool and we have seen issues in liverpool and we have seenjust recently actually liverpool's — we have seenjust recently actually liverpool's black mp kym johnson spoke _ liverpool's black mp kym johnson spoke about being racially profiled when _ spoke about being racially profiled when she — spoke about being racially profiled when she visited london. she spoke very eloquently about that and about the pain— very eloquently about that and about the pain and the damage of it. and this is— the pain and the damage of it. and this is a _ the pain and the damage of it. and this is a damning report, and as lucv_ this is a damning report, and as lucv said — this is a damning report, and as lucv said to— this is a damning report, and as lucy said to him as a 22 years since the mcpherson report and it seems
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like very— the mcpherson report and it seems like very little progress is being made — like very little progress is being made. we are still in

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