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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 29, 2021 9:00pm-10:00pm BST

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this is bbc news — i'm shaun ley our top stories for viewers in the uk and around the world: bipartisanship's not dead, not yet at least. the us senate begins debating a trillion—dollar infrastructure bill after senators from both sides of the aisle strike a deal. another warning from scientists that climate change is already having an impact on the uk. last year was one of britain's warmest, wettest and sunniest years ever recorded. at the tokyo olympics, the usa's sunisa lee wins the women's all—around gold medal at the age of 18. and remember that tune? the programme that inspired generation after generation of kids comes to an end,
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arthur the ardvark is handing back his library card. welcome to the programme. his predecessor in the white house had his name on a book called the art of the deal. joe biden has spent much of his career making them on capitol hill. for donald trump, deals meant a winner — and losers. senator biden�*s depended on bi—partisanship, something that has become vanishingly rare in dc. so it was a win for the president when democrats and republicans voted to allow debate to take place on his proposed one trillion dollar infrastructure bill. roads, bridges, public transport and high speed internet are among the areas of investment. although the proposed spend is undeniably large,
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it's still less than one quarter the size of the 2.6 trillion plan that mr biden proposed back in march. in the past few hours, the senate has begun debating that infrastructure package. let's bring democratic senator from connecticut chris murphy senator murphy. we're very pleased to have you with us here on bbc world news. can i ask you of all. your reaction to this, progressing in the senate with out recourse to budget resolution.— in the senate with out recourse to budget resolution. good news. this would be good _ budget resolution. good news. this would be good news _ budget resolution. good news. this would be good news in _ budget resolution. good news. this would be good news in and - budget resolution. good news. this would be good news in and of - budget resolution. good news. this| would be good news in and of itself, the biggest bipartisan investment in infrastructure and roads, rails and bridges, electric charging stations in the century. it speaks to weigel a bite must to do business. he wants to reach out to the aisle and find ways republicans and democrats work together. i will say that it is a
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fairly common narrative that there's very little bipartisanship here. very little bipartisa nship here. there very little bipartisanship here. there has been a remarkable amount of bipartisanship over the course of the last year and a half. congress passed pandemic relief bills, totalling trillions of dollars which has rescued many americans from poverty. this would be a very significant infrastructure and this is just the first step. president biden must get a second bill that has human infrastructure, investment and childcare in the health care system, medicare and hopefully will get that past this fall. between the two, it would right the ship. it would tip the balance of power and away from the billionaires and corporations to regular folks and i think that will breathe some new life into american democracy and rescue a lot of families in desperate situations. this is one
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area where _ desperate situations. this is one area where the _ desperate situations. this is one area where the president - desperate situations. this is one area where the president could l area where the president could propose but congress has to dispose. for the present has the greatest degree of discretion is foreign policy. we have seen some fairly dramatic moves by president biden in the last couple of weeks. the leaders relating to the decision to announce the end of the military combat presence in iraq. some would say that is already had worrying consequences. we have seen further attacks on the green zone with the us embassy and doesn't it in danger confidence and the iraqi government system if the perception is that the iraqi troops cannot cope? we system if the perception is that the iraqi troops cannot cope?— system if the perception is that the iraqi troops cannot cope? we are not announcing _ iraqi troops cannot cope? we are not announcing withdrawal _ iraqi troops cannot cope? we are not announcing withdrawal from - iraqi troops cannot cope? we are not announcing withdrawal from iraq. - iraqi troops cannot cope? we are notj announcing withdrawal from iraq. we announcing withdrawalfrom iraq. we will still have a presence there in an advisory capacity. but the reality is, american troops have not been an active forward positions in combat operations in iraq for a long
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time. so, we still maintain an important advisory role and in economic development and governance partners. at the president isjust reflecting the reality which is that today, our true presence there is much more about supporting the iraqi military rather than fighting battles on their behalf. we also know that these attacks on the green zone, troops, they have been happening consistently since the united states withdrew from the nuclear agreement. united states withdrew from the nuclearagreement. but united states withdrew from the nuclear agreement. but the iranian proxy forces in iraq have been using our presence there as a means to destabilise her interests in the region. and that is not a reason why we should be adding troops to iraq. we should be finding a way to get back to a diplomatic conversation with the iranians. minn; back to a diplomatic conversation with the iranians.— with the iranians. why the ways president trump _ with the iranians. why the ways president trump pulled - with the iranians. why the ways president trump pulled out - with the iranians. why the ways president trump pulled out of l with the iranians. why the ways l president trump pulled out of the nuclear deal and did not think, he
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thought it was wrong that iran had i've been asked to restrain the activities of some of the property groups that he clearly has a strong influence over. that situation remains and americans admit the possibility of returning to a nuclear deal if the parts can reach a deal it is satisfied with. secretary of state said today look, time is short and it is done to the iranians, the ball is in their court. what he think iran could do to persuade america that this was a deal worth returning to? well. to persuade america that this was a deal worth returning to?— dealworth returning to? well, it is a deal worth _ dealworth returning to? well, it is a deal worth returning _ dealworth returning to? well, it is a deal worth returning to _ dealworth returning to? well, it is a deal worth returning to in - a deal worth returning to in the administration believes that we should return to it in the democratic majority in congress believe that to be the case and to point out the obvious, during the deal, those forces in iran were not against the united states. they did not drop all of their proxies but ourforces came under not drop all of their proxies but our forces came under fire after donald trump pull it out of the deal and doldrums decision to do that was
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and doldrums decision to do that was an utter complete total failure and only did not come back to the table to all on the other behaviour, but they restarted their nuclear research programme and they started shooting at american troops and the increase of their support for the region. i don't think you need to persuade the american people that the problem is we have a hard line regime that is going to be more hostile than the previous one in the cities negotiations but as you seen in these protests, it is difficult for this regime to stand back. they have to deliver some economic relief for the people and around the these protests are going to continue. thank you very much for being with us on bbc world news. it's one of the gravest warnings about extreme weather and climate change yet. and in language — bordering on the apocalyptic — a group of the world's top climate experts believe the recent floods, rainfall, heatwaves and wildfires
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are already a fully fledged global emergency. greenhouse gas levels, they say, are already too high for a manageable future of humanity and we need to start removing them from the atmosphere. the climate change advisory group says the recent weather events cannot be explained only by a global temperature increase of 1.2 degrees celsius — that's the amount the earth has already warmed since pre—industrial times. they believe these events must be connected with what's happening in the arctic, where temperatures are rising much faster than anywhere else in the world. warming and melting of the arctic contributes to sea level rise, but it also changes how our weather works, explaining the extremity of these events. here in the uk — a report by the met office found the impact of climate change was already being felt across the uk. in the space of 30 years, the uk has become 0.9c warmer and 6% wetter. while last year was the third warmest, 5th wettest and 8th sunniest on record. our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports.
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the changes we are seeing are dramatic. this week's storms leading to flash flooding in the south of england. in ilford in essex rainwater peered into the women's garden and garage, taking the family by surprise. we turned off the electricity in the garage. i tried making a barrier in the garage to store more water coming in but it didn't really help and we were just worried about what to do because we have never experienced anything like this before. these extremes are the focus of a new report that assessed that uk's climate in 2020, from the hottest they recorded in heathrow in london where temperatures reach 37.8 degrees, to the coldest in braemar in aberdeenshire that hit a low of minus 10.3 degrees to reign in october with the wettest day on record and wind on the isle of wight with gusts reaching over 100 mph. the report says the uk is getting warmer, wetter and sunnier.
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we can see very clearly from observations that the gatekeepers that climate is already changing so climate change is notjust something that is going to happen in 2015 or we need to worry about at the end of the century. we are seeing this in our observations now. the report compared to most recent three decades with the 30 years before and it shows the good care is warming. the darker the red the bigger the temperature increase and every is hotter by an average 0.9 degrees but east anglia and the east midlands have won by more than 1 degrees. in this map shows the changes in average rainfall. dark blue means more rain and the uk is an average of 6% wetter, but across much of scotland the increase is more than 10%. it is putting immense strain on the uk's infrastructure. extreme heat halting trains as tracks buckle. experts warn all future temperatures reaching over a0 degrees.
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what is interesting as there is lots of data in the air, lots of temperature records and percentage changes, but what we are seeing ivy impacts, the impacts to us as humans, to businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of her eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united nations climate summit and we will find out if governments can't rise to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effects of climate change. we need deep and rapid emissions reduction but we also need to remove the excess greenhouse gases we have put into the atmosphere which are creating these major problems today and thirdly we need to repair those parts of the climate system that have passed their tipping point. right now the elements show no signs of letting up and scientists will continue to track and analyse these events, but they warn extremes
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are becoming the new normal. well, today also marks earth 0vershoot day — the day each year when the demand for ecological resources exceeds those that the earth can regenerate in 12 months. the global footprint network, which calculates the date each year, said humans currently use 74% more than what the planet can remake. according to the organization, the world has been overshooting the planet's resources since the 1970s, when earth 0vershoot day was late in december. well let's discuss all this with laurel hanscom from the footprint network who joins us now. very good to speak to you. you may ask you, what is it that this measure is designed to communicate to us? , , ., , measure is designed to communicate to us? ,, ., , , measure is designed to communicate tous? ,, , ., measure is designed to communicate tous? ,, ., , , ., ., to us? essentially, is trained to show the magnitude _ to us? essentially, is trained to show the magnitude of - to us? essentially, is trained to show the magnitude of the - to us? essentially, is trained to - show the magnitude of the challenge in front of us. we looking at data
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thatis in front of us. we looking at data that is readily available but it's really something that we are hoping will get people to open up their eyes to what is possible also. it's notjust eyes to what is possible also. it's not just about the doom and eyes to what is possible also. it's notjust about the doom and gloom of overshoot which could be scary, but also the opportunities to push back. that is the difficulty with these concepts. trying to play the global to the personal. it, i cannot do enough. i cannot change this. some analysis to make the decisions, the politicians of the big companies, it is not down to me. how do you respond to that because you must hear that all the time. mil respond to that because you must hear that all the time.— respond to that because you must hear that all the time. all the time and i think it _ hear that all the time. all the time and i think it is _ hear that all the time. all the time and i think it is quite _ hear that all the time. all the time and i think it is quite the _ and i think it is quite the challenge because we have the opportunities to make choices that are notjust helping move it over but improve our lives, our communities and businesses in each of us has the opportunity every day in our lives to make those choices in our lives to make those choices in a different way. one of the ways
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we are highlighting some of the amazing solutions and opportunities that are out there is by looking at the hundred days between now and the 26th which reveal a different solution every day on a hundred days of possibilities. can solution every day on a hundred days of possibilities.— of possibilities. can you give me some examples _ of possibilities. can you give me some examples the _ of possibilities. can you give me some examples the you - of possibilities. can you give me some examples the you have i of possibilities. can you give me - some examples the you have talked about? ~ , ,., , some examples the you have talked about? ~ ,,., , ., , about? absolutely. one of them is where working. — about? absolutely. one of them is where working, one _ about? absolutely. one of them is where working, one of _ about? absolutely. one of them is where working, one of the - about? absolutely. one of them is. where working, one of the solutions we are highlighting is a us—based financial company where instead of using deposits the people put into their bank for unknown things, every dollar is to go towards new technology, specifically infrastructure for clean energy. so, thatis infrastructure for clean energy. so, that is something that is an individual opportunity for you, but also as a systemic repercussion in terms of how we address the challenges in front of us both climate and resource stop there are
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many others, related to city policy, many others, related to city policy, many around the energy systems, energy grids and also we look at food and the different ways we are destroying the planet too.- destroying the planet too. ample opportunities _ destroying the planet too. ample opportunities to _ destroying the planet too. ample opportunities to talk _ destroying the planet too. ample opportunities to talk about - destroying the planet too. ample opportunities to talk about it. - destroying the planet too. ample | opportunities to talk about it. and we look at the challenge that is represented by the meeting in glasgow in november which is supposed to effectively agree, not just the rules they have already been agreed but how you enforce them, the optimistic? you been agreed but how you enforce them, the optimistic?— been agreed but how you enforce them, the optimistic? you know, it doesnt them, the optimistic? you know, it doesn't really _ them, the optimistic? you know, it doesn't really matter— them, the optimistic? you know, it doesn't really matter whether - them, the optimistic? you know, it doesn't really matter whether or i them, the optimistic? you know, it| doesn't really matter whether or not i'm optimistic because what really is important is that we are not going to wait. we don't need to wait for international agreements to make these changes. we each have opportunities as leaders in our own lives, whether that is at a community level, our place of worship, our business, to move things forward in a way that does not require everyone else making the same agreement. and moreover, that
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is something that puts us at a strategic advantage as we navigate the storms and the challenges and weather events, whatever they are, all of that to come, which he knows going to happen as we have seen so clearly over the past weeks and days. clearly over the past weeks and da s. ., ~ clearly over the past weeks and da s. . ,, , ., clearly over the past weeks and da s. . ,, . ., clearly over the past weeks and da s. . . .,, days. thank you so much for being with us on — days. thank you so much for being with us on bbc— days. thank you so much for being with us on bbc news. _ now — to the olympics in tokyo — more medals, more excitment but also the backdrop, of more coronavirus cases across japan. lucy hockings is in tokyo for us. hello, everyone, welcome to tokyo. you're right, some medals have been given out today. one of the big ones, as well, one of the events everyone looks to the olympics for is the women's all—around gymnastics. a huge development to bring you because we have a gold medalfor the usa. sunisa lee winning the women's all—around gold medal. you will remember simone biles pulled out of the competition citing her mental health. it's the fifth time in a row that
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a usa gymnast has won this event. the 18—year—old making history. she is the first american from the hmong community to win the gold medal and to compete at an olympic games. always one of the highlights of the olympics, this event. it really highlights the breathtaking skill that's so obvious and on display, but really under scrutiny during these games, particularly because of the absence of simone biles. but let's talk about sunisa lee's victory. cindy boren is a sports reporter for the washington post. lots to talk about, cindy. we'll talk about her life in a moment, but can i ask you first about sunisa's performance because it came right down to the wire at the end. it did. it came down to points. i think we were all furiously scribbling numbers on pieces of paper trying to figure it out. there was a brief question over the judging and the point allotment and whether there would be on appeal
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concerning rebecca andrade's performance, but there wasn't. and it was sunisa's clearly going up to that point and afterward. the appeal never took place. a phenomenally talented gymnast obviously. she's only 18. she will be a household name in america now. tell us about sunisa lee. she is an 18—year—old from minnesota. she is one of the first members of the hmong community, which is a group of people from southeast asia who were protected by the cia... they cooperated with the cia and helped the united states during the vietnam war. and many of them were brought to america afterward because for safety reasons, and she was born here. her parents are middle—class workers, strong, strong workers. her father has been in a wheelchair since falling off a ladder and breaking his back.
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he's a paraplegic. so, this is a tough family, and all you had to do was see the reaction, the big group of hmong community members watching because they couldn't be there, of course. and theyjust erupted injoy. it'sjust a wonderful, wonderful story. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: we'll mark the end of an era, as the hit kids tv show arthur comes to an end. the bbc have confirmed jodie whittaker will step down on her role in doctor who next year. she took over as the 13th doctor back in 2017, replacing peter capaldi, and was the first woman to play the time lord. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba has more. some will have liked her and some will have liked other particular doctors that have come in the past.
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for those of us that grew up in the 1990s, the fact that doctor who is still on air means the doctor has been a success and kept the programme going. it's fair to say that, when her first episode aired, it got 11.5 million viewers, doctor who's biggest audience for almost a decade. so, there seemed to be a real groundswell of support, presumably because she was the first female doctor. people were fascinated, really wanted her to succeed in the role. it's fair to say that over her first two series, the ratings did drop away to closer to what they were for her predecessor peter capaldi's ratings were during his tenure, so not as big as it was at the start. let's look at some of the day's other news a public inquiry into the assassination of maltese investigative journalist daphne caruana galizia has found the state responsible for her death. the report said the state had failed to recognise risks to the reporter's life and take reasonable steps
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to avoid them. israel is set to become the first country in the world to offer a third dose of the coronavirus vaccine. people over 60 will be eligible for the top—up starting sunday. the us and the eu have yet to approve the booster shots. the nigerian influencer ramon abbas — also known as hushpuppi — has pleaded guilty to money laundering in a us court. the 37 year old is known for posting photos of his lavish lifestyle on instagram to millions of followers. court documents filed in california said hushpuppi's crimes cost victims almost 2a million dollars in total. for twenty five years arthur the aardvark has entertained and educated generation after generation on the importance kindness, empathy and inclusion. it was always a wonderful kind of day when arthur was on television.
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but after twenty five years of teaching viewers that having fun isn't hard when you've got a library card, arthur is returning his books for one last time, as the longest—running kids animated series in history comes to an end. the news broke onjason szwimer�*s podcast finding d.w, he also played d.w in the series and i'm so glad to say he joins us now. it is bittersweet which to be talking to you for this. how do you feel about the announcement? sean. feel about the announcement? sean, it is an honour— feel about the announcement? sean, it is an honour and _ feel about the announcement? sean, it is an honour and privilege - it is an honour and privilege talking about this. to be honest, i feel like i need it for granted. arthur has been on for my entire life and in my mind was an institution was devastated to find out. ~ . , ., ~' institution was devastated to find out. ~ ., i. ~ , institution was devastated to find out. ., ~ institution was devastated to find out. what you think is a special auali ? out. what you think is a special quality? 0r— out. what you think is a special quality? or perhaps _ out. what you think is a special quality? or perhaps i _ out. what you think is a special quality? or perhaps i should i out. what you think is a special| quality? or perhaps i should say the special quality of the writing in the characterisation that has made his appeal so enduring. people may not know that this is a series on television that is 25 years vintage, but the books date back to 50 years
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now. . , but the books date back to 50 years now. ., , ., , ., ., now. yeah, is a testament to the ower now. yeah, is a testament to the power and _ now. yeah, is a testament to the power and quality _ now. yeah, is a testament to the power and quality of _ now. yeah, is a testament to the power and quality of the - now. yeah, is a testament to the power and quality of the writing. | now. yeah, is a testament to the | power and quality of the writing. i think that arthur himself as a character is in every man but the writers and producers of the television series made arthur such that the series and the characters in the world really reflect the diversity and culture that we all have in the road. so, everyone could see themselves in all the characters. it see themselves in all the characters.— see themselves in all the characters. ., ., i, , characters. it has won many prizes and regarded _ characters. it has won many prizes and regarded by — characters. it has won many prizes and regarded by educationalists i characters. it has won many prizes and regarded by educationalists as a key tool in teaching some really important values and it does this by not showing orfrom important values and it does this by not showing or from subjects. subjects that the audience is very young and it might surprise people when dealing with things like the asp burgers spectrum, or dealing with things like all the basic things like jealousy, and anger
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with things like all the basic things likejealousy, and anger and love and fear. how did you feel, saying, this is special what doing here? ., . ., saying, this is special what doing here? ., ., �* 4' here? for the record, i don't think, i did not here? for the record, i don't think, i did not have _ here? for the record, i don't think, i did not have a _ here? for the record, i don't think, i did not have a hand _ here? for the record, i don't think, i did not have a hand and _ here? for the record, i don't think, i did not have a hand and telling . i did not have a hand and telling the stories, i think it is a testament to the writers and the producers and to mark brown, really. they were conscious of bringing on writers and fostering a culture where we did not feel that we are writing for television, for kids. they want to cover all sorts of topics. i they want to cover all sorts of to - ics. . they want to cover all sorts of toics. ., , ., ., ., topics. i am sorry that we have to interru -t topics. i am sorry that we have to interrupt you- _ topics. i am sorry that we have to interrupt you. it's _ topics. i am sorry that we have to interrupt you. it's a _ topics. i am sorry that we have to interrupt you. it's a bit _ topics. i am sorry that we have to interrupt you. it's a bit of- interrupt you. it's a bit of 1—upsmanship. it is the president of the united states. here he is now. what it means is what we need to do this week and the months ahead is, for the moment, i would always give it straight from the shoulder. we
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need some straight talk right now. there is a lot of fear and misinformation in the country and we need to cut through it with facts, with science, with the truth. so, what is really happening today after months and months of cases going down, we are seeing a spike in covid—19 cases. they are going up. why? because of this new variant called the delta variant. this is a much different variants than the one we dealt with previously. it is highly transmissible, and it is causing a new wave of cases and those were not vaccinated. 0ur those were not vaccinated. our experts tell me that cases will go up experts tell me that cases will go up further for they start to come back down. but while cases are on the rise, we are not likely to see according to experts, a comparable rise and hospitalisations and deaths in most places of the country. why is that? because hundred 64 million
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americans are fully vaccinated. including 80% of the most vulnerable are seniors. and so, there is a challenge as we knew there could be, but there's also good news. we spent the last six months preparing for this possibility and the vaccines are highly effective. we have enough vaccines for everyone to get vaccinated. and thanks to the american rescue plan, and the hard work of the american people, we have administered over 325 million vaccinations doses in the past six months. we have the tools to prevent this new wave covid—19 from shutting down or businesses, our schools, our society as we saw happened last year. aside the beginning, that will be guided by the science. so, here is what the science tells us. on
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tuesday, the centers for disease control and prevention, the cdc, announced its new mask recommendations and parts of the country were covid—19 cases are substantially higher in people did not get vaccinated, which they defined as 50 new cases for every 100,000 people in the week. the cdc recommends that if you wear a mask when you're in public and endorse, like work or in a grocery store, thatis like work or in a grocery store, that is for both vaccinated and unvaccinated. even if you've been fully vaccinated and protected from severe illness of covid—19, you could have the delta variant in your system and spread it to someone who is not vaccinated. you need to wear a mask to protect each other stop the rapid spread of this virus as we work to get more people vaccinated. and i hope all americans,
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preliminaries with substantial or high cases will follow the masked guidance being laid down by the cdc. i will and i have because this is one of those areas in washington. and my direction, all federal personnel and visitors to federal buildings will have to do the same thing. as a set from the beginning, a mask is not a political statement. it's about protecting yourself and protecting others. masking is one defence against the spread of covid—19, make no mistake, vaccines are the best defence against you getting severely ill from covid—19. the very best defence. and you want to know how we put this virus behind us? i will tell you to know how we put this virus behind us? iwill tell you how, we to know how we put this virus behind us? i will tell you how, we need to get more people vaccinated. look,
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and it's important to understand but vaccines do and what they do not do. put simply, vaccines are designed to save lives and prevent severe illness. they are highly effective at both. i americans have had a least one shot. of that group, 90% are done now. in 10% are waiting for the second shot. to those folks of one shot and not the second, go get the second shot. even if you're overdue for the second shot, it is not too late. go get the second shot now. now. the bottom line is if you are fully vaccinated, you are highly protected from covid—19. but what i also know is that many of you who are vaccinated are concerned about what is called, breakthrough cases. yes, some fully vaccinated people
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will still test positive and some will still test positive and some will show some symptoms of covid—19. that is expected with almost every vaccine there is. further diseases. the breakthrough cases remain rare and almost all are mild cases. in fact, virtually all hospitalisations and deaths are among the unvaccinated. i also know many of you are wondering if you need a booster shot to add another layer of protection. as of now, my medical advisers say the answer is no. no american needs a booster now. but if the science tells us that there is a need for boosters, then that is something we will do. and we will purchase the supply, all the supply we need to be ready if that is called for. the truth is as more people get vaccinated, we are more likely to
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open up safely and responsibly. we aren't out of the woods yet because what is happening in america right now is a pandemic, a pandemic of the unvaccinated — let me say that again, a pandemic of the unvaccinated. there are 90 million americans who are eligible to get the shot but haven't gotten it yet. as ijust mentioned, nearly all the cases, hospitalisations and deaths due to covid—19 today are from unvaccinated people. last month, studies show to the over 99% of covid—19 deaths had been among the unvaccinated. 99%. this is an american tragedy, people are dying and will die who don't have to die. if you're out there unvaccinated, you don't have to die. read the news, you'll see stories about unvaccinated patients at hospitals. as they lie in bed dying from
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covid—19, they're asking, "doc, can i get the vaccine?" and the doctors have to say, "sorry, it's too late." right now too many people are dying or watching someone they love dying and saying, "if ijust got vaccinated. if ijust..." it's heartbreaking, and it's complicated even more because it's preventable. america is divided between the amount dutch majority of people who are vaccinated and those who are not. and i understand that many of you in the majority are frustrated with the consequences of the failure of the minority to get vaccinated. but i want you to know that i'll continue to do everything i can to convince the unvaccinated get vaccinated. that includes addressing
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hesitancy had on. for example, i know some of you who aren't vaccinated think the development of the vaccine was rushed — therefore you won't take a chance. as a result, you think it's unsafe because it's rushed. i understand. but let me explain — our top scientists at the nih and across the country got to work applying decades of research — decades of research, let me repeat, decades to develop the covid—19 vaccine when it hit. in the covid—19 vaccine when it hit. in the last six months, more than 325 million doses of the vaccine have been administered in the united states, and billions of doses administered around the world. the
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vaccine was developed and authorised under a republican administration. it has been distributed and administered under a democratic administration. the vaccines are safe, highly effective. there's nothing political about them. look at all the people who took a shot at it — we later learned a lot of them weren't even vaccinated. from the start, i must complement republican senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. he hadn't made it political, he's encouraging people to get vaccinated, and the state is in pretty good shape. alabama republican governor k iv recently spoke out to encourage vaccination, and even the commentators on facts who have been belittling this for a long time — some haven't, but many have are arguing for vaccination. this isn't about red states and blue
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states. it's literally about life and death, about life and death. that's what it's about. and i know people talk about freedom, but i learned growing up in school and my parents that with freedom comes responsibility. the decision to be unvaccinated impacts someone else. unvaccinated people spread the virus. they get sick and fill up our hospitals. and that means if someone else has a heart attack or breaks a hip, there may not be a hospital bed for them. hip, there may not be a hospital bed forthem. if hip, there may not be a hospital bed for them. if your unvaccinated, you put your doctor and nurses at risk, the same front—line and central workers who put their lives on the line the past year have gone through hell. again, with freedom comes responsibility. so please, exercise
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responsiblejudgment. get responsibility. so please, exercise responsible judgment. get vaccinated — for yourself, for the people you love, for your country. i'm being literal as i say this, as i travel the world every day, a foreign leader asks me if i could provide therapy people with more vaccines. there are people desperate for more vaccines. doing everything to answer those calls, sending millions of vaccines to people around the world. but folks, it's an american blessing that we have vaccines for each and every american. we've made ourfirst and top priority to have available vaccines for every eligible american, and that'll never change as long as i'm here. and it's a shame, it's such a shame to squander that blessing. that's why after six months of extraordinary work and effort, today i'm laying out additional steps we should be taking
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to deliver these life—saving vaccines to more americans. first, we'll provide more incentives to encourage unvaccinated to get vaccinated. that starts with paid leave to get the shot. we are still hearing that people are unable to get time off from their employer to get time off from their employer to get vaccinated. this is unacceptable. forsome get vaccinated. this is unacceptable. for some time now, i've said you should be able to get the shot and still get paid. thanks to the american rescue plan, the federal government is fully reimbursing any small or medium—size business that provides worker with paid time off to get vaccinated. employers, this costs you nothing. if you haven't given employees paid time off, do it now, please. today i'm announcing we're taking this a step further — the federal government will now reimburse those
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employers to get —— who give their staffs off not only get themselves vaccinated, but also get there family members vaccinated. that means employers can get reimbursed if they give parents time off with paid leave to take their kids or their own parents to get vaccinated. so i'm calling out all employees across the country to get paid time off to get the shot, or to help a family member do so. i promise you it will cost you, the employer, nothing. you will be reimbursed. secondly, i'm announcing that we will continue the work we state —— with states to encourage unvaccinated people to get vaccinated. in february, a grocery store chain, kroger, offered $100 to their associates if they got vaccinated — and it worked. vaccination rates moved up from 50%
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to 75% among their employees. states like new mexico, 0hio to 75% among their employees. states like new mexico, ohio and colorado are offering similar incentive programmes that have helped increase vaccination rates. so today, i'm calling out all states and governors to use all the money they've used from the american rescue plan to give $100 to anyone who gets fully vaccinated. i know paying people to get vaccinated might sound unfair to those who've already been vaccinated. but here's the deal — if incentives help us beat the virus, i believe we should use them. we all benefit if we can get more people vaccinated. in addition to providing incentives for vaccination, it's time to impose requirements on key groups to make sure they are vaccinated. excuse me. just this week, we took an important step to protect our veterans. like many
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civilian hospital systems are doing, the department of veterans affairs will now require covid—19 vaccines for doctors and nurses who care for our veterans. we must do everything possible to protect our veterans from getting covid when they come to get medical care they so richly earned serving their country. we owe them. next, since many vaccinations are required for active duty military today, i'm asking the defence department to look into how and when they will add covid—19 to the list of vaccinations that are armed forces must get. 0ur men and women in uniform who protect this country from grave threats should be protected as much as possible from getting covid—19. i think this is particularly important because our troops serve in certain places around the world. many where
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vaccination rates are low in the disease is prevalent. next, every federal government employee will be asked to attest to their vaccination status. anyone who does not attest or is not vaccinated will be required to wear masks no matter where they work, test 1—2 times a week to see if they have acquired covid, socially distance and generally will not be allowed to travel for work. likewise today, generally will not be allowed to travel forwork. likewise today, i'm to admit travel for work. likewise today, i'm to admit some travel forwork. likewise today, i'm to admit some echo directing my administration to apply similar standards to all federal contractors. if you want to do business with the federal government, get yourworkers vaccinated. look at the chamber of commerce — representing tens of thousands of american businesses, the business round tables comprised
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of the largest and biggest corporations in america. they're all applauding the steps the federal government is taking and urging them to follow suit. i also commend the nfl, which has announced that if there breaks out dust break—outs among unvaccinated players and personnel, the team risk forfeiting games. i urge other sport leagues at every level to take every step they can. every day more businesses are implementing their own vaccine mandates. the justice implementing their own vaccine mandates. thejustice department has made it clear that it is legal to require covid—19 vaccines. we all want our lives to get back to normal, and fully vaccinated workplaces will make that happen more quickly and more successfully. we all know that in our gut. incentives and mandates can make a huge difference and save lots of lives. i also want to speak to
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families with children in school. we can and we must open schools this fall full—time. it is betterfor our children's mental and emotional well—being, and we can't afford another year out of the classroom. every school should be open, and we are giving them the tools to be able to do so safely. even those areas where they have a higher rate of covid. through the american rescue plan, we've provided schools billions of dollars to implement safety measures, better ventilation, social distancing and other measures. in march, when vaccination was scarce, i prioritised teachers and school workers by utilising our federal pharmacy programme. almost 90% of educated democrat educators and school staff are now vaccinated. additionally, the cdc has provided
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clear guidance on how all schools can safely protect their kids and bring them back to the classroom. every student wears a mask. it's that simple. every student wears a mask. it's that simple-— every student wears a mask. it's that simple. that's president joe biden making — that simple. that's president joe biden making an _ that simple. that's president joe biden making an important - biden making an important announcement there from the white house that, with immediate effect, federal employees, those employed by the national government, which is the national government, which is the biggest employer in the united states, federal employees will either be required to be vaccinated or wear a mask when they are at work, to socially distance, and subject themselves to testing once or twice a week. those who visit federal buildings will have to follow similar rules, and federal contractors, those who want to do business — a huge number of companies depend on federal business and federal interaction — they too
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will be required to do this in order to push up vaccination rates. let's bring in the bbc�*s barbara plett usher, who was listening to mr biden's speech. why do you think resident biden has felt required to do this because yellow because he hit a wall. he started off well with the vaccinations, he started off well with the vaccinations, , ,, ., vaccinations, he pressed for them and made them _ vaccinations, he pressed for them and made them available. - vaccinations, he pressed for them and made them available. there i vaccinations, he pressed for them - and made them available. there were many doses available, they are easy to get, they are free, and things went well. the rates of vaccination climbed, then all those people who are open to getting vaccinated have been vaccinated. now you are up against a chunk of the country, a significant number of people who simply won't get vaccinated for various reasons, some of them think it's unsafe, many of them for political reasons, they get their information from social media and right—wing politicians and pundits who say this is a government conspiracy and so on. that hasn't been able to budge and, because of that, mr biden is saying they are the primary reason the virus is
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spreading again, it's a very contagious variant, and mostly among the unvaccinated. so he is trying to push against this wall. you heard him they are making an appeal going through the various misinformation, trying to explain to people that they were wrong. but then he also said you needed to have enforcement, notjust incentives — therefore he's doing what he can to enforce action where he can, and that is with other real employees. dutch federal employees. so if they are vaccinated or, if they aren't, they will be subject to these regular tests, that is something he can do to protect people working in the government, but also to be an example to other employers, notjust private employers, not just private businesses employers, notjust private businesses but state governments, for example. this is what he's able to do now that he has reached her this moment where things are stuck. barbara, many thanks. i should also say apologies to david they are who we had to interrupt talking about the tv series arthur, because
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president biden was speaking. it'll be interesting see how much that phrase, "pandemic of the unvaccinated", takes hold. testosterone, as you may recall from school, affects many things in the body, your libido, muscle mass, and strength for example. but what about how successful you are? in the past, studies have drawn a link between higher testosterone levels and socioeconomic success. lucky for the alpha male, perhaps. except now a new dna—based study is suggesting otherwise. researchers at the university of bristol found that testosterone is not that important when it comes to determining your life chances. dr amanda hughes is one of the authors of behind the study and joins us now. thank you very much for being with us on bbc news. explain to us what you found. 50 us on bbc news. explain to us what ou found. ., ., ., you found. so we found that in all studies come _ you found. so we found that in all studies come up _ you found. so we found that in all studies come up like previous - studies come up like previous studies, there was definitely evidence that higher testosterone correlated, at least a among men,
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more likely to be employed in higher education qualifications. lots of markers of educational status. but then when we used genetic methods which are able to actually separate off just the effect of testosterone on those outcomes, as opposed to potentially the effect of those outcomes on testosterone, there was no evidence at all that testosterone had influence on those things. so our results suggest that if there is a link that's been observed between testosterone and something like higher income, it may be because higher income, it may be because higher income, it may be because higher income affects testosterone, not the other way around. 50 higher income affects testosterone, not the other way around.— not the other way around. so for example. _ not the other way around. so for example, somebody _ not the other way around. so for example, somebody who - not the other way around. so for example, somebody who is - not the other way around. so for example, somebody who is very | not the other way around. so for - example, somebody who is very poor might have a lot of things who are affecting them, their physical health and mental well—being, stress and so on — that might mean the quality of their testosterone might be diminished?— quality of their testosterone might be diminished? absolutely, there is evidence that _ be diminished? absolutely, there is evidence that chronic _ be diminished? absolutely, there is evidence that chronic stress - be diminished? absolutely, there is evidence that chronic stress can - evidence that chronic stress can reduce testosterone levels, we also
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know that social disadvantage and financial strain is extremely stressful on the body.- financial strain is extremely stressful on the body. what affect is havin: stressful on the body. what affect is having higher _ stressful on the body. what affect is having higher rates _ stressful on the body. what affect is having higher rates of _ is having higher rates of testosterone have physically? so testosterone have physically? sr there's testosterone have physically? 5r there's evidence that — i should specify that the relationships look quite different in men and women. in men, having higher testosterone, there's evidence that there might be some beneficial aspects for sexual function. but in terms of overall health, we look to overall health in the study, and there was very little evidence that overall health was made better by having higher testosterone.— made better by having higher testosterone. ., ., ,, , ., , testosterone. doctor, thank you very much, fascinating _ testosterone. doctor, thank you very much, fascinating to _ testosterone. doctor, thank you very much, fascinating to talk _ testosterone. doctor, thank you very much, fascinating to talk about. - much, fascinating to talk about. testosterone wasn't in the x factor that explained the success of contestants on the x factor. at its peak, the—x factor pulled
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in 20 million viewers — but now after 17 years on air, it's been announced that the—x factor uk has been axed. reports in today's paper say the show�*s creator simon cowell decided to pull the plug, but no doubt the shows dwindling ratings have been a factor, too. famed for making stars out of one direction, little mix, and leona lewis, in recent years, a number of former contestants have suggested that they weren't treated well by the show team. one of the show�*s most prominent critics is the duo john and edward grimes — also known asjedward — whojoin us now from dublin. it's a real pleasure to speak to you, thanks so much. do you feel mixed emotions at the end of the x—factor which of the first of all, i want to send a lot of good vibes to the viewers on bbc, we are jedward and we are here to talk about the first chapter of our career, which was the x—factor. the career, which was the x-factor. the x-factor career, which was the x-factor. the ”actor was — career, which was the x-factor. the x-factor was over _ career, which was the x—factor. the x—factor was over 17 years, and i think— x—factor was over 17 years, and i think people — x—factor was over 17 years, and i think people have seen through it, they want—
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think people have seen through it, they want their tv... | think people have seen through it, they want their tv. . ._ they want their tv... i feel like they want their tv... i feel like the show _ they want their tv... i feel like the show itself _ they want their tv... i feel like the show itself was _ they want their tv... i feel like the show itself was not - they want their tv... i feel like | the show itself was not evolving they want their tv... i feel like - the show itself was not evolving as the show itself was not evolving as the years progressed my so people were tired of seeing the same stories. ., ., , ., stories. now i feel the world is a different place _ stories. now i feel the world is a different place and _ stories. now i feel the world is a different place and certain - stories. now i feel the world is a different place and certain tv . stories. now i feel the world is a - different place and certain tv shows need to— different place and certain tv shows need to meet certain criteria is to be successful, and the current winners — be successful, and the current winners and people on the show weren't— winners and people on the show weren't successful, but if you like we've _ weren't successful, but if you like we've been— weren't successful, but if you like we've been here, longevity. you have to be passionate _ we've been here, longevity. you have to be passionate about _ we've been here, longevity. you have to be passionate about what - we've been here, longevity. you have to be passionate about what you - to be passionate about what you do and keep growing as a person, and if you like on the show the different contestants were good on the show but they didn't have the passion or drive to keep going. what but they didn't have the passion or drive to keep going.— drive to keep going. what do you think ou drive to keep going. what do you think you gain — drive to keep going. what do you think you gain from _ drive to keep going. what do you think you gain from it, _ drive to keep going. what do you | think you gain from it, apart from the fact that it was a big audience who saw your potential? arguably it was the audience of ultimately made to the stars because they supported you be on the show. i to the stars because they supported you be on the show.— you be on the show. i feel like you have to start _ you be on the show. i feel like you have to start somewhere, - you be on the show. i feel like you have to start somewhere, and - you be on the show. i feel like you l have to start somewhere, and i feel like since then we've kept growing as people. but if you like we were on the show, it was all new to us,
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we had never done something like that before. use have to stay loyal to your soul no matter what you do, even you have certain critics critiquing you as long as you stay true... leave read the contracts, they are very important if you get into the music industry, make sure you aren't locked into anything that will affect your future. we turned 30 this— will affect your future. we turned 30 this year, we hit the stage when we were _ 30 this year, we hit the stage when we were i7~ — 30 this year, we hit the stage when we were 17-_ we were 17. we're looking into some -ictures, we were 17. we're looking into some pictures. and — we were 17. we're looking into some pictures. and it _ we were 17. we're looking into some pictures, and it was _ we were 17. we're looking into some pictures, and it wasjust, _ we were 17. we're looking into some pictures, and it wasjust, it - we were 17. we're looking into some pictures, and it was just, it takes - pictures, and it wasjust, it takes us back watching, it must take you guys back. but it's fair to say that this was a programme that millions of people watched and loved. if you like these types _ of people watched and loved. if you like these types of _ of people watched and loved. if you like these types of shows _ of people watched and loved. if gm. like these types of shows brought everyone together, the fact that we could be a part of the peak of the show and become memories, we can look back at those memories. but i feel like we all have to keep moving on into the future and look back at those fond memories. i on into the future and look back at those fond memories.—
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those fond memories. i think it's incredible that _ those fond memories. i think it's incredible that we've _ those fond memories. i think it's incredible that we've been - those fond memories. i think it's i incredible that we've been standing for everyone to get the vaccine, we've _ for everyone to get the vaccine, we've been— for everyone to get the vaccine, we've been taking on piers morgan... they need _ we've been taking on piers morgan... they need us— we've been taking on piers morgan... they need us to speak to the people in america and get their vaccine to have a future. in america and get their vaccine to have a future-— have a future. anyone who themselves, _ have a future. anyone who themselves, re-evaluate l have a future. anyone who i themselves, re-evaluate your themselves, re—evaluate your situation, _ themselves, re—evaluate your situation, realised you put people at risk, _ situation, realised you put people at risk, re—evaluate yourselves, listen _ at risk, re—evaluate yourselves, listen to — at risk, re—evaluate yourselves, listen to joe at risk, re—evaluate yourselves, listen tojoe biden. at risk, re-evaluate yourselves, listen to joe biden.— listen to joe biden. stay with family and — listen to joe biden. stay with family and friends, _ listen to joe biden. stay with family and friends, all- listen to joe biden. stay with family and friends, all you i listen to joe biden. stay with | family and friends, all you can listen to joe biden. stay with i family and friends, all you can do in life to keep moving forward, that support system is very important. and download alljedward songs. iinstill and download all jedward songs. will that and download alljedward songs. will that -oes and download alljedward songs. ii. that goes that saying. let me ask you both finally, what would you advise people who are starting out to? they know they've got a talent, or they think they do, and they're prepared to make that step and are unprepared whether they want to say so? it's a huge thing to put yourself up there in the public eye and face maybe the bouquets but also the bricks? , . ,
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and face maybe the bouquets but also the bricks? , ., , ., ., ., the bricks? visually and manage... your messaging — the bricks? visually and manage... your messaging is _ the bricks? visually and manage... your messaging is important, i the bricks? visually and manage... your messaging is important, whatj your messaging is important, what you write about, your flavour of music, what you want and how you about it. is music, what you want and how you about it. , ., , . ., about it. is not 'ust chart success but ou about it. is notjust chart success but you yourself _ about it. is notjust chart success but you yourself as _ about it. is notjust chart success but you yourself as a _ about it. is notjust chart success. but you yourself as a person, what you sing _ but you yourself as a person, what you sing about. it doesn't matter how big — you sing about. it doesn't matter how big or— you sing about. it doesn't matter how big or small you are, if you start— how big or small you are, if you start off— how big or small you are, if you start off organically and have real fame, _ start off organically and have real fame. and — start off organically and have real fame, and not fake hype, but actually— fame, and not fake hype, but actually real people that follow you. _ actually real people that follow you. it's — actually real people that follow you, it's all about... actually real people that follow you, it's allabout... just actually real people that follow you, it's all about...— you, it's all about... just treat our you, it's all about... just treat your life _ you, it's all about... just treat your life like _ you, it's all about... just treat your life like a _ you, it's all about... just treat your life like a marathon, i you, it's all about... just treat| your life like a marathon, keep going and put a little bit every step of the way.— going and put a little bit every step of the way. going and put a little bit every ste ofthe wa . , ., ., step of the way. some people who are watchin: step of the way. some people who are watching this — step of the way. some people who are watching this will _ step of the way. some people who are watching this will wonder _ watching this will wonder what jedward — watching this will wonder what jedward are talking about. we will be here _ jedward are talking about. we will be here in— jedward are talking about. we will be here in 50 years. you jedward are talking about. we will be here in 50 years.— be here in 50 years. you certainly are, john be here in 50 years. you certainly are. john and _ be here in 50 years. you certainly are, john and edward, _ be here in 50 years. you certainly are, john and edward, jedward, l be here in 50 years. you certainly are, john and edward, jedward, i | are, john and edward, jedward, i think america — that's right, i think america — that's right, i think america — that's right, i think america can have you so long as we can keep some of you, as well. jedward, thank you so much. they are
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jedward, thank you so much. they are jedward, i'm shaun ley, how do you follow that? bye—bye. hello there. a stormy evening and night across the south—west of england. the met office were prompted to issue an amber warning, and that is because we have this rapidly deepening area of low pressure. a named storm — pretty unusual at this time of year. some uncertainty as to how far north it'll go, but it will bring with it some soaking rains as well, but the amber warning is out because of the strength of the winds. damaging winds could bring down some trees, some power lines. because it's really quite unusual at this time of year, concerns, of course, for those on holiday under canvas and in caravans. so the strongest of the winds starting to ebb away across the south—west as we go through the morning, pushing further south and east. now, it doesn't look as if they'll be quite as ferocious as further west, but still unusual for this time of year — gusts of wind of 40 or 50mph, as opposed to the potential
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60 further west. either way, it could cause some disruption and, with it, slow—moving bands of showers, heavy with hail and thunder in there. whilst, further north, fewer than we've seen across scotland and northern ireland. the temperatures a little bit lower, just because there's more cloud around — it's quite cool, actually, across scotland. and that's because of the wind direction. as we go through the night on friday, that storm system, storm evert, will move out of the way and will allow a northerly breeze in. it's a little bit cooler and fresher through the night, as you can see, into saturday. so saturday, you would hope, would promise some drier weather, and it does for many areas. but what it also promises is a change in wind direction. as that low pressure pulls away, we get this northerly wind coming in. it's not a warm direction at any time of the year, but temperatures will, certainly in scotland and northern ireland, be a little bit below average from where they should be. so quite a bit of clout as well, with that low pressure still close by, these weak weather fronts meandering southwards. butjust enough focus, then, to give some big showers still. some heavy showers,
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and again a risk of thunder, particularly in england and wales, where we've got more instability. further north, that northerly takes us into sunday, continues to blow, continues to keep it a little cooler and somewhat cloudier here. some sunshine coming through in shelter, but again just that focus in the south — still unsettled, still low pressure, enough to give some big showers around. but they're becoming more focused and less widespread, if you like. there's just the hint that we go into the start of the new week with this little bump of high pressure starting to build in, particularly across the northern half of the country, so that's just going to, again, mean drier weather across scotland, northern ireland, the northern half of england. but again low pressure's close by to the south, so even on monday there's the chance of some big showers and downpours. and it's cooler by that stage as well, you can see — just 19s and 20s. so temperatures below par in the south as well as in the north. tuesday a very similar set—up. although, by that stage, we're starting to see something a little bit more unsettled picking up in the north. why is that? well, i'll show you.
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but, as you can see, temperatures again struggling to get to the seasonal average. so the change is afoot later in the week — that high pressure in the north only transient, because the jet stream starts to strengthen once again, and we're on the side of the jet which means we are in the developmental zone for low pressure, and that low pressure could hang around for several days into next week, so that means the potential for a lot of rain to come our way, and periods of strong winds, particularly, we think, at this stage in southern areas. so, yes, relatively dry at first, but not for long — it looks set to turn better, windier again and, as a result, it'll stay rather cool. all the details of the warnings are on our website. bye— bye.
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tonight at 10pm... prepare for more flooding and higher temperatures, as scientists warn climate change is already having an impact on the uk. last year was one of britain's warmest, wettest and sunniest years ever recorded.

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