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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 29, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm philippa thomas, this is outside source. the us moves to force more people to take up a covid vaccine. president biden is due to say all federal workers will have to be vaccinated, if they want to go to work. global leaders pledge $4 billion to send children to school in poor countries. borisjohnson told the pledging summit in london the importance of education. this is the panacea, this is the universal cure. this is the swiss army knife, complete with allen key and screwdriver, and everything else that can solve virtually every problem that afflicts humanity. charities however say the sum
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raised is "underwhelming" and a "disappointment" — we'll look at their reasons for saying that. and an urgent warning in a new report — greenhouse gas levels are already too high for humanity to have "a manageable future". we've put too much greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. we all need to collaborate to find means of removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere — and in particular, we need to remove at scale. hello, welcome to the programme. let's turn now to covid vaccines in the us. president biden is expected to announce that all federal workers will have to be vaccinated. this comes amid rising case numbers and stagnating vaccination rates. there's been a 46% increase in cases from last week. the highly—transmissable delta variant now accounts for 83% of us covid cases.
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overall, 48% of the us population are fully vaccinated. but there has been a 35% decrease in week—on—week vaccination rates. the us would not be alone in starting to introduce vaccine mandates. in march, italy introduced a requirement for health workers, including pharmacists, to be vaccinated before treating patients, care home workers in the uk will be required to be vaccinated against covid—19 from october. and saudi arabia has taken possibly the strongest line — no jab, nojob. that's across all industries and sectors, both public and private. today, we also heard that in portugal, entry to nightclubs and bars will soon rely on proof of vaccination. barbara plett—usher is in washington. good to see you. what are we expecting from president biden�*s
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address? we expecting from president biden's address? ~ . , . ., address? we are expecting him to announce that _ address? we are expecting him to announce that federal _ address? we are expecting him to announce that federal employees | address? we are expecting him to i announce that federal employees will have to get vaccinated if they want to come to work. but they won't be calling it a vaccine mandate, they'll say if you don't get vaccinated, then you have to submit to regular covid testing and other protocols or restrictions. so it's not as if they're saying you'll be fired if you don't get vaccinated, but it will cost you in some way. this is part of a plan to get government workers back to the office safely, it's also to try and be an example to other employers in the country about how to go about this in terms of vaccination and the rise in covid cases. but it's also basically an acknowledgement that president biden�*s drive it for vaccination has not met its goals — as you were saying, cases are on the rise because there's a delta variant, and they are primarily amongst those who are unvaccinated, which is a significant proportion of
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the country, 33% of adults are sceptical. president biden has done what he could, he's used of the bully pulpit and made access to vaccines easier, but there is a limit to what he can do to force action. in this case, he can come up with federal workers he has the authority. so that's what he'll do and it's the nation's largest employer, the government, so he hopes it'll make a difference. what hopes it'll make a difference. what we mean by _ hopes it'll make a difference. what we mean by federal— hopes it'll make a difference. what we mean by federal workers, what sectors are we looking at? 2.2 million people _ sectors are we looking at? 22 million people work directly for the government, so that would be all the civil servants that staff the bureaucracy, that would be people like wildlife protection officers in parks, that sort of thing. you also have quite a few other people who are connected — for example, people in the military service, working for the postal service, and people working for federal contractors that are doing federaljobs, even though the work of themselves are private —— workers themselves. the 2 million who work directly for the government
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we believe will be the least to which this announcement will apply. barbara, thanks very much. barbara saying that the us government is the largest employer in the country. let's look at america's private sector too, as some key corporations are introducing their own rulings on covid jabs. netflix will require vaccinations for so—called "zone a" cast and crew on sets. google will require vaccination for those returning to us offices this autumn. as will facebook, who said in a statement... amazon has stopped short of a vaccine mandate in its buildings — working with carrot rather than stick, it's offering an $80 bonus to vaccinated front line workers. let's look into the impact such rulings could have — here's the analysis of one public health professor. it puts a tremendous burden on private companies to do this.
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frankly, i think it's the responsibility of public health to make sure that things happen. but there are political reasons why the government is only pushing so far. it's put the burden on private companies, private companies have to make the decision whether they'll mandate vaccination — or if they won't mandate it, though allow people to come into work not vaccinated, but insist on verification. but the private companies are the ones who would have to do the verification because the government has hasn't stepped in to do that. so i think there is a role for government here that has not been filled adequately. let's take a look at some of the reaction to vaccine mandates. public support for mandatory staff jabs seems to depend on the type of worker you're talking about. we'll start with health care. 6% of americans think that health care workers should have a vaccine mandate and many industry bodies agree. -- 66%. this statement, signed by more than 60 medical associations,
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calls for mandatory vaccines for all health workers. as of may, around 83% of nurses were vaccinated. which is higher than the average population. but there has been some resistance, for example at one hospital network in texas where more than 150 staff left their posts after refusing to be vaccinated. and let's turn now to education. there has been backlash in the uk against proposals to make vaccines necessary to attend lectures. the university and college union called it "wrong and hugely discriminatory". but in the us, over 400 universities and colleges will require students to have their covid vaccinations when they start the new term. and it's worth remembering that vaccine mandates are not a new concept — for example, 68% of colleges in the states require vaccination against measles. indeed, all 50 states have laws requiring specific vaccines for students, though they do allow for medical exemptions.
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however, covid vaccines are a legal grey area, as they are still under emergency approval for use. and it is for this reason that fewer than half of those higher education facilities have mandates for staff. and seven states have banned any vaccine mandates for schools. and, as we heard a little earlier, some large companies in the us have mandated vaccines for their employees. here's peter bowes on what the reaction has been to that. to some extent, this issue has been politcised, certainly in states like florida where there is a relatively low vaccination rate. but as far as employees at these major companies are concerned, i think it still comes down largely to personal opinions. as far as their reaction will be i think people will have to make difficult decisions that, if they want to go back to theirjob in the office and the company's telling them they have to be vaccinated, then it seems they will have no choice. we have netflix, the first major
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studio to make a decision that all of its major cast members and anyone who comes into contact with them will have to be vaccinated. for workers to go back to facebook in—office and to be working alongside other people, they'll have to be vaccinated too. and these, of course, are very high—profile, well—known companies. there will be lesser—known companies, privately—owned companies up and down the country having to make similar decisions. but whilst these larger companies gain public attention for their mandates, a survey from may found 72% of companies in the us were not planning on requiring vaccination before entering the workplace. and public opinion is evenly split on whether or not vaccine mandates should be introduced by private companies. robert blendon is a professor of health politics at harvard. hejoins me now. thanks very much for being with us
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here on bbc news. it's complicated, is the way i can sum up what i've said over the last few minutes. but firstly, where do you think the idea of vaccine mandates is welcome in the united states, if anywhere? 50. the united states, if anywhere? so, the united states, if anywhere? so, the country — the united states, if anywhere? so, the country is _ the united states, if anywhere? srr, the country is divided. the united states, if anywhere? s57, the country is divided. in democratic areas — and many of the companies you cite are in very democratic areas — many people, the democrats have a different view than more republican, conservative areas. and they are willing to have mandates of a type. so we are talking about a0 point difference is here. so when somebody cites a company in san francisco, there's no surprise. but if that company was in dallas, i would surprise. but if that company was in dallas, iwould be surprise. but if that company was in dallas, i would be amazed. surprise. but if that company was in dallas, iwould be amazed. so dallas, i would be amazed. so the splits have to do with geography, politics and conservatism. also for british audiences, it's important to
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understand that the biggest decisions on this issue in the united states are made at the state level. so when we talk about italy and britain, president biden does not have the same authority or reach as that. it's what the states do. and what you have to understand is that there are about a dozen states in the united states where a substantial share of the population are resistant to taking the vaccine. another group of states, absolutely everyone wants to take the vaccine. so what business does in those 12 states will be different than what business does particularly on the east or west coast. find business does particularly on the east or west coast.— business does particularly on the east or west coast. and i except of course that — east or west coast. and i except of course that we _ east or west coast. and i except of course that we are _ east or west coast. and i except of course that we are talking - east or west coast. and i except of course that we are talking about i course that we are talking about large territories, if you're talking about the states of alabama or mississippi... about the states of alabama or mississippi. . ._ about the states of alabama or mississippi... texas and florida. texas can _ mississippi... texas and florida. texas can especially. _ mississippi... texas and florida. texas can especially. but - mississippi... texas and florida. texas can especially. but does l mississippi... texas and florida. i texas can especially. but does that mean that what you might end up happening is almost a series of
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public health experiment side by side, with one state doing something quite different to its neighbour? yes, though they are likely to be separated by coasts. so it's not likely to be vermont doing one thing, new hampshire is different. the thing you have to understand about the business side of this is on the business pages, there are two separate stories going on. one is reporting... they are looking for other places to work. secondly, a large series of business surveys shows that millions of people are missing from the labour force. so companies, particularly middle sized and small businesses are desperate for workers. and small businesses are desperate forworkers. many and small businesses are desperate for workers. many of them are in those 12 states. so if i am a company on either coast, i don't have a problem finding employees, i
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can do one thing. if i'm in texas andi can do one thing. if i'm in texas and i can't find truck drivers are deliverers, people to work in fast food restaurants, i'll have another issue. so it really is important to realise that the business environment will be different without mandating depending on is the labour market — lots of people want to work for disney. that the labour market - lots of people want to work for disney.— want to work for disney. that is really fascinating, _ want to work for disney. that is really fascinating, if _ want to work for disney. that is really fascinating, if i _ want to work for disney. that is really fascinating, if i can - want to work for disney. that is really fascinating, if i can just i really fascinating, if i can just come in on that, that adds to the problem for the white house, for president biden. because one, if he forces, he risks political backlash, but you also potentially faces a big business problem at? he absolutely does. it would _ business problem at? he absolutely does. it would not _ business problem at? he absolutely does. it would not benefit _ business problem at? he absolutely does. it would not benefit him - does. it would not benefit him to get into this battle with businesses who can hire people to open over this. so you send the signal, let's get federal employees — but again,
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for people in europe, a much smaller share of americans work for government can do in european countries. forthis, government can do in european countries. for this, the health carrots centre, one and i2 countries. for this, the health carrots centre, one and 12 people work in health care. so the most significant issue and debate going on is whether or not health care workers would be required to get a vaccine — and there's a lot of public support even amongst conservatives and republicans for health care workers. that's where the really big battle is, because that'll be in alabama and texas, and florida and tennessee. these are local hospitals and, if they require it, it'll set going. but federal workers are not the key, the other sectors will be more important. but health care is the one to watch because it could actually shape some of these other states if you are in local hospitals, go ahead and do
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this. ~ ., ., ., , this. we have to leave it there, but that is utterly _ this. we have to leave it there, but that is utterly fascinating, - this. we have to leave it there, but that is utterly fascinating, and - this. we have to leave it there, but that is utterly fascinating, and now| that is utterly fascinating, and now we know what we do have to watch particular look closely in the states. robert, thank you very much. thank you. here in the uk, england's deputy chief medical officer, jonathan van tam, has urged people who've not yet been vaccinated to come forward. the latest data from public health england suggests that covid vaccines have prevented an estimated 22 million infections and 60,000 deaths in england alone. here's our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. after the misery of many months with a pandemic, the thrill of the holidays. the nhs in england went to fir park today to encourage its younger visitors to get vaccinated. —— thorpe park. we are doing covid vaccines today. ijust want to be more safe and know i am 0k, and also when everything is open now, i can have my freedom. did you see that? there's something about being fearless when you are young
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and perhaps that is what is being played out with the vaccinations. unlike with the older generation who went full throttle to get immunised, a significant proportion of younger people are still dragging their feet over getting the jab and getting protected. the numbers of those being immunised are continuing to rise, but there is a stark difference between the age groups. more than 30% of 18—29—year—olds in england still have not had a single dose of the vaccine. compare that to the over—60s, where 90% have had two jabs. today, the deputy chief medical officer was answering questions from young people on bbc news about the vaccine. i was wondering why would i or any other young person be inclined to get the vaccine for individual reasons? the idea that covid is less serious to the young is right, but the idea that it is not pretty serious indeed for some young
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people is sadly wrong. and then, of course, on top of that, there is the risk of long covid. in northern ireland, there's been an enormous concern about what has been described as the incredibly slow uptake of vaccines by the under—30s. and in glasgow, health officials have taken the jab on a bus in an attempt to persuade more younger people to get immunised. i didn't really think i needed it but i suppose i am going to need it for things like vaccine passports. i was waiting to see. i am not against it. it was just a case of not yet. but many have not been able to enjoy a day out. a record number, nearly 700,000, have been contacted by the nhs app advising them to self—isolate. and for those young people who want to continue to go out, it seems increasingly likely that being double—jabbed will be the key.
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sophie hutchinson, bbc news. a summit in london has raised around sa billion in pledges for education in the developing world. the need to provide for the millions of children who don't receive a basic education has greatly increased since covid—i9 struck. the sumit had sought to raise $5 billion — and charities have described the result at "underwhelming". this was kenya's president, uhuru kenyatta, arriving to bump elbows with the uk prime minister borisjohnson. the money is being raised for the global partnership for education, the charity chaired by the former australian prime ministerjulia gillard. borisjohnson spoke at the summit — he was in no doubt about the importance of getting more children into school. this is the silver bullet, this is the magic potion, this is the panacea, the universal cure. this is the swiss army knife, complete with allen key and screwdriver, and
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everything else that can solve virtually every problem that afflicts humanity. and i'm absolutely serious — if you educate the world, then of course, agincourt the world, then of course, agincourt the world, then of course, agincourt the world properly and fairly, then of course you and a natural great injustice. the former australian prime minster julia gillard chairs the global partnership for education, she spoke earlier to the bbc. when the world came into the pandemic, we already had a big mountain to climb to make sure every boy and girl could get educated. the best estimates were about 250 million children of school age where not going to school. we've been concerned that covid could push us backwards with schools closed, education hours lost, and unfortunately, the evidence from earlier health crisis like ebola is that when schools close, the most marginalised children don't return. —— health crises. so it was really vital that people gathered today to globalise attention and resources on making sure we keep going forward rather
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than getting pushed back by the covid crisis. let's hear from james landale at the summit. even before covid struck, millions of children were out of school that should have been in school. but what has happened is the pandemic has made that situation much, much worse. lockdown has meant that schools have been closed because of the economic crisis following the pandemic, economic budgets, school budgets have been squeezed in governments around the world, and a lot of that was children are staying out of school, they are not going back. —— a lot of those children. and as a result of that, poverty is increasing, rates of child marriage teenage pregnancies and all of the downsides of an absence of education, all those negative impacts are being seen around the world. so this summit, which, you know, is a regular summit, it happens every 3—5 years to raise money for big global education fund has added urgency to get as much money into the system as possible, notjust in terms of external donors from the outside, but also in developing countries themselves, getting commitments
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to a decent question to their domestic budgets to go on education too, you know, invest in the future. in the run—up to the summit, the uk government had been criticised for encouraging other countries to increase their contributions, only weeks after its mps voted in parliament to cut the uk's own aid budget. the independent newspaper quotes lis wallace from the development charity the one campaign saying... as the summit closed the one campaign said the amount of money raised was "underwhelming" — falling short of that ssa billion dollar goal. and another charity, save the children, said it was "disappointing". let's be frank, they won't raise around $5 billion in pledges here, it'll be the $a billion total. if you speak to organisers, they'll say look, that's inevitable, a lot of
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pledges come in over that period, different countries have different budgetary timescales. if you talk to the aged charities, they say that's a reflection of the letter a, other priorities and economies dealing with health, they also say the uk's decision to cut the aid budget has flattened appetite amongst other countries. why should they do that when the uk cuts there is? so there's that political debate there, but $a billion over five years they hope will make a real dent in getting 175 million children back into school. the charity aims to use the money raised in particular to help girls missing out on school around the world. many who don't complete their schooling end up being married and getting pregnant at a young age. nobel laureate malala yusufsai spoke by video link at the summit. if we want a stronger, fairer world, we must keep girls learning. girls education improves public health, mitigates climate change, improves peace
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and promotes economic growth. strong education financing is key to achieving this goal. 70 countries in the developing world stand to benefit from the money raised. kenya is one of them. our east africa women's affairs correspondent esther ogola went to visit a "catch—up" centre giving teenage mums the opportunity to return to formal education. 17—year—old mary — not her real name — was married at 13 and has little formal education. but now, she's been given the opportunity to go back to school. translation: i back to school. translation: , v back to school. translation: ,. v back to school. translation: ,v v translation: i started school at ten ears, and translation: i started school at ten years. and only _ translation: i started school at ten years, and only attended _ translation: i started school at ten years, and only attended for- translation: i started school at ten years, and only attended for two - years, and only attended for two years. i had to drop out because my aunt needed someone to help her look after cattle. i had only learned to write my name and count up to 50. this centre, which is one of 26 across multiple kenyan counties,
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operates for half a day, three days a week to enable the girls — of whom are mothers — a chance to look after their children or earn a living. but for girls from pastoralist communities like mary, cultural aspects mean girls are being left behind. . , aspects mean girls are being left behind. v , v v aspects mean girls are being left behind. ., , ., v �*, behind. early marriage. there's also, in behind. early marriage. there's also. in some — behind. early marriage. there's also, in some places, _ behind. early marriage. there's also, in some places, child - also, in some places, child pregnancy, teenage pregnancy. also ftm. there's also, you know, prevalence that boys go to school and the girls stay at home, help the mother with house chores. for and the girls stay at home, help the mother with house chores.- mother with house chores. for the uirls who mother with house chores. for the girls who have _ mother with house chores. for the girls who have enrolled _ mother with house chores. for the girls who have enrolled in - mother with house chores. for the girls who have enrolled in this - girls who have enrolled in this education programme, being able to do even the most basic of things such as spelling or writing their name has given them not only a wider sense of identity, but a voice, power, and a sense of control over their lives.
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this is ronald demeo visiting beirut in a show of solidarity with the city for a bit prepares to mark the first anniversary of the devastating explosion in the port. you can remember how much damage it did. they are still struggling to recover. he made a wreath for a memorialforfirefighters recover. he made a wreath for a memorial for firefighters who lost their lives. more than 200 people were killed in a blast that wrecked the heart of the lebanese capital. we've been telling you more on outside source in recent days about how lebanon is struggling with a physical and economic crisis, a political crisis — client up dust quite a lot of which stems from that devastating explosion at the port. and you can see the reaction he's getting from there, as well, visiting on the adversity and paying his respects — and drawing the attention of the outside world to the state that lebanon is in. if you want more if you want more analysis from outside source,
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a good place to find it is on twitter, i'm @philippabbc. we're posting new material all the time. hello. a stormy evening and night is ahead for the southwest of england, whilst only thunderstorms further north in the uk will tend to fizzle out in the next few hours. but we have had some around again today. but this is a named storm we're talking about in the southwest approaches. that's unusual at this time of year. of particular concern, though, sleeping out under canvas 01’ in a caravan. it's this rapidly deepening area of low pressure bringing that stormy weather. notjust winds, but some more soaking rains as well, and those will affect many parts, actually, of england and wales as we through the evening and overnight, as you can see. we could have 15—20 mm of rain as that weather front moves through. the winds escalating in southwest approaches first of all, could see gusts in excess of 60 mph, as i say, enough to bring down potentially trees and power lines, it could cause some disruption.
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by morning, you can see that that rain is affecting many parts of england and wales, whilst the showers have eased in the north, it becomes a little drier. certainly not a cold night for anywhere, and it does look as if we will start with some drier weather in the north, just rather cloudy and cool across northern scotland. one or two showers here pepping up again and for northern ireland, but around our area of low pressure, our storm across southern areas will see heavier showers breaking out with thunder and lightning. again, some strong winds, even gale force winds around coastal areas in southern and eastern parts as well. not as lively, we think, as those further west to start the day, but unusually strong for this time of year, and the winds should ease down a little bit in the southwest as we get into the afternoon. but the feel of the day will be tempered somewhat compared with today because we've got more cloud around, and those heavy downpours. now, those are all tied in, as i say, with that storm system which moves away for saturday. and then we open up to this northerly wind bringing showers southwards. so northerly wind will make it feel cooler, and temperatures actually
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will be below average across the northern half of the country in particular. and still with those weather fronts close by for a the north sea coast, the risk of some cloudy periods with some patchy rain. and still in southern areas, there's the energy there for some heavier showers to break out, so it's not as unsettled, but it's still not dry. and as a say in the north, it will feel quite cool. similar outlook for sunday, really. by the beginning of the week, things may start to calm down a bit more. more detail on that amber warning online.
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hello, this is outside source. the us moves to forest more people to take up a coveted vaccine. joe biden has had all federal employees like to be vaccinated or undergo regular testing if they want to go to work. a london placing signage raises $a billion for education in poor countries, but that is less than the amount hoped for. charities are calling it underwhelming into disappointment. an urgent warning for all of us on climates, greenhouse gas levels are already too high for humanity to have a manageable future. we too high for humanity to have a manageable future.— too high for humanity to have a manageable future. we have put too much greenhouse _ manageable future. we have put too much greenhouse gas _ manageable future. we have put too much greenhouse gas into _ manageable future. we have put too much greenhouse gas into the - much greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. we all need to collaborate to find means of
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removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and in particular, we need to remove at scale. we're going to look at two climate change reports — in a moment we'll look at how extreme weather is impacting the uk. first — a report by some of the world's top climate experts has found the warming of the arctic is contributing to global records being broken for heat and rainfall. the group was founded by sir david king. this is his warning. this is a global emergency requiring all governments to club together and act accordingly. we are pushing for three rs. reduce emissions as deeply and rapidly as possible, emissions from greenhouse gases. the fossil fuel era is over, let's move on to cleaner energy production, for example.
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secondly, we have put too much greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. we all need to collaborate to find means of removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and in particular, we need to remove at scale. the report connects several recent weather disasters in europe and the us, with the arctic — where temperatures are rising faster than anywhere else in the world. recent flooding in western germany is one example. the intensity of rain and scale of destruction was shocking. over 170 died. tens of thousands of homes were destroyed. here's another example. wildfires in siberia — driven by a heatwave. the report believes these are "all outlier events that exceed what one would expect if it were �*only�* the impact of warming by 1.2 degrees celsius". that's the amount the earth has already warmed since pre—industrial times. it adds this dramatic sentence:
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"greenhouse gas levels are already too high for a manageable future for humanity." here's sir david king again. so what else do we need to do? we have to buy time. so what we are looking at is how do we keep ice covering the arctic sea during the polar summer? if we could achieve that, we could buy time to allow us to get these other possibilities going. so it's reduce, remove and repair that damage that's being caused by the arctic circle region. we have long been warned that increased emissions would cause more floods, droughts, heatwaves and storms. but recent events surpass expectations. we have numerous examples to show you. these apocalyptic scenes are from the town of lytton in canada — destroyed by wildfire after a record breaking heatwave. next — lets get the analysis from our climate and environment analyst roger harrabin.
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so there are two completely separate conversations going on here. one is from david king, looking at events like those recent american and canadian heat waves, plural, i should say, because they were more than one of them, and just look at one event in late ten in canada, where they had an increase on the previous high temperature of 4.6 celsius. now, that may not mean very much to people, but if i tell you that a normal increase on our record would be probably by .1 of a degree or point to have a degree, you can see that people like sir david are absolutely horrified that we have an increase of 4.6 degrees. this is completely off the scale and has alarmed ten, notjust ten, ——this is completely off the scale and has alarmed himn, notjust him, but many other scientists as well. in the meantime, governments are going on with their discussions about, well, can we possibly limits climate change to 1.5 celsius? and sir david is saying,
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hang on a second, all of these are happening with 1.2 celsius increase in temperature overall, and so why on earth are you talking about that? why are you talking about phasing out emissions by 2050 when already emissions in the atmosphere are causing, in his view, are causing extremely dangerous consequences like the american heat dome. so there is, as i say, a huge mismatch between what politicians think they are able to achieve and what scientists say needs to be done. there are plenty of other examples of weather disrupting our daily lives. next we're going to look at india — which has been dealing with major landslides and floods for over a week. this is maharastra state. streets are now rivers, homes are under water. over 209 people have died. scientists tell us this is connected to climate change. here's dr roxy koll from the indian institute of tropical meteorology. we do see a threefold rise in extreme rainfall events across india, and a 50% increase
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in the number of cyclones. not only that, it's notjust a frequency of these kinds of extreme weather events, but also their intensity and duration also have increased. and they are spread over a larger region in the recent decades. this is particularly because of global warming. we have attacked it up to global warming because if we look at the geography of india, it is particular. surrounded on all three sides by warm indian ocean waters, and this is warming further because more than 90% of the additional heat from global warming goes into the oceans, and these monsoon winds which blow from the indian ocean towards the subcontinent is bringing in more heat and moisture, which is being dumped as heavy rainfall events over the subcontinent in a short spell of time, so we are seeing more of these kinds of rains in recent decades. next we turn to the uk,
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where another report released by the uk met office, concludes britain is already undergoing disruptive climate change — with increased rainfall, sunshine and temperatures in 2020. here's science correspondent rebecca morelle. the changes we are seeing are dramatic. this week's storms leading to flash flooding in the south of england. these extremes are the focus of a new report that assessed the uk's climate in 2020, from the hottest day recorded in heathrow london where temperature reached 37.8 celsius, to the coldest in aberdeenshire, that had a low of —10.3 celsius, to reign in october with the latest and record and leaned ——wind in the isle of wight with gusts reaching over 100 mph. the report says the uk is getting warmer, wetter and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our observations that the uk's climate is already changing. so climate change isn't
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just something that's going to happen in 2050, or we need to worry about towards the end of the century. we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. the report compared to the most recent three decades were the 30 years before, this map shows the uk is warming. the darker the red, the bigger the temperature increase, and everywhere is now hotter by an average of 0.9 degrees. but east anglia and east midlands have warmed by more than 1 degrees. this map shows the changes in average rainfall. dark blue means more rain, and the uk is now an average of 6% wetter, but across much of scotland, the increase is more than 10%. it's putting immense strain on the uk's infrastructure, extreme heat halting trains as tracks buckle. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united nations climate summit, and we will find out if governments can rise to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effect of climate change.
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professor myles allen is head of the climate dynamics group at the university of oxford and has served on the un's intergovernmental panel on climate change. great to have you with us. i would like to start with glasgow, because i want to ask you what would be a sign of actual practical success for you coming out of that key summit? well, for me, it's really very simple. one thing which people have to understand about this problem as it is fixable. we don't need to keep using the atmosphere as a giant waste dump. you know, 200 years ago, if you told somebody living in london that within 50 years, we would stop dumping sewage in the river, they would've told you, that's impossible. where else to put a? we sorted that out, we can sort this out too. and we can sort it out within a generation. we can stop climate change that out, we can sort this out too. and we can sort it out within a generation. we can stop
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climate change within a generation if we in glasgow but should be is how we list the industry that is selling the products that's causing the problem to help solve ads. at the problem to help solve ads. at the moment, we see the fossil fuel industry as just sitting in the corner, selling its goods, part of the problem. it has to be made to be part of the solution. i the problem. it has to be made to be part of the solution.— part of the solution. i heard david kane say that _ part of the solution. i heard david kane say that fossil _ part of the solution. i heard david kane say that fossil fuel - part of the solution. i heard david kane say that fossil fuel era - part of the solution. i heard david kane say that fossil fuel era is - kane say that fossil fuel era is over, and i thought, well not to them it's not. so what would you suggest to make them step up to their responsibilities to humanity? absolutely. we cannot afford to wait for the world to stop using fossil fuels before we stop using global warming. that is absolutely clear, and it has a very clear implication. the industry itself needs to sort out the waste generated by the products itself. they know how to do it. they can catch a carbon dioxide, they can presage, reinjected back on they can presage, reinjected back on the ground. it is controversial for
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many people, because they see this as a way for the fossil fuel industry to continue in its existence. however, if we don't force them to do this, then the alternative is that carbon dioxide just gets dumped in the atmosphere causing everywhere as extreme weather, so we must require the industry to sort out its waste problem. it wouldn't be acceptable for the nuclear industry, why is it acceptable for the fossil fuel industry? that is the message that has to come out of glasgow. i motivate politicians to say that directly to those at the top of such corporations?— corporations? increasingly, companies _ corporations? increasingly, companies like _ corporations? increasingly, companies like bp - corporations? increasingly, companies like bp and - corporations? increasingly, | companies like bp and shell corporations? increasingly, - companies like bp and shell are saying, look, if you asked us to do this, we would just do it, and that's the message the politicians don't seem to be getting. they seem to, you know, a lot of these companies have actually made commitments to reach net they are themselves. although it's unclear how they could do it, and if one
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company aims to dispose of its carbon dioxide properly and on the other companies don't come of that company would just go belly up because it would cost more than other people, and people would buy elsewhere, the government can step up elsewhere, the government can step up and tell the government, look, but the right route —— regulation, we can fix this, and the politicians would have no excuse and to put the regulation in place. typically, this isn't a free pass. fossil fuels used responsibly will be more expensive. significantly more expensive than fossil fuels used the way that we use them at the moment, but the alternative is to impose all of these costs on future generations, and that should be acceptable. professor myles allen, thank you so much forjoining us. into multi—now, ——
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let's go to malta now — where an independent inquiry into the murder of the journalist daphne caruana galizia has found the maltese state must bear responsibility after it created a culture of impunity. this is caruana galizia, the anti—corruption reporter. she was killed four years ago in a massive car bomb attack near her home. the murder led to huge protests, and allegations of government involvement led to the resignation of the then prime minister joseph muscat last year. here's our europe correspondent nick beake. for the last two years, this independent inquiry has been hearing from dozens of different witnesses and trying to piece together what happened in the moments before her death, and really, the finding today is that the maltese state bears responsibility for the death of caruana galizia. that is not to say there was direct evidence that the government or members of the government or associates were directly involved in the assassination, but it talks about the culture of impunity being created on the island which allowed people who may be wanted her dad
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to be able to act and believe that they could simply get away with it, and it also paints a very devastating picture, really of corruption, and the tentacles that reached between the judiciary and the police and also parts of the government and potentially people involved in organised crime and corruption network. so i think it is a pretty strong message today from this independent panel. definitely caruana galizia was a fearless investigative journalist to pledge more than three decades shone a light on the finances of many rich and powerful people on the island of malta, and a lot of people did not like that. it won her plaudits, but also clearly created enemies. and herfamily have said it's because of this work that she was targeted. they say that if there is to be any legacy from this it's that things change thatjournalism on the islands can be protected in the future, journalists as well, and that this notion of corruption being something that's accepted but really
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is a thing of the past. stay with us on outside source — still to come... goal that the olympics for us gymnasts, the 19—year—old stepped up after simone biles withdrew from the event. here in the uk the number of people on furlough has fallen sharply — to below two million — with younger people coming off the scheme twice as fast as any other age group. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports. leah bailey has been able to spend a lot more time with little ava than she was expecting. after maternity leave, she had 11 months on furlough. then this april she took a call from her manager. she hit me with the news that i'm at risk of being made redundant. two or three weeks later i got the phone call. "i'm so sorry, leah, but you're being made redundant."
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she said, "i tried my hardest to try and find, juggle people's jobs around in the office to kind of find you stuff, but there is not enough work for the people in the office." and that's hard when you'd been on furlough for so long, hoping and expecting to go back into work. i burst out crying. it was really scary. i had a little girl to support and i had a roof over our heads to do and bills to pay. it was horrible. jo has been on the other end of those decisions throughout the pandemic. she runs this small promotions company in stockport and says decisions around furlough have been really hard. my team have been with me a long time. you know, most of them have worked for me for years, you know them very well, you know their family circumstances, you're trying to weigh up perhaps some of their financial circumstances. who can you keep in? who can you not? from next week businesses are going to have to start paying
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more for every member of staff still not back at work, forcing many companies to start making those difficult choices. today's figures show fewer people on furlough than ever before, with the real boost coming as hospitality and retail opened up again. but for the 1.9 million people still on furlough, the risk of redundancy is increasing. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is? as progress slows on vaccination in the united states, president biden is expected to announce that all federal workers must be vaccinated or undergo regular testing. now, let's take it to the tokyo olympics. and on day six, all eyes were on the women's gymnastics all—around final after the reigning champion simone biles pulled out of the event due to mental health pressures. as team usa won the title at each
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of the last four olympics, the pressure on their remaining competitors to bring home the gold was massive. but 18—year—old sunisa lee rose to the challenge, coming from behind to win the gold medal on the last apparatus of the day, with a brilliant floor routine. the win means the us keeps their streak alive, now with five straight gold medals in the event. well, her family and friends were watching the tense finish from back home in oakdale minnesota — and this was the moment they realised suni had won the gold. as well as being a big moment for sunisa and herfamily — it was also a historic moment for america's hmong community — with lee becoming the first ever athlete from this immigrant community to win
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an olympic gold medal. for more on her background and the significance of today's win, here's cindy boren, sport reporter with the washington post. she is an 18—year—old from minnesota. she is a member, she is one of the first members of the mung community, which is a group of people from southeast asia who were protected by the cia. —— hmon community. they cooperated but the cia and help that the united states during that war. —— hmong community. and she was born here. her parents are middle—class workers. strong workers. herfather has been in a wheelchair since falling off a ladder and breaking his back. she thought about quitting gymnastics after her father was injured, thought about quitting gymnastics after herfather was injured, but she stuck with it and it's going to help herfamily
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she stuck with it and it's going to help her family enormously to have one this metal. so a new star for us gymnastics. but what about simone biles? well, she still hasn't confirmed whether or not she will compete in any of the individual finals next week after pulling out of both the team and individual all around finals — which she qualified for on all apparatus despite not performing at her best. but on thursday she was there, in the stands, supporting her team—mate sunisa to gold. here is cindy boren again. she and her team—mates were in the stands, mask stop, and one of the voices he could hear echoing in the empty stadium belonged to simone biles. she's been very outspoken about being supportive at a time, now, when so many gymnasts need it. and she never really felt that she got it herself until now, she has about the outpouring of support since her decision to drop out. well injapan the olympics are still sharing the headlines with coronavirus. japan has surpassed 10,000 cases for the first time nearly a,000 of them are in tokyo alone — twice the daily level a week ago. but olympic officials say there's no
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evidence that the games has contributed to the rise. our correspondent mariko oi has more from tokyo. it's now being reported that the state of emergency will be including the three surrounding pip extras of tokyo as well as osaka, because that is going to start on monday. also, the state of emergency for tokyo as well as okinawa, that is being extended by about ten days until the end of august. how effective that will be remains to be seen because, of course, the capital has been under the state of emergency press quite some time now, but we are seeing this continued surge and covet cases as you mention. the ioc has emphasised that the surge has nothing to do at the olympics. i don't think people here think of athletes and officials at spreading the virus, but the very fact that the virus, but the very fact that the olympics are taking place in the city, that really sends the wrong message, as you can see around me,
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people are still out and about. there is no sense of urgency. this is the part state of emergency by the japanese capital, and it's become somewhat of the norm. that's why medical experts are saying that the government has to do something more, what they can deal we still don't know, and we still need to find out. and while cases rise in the community, coronavirus is also bringing heartbreak to athletes in the olympic village. the reigning world pole vault champion, american sam kendricks, has been ruled out of the games after testing positive for covid—19. some members of australia's track and field team briefly isolated as a precaution after coming into contact with him, but have resumed normal activities after negative tests. despite the devastating blow for kendricks, he posted this message on twitter. i was all set to compete that saturday after my second olympic games. sadly today, thursday, iwas removed from the competition due to a positive coronavirus test. despite having past two at home and went in
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the airport on the way to tokyo, i'm out. my man in the pulled out, you are my friends chemical have a great time, enjoy the olympics. miss me if he wants, but i'll be on the road shortly after to compete in every other event can and hopefully we will all have fine long careers. let's turn to archery now — and in particular to the south korean archer an san. she bagged two olympic gold medals earlier in the week — but received a shocking amount of online abuse from men in korea for her short hairstyle. she has since been flooded with support from women in her home country and around the world. here's our correspondent laura bicker, who's in seoul, to explain. it's hard not to feel outraged when you hear something like that. she should be a national hero, she has won two gold medals. she has helped make a bit of history here in south korea, but it seems that a number of online groups, especially run by men have said that her short hair has made her a feminist. now, feminism has been associated with a bit of a dirty word here in south korea. men
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feel that feminists are perhaps getting preferential treatment over them in this country. they feel unfairly targeted by what they call feminists. this has all started years back when young women here in south korea took things into their own hands, they started protesting on the streets about the likes of digital sex crimes, spy camera crimes, they tried to call for further sentencing for those who were found guilty. they have asked for gender equality. maximum then say they are unfairly targeted because they have to do military conscription here come back to spend two years doing military training. well, there's been some big moments on day six. in the pool, america's caeleb dressel won gold in the 100 metres he won gold, he's been under so much pressure, many people calm the new michael phelps. he is of course the olympian with the most metals ever, so he has been talking about his mental health as well, but he performed well in the pool today
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this was an unexpected victory for them. they won the women's ax200 m freestyle relay. it was a world record time, seven minutes a0 .3 seconds, beating australia's record from the 2019 world championships. what does this all mean for the metal tally? lets have a look. china now on top. ——well china is now on top, tied with japan on 15 gold medals, but they are in the lead because of their impressive 31 medals overall. well after a best ever start to the olympics, there were no new gold's for great britain on day six, with team gb picking up the silver medal in the womens canoe slalom and bronze in the mens trap shooting. much more, of course, a lot more detailed and a lot more of the personal drama on the bbc online. you can watch the life page and some of you may, of course, be watching through the night. stay with us, we will be bringing you much more as they games
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were aligned and the drama continues. goodbye for now. hello. a stormy evening and night is ahead for the southwest of england, whilst only thunderstorms further north in the uk will tend to fizzle out in the next few hours. but we have had some around again today. but this is a named storm we're talking about in the southwest approaches. that's unusual at this time of year. of particular concern, though, sleeping out under canvas 01’ in a caravan. it's this rapidly deepening area of low pressure bringing that stormy weather. notjust winds, but some more soaking rains as well, and those will affect many parts, actually, of england and wales as we through the evening and overnight, as you can see. we could have 15—20 mm of rain as that weather front moves through. the winds escalating in southwest approaches first of all, could see gusts in excess of 60 mph, as i say, enough to bring down
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potentially trees and power lines, it could cause some disruption. by morning, you can see that that rain is affecting many parts of england and wales, whilst the showers have eased in the north, it becomes a little drier. certainly not a cold night for anywhere, and it does look as if we will start with some drier weather in the north, just rather cloudy and cool across northern scotland. one or two showers here pepping up again and for northern ireland, but around our area of low pressure, our storm across southern areas will see heavier showers breaking out with thunder and lightning. again, some strong winds, even gale force winds around coastal areas in southern and eastern parts as well. not as lively, we think, as those further west to start the day, but unusually strong for this time of year, and the winds should ease down a little bit in the southwest as we get into the afternoon. but the feel of the day will be tempered somewhat compared with today because we've got more cloud around, and those heavy downpours. now, those are all tied in, as i say, with that storm system which moves away for saturday. and then we open up to this northerly wind bringing showers southwards.
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so northerly wind will make it feel cooler, and temperatures actually will be below average across the northern half of the country in particular. and still with those weather fronts close by for a the north sea coast, the risk of some cloudy periods with some patchy rain. and still in southern areas, there's the energy there for some heavier showers to break out, so it's not as unsettled, but it's still not dry. and as a say in the north, it will feel quite cool. similar outlook for sunday, really. by the beginning of the week, things may start to calm down a bit more. more detail on that amber warning online.
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hello, i'm philippa thomas, this is outside source. global leaders pledge four billion dollars to send children to school in poor countries. borisjohnson told the summit in london of the importance of education. this is the silver bullet. this is the magic potion, this is the panacea that's going to solve virtually every problem that afflicts humanity. charities however say the sum raised is "underwhelming" and a "disappointment" — we'll ask one of them why. also in the programme: the us moves to force more people to take up a covid vaccine. president biden is due to say all federal employees will have to be vaccinated — or undergo regular testing —
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if they want to go to work. and, an urgent warning on the climate —

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