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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  July 29, 2021 6:00pm-6:30pm BST

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at six: prepare for more flooding and higher temperatures as scientists warn climate change is already having an impact on the uk. last year was one of britain's warmest, wettest and sunniest years ever recorded. climate change isn'tjust something that is going to happen in 2050 or we need to worry about towards the end of the century. we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. experts are calling for radical action to prevent the worst consequences of climate change. also on the programme tonight: more young people are urged to get the coronavirus vaccine — as the latest data suggests the jabs have prevented around 60,000 deaths. 32 years after the
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hillsborough disaster, a man who was caught in the crush in the stadium has died — making him the 97th victim of the tragedy. and there's no fairytale comeback for helen glover — who was going for her third gold — with team mate polly swan — just 18 months after giving birth to twins. and coming up on the bbc news channel: one half of the diving gold medal team, matty lee, has arrived home to a warm welcome. he tells us it still hasn't sunk in that he's the olympic champion. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. we've been experiencing some pretty extreme weather conditions over the last few weeks, from heatwaves to flash flooding, and scientists say climate change is a major cause of that. today, a landmark report, from the met office, confirmed that the impact of climate
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change is already being felt across the uk, and scientists are warning of the need to prepare for higher temperatures and more flooding. in the space of 30 years, the uk has become 0.9 degrees celsius warmer, and 6% wetter. 2020 was the third warmest, fifth wettest and eighth sunniest year on record — the first time all three have been in the top ten at the same time. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. the rebecca morelle reports. changes we are seeing a| dramatic. the changes we are seeing are dramatic. this week's storms leading to flash flooding in the south of england. in ilford in essex rainwater peered into the women's garden and garage, taking the family by surprise. we garden and garage, taking the family b surrise. ~ q by surprise. we turned off the electricity _ by surprise. we turned off the electricity in — by surprise. we turned off the electricity in the _ by surprise. we turned off the electricity in the garage. - by surprise. we turned off the electricity in the garage. i - by surprise. we turned off the | electricity in the garage. i tried making a barrier in the garage to store more water coming in but it
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didn't really help and we were just worried about what to do because we have never experienced anything like this before. , , ., this before. these extremes are the focus of a new— this before. these extremes are the focus of a new report _ this before. these extremes are the focus of a new report that _ this before. these extremes are the focus of a new report that assessed | focus of a new report that assessed that uk's climate in 2020, from the hottest they recorded in heathrow in london where temperatures reach 37.8 degrees, to the coldest in braemar in aberdeenshire that hit a low of minus 10.3 degrees to reign in october with the wettest day on record and wind on the isle of wight with gusts reaching over 100 mph. the report says the uk is getting warmer, wetter and sunnier. we can see very clearly _ warmer, wetter and sunnier. we can see very clearly from _ warmer, wetter and sunnier. we can see very clearly from observations . see very clearly from observations that the gatekeepers that climate is already changing so climate change is notjust something that is going to happen in 2015 or we need to worry about at the end of the century. we are seeing this in our observations now. the century. we are seeing this in our observations now.— observations now. the report compared — observations now. the report compared to _ observations now. the report compared to most _ observations now. the report compared to most recent - observations now. the report i compared to most recent three decades with the 30 years before and
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it shows the good care is warming. the darker the red the bigger the temperature increase and every is hotter by an average 0.9 degrees but east anglia and the east midlands have won by more than 1 degrees. in this map shows the changes in average rainfall. dark blue means more rain and the uk is an average of 6% wetter, but across much of scotland the increase is more than 10%. it is putting immense strain on the uk's infrastructure. extreme heat halting trains as tracks buckle. experts warn all future temperatures reaching over a0 degrees. temperatures reaching over 40 decrees. ~ ., , , temperatures reaching over 40 decrees. ~ . , , ., , degrees. what is interesting as there is lots _ degrees. what is interesting as there is lots of _ degrees. what is interesting as there is lots of data _ degrees. what is interesting as there is lots of data in - degrees. what is interesting as there is lots of data in the - degrees. what is interesting as there is lots of data in the air, l there is lots of data in the air, lots of temperature records and percentage changes, but what we are seeing ivy impacts, the impacts to us as humans, to businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of her eyes. being played out in front of her e es. ., ., ., , .,
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eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading _ eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to _ eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow - eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later- will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united will be heading to glasgow later this yearfor the united nations climate summit and we will find out if governments can't rise to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effects of climate change. we stop the worst effects of climate chan . e. ~ , ., stop the worst effects of climate chance. ~ , ., change. we need deep and rapid emissions reduction _ change. we need deep and rapid emissions reduction but - change. we need deep and rapid emissions reduction but we - change. we need deep and rapid emissions reduction but we also | change. we need deep and rapid - emissions reduction but we also need to remove the excess greenhouse gases we have put into the atmosphere which are creating these major problems today and thirdly we need to repair those parts of the climate system that have passed their tipping point.— climate system that have passed their tipping point. right now the elements show _ their tipping point. right now the elements show no _ their tipping point. right now the elements show no signs - their tipping point. right now the elements show no signs of - their tipping point. right now the| elements show no signs of letting their tipping point. right now the - elements show no signs of letting up and scientists will continue to track and analyse these events, but they warn extremes are becoming the new normal. and rebecca morelle is here now. rebecca, stark warnings today about dangers we face right now, notjust in the future? yes, that is right. we are moving away from thinking of climate change is happening in the future to some far off distant place, it is on our doorstep and it is notjust the uk.
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in the last few weeks we have had extreme heat waves in canada, wildfires in siberia, devastating floods in europe, more flooding in china, we are seeing the effects everywhere. to some extent these changes are already baked into the system. the greenhouse gases are already up there in the atmosphere. global temperatures have risen. the air is holding more moisture which means more rain but we can do things to stop it getting worse. decisions about what people eat to the transport figures to whether they fly or not, but really this is going to require some fundamental shifts, phasing out fossil fuels, to require some fundamental shifts, phasing out fossilfuels, cutting greenhouse gases to zero, and this is why the talks coming up in november and glasgow are so important. world leaders coming together to discuss climate change. scientists say we are past the point of promises and pledges, we need them to lay on the table exactly what it is every country needs to do to cut their emissions and these are going to be big changes that affect
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all of us. , m, going to be big changes that affect all of us. , . ., ~ going to be big changes that affect allofus. , ., ~ and you can get more information on how climate change could affect where you live from our website, at bbc.co.uk/news england's deputy chief medical officer, jonathan van tam, says he hopes the worst of the coronavirus pandemic is behind us — but he has warned there could be "one or two bumpy periods" ahead as autumn approaches. he has urged people who've not yet been vaccinated to come forward. the latest data from public health england suggests that covid vaccines have prevented an estimated 22 million infections and 60,000 deaths in england alone. here's our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. after the misery of many months with a pandemic, the thrill of the holidays. the nhs in england went to fir park today to encourage its younger visitors to get vaccinated. we are doing covid vaccines today. i just want to be more safe and no i
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am 0k_ just want to be more safe and no i am 0kand— just want to be more safe and no i am 0k and also when everything is open _ am 0k and also when everything is open now— am 0k and also when everything is open now i— am 0k and also when everything is open now i can have my freedom. did open nowl can have my freedom. did ou open now i can have my freedom. did you see open now i can have my freedom. you see that? open now i can have my freedom. d c you see that? there's something about being fearless when you are young and perhaps that is what is being played out with the vaccinations.— being played out with the vaccinations. ~ ., vaccinations. unlike with the older reneration vaccinations. unlike with the older generation who _ vaccinations. unlike with the older generation who went _ vaccinations. unlike with the older generation who went full - vaccinations. unlike with the older generation who went full throttle l vaccinations. unlike with the older. generation who went full throttle to get immunised a significant proportion of younger people are still dragging their feet over getting the jab and getting protected. the numbers of those being immunised are continuing to rise but there is a stark difference between the age groups. more than 30% of 18 to 29—year—olds in england still have not had a single dose of the vaccine. compare that to the over 60s were 90% have had twos. today the deputy chief medical officer was answering questions from officer was answering questions from young people on bbc news about the vaccine. i young people on bbc news about the vaccine. . , ., , .,
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vaccine. i was wondering why would i oran vaccine. i was wondering why would i or any other — vaccine. i was wondering why would i or any other young — vaccine. i was wondering why would i or any other young person _ vaccine. i was wondering why would i or any other young person be - or any other young person be inclined to get the vaccine for individual reasons? the inclined to get the vaccine for individual reasons?— inclined to get the vaccine for individual reasons? the idea that covid is less _ individual reasons? the idea that covid is less serious _ individual reasons? the idea that covid is less serious to _ individual reasons? the idea that covid is less serious to the - individual reasons? the idea thatj covid is less serious to the young is right, — covid is less serious to the young is right, but— covid is less serious to the young is right, but the idea that it is not pretty— is right, but the idea that it is not pretty serious indeed for some young _ not pretty serious indeed for some young people is sadly wrong. and then, _ young people is sadly wrong. and then, of— young people is sadly wrong. and then, of course, on top of that, there _ then, of course, on top of that, there is— then, of course, on top of that, there is the _ then, of course, on top of that, there is the risk of long covid. in there is the risk of long covid. northern there is the risk of long covid. in northern ireland that has been an enormous concern about what has been described as the incredibly slow uptake of vaccines by the under 30s and then glasgow health officials have taken the jabon a bus to hand in park in an attempt to persuade more younger people to get immunised. i more younger people to get immunised.— more younger people to get immunised. �* . , ~ immunised. i didn't really think i needed it but _ immunised. i didn't really think i needed it but i _ immunised. i didn't really think i needed it but i suppose - immunised. i didn't really think i needed it but i suppose i - immunised. i didn't really think i needed it but i suppose i am - immunised. i didn't really think i l needed it but i suppose i am going to need it for things like vaccine passports. i to need it for things like vaccine passports-— to need it for things like vaccine ”assorts. .,, ., ., , passports. i was waiting to see. i am not against — passports. i was waiting to see. i am not against it. _ passports. i was waiting to see. i am not against it. it _ passports. i was waiting to see. i am not against it. it was - passports. i was waiting to see. i am not against it. it wasjust - passports. i was waiting to see. i am not against it. it wasjust a i am not against it. it was just a case _ am not against it. it was just a case of— am not against it. it was just a case of not _ am not against it. it was just a case of not yet. am not against it. it was 'ust a case of not yet.�* am not against it. it was 'ust a case of not yet. am not against it. it was 'ust a case of not et. , . ., , case of not yet. many have not been able to enjoy — case of not yet. many have not been able to enjoy a _ case of not yet. many have not been able to enjoy a day _ case of not yet. many have not been able to enjoy a day out. _ case of not yet. many have not been able to enjoy a day out. a _ case of not yet. many have not been able to enjoy a day out. a record - able to enjoy a day out. a record number, nearly 700,000, have been
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contacted by the nhs are advising them to self—isolate and for those young people who want to continue to go out it seems increasingly likely that being double jabbed will be the key. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. the number of daily coronavirus cases has risen for the second day in a row — after a week of falls. the latest government figures show there were were 31,117 new cases in the latest 24—hour period — though that number is down on this time last week. there were, on average, 29,238 per day in the past seven days. 85 deaths were recorded in the last 24 hours, meaning an average of 71 deaths in the past week. the number of people in hospital with covid has risen slightly since yesterday — to 6,034. more than 88.4% of uk adults have now had theirfirstjab and more than 71.4% are now fully vaccinated. a 55—year—old man who suffered
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life—changing injuries after he was crushed in the crowd at hillsborough in 1989 has died — making him the 97th victim of the tragedy. andrew devine was 22 when he went to watch liverpool in the fa cup semi—final against nottingham forest. he spent the rest of his life in a wheelchair. our correspondent danny savage reports. for 97 seconds today, liverpool's players stood in silence. their tribute to another fan whose life was cut short by the hillsborough disaster. andrew devine died this week, more than three decades after sustaining crush injuries at that infamous football match aged 22. his family said... for years the chant from liverpool
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fans was "justice for the 96." this public pressure led to the hillsborough inquest, which ruled the fans were unlawfully killed. for those involved in the campaign forjustice, this is another sad milestone. they've done, you know, a lovelyjob of caring for him, looking after him for 32 years, and their carers as well have looked after andrew. they should be proud of themselves, but it's so, so sad that yet again we might have another victim on this memorial. the hillsborough memorial lists every one of the 96 who died. that number has now of course risen to 97. andrew devine's name may now be added to this tragic register, if that's what his family wishes. the 2016 inquest into the deaths at this fa cup semifinal ruled the fans were unlawfully killed. a coroner this week said andrew devine was also unlawfully
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killed, only that his injuries proved fatal so many years later. liverpool football club said... the message is that andrew devine will always be remembered by those at this club. danny savage, bbc news, liverpool. it's been a mixed day at the tokyo 0lympics for team gb. there were medals in shooting and canoeing, but disappointment for one of the country's biggest rowing stars. helen glover and her partner polly swann came fourth in the women's pair. it meant there was no fairytale comeback for helen glover, who gave birth to twins last year. from tokyo, here's our sports correspondent natalie pirks. is she going to be the first to claim an olympic c1 title? her passion for paddling began atjust five. today it was time for
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mallory franklin to ride the biggest wave of nerves. this was a cracking run with just one small mistake. and that is a fabulous performance. and back at lea valley, where she trains, her family knew just how good it was. cheering golden girl. here she goes... 0nly her nemesis, the all—conquering jess fox, could now snatch the gold. franklin's wait for her fate was a white knuckle ride in itself. it is going to fox. happy tears from the australian, on the event's 0lympic debut for women. but franklin's great leap for silver was one great leap for women's sport. it can mean so much for people and i hope that people see it now as an event that's really high class, there was some amazing paddling out there. so, silver success here, then, but away from canoe slalom, it's been a day of hits and near misses for team gb. nip and tuck, edge of the seat stuff. former rugby player matt coward—holley broke his back
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as a teenager, so turned his eye to trap shooting. he's won 0lympic bronze atjust 26. but there was to be no fairy—tale finish for helen glover and polly swann in the women's pair. glover's had three children since the last 0lympics, and swann is an nhs doctor. but the comeback medal didn't materialise. they finished fourth in glover's last games, and she had this message for her children. you can do anything you want to do. trying and failing is no problem as long as you try. five strokes, there it is... and how's this for a tight finish? britain's lightweight women's double sculls were initially shown as joint third, but they were later squeezed out of bronze by one hundredth of a second. it was britain's fifth fourth place in the rowing. oh, no! biles not often a spectator... the biggest star in gymnastics wasn't defending her 0lympic all—around title tonight for mental health reasons.
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big powerful gymnast... but in her absence, american team—mate sunisa lee grabbed the opportunity to snatch the crown. there is the new all—around champion. 16—year—old twinsjennifer and jessica gadirova were contesting their first 0lympics. jessica came tenth, britain's best performance in this competition. jennifer 13th. good landing. coming top 15 is just amazing, and doing it with jess as well, like, i couldn't ask for more, really. and if you've won only your country's second olympic gold in history, there are many ways to celebrate, but this is the most beautiful. they sing fiji soothing our souls with a hymn called we have 0vercome. an olympic metaphor if ever there was one. natalie pirks, bbc news, tokyo. more than 50 competitors
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and officials from the australian 0lympic athletics team briefly went into isolation in tokyo over coronavirus fears. they were confined to their rooms for two hours after several came into contact with the us pole vaulter sam kendricks, a two—time world champion who's tested positive and is now out of the games. so at the end of day six of the games, team gb remains sixth in the medals table, with five golds and 18 medals in total. the time is coming up to 20 past six. 0urtop the time is coming up to 20 past six. our top story this evening... scientists say climate change is already having an impact in the uk with the prospect of more flooding and higher temperatures. coming up... double gold medallist tom dean tells us his 0lympic achievements have yet to sink in. coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel... good news in the gymnastics, with team gb'sjessica gadirova recording the best ever result by a british woman in
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an olympic all—around final, finishing in tenth. thousands of women are made homeless every year across the uk. for many of them it's because of domestic abuse — fleeing violent partners, often with their children. but a new report says the strong link between women being abused and ending up homeless is often not talked about enough and far more needs to be done to protect them. it says they should be given more help, for example, to stay in their home while their abuser is moved away. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. he wouldn't leave. he'd locked me in the house. it was then that i had to pay him money for me to escape, basically. among many instances of abuse, liana fairfax was held hostage by a former partner. i went back later that evening. all my clothes had been cut up. they had been set on fire in the back garden.
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all my electricals had been put in the bath with water in. ijust remember feeling extremely scared, because ijust didn't know where he was. his behaviour led to leanna and her young children being left homeless on three separate occasions, but instead of understanding, she was often blamed. in my case, it was often portrayed as a failure to parent. and that would be then reflected, for example, in social services notes as "the children seemed untidy and unkempt." but that wasn't through a fault of my own. i was asking for support. i was in a vulnerable place. too often, says today's report, the strong link between homelessness and violence isn't appreciated, with survivors of abuse continually treated as a problem. every woman that approaches a homelessness service, it should be in the back of the service's mind that this woman could have experienced some form of violence. i don't think that straightaway they should be asked to recall the details of that,
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because that's something that should be done, you know, once there is a relationship there and once the woman feels safe. one recent survivor of domestic violence told me of a common problem. the abuser remains in the home. it would have been far. easier for him to leave, but he didn't want to. and i didn't see any way or means for me to get him out. _ the perpetrator�*s refusal to move left her with no option. i put my boys in the car, - i put my blankets in the car, and i drove as far as i could, because ijust wanted to bel somewhere where i felt we'd be safe. and how about safety planning? this yorkshire charity resettles women from all over the country, providing safe accommodation and ongoing support. 0h, right, so do you want to register for housing - in this area, then? such good practice should be spread further afield, after ministers in england announced new investment in helping
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domestic abuse survivors access women—only housing. liana fairfax has rebuilt her life. the 32—year—old is about to start a phd. her studies affording her a new perspective. i was a victim of domestic violence, and regardless of whatever i might have done or whatever had happened, i didn't deserve this. michael buchanan, bbc news. the rnli says it has been overwhelmed by a "huge level of support" following accusations its work is assisting migrants. the lifeboat charity received over £200,000 in donations in 24 hours after it posted rescue footage on social media. downing street has praised its "vital work". a national holocaust memorial is to be built next to the houses of parliament. the proposals — which include 23 large bronze sculptures — were previously rejected by westminster council, but the government has ruled
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in favour of its go—ahead. the board of deputies of britishjews said it was "delighted". the bbc has announced that jodie whittaker is going to leave doctor who in the autumn of next year. the actor was the first female doctor and has been playing the role since 2017. the bassist dusty hill — seen here on the left playing with his band 22 top — has died, aged 72. known for his bushy beard and ever—present sunglasses, dusty hill played as part of the trio for more than 50 years — releasing 19 albums, with hit singles like gimme all your lovin', sleeping bag, and viva las vegas. the number of people on furlough has fallen sharply to below two million, with younger people coming off the scheme twice as fast as any other age group. at the peak of the pandemic, nearly nine million people were on furlough — at the end ofjune it was down to 1.9. the scheme will be wound up by the end of september. and from next week firms
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are being asked to make a bigger contribution. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports. leah bailey has been able to spend a lot more time with little ava than she was expecting. after maternity leave, she had 11 months on furlough. then this april she took a call from her manager. she hit me with the news that i'm at risk of being made redundant. two or three weeks later i got the phone call. "i'm so sorry, leah, but you're being made redundant." she said, "i tried my hardest to try and find, juggle people's jobs around in the office to kind of find you stuff, but there is not enough work for the people in the office." and that's hard when you'd been on furlough for so long, hoping and expecting to go back into work. i burst out crying. it was really scary. i had a little girl to support and i had a roof over our heads to do and bills to pay. it was horrible.
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jo has been on the other end of those decisions throughout the pandemic. she runs this small promotions company in stockport and says decisions around furlough have been really hard. my team have been with me a long time. you know, most of them have worked for me for years, you know them very well, you know their family circumstances, you're trying to weigh up perhaps some of their financial circumstances. who can you keep in? who can you not? because the business has changed so dramatically this year, to stay on topjo says she's had to let one person go. we had a member of staff that had been with me a few years, but i really felt that it was an account management role and ijust felt that that wasn't what the business was going to need. from next week businesses are going to have to start paying more for every member of staff still not back at work, forcing many companies to start making those difficult choices. today's figures show fewer people on furlough than ever before,
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with the real boost coming as hospitality and retail opened up again. but for the 1.9 million people still on furlough, the risk of redundancy is increasing. leah has had an extra mountain to climb. maternity leave and then furlough meant nearly two years out of the workplace. after a couple of months searching, she's managed to find a newjob. yeah, it was just one of those things, you have to do it, don't you, especially when you've got children, you just have to get on with it, you have to do it, you have to be strong for them. colletta smith, bbc news, in rochdale. this was maidenhead, in berkshire in the very early hours of monday morning — the family and friends of the british swimmer tom dean as he was going for gold. these images went viral on social media — and showjust how much the olympics mean notjust to the athletes but to everyone around them.
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and tom did of course win not just one, but two gold medals at the games, becoming the first british male swimmer in 113 years to do so. he has been taking to our sports editor dan roan about his whirlwind past few days. tom dean, you've just won the olympic games 200 metres freestyle. congratulations on everything that has happened the last couple of days. how do you reflect on it now? it's been a whirlwind, and even now it's not really sinking in. i woke up this morning and i looked at these two gold medals and i thought, you know, they are actually mine, so it's amazing. did you surprise yourself? you can't go into it thinking you're not going to be able to do it, because then you have kind of written yourself off at that point already, so the 200, it was going to be tight. luckily i got my hand on that wall first. four hundredths separating us both, i think it's really fingertip stuff. cheering i must ask you about the video of your family back home, because it's gone viral, of course. cheering he laughs my mum's going crazy, oh, my god. who can you see there?
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i can see all my family, i can see my neighbour. all my brothers and sisters. i could watch this video so many times, honestly. see, i thought it would be, you know, one or two neighbours or something like that. and i look and it'sjust, it looked like half of maidenhead were there. it was amazing. cheering i always had a hunch that my mum would put on a big party. she loves putting on a big party, and i think that shows how much it means to people back home. i must ask you about covid quickly, because lots has been written about this recovery. how ill were you? i think i was the first athlete in any olympic sport within great britain to have a reinfection case. right. you know, i'm coughing and wheezing and i'm doing a sport that requires so heavily on your lungs and heart. i'm thinking, how am i going to be able to get back to the brutal training that it requires? but luckily no long lasting effects, and here i am hopefully with it behind me for good. this is wonderful. duncan scott, can you get the world record?
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it's gold to great britain. well done, guys. tom dean is a double olympic champion. i mean, how wonderful was it to have that as well and to get a second? like a dream come true. the four guys i shared the podium with were the four best guys i could possibly imagine. swimming's right up there, very, very competitive, so this is a major achievement by great britain. this is it for us, and if we can put on a good show here, i think it's going tojust bring up the sport within the country and get it into kind of the limelight a bit more, which is where it should be, and kind of bring it into the centre of people's focus, because team gb and british swimming are here to stay. tom dean speaking to dan roan. what a has had. time for a look at the weather. here's helen willets. i'm not sure you will like this one. i'm not sure you will like this one. i have a named storm. after all the heat and the thunderstorms now we have an amber warning from the met office because of this rapidly office because of this rapidly deepening area of low pressure,
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bearing down on the south—west and it is going to give quite a battering and the concern is we have lots of people on staycation, camping and caravans, these wind speeds more into autumn but they could bring down trees and damaged power lines, even bring them down, certainly bringing some disruptive conditions across the isles of scilly and gomel through the night but many parts of the south—west of england along with generally the south—west of the uk will have quite a windy night, a stormy night. some sunshine ahead. still if you thunderstorms across north as you can see here, they will certified white, but as well as the winds, thatis white, but as well as the winds, that is what the amber warning is poor because of the strength of the winds, we will get quite a soaking through the night. but is not limited to lows of us, that will affect many parts of england and wales. gales is gliding through the night stop starting to ease their way eastwards as well, all—around this storm system here. wet and windy, while the storms further north tend to ease overnight a bit
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of cloud holding the temperatures up but with all this going on in the south it is not going to be a cold night. it does mean a really unsettled day tomorrow. even though the winds don't look as process further east there are still some yellow warnings from the met office for some unseasonably windy weather, 50 mph gust of wind, they start to ease in the morning further south and west but lots of rain slow moving, showers, thunder and lightning, gusty winds. if you were across scotland and northern ireland but not exempt, a cool breeze blowing across northern scotland is a sign of things to come as we head into the weekend. temperature about 17-20, into the weekend. temperature about 17—20, down on today in the south with a lot more cloud and wind. in the evening and overnight the storm system will blow out into the north sea but look at what is heading our way, the northerly breeze. you look at the weekend but still some showers around. certainly not settled.

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