Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 29, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

5:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm clive myrie. the headlines... england's deputy chief medical officer, tells bbc news, that covid vaccines have saved around 60,000 lives across the country, and prevented 22 million new infections. that's truly massive. and the benefit of vaccines is in that secret work that you never see, because if people don't go into hospital and they don't die, you never see that. new cases in the uk have now risen over 31,000, while there were 85 deaths, in the latest 24—hour period. scientists warn the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects of climate change, with more rain, more sunshine, and higher temperatures.
5:01 pm
team gb secure two more medals at the tokyo games — bronze in the men's trap shooting and silver in the women's canoe slalom. it can mean so much for people, and i hope people see women now as an event that is really high class, there was some amazing paddling out there. and a change to saturday night tv. it's goodbye tojodie whittaker as dr who, and goodbye, to itv�*s the x—factor. good afternoon. england's deputy chief medical officer, jonathan van—tam, has told the bbc that the covid vaccination programme has saved around 60,000 lives across the country, and prevented around 22 million new infections.
5:02 pm
he announced the figures from public health england, while answering questions on vaccines from listeners to bbc newsbeat. let's hear what he had to say: there's some new data coming out today. i'm going to break the news here. i don't think it's out actually until another few minutes, but the latest public health england analysis shows that because of the vaccines and because of this massive third wave we've had, actually what the vaccines have done is they've prevented in total, since we got them, 22 million cases of covid infection and 60,000 deaths. so, you know, that's truly massive. let's talk to robert west, a member of the independent group let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures for the uk — a further 31,117 new infections have been recorded.
5:03 pm
and that 85 people have died within 28 days of a positive test. 0verall, more than 46.7 million people have received their first dose of a covid vaccine, with over 37 million, having received two doses. lets talk to robert cough. figures going up again, not what people were hoping for a given the numbers of days we've had where fingers have dutch figures have been going down? we had phenomenal news for a week, every day going down, but that's very unusual. it's best not to look at the day on date changes. if we bring up a figure that shows how figures have been looking over the last while, the news is still good even though we are seeing fluctuations day today which is be expected. the 31,000 cases we've had reported today is still lower than the 38,000 cases reported a week ago — and that's a better measure to look at. every week, look at where
5:04 pm
the numbers are going in the longer term rather than day—to—day. in the news is still good with regards to people going in hospitals, seeing 930 - it's people going in hospitals, seeing 930 — it's been hovering around 900 the last week, maybe the growth is slowing down a bit, we saw cases fall in scotland, than ten days later her hospitalisation started to turn, which is what we are looking for in england. 15 turn, which is what we are looking for in england-— for in england. is that really not the crucial _ for in england. is that really not the crucial fixture _ for in england. is that really not the crucial fixture we _ for in england. is that really not the crucial fixture we should - for in england. is that really not the crucial fixture we should be| the crucial fixture we should be keeping an eye on, as well as you say, the longer—term trends over may be seven days are further than that was back but also looking at the numbers of hospitalisations? it's that link between infections and numbers going into hospital that's really critical.— really critical. absolutely. it tells us what's _ really critical. absolutely. it tells us what's really - really critical. absolutely. it tells us what's really going l really critical. absolutely. it l tells us what's really going on really critical. absolutely. it - tells us what's really going on with the cases, it tells us about sickness, people testing positive, and the pressure that the pandemic is putting on the nhs. so the admissions give us so much information about what's going on in the pandemic, but itjust takes a little bit longerfor
5:05 pm
the pandemic, but itjust takes a little bit longer for that data to come in, so people will have to wait an extra week or ten days before they can validate those exciting or terrifying numbers they see on a day—to—day basis. terrifying numbers they see on a day-to-day basis.— terrifying numbers they see on a day-to-day basis. have we been able to cive a day-to-day basis. have we been able to give a clear — day-to-day basis. have we been able to give a clear enough _ day-to-day basis. have we been able to give a clear enough explanation i to give a clear enough explanation for why we saw seven days where the numbers were coming down, even though we've unlocked in lots of ways over the recent period? i think it's probably — ways over the recent period? i think it's probably still _ ways over the recent period? i think it's probably still a _ ways over the recent period? i think it's probably still a mystery. - ways over the recent period? i think it's probably still a mystery. when l it's probably still a mystery. when you ask all the experts in the field, there's plenty of reasons and hypotheses that people are advancing, but we don't know for sure what caused it, and i must say the effect of people going on holiday and night clubs opening, they still need to play through in they still need to play through in the data and we still need to be sure exactly how fast the epidemic is falling. i think people are confident the last week has been a genuine fall, so the question is, will that fall continue, stabilise, or go back up? we will that fall continue, stabilise, or go back up?— or go back up? we live it there, thank you. _ or go back up? we live it there, thank you, robert _ or go back up? we live it there, thank you, robert -- _ or go back up? we live it there, thank you, robert -- leave - or go back up? we live it there, - thank you, robert -- leave it there.
5:06 pm
thank you, robert —— leave it there. professorjohnson van tam urged people to get more vaccinations, and holidays abroad may be dependent on the jabs in the future. it's a problem faced by many in the future. let's talk to robert west, a member of the independent group of scientists offering the government advice on pandemics — known as spi—b. he's also professor of human psychology at university college london. hello to you, thank you forjoining us. first of all, jonathan van tam's assertion that 60,000 lives across england have been saved as a result of the vaccination programme, 22 million new infections have been prevented — is it possible to calculate accurately that kind of stuff? i calculate accurately that kind of stuff? ., , , calculate accurately that kind of stuff? . , , ., , stuff? i mean, pretty accurately, we now have a — stuff? i mean, pretty accurately, we now have a lot— stuff? i mean, pretty accurately, we now have a lot of _ stuff? i mean, pretty accurately, we now have a lot of information - stuff? i mean, pretty accurately, we now have a lot of information about| now have a lot of information about what the infection rates are under certain conditions when, you know, you've got a restriction at a certain level, and we know what the
5:07 pm
infection, hospitalisation ratio is, we know at the mortality rate is. that has changed dramatically. we've certainly not been able to open up the economy in the way that we had if it weren't for the vaccine. {lila if it weren't for the vaccine. 0k, vaccines it's _ if it weren't for the vaccine. 0k, vaccines it's clear _ if it weren't for the vaccine. 0k, vaccines it's clear are _ if it weren't for the vaccine. 0k, vaccines it's clear are working. but there's still lots of hesitancy out there, lots of people who don't want to take it. we know with the french are doing, a big old stick — you will be able to go eat in a restaurant or go to the cinema, and so on. in america, they had various measures including lotto wins, you could win money on the lottery, and so on and so forth to control people. now they are becoming more aggressive it seems, and president biden has asserted federal workers will have to have the vaccine if they want to return to work. you're a professor of psychology, what's the best way?— the best way? ideally if you want eo - le to the best way? ideally if you want peeple to do _ the best way? ideally if you want people to do something, - the best way? ideally if you want people to do something, you - the best way? ideally if you want. people to do something, you want the best way? ideally if you want - people to do something, you want to get them on board with the idea of doing it. you want people to be
5:08 pm
intrinsically motivated because i think it's a good idea. and i think the problem we faced — and other countries have had this as well, particularly as you've got younger people getting involved — is that risk—benefit equation has not been properly explained to them, and i think we've still got a long way to go in this country in terms of making sure that young people have the information they need to make an informed decision before you start getting into these sorts of extrinsic rewards, in effect punishing them for not taking up the vaccine or offering incentives to do so. we are a long way from young people being able to make an informed decision.— people being able to make an informed decision. really? i mean professor. — informed decision. really? i mean professor, this _ informed decision. really? i mean professor, this pandemic - informed decision. really? i mean professor, this pandemic has - informed decision. really? i mean| professor, this pandemic has gone informed decision. really? i mean . professor, this pandemic has gone on for 18 months. we know from the figures that 60,000 lives saved in the uk, 20 million infections prevented — the evidence is out
5:09 pm
there, at the end of the day their people who simply do not want to get this. what do we do about that, do we force them perhaps? ha. this. what do we do about that, do we force them perhaps? no. those firures we force them perhaps? no. those figures don't _ we force them perhaps? no. those figures don't really _ we force them perhaps? no. those figures don't really mean _ we force them perhaps? no. those figures don't really mean anything | figures don't really mean anything to a young person who is making a personal risk—benefit calculation. what they know and what they've been told with some degree of accuracy is that the virus is something that mainly affects other people, older people, people with pre—existing conditions. what they don't know is what their own personal risk is, and what their own personal risk is, and what they've also not been fully explained is the risks of the vaccine. when i do that to young people i know, family members or friends, you give them the figure, then the benefit risk equation for them as an individual is so strong and obvious that they go, "0k,
5:10 pm
them as an individual is so strong and obvious that they go, "ok, i understand it now, why did nobody say that before?" it's not that most of these young people are anti—vaxxers or anything like that, but they're getting all sorts of confusing bastions democrat messages from the government —— and information. the government needs to do more to improve the clarity of the messaging from medical science. in america, companies like apple, facebook, twitter is a you won't be able to come back to work if you haven't had a vaccine. should british businesses be doing the same think was yellow i don't think so. we aren't at that point. especially when you're trying to encourage or support people to do things, as i said in the beginning. it’s support people to do things, as i said in the beginning.— said in the beginning. it's much better to do — said in the beginning. it's much better to do it _ said in the beginning. it's much better to do it from _ said in the beginning. it's much better to do it from a _ said in the beginning. it's much i better to do it from a perspective of getting them to understand why it's important, and then for them to want to do it rather than for them to feel cajoled into doing it. there are all sorts of negative
5:11 pm
consequences to this approach, not least people who will gain the system, but it also causes resentment and unfairness is in any qualities. and it's the last thing you should do. we aren't even close to being in a situation where we would need to do that. if we had a proper public information campaign, i'm quite sure that people would come up many more young people would take the vaccine if the facts were explained to them. you take the vaccine if the facts were explained to them.— take the vaccine if the facts were explained to them. you say we aren't an here explained to them. you say we aren't anywhere near _ explained to them. you say we aren't anywhere near close _ explained to them. you say we aren't anywhere near close enough - explained to them. you say we aren't anywhere near close enough to - explained to them. you say we aren't| anywhere near close enough to having to use a stick, but vaccine take—up rates are falling in england, aren't they? rates are falling in england, aren't the ? , . rates are falling in england, aren't the ? , , rates are falling in england, aren't the? ,, ., they? they are because we are not ex-alainin they? they are because we are not exoiaining the _ they? they are because we are not explaining the faxed _ they? they are because we are not explaining the faxed to _ they? they are because we are not explaining the faxed to them, - they? they are because we are not explaining the faxed to them, and | explaining the faxed to them, and thatis explaining the faxed to them, and that is the government must �*s possibility democrat responsibility. i think a multi—million pound programme, public health england led to explain the vaccine of what is your own personal risk, what are the personal benefits and the people around you to society? because the
5:12 pm
vaccination also reduces infection rates. we would get a bigger take—up after that. rates. we would get a bigger take—up afterthat. i rates. we would get a bigger take-up after that. ., , , ., after that. i feel a big youth tarueted after that. i feel a big youth targeted take-up _ after that. i feel a big youth i targeted take-up programme after that. i feel a big youth _ targeted take-up programme coming. targeted take—up programme coming. thank you. the impact of climate change is already being felt across the uk, with more rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. these are the findings of the latest state of the uk climate report, from the met office. it says that 2020 was the third—warmest year since 1884. it was also the fifth wettest. in fact, six of the ten wettest years have been since 1998. last year was also the eighth sunniest on record. the experts say overrall in the space of 30 years, the uk has become 0.9 celsius warmer and 6% wetter. the report's lead author, mike kendon, warns "we are going to see more and more extreme weather such as heatwaves and floods" as the climate continues to warm.
5:13 pm
with the latest, here's our science correspondent, rebecca morelle. dramatic changes in our skies. in 2020, the uk experienced a year of extremes. from storms in february, which caused chaos across the country, to a summer heatwave where temperatures sweltered above 3a degrees for six consecutive days, and rain in october with the uk's wettest day on record. it is all charted in an annual assessment of the climate which found the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our observations that the uk's climate is already changing, so climate change isn't something that will happen in 2050 or something we need to worry about towards the end of the century, we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. the report compared the most recent three decades with the 30 years before and found that on average
5:14 pm
the uk was 0.9 degrees hotter. for rainfall, the country was on average 6% wetter and 2020 was the eighth sunniest year recorded in the last 100 years. new defences are under construction, like this tidal barrier in lincolnshire, to cope with future storm surges. but the reality is flooding is having a devastating impact now with some homes being flooded again and again, changes that seem small having a big effect on people's lives. what's interesting about this report is there's lots of data in there, so there's lots of temperature records and percentage changes, but actually what we are seeing are the impacts — the impact to us as humans, to our businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of our eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united nations climate summit and we'll find out if governments can rise to the challenge of cutting
5:15 pm
emissions to stop the worst effects of climate change. right now, the elements show no signs of letting up, with this week's flash floods taking london by surprise. scientists will continue to track and analyse these events, but they warn that extremes are becoming the new norm. rebecca morrelle, bbc news. i'm nowjoined by sirjohn armitt, who is the chair of the national infrastructure commission. thank you very much for being with us. ijust wonder as thank you very much for being with us. i just wonder as a thank you very much for being with us. ijust wonder as a nation, are we anywhere near ready for this change in our climate infrastructure wise? 0r change in our climate infrastructure wise? or be able to deal with it? == wise? or be able to deal with it? -- are we wise? or be able to deal with it? » are we able kudela we need to we've seen the impacts and we've been recommending the government now steps which can be taken to make small resilience towards this. for example, in terms of the hot weather
5:16 pm
and risk of drought, we need to reduce the leakage from our systems and build new capacity for storage of water, and we need to try and reduce the amount that we use ourselves when it comes to floods, we recommended the national standard for the country of resilience against flooding and a rolling six year programme of investment in flood protection. the government has recently announced the five year programme, we think that needs to be done every five years, so there needs to be a programme with dealing with relief from floods. of course we are trying to reduce emissions, steps are being taken with electrical vehicles reducing the amount of c02 which is going into the air, which will help us to contain that increase in temperature. what the government needs to do is encourage and make sure we have the infrastructure in place so that we can use those electric vehicles, and we need to make our energy systems resilient against these changes in the
5:17 pm
climate, and make sure that that's in place. that can be done by regulating demands that the energy companies demand through stress testing that they are making sure their infrastructure will be fit and able to stand up to these increasing extremes we are facing. it's not a once in a moment thing, we will have to fight with this over the next 20-30 to fight with this over the next 20—30 years. to fight with this over the next 20-30 years-— 20-30 years. what you say consistently _ 20-30 years. what you say consistently fight _ 20-30 years. what you say consistently fight and - 20-30 years. what you say i consistently fight and struggle 20-30 years. what you say - consistently fight and struggle with this — is part of the problem that, because this is been going on for so long, man—made global warming and the effects on our planet, it's difficult for ordinary people, for many people to actually see the effects of this until it hits home? and it's really only in the last few years, according to the met, that this is hitting home with much wetter summers? we saw flooding and lots of areas around the country, and with much more mild winters? that's absolutely right, the
5:18 pm
committee of climate change, the met office giving us very clear 0ffice giving us very clear scientific analysis to show that this is not something which will just go away, therefore we have to face up to that with government, we have to face up to that the operators of infra structure have to face up to it, we have to plan and prove the resilience of our systems, and we have to invest in that. we must make sure there's as much focus on maintenance for example, which often gets forgotten to start clearing out our drains as the first step we can do to make sure we are reducing the risk of flooding. it requires a whole series of actions, accommodation of government working with industry and a regulator, and we as numbers of the public doing our bit to make sure we do what we can do, that we reduce the amount of water that we perhaps need to use, to reduce the impact of droughts. at the same time, we switch to using less heat in our homes or we
5:19 pm
recognise we need to change to electrical vehicles rather than patchell. we announced new greenhouse gas removal technologies today which we feel we need to develop to scale, we need... so we can actually report... we've got a 30 year programme to ensure that by 2050, we are fit for purpose, we all have a part to play in that, and that i think it's something which young people, as you mentioned in the earlier piece are increasingly recognising that we all have to play our part in this. climate change is here and we have to make our planet fit for future for everyone. and we can do that, but it requires concerted efforts, otherwise continuous levels of investment. but we all have a part to play and we can keep on top of this, but it's just continuous drive which we all
5:20 pm
take part in. just continuous drive which we all take part in-_ take part in. you made that point 'ust then, take part in. you made that point just then. it _ take part in. you made that point just then, it requires _ take part in. you made that point just then, it requires investment | take part in. you made that point| just then, it requires investment - just then, it requires investment — what would you say to those people who would argue we've just borrowed half a trillion quid to deal with the pandemic, we've got much more immediate problems and concerns, and that there are other things we need to worry about. frankly, this may be a problem in some people's mines, it may not be, but it's not a problem we should be spending money on now? dealing with all of this creates jobs, it creates opportunity, it makes us a fitter nation in every respect. it doesn't all have to be the government's money. at the end of the day, all money comes from the public in one form or another, either we pay our taxes or we buy things, we pay for our electricity. the regulator is there to make sure we get the right balance between investing for the future and the private sector, while at the same time dealing with the resilience
5:21 pm
that's needed it and keeping the bills at sensible proportions. we shouldn't shy away from the fact that this will cost money, and we all have a part to play, we need to spend that money wisely and make sure it spent sensibly. but we can't run away from this, these are opportunities for the uk to lead the world and create jobs, opportunities for the uk to lead the world and createjobs, and opportunities for the uk to lead the world and create jobs, and therefore we have to be up for it. and i believe that with collaboration — this isn'tjust the government or the private sector, orjust the civilian, we all have a part to play, and if the government takes the lead and gets this working, then we have a chance of dealing with this. mi we have a chance of dealing with this. �* ., this. all right, we will leave it there, this. all right, we will leave it there. sir— this. all right, we will leave it there, sirjohn. _ this. all right, we will leave it there, sirjohn. good - this. all right, we will leave it there, sirjohn. good to - this. all right, we will leave it there, sirjohn. good to talk i this. all right, we will leave it | there, sirjohn. good to talk to there, sirjohn. good to talk to you, thanks forjoining us. there, sirjohn. good to talk to you, thanks forjoining us. you, thanks for “oining us. thank ou. team gb have won more medals in at the olympics games. my colleague lucy hockings has the latest from tokyo.
5:22 pm
we have a new star at the olympics, she will be a household name for sure in the next 2a hours, because sunisa lee from team usa has won the women's all—around gymnastics event in the last hour or so. it's one of those events that everyone looks forward to because of the sheer talent and skill that's so obviously on display. and this event was under quite a lot of scrutiny because simone biles pulled out of the competition, citing her mental health. but this is sunisa lee, she's outstanding — it's the fifth time in a row we've seen a us gymnast winning the event, she's only 18 years old, and she's made history for other reasons, as well. she's become the first american from the hmong community to win a gold medal at these olympic games. and while we're talking about simone biles, as well, the stadiums here are empty, of course, but team usa had a lot of their support staff in the stands, and one of the loudest voices you could hear was that of simone biles cheering on the team. team gb has had a good day again today, with mallory franklin
5:23 pm
becoming only the second british woman to win a medal in olympic canoe slalom, taking silver in the c1 class. the 27—year—old is a former world champion and multiple medallist at all levels, but had been denied a shot at olympic glory before the category was included for the first time here. the other big story here in tokyo is what's happening with coronavirus infection rates. they've hit a new high, nearly 4,000 — that's twice the daily level we were seeing here a week ago. 0lympic officials at a press conference this morning were telling us that there is no evidence that the games have actually contributed to the rise, and we are also seeing injapanese media this evening here in tokyo for the very first time, the national daily coronavirus cases have exceeded 10,000 — that is the first time we've seen that. so a lot of concern here injapan about this rise in rates, the numbers go up every day. let's get more on this
5:24 pm
from william pesek, an american columnist based in tokyo. can you put these cases in perspective for us? for some countries they would still seem so low, but how are they being seen injapan, relative to how the hospitals and health care systems can cope? these numbers are off the charts certainly and there is a sense of, here we go, because there were a lot of predictions that we would see a very big ramping up of cases and we are seeing that as we speak. as you mention, the caseloads here from the us, relative to japan, has not had a bad covid experience but the idea of having this massive, in—person, 80,000 people arriving from around the world into a country that is getting better with vaccinations but is still behind the curve was always quite a big risk, and we don't really know where we'll be a month from now,
5:25 pm
so there is this kind of sense here that people were worried about this happening and it is happening. 0lympic officials say it is not the olympics that is causing this rise in infections. are they simply ignoring the fact that the japanese are winning gold medals? people are gathering together to watch the olympics and they're hearing a mixed message? on one hand, stay inside, on the other hand, here are all the athletes performing in these venues. it isn'tjust the ioc, it's the government, as well. the prime ministers, when asked about rising covid cases, he smiles and says, we are winning all these medals, and there is this kind of schizophrenia here because you see people excited about the fact japan suddenly has something to celebrate, the economy has not been great for years and nowjapan is beating china, the us, south korea and people think, "shouldn't we be celebrating"? —— should we be celebrating?
5:26 pm
"look at all this hardship in the world, cases in our city and our country are surging, where might we be in six weeks?" there is this kind of schizophrenia between celebration and trepidation. what's the situation with testing injapan? i notice it's an incredibly expensive place to get a coronavirus test. do you suspect the figures every day are a true reflection of what's happening? we've always known the cases were a lot higher. tests are harder to get, reservations are difficult to get and expensive. what we've looked at morris hospitalisations and the extent to which the health care system was stretched and at the moment it is quite stretched, so in many ways the caseload probably is a lot higher than we know and with the delta variant, who knows where we will be in six weeks or four weeks, but the delta variant is tearing through asia, tearing throuthapan, showing up all over the country.
5:27 pm
we've seen four different prefectures today announce states of emergency as well, so japan is not moving in the right direction and the medals are terrific, but who knows what to expect four weeks from now? william, thank you for your thoughts. that's the feeling here at the moment, things possibly under control right now, but what about the autumn as infection rates keep going up? in terms of the olympics, sunisa lee, the 18—year—old from the usa, the first member of the hmong community to represent the usa at the olympics, taking gold with a simone biles watching from the stand. those are the images being beamed around the world at the moment. lucy reporting for us there. there are now under two million people still on furlough — a drop of almost 600,000 since may, and the lowest level since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. the under—25s are leaving the scheme
5:28 pm
faster than any other age group, but it's unclear whether they're heading back into full time work. furlough is being reduced with employers expected to pay more, but some are warming this could triggerjob losses as firms struggle to meet the costs. here's our consumer affairs correspondent, colletta smith. all the data we are seeing about the labour market is really positive. a year ago, labour market is really positive. a yearago, people labour market is really positive. a year ago, people were expecting unemployment to peak in our country at 12%, 19805 unemployment to peak in our country at 12%, 1980s style levels. if you ask them now, they think it will peak at a level half of that — so that's 2 million fewer people that we feared a year ago. so actually, it is working, unemployment in the country is lower than most of our competitive nations. in the last few months ofjobs data has shown huge increases in the number of people going back to work. so i'm enormously encouraged by all that. rishi sunak speaking earlier today.
5:29 pm
the number of people being told to isolate by the nhs covid app has reached another record high — with almost 700,000 alerts sent in england and wales in the seven days to 21 july. the 11% rise on the previous week comes as new figures from the nhs test and trace programme show the number of positive tests in england has climbed to its highest level since mid—january. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. hello. there's a stormy evening i had for parts of southeast england where there is my office morning i had. but the wind strengths we're anticipating could break down trees and power lines, and they are very big concerns for those sleeping under canvas and caravans. as well as that, it'll be wet notjust in the southwest, but across many southern parts of england, then into central areas across wales, as well, 30 mm of rain. we've had some heavy
5:30 pm
showers further north, they will tend to ease later on but pepper up in a few spots tomorrow. england and wales further showers of rain, and starting very windy and the southwest but the strongest winds migrating into southern and eastern areas. a notch down on those in the southwest, but still unusually windy for the time of year, and tempering things with the day of course.
5:31 pm
the headlines... england's deputy chief medical 0fficerjonathan van tam tells bbc news that covid vaccines have prevented 22 million cases in the country — and 60,000 deaths. that's truly massive, and the benefits of vaccines is in that kind of secret work that you never see it, because if people don't go into hospital and they don't die, you never see that. new cases in the uk have now risen to over 31,000, while there were 85 deaths, in the latest 24 hour period. scientists warn that the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects of climate change — with increased rainfall, more sunshine — and higher temperatures. canoeist mallory franklin secures a silverfor team gb in the women's slalom
5:32 pm
event in tokyo. and there was a bronze for matt coward—holley in men's trap shooting. and it's goodbye doctor — it's confirmed that jodie whittaker will step down from the role next year. sport and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good evening. day six in tokyo has ended with team gb sitting in sixth in the medals table. no golds today, but two more medals nonetheless take them to 18 in total. mallory franklin got a silver on her 0lympic debut in the women's canoe slalom, an event that was also appearing at the games for the first time. franklin went early in the final and posted a time that saw her lead the competition right until the final paddler. and a flawless display from australia'sjessica fox, meant the brit had to settle for silver. franklin is a legacy of london 2012, as she's been training
5:33 pm
at the lee valley white water centre built for those games. it was really cool, it was so stressful being sat up there on the start line, but ijust had a moment where i was like this is actually really cool. i wouldn't want to be anywhere else right now. the camera was panning around me, psychotic limb stand smiled in it. it reminded me of the environment and how crazy it all is, but it's just really cool the other medal today came courtesy of matt coward—holley won won bronze in the men's trap shooting. he is the world and european champion, but paid the price for a slow start, missing three of his first 10 targets. the brit recovered with 14 successive hits to climb onto the podium. elsewhere, america's sunisa lee has won the coveted women's all around gymnastics title. the 18 year old secured the gold with her fourth discipline on the floo, but her uneven bars was the feature of her competition as lee finished just ahead of brazil's rebeca andrade, who won her country's first ever medal in women's gymnastics. lee was supported throughout by simone biles, who watched on from the sidelines
5:34 pm
alongside her other american teammates. this was one of the four gold medals biles won in rio, but she withdrew from the competiton in tokyo to focus on her mental health. the gadirova twins, jessica and jennifer finshed in 10th and 13th respectively for team gb, with their vaults providing the best score of their events. this isjessica. and her result is the best achieved by a british woman in the all around competition at the 0lympcis. i still can't believe it. like, coming away with a bronze, top 15 isjust amazing, and doing it withjess as well, i couldn't ask for more really. and the day has also been affected by coronavirus. 0n the eve of the track and field events beginning. sam kendricks, the world pole vault champion, has withdrawn from the games, having tested postive. he had been expected
5:35 pm
to contend for a medal in tokyo, while his rival from argentina german chiaraviglio has also contracted the virus. kendricks' positive meant that the whole australian track and field team had to temporarily isolate because three of them were determined to be close contacts. those three have tested negative, while the rest have returned to training. tea m team usa, you are my team, i will always be rooting for the red white and blue. enjoy the olympics, have a good time. miss me if you want, but i will be on the road shortly after to compete in every other event, and hopefully we will all have fine come careers. 0n hopefully we will all have fine come careers. on a final note, my friend, maps, birthplace in the united states olympic trials, i would hope you would get on a plane soon and come compete in my stead. away from the olympics, the british and irish lions face south africa in the second test on saturday. but there's been an extraordinary outburst from the springboks' director of rugby rassie erasmus. he posted an hour—long monologue on social media where he rails against the refereeing in last weekend's series opener, which the lions
5:36 pm
won by 22 points to 17. he said he wanted to make sure his side got an "equal chance" in the next game. among his complaints, he said the referee didn't give the south africa players the same level of respect as the visitors. lions captain alun wyn jones doesn't agree. he didn't really have any... felt we had any— he didn't really have any... felt we had any advantage, because a lot of times, _ had any advantage, because a lot of times, we _ had any advantage, because a lot of times, we were standing next to the rafts when _ times, we were standing next to the rafts when he was speaking to them, so i rafts when he was speaking to them, so i had _ rafts when he was speaking to them, so i had an— rafts when he was speaking to them, so i had an outside perception, i can't _ so i had an outside perception, i can't really — so i had an outside perception, i can't really get it. it's difficult for players at the speed of the games— for players at the speed of the games going you know, the ball in play. _ games going you know, the ball in play. and — games going you know, the ball in play. and i— games going you know, the ball in play, and i think sometimes the referees — play, and i think sometimes the referees have the hardestjob in the game _ referees have the hardestjob in the game being in the middle of all of that _ the latest match in cricket's100 competition is nearing its conclusion. trent rockets women set london spirit 152 to win, rachel priest was the mainstay of the rockets innings with 76 off 42 balls, and that included four sixes. in reply, london have rather stuttered after a promis8ing start.
5:37 pm
in reply, london have rather stuttered after a promising start. losing star that was the return —— the turning point in truth, they eventually lost by those 18 runs. it has just finished. the men's match is to follow a little bit later on. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport much more that's happening in tokyo 2020, we never have enough time to tell you, so you will have to go to the website to check it out. 0h, the website to check it out. oh, yes, we will have to do that. thank you for that. a bit of breaking news for you out of northern ireland, politicians there have relaxed some covid restrictions in line with the rest of the uk, none of this is that much of a surprise. it says that from monday, eu and us travellers are hoping —— to have been fully vaccinated will not have to quarantine on arrival into northern ireland. any students arriving into
5:38 pm
red laced countries placed in managed isolation facilities that is what will happen. a final decision on whether secondary school pupils should continue wearing masks has been delayed by the stormont executive. so, filing and i'm with the rest of the uk, politicians and northern ireland have relaxed some covid restrictions in line with the rest of the country, which means that from monday, eu and us travellers who have been fully vaccinated will not have to quarantine on arrival. a football supporter who suffered life—changing injuries at hillsborough has died at the age of 55. an inquest into andrew devine's death — held on wednesday — concluded he'd been unlawfully killed. it makes him the 97th victim of the disaster. 0ur reporter nick garnett is at anfield with the latest. there are 96 names on the memorial
5:39 pm
here, and originally, 95 people died at the time of the disaster, and tony bland died a short time later. his name was added to the list. and then when this memorial was built, all the names were put on in alphabetical order, and now one more name, the 97th person to have been unlawfully killed at the hillsborough disaster at the fa cup semifinal between liverpool and nottingham forest in 1989. now, andy devine was just 22 years old when that match took place. he went just to watch a football game. but the injuries he received there were life—changing. he had to have 24—hour care, around the clock, and he also had to live his life in a wheelchair. he died just two days ago in liverpool royal hospital of pneumonia, but when he died the inquest and the coroner was informed, and the coroner has ruled that he was unlawfully killed,
5:40 pm
although his death happened 32 years after the injury. andre rebello is the coroner. he gave the cause of death as not only pneumonia, which was the actual condition that mr devine had at the end of his life, but also the fact that he had brain and crush injuries from the hillsborough disaster. mr rebello said it was proportionate, reasonable and sufficient for him to adopt the findings of the inquest into the 96 other victims which found that they had been unlawfully killed, and to use those same conditioning, because it had been at the same time, so that he could call mr devine's death and unlawful killing as well. margaret's son, james, died at the game as well. today, she paid tribute to andy devine and she thinks that his name really should be added to the memorial behind me. that is entirely up
5:41 pm
to the family, obviously. that is a discussion between the family whether they would like his name put on this. they might have a different view. but you know who wants to put another name on this memorial? 96 is enough. mr devine's family cared for him all the way through, and they were there when he died the other day. they have released a statement saying, "0ur collective "devastation is overwhelming, but so too is the realisation "that we were blessed to have andrew with us for 32 years "since the hillsborough tragedy." i was earlier on today, liverpool players played tribute to andy devine by having a 97 second silence at their preseason training ground in austria. kenny has been on social media, a message saying his thoughts are with the family, and that andy devine
5:42 pm
will always be remembered. portsmouth football club has released three academy players, following an investigation into the alleged use of racially abusive language, in a social media chat group. the club began an inquiry after images allegedly showed some players posting offensive words and images, in a private under—18 team chat group, following england's defeat by italy in the euro 2020 final earlier this month. all three players have the right to appeal. a group of colleges and universities is urging the government to step back from its decision to scrap b—tecs in england. education leaders are warning the plan is "reckless", as it will harm the prospects of poorer pupils. ministers insist replacing the vocational qualifications with a new system of t—levels will ensure students leave education with the skills employers want. more now on one of our main stories — a new report from the met 0fice says the impact of climate change is already being felt across the uk, with heavier rainfall, more
5:43 pm
sunshine, and higher temperatures. i'm joined now by lilias ahmeira, whose house in somerset was flooded last month. good to see you. thank you for joining us. it must have been a horrible experience. take us through a happened. horrible experience. take us through a happened-— a happened. yes, it was pretty alarming- _ a happened. yes, it was pretty alarming. the _ a happened. yes, it was pretty alarming. the day _ a happened. yes, it was pretty alarming. the day started - a happened. yes, it was pretty alarming. the day started like | a happened. yes, it was pretty i alarming. the day started like any other day, it rains, and then you notice that the water coming down the road, which we quite often see, is getting higher and higher to the point that it's lapping up against the front door, which we have never had. within hours, we have got for fat sandbags in front of the door and behind the door to stop what now is a raging boiling riverfrom bursting through the front door. tarmac is being ripped up in front of us that we can see out the window. and everybody around the houseis window. and everybody around the house is running around trying to get buckets, move furniture. we just
5:44 pm
didn't expect any of this, so our lives have been turned upside down ever since, lives have been turned upside down eversince, but lives have been turned upside down ever since, but we are not the only ones. 0ther ever since, but we are not the only ones. other people are in the same boat, you just don't expect it to be flooded when you are on the side of the hail. �* flooded when you are on the side of the hail. ~ , ., the hail. indeed. are you in the house now _ the hail. indeed. are you in the house now or _ the hail. indeed. are you in the house now or are _ the hail. indeed. are you in the house now or are you _ the hail. indeed. are you in the l house now or are you somewhere the hail. indeed. are you in the - house now or are you somewhere else? no, we are in the house now, an entire decor is a mile road tarmac was ripped up, so we were stranded here for four days not able to leave the lane but we can't move out until there is tarmac and caravans can come down and we can move into it. so are living in a very damp chaotic situation, but with tarmac started to go down today, so a big shout out to somerset county council for that, hopefully we will be able to move out of this house very shortly. i am sor to out of this house very shortly. i am sorry to hear _ out of this house very shortly. i am sorry to hear that. _ out of this house very shortly. i am sorry to hear that. there _ out of this house very shortly. i am sorry to hear that. there are some people are going to say camilla, we get smiled but every now and again, things change. you know, sometimes it's hot, sometimes it's called. you
5:45 pm
know, it's what happens. mother nature. the met office is pretty clear when it said today that we are seeing much wetter summers and warmer winters, and it's all due to man—made climate change. what is your view on this? i man-made climate change. what is your view on this?— your view on this? i think you hit the nail on _ your view on this? i think you hit the nail on the _ your view on this? i think you hit the nail on the head. _ the nail on the head. man—made climate change. i don't think this is normal. i think, you know, climate change. i don't think this is normal. ithink, you know, when climate change. i don't think this is normal. i think, you know, when i was a kid, we never had weather like this at all. the amount of rain that is falling in a very short period of time is extraordinary. i mean, we had eight inches of rain and a three hour period. that isn't normal. years ago, we never had this at all. so something is definitely, definitely changing, and how much man has got to do at that, i'm not sure, but something is not right here. .. , sure, but something is not right here. , , ., here. the fact is, sadly, for many --eole here. the fact is, sadly, for many people to — here. the fact is, sadly, for many people to understand _ here. the fact is, sadly, for many people to understand what - here. the fact is, sadly, for many people to understand what the i people to understand what the scientists have been telling us all for many, many years, for them to understand, really, they tragically have to go through what you have
5:46 pm
gone through. i have to go through what you have gone through-— have to go through what you have gone through. i think it's very sad. unfortunately. _ gone through. i think it's very sad. unfortunately, we _ gone through. i think it's very sad. unfortunately, we happen - gone through. i think it's very sad. unfortunately, we happen to - gone through. i think it's very sad. unfortunately, we happen to be i gone through. i think it's very sad. j unfortunately, we happen to be on the wrong hail at the wrong time, but the world changes. i think the world breeds and changes all the time and we are just going through page period of transformation and change, and unfortunately, we have to live with it.— to live with it. good luck to you and our to live with it. good luck to you and your family _ to live with it. good luck to you and your family cannot - to live with it. good luck to you | and your family cannot speaking to live with it. good luck to you - and your family cannot speaking with us from her, i don't know, damaged home them i suppose, and somerset. that's it. i’m home them i suppose, and somerset. that's it. �* , ., ,, home them i suppose, and somerset. that's it. �* , ., saturday night television will look a bit different in the future, as major changes are announced to two big players in the high profile slot. the bbc have confirmed that jodie whittaker will step down as doctor who next year. she took over in 2017, and was the first woman to play the time lord. showrunner chris chibnall, who appointed the actress in the role, will also be leaving. over on itv, x factor is taking a break, perhaps a permanent one, as a spokesperson for the channel said there are currently no plans for another series to air.
5:47 pm
let's talk to our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba— and start with dr who. jody whitaker has had enough. yes, not hu:el jody whitaker has had enough. fie: not hugely surprising. she jody whitaker has had enough. .23 not hugely surprising. she will have done by the time this comes out, the last episode goes out around 0ctober. she will have done around the same number of episodes like the series and a few specials as stated tenants, as matt smith, as peter capaldi, so it's, i think i'm a not surprising news that she wants to move on, and of course, that's the beauty of doctor who as a show and as a programme. there are people who will have left her tenure as the doctor, people will have been less keen and had other performers who were their favourite doctor going back to the past, but the way that show reinvents itself every few years by having that device of thinking, well, 0k, years by having that device of thinking, well, ok, the lead actor is moving on, how can we deal with this? well it has this device called regeneration where part of the fabric of the show. what a genius idea it is. as part of the fabric of the whole show. you get a new actor coming in, and it's not like when i grew up watching dallas and they can hang on, that's not me sally. what's
5:48 pm
going on here than? 0h, hang on, that's not me sally. what's going on here than? oh, yes, it's part of the drama of what you are seeing. so for those people that really enjoyed her, and she got huge figures towards the start of her time on the show will be very sad, for people who haven't enjoyed her as much as other doctors, it's doctor who, so it will still be on so they can see if they can enjoy the next doctor moore. so they can see if they can en'oy the next doctor moorefl so they can see if they can en'oy the next doctor moore. we've got to talk about the — the next doctor moore. we've got to talk about the fact _ the next doctor moore. we've got to talk about the fact that _ the next doctor moore. we've got to talk about the fact that she - the next doctor moore. we've got to talk about the fact that she was - the next doctor moore. we've got to talk about the fact that she was the l talk about the fact that she was the first female doctor as well. you know, a really important thing to happen. i mean, where some of the criticism as a result of that decision, do you think? i don't think so. i think most doctor who fans were very excited by the idea of a woman doctor and the fact that she got something like 11 of a woman doctor and the fact that she got something like— she got something like 11 and a half million viewers, _ she got something like 11 and a half million viewers, the _ she got something like 11 and a half million viewers, the best _ she got something like 11 and a half million viewers, the best viewing i million viewers, the best viewing figures for almost a decade for had to be you showed the massive amounts of interest and support that there was for having a female doctor in the role. i think for a lot of the general audience out there, maybe
5:49 pm
they do enjoy the programme making, or didn't enjoy the scripts is much as they have at previous people, but the thing about doctor who fans, they are incredibly passionate about what they like and what they don't like and even from episode two or three back in 1960 people would say it's not what it was. it's changed, oh, i don't like this new texture —— direction. you pointing the finger at me that? i direction. you pointing the finger at me that?— direction. you pointing the finger at me that? i was a twinkle in my dads in at me that? i was a twinkle in my dads m the _ at me that? i was a twinkle in my dads in the 1960s. _ at me that? i was a twinkle in my dads in the 1960s. |_ at me that? i was a twinkle in my dads in the 1960s. | wish. - at me that? i was a twinkle in my dads in the 1960s. | wish. that's| dads in the 1960s. i wish. that's the nature _ dads in the 1960s. i wish. that's the nature of— dads in the 1960s. i wish. that's the nature of it. _ dads in the 1960s. i wish. that's the nature of it. we _ dads in the 1960s. i wish. that's the nature of it. we will- dads in the 1960s. i wish. that's the nature of it. we will have - dads in the 1960s. i wish. that's the nature of it. we will have a l dads in the 1960s. i wish. that's i the nature of it. we will have a new doctor coming along at some point in the future, and people will be just as excited about the show and so it can continue there. i as excited about the show and so it can continue there.— can continue there. i thought jody was brilliant, _ can continue there. i thought jody was brilliant, so _ can continue there. i thought jody was brilliant, so there. _ can continue there. i thought jody was brilliant, so there. let's - can continue there. i thought jody was brilliant, so there. let's talk| was brilliant, so there. let's talk about the expected end. ratings, they have been going down for a while, so this could be the end of it, right? it while, so this could be the end of it, ritht? .., , while, so this could be the end of it, ritht? u. , ., it, right? it could be the end of it. i it, right? it could be the end of it- i simon _ it, right? it could be the end of it. i simon cowell_ it, right? it could be the end of it. i simon cowell appeared - it, right? it could be the end of l it. i simon cowell appeared to be hedging their bets somewhat, but compared to the massive viewing figures of 16 or 17 million it was getting around a decade ago, it had
5:50 pm
shrunk down to a fraction of those being figures for the last proper series of the general x factor show backin series of the general x factor show back in 2018, so the fact that the figures have dropped on so much and we haven't had a proper x factor series since then, again, not to my surprising news. simon cowell has got a new big show that he is hoping will be a success called walk the line. he's also got britt and's got talent and itb. so the music industry has changed as well so much over the past decade you know, the impact of streaming, the lesson portends given to the charts. it means it's genuinely harder for people from shows like the x factor to make an impact in the way they deal. but it launched the careers from match cargo, one direction, leona lewis. so it has had a huge impact which continues in many ways in the music world, but i think probably it, it's time has come, and i would be quite surprised to see it's coming out for a full series,
5:51 pm
maybe an occasional special, but who knows. simon cowell is a much brighter man than me when it comes to how television works, so i'm sure if he wants to bring it back and he will try to make a success of that in some way. we will try to make a success of that in some way-— will try to make a success of that in some way. will try to make a success of that insomewa . ~ ., ., ., �*, in some way. we all wonder what he's not u- his in some way. we all wonder what he's got up his well— manicured sleep. thank you. earlier this month, that of addicts announced that they would allow to bring their children. earlier this month, organisers of the tokyo 0lympics announced that "nursing children" can accompany athletes to the games when necessary. bbc sport africa's michelle katami has been speaking to medal winning mothers from kenya, to learn more about the juggling act required to get to the start line... eunice sum and janethjepkosgei know plenty about winning. both are former world champions. it's not the only thing they have in common. they also know how difficult it is to be an elite athlete and a mother. when i was still young, i was told, "don't get pregnant, "because your career will end." it was a bit difficult, like, to train, to bring the body back to the track.
5:52 pm
they think, "ah, you are finished." the two kenyan middle—distance runners have been firm friends for over a decade and have come to rely on each other for child support. 2016, the rio olympics, my child was here with her, and it was easier maybe even for me to communicate to my daughter through janeth. my mind was set for the games. even so, they have not always been totally honest with each other. i asked eunice, "have you really stopped breast—feeding?" and she told me yes, and it was a lie. with such a huge price to pay for becoming a mother, perhaps it's no surprise that only two female athletes have ever successfully defended an olympic title after giving birth in between games. one of those is the cameroonian triple jumper francoise mbango. kenya's faith kipyegon is aiming to emulate her by winning the 1500m title in tokyo. it means a lot to me, going to tokyo as a mum. i am going there with a strong mind, carrying the flag of kenya and also carrying a flag
5:53 pm
of my daughter behind me. kipyegon is drawing inspiration from the 2019 world championships, where she watched mothers shelly—ann fraser—pryce of jamaica and american allyson felix making their way into the gold. shelly—ann had a son on the track, but i left my daughter at home. for me, i can't concentrate too much when the baby is there, so it's better when she is at home. despite having the support of her family, the 27—year—old agrees the idea of an informal mums club with athletes assisting each other is a good one. it will motivate and encourage the mothers that everything is possible. i think it is something so nice, having a club for mothers in athletics, because we can exchange our experience, you know? as eunice sum prepares for her third olympic games, she will again be relying on her friend for support. when you are a young mum, there are so many things which, like, you don't know.
5:54 pm
0urfriendship has grown beyond athletics. she's not even like a real friend, she's like a mum. michelle katami, bbc news, nairobi. doctors at addenbrooke's hospital in cambridge, have begun prescribing children with long term illnesses, videos to watch. now the films feature other youngsters with the same conditions describing what the medical treatment is like, and offering moral support. here's our science correspondent, richard westcott. theyjust, like, put the anaesthetic in... these videos are being prescribed on the nhs. you can taste mint in the back, and that's the last thing i can remember. just, like, saying, "0h, minty," and just gone. made by children with long—term health problems for other children who have just been diagnosed. i am very scared of the actual needle. it took me about two hours to have one injection done in year eight. 0ne injection! telling them what they went through.
5:55 pm
sometimes you are really in a lot of pain, and thenl it can go back to normal, - then pain, then normal, then pain, and it carry on going on and on. 0h, julia, you get the assist. i can't use my hands because i don't want to touch the ball. nathan has now got his condition under control, so he's helped make the video to treat others. what did you think was the most important thing you had to tell people, someone who's actually gone through the illness? make them realise that you can be all right, because now i'm fine. since like 2016, i have had this medicine, and it is helping me. because when i was younger, like, when i was ill, i didn't really... ..i thought no—one could really understand. so it would have probably helped if i'd had videos of people that did understand. this is for the children to watch the video, but how useful do you think it will be for the parents? even better, because often, although there is social media out there, often you find these parents in isolation, i was in isolation to begin with.
5:56 pm
the new video treatment has been pioneered by doctors at addenbrooke's hospital in cambridge. feeling better and coping better is not only about medication. it is not only about the doctor prescribing things. it is also about helping you cope with your day—to—day challenges, with your peers, with your school. and i think that's what this broader view of each condition gives these kids — ways that they can go and play sport, that they can have sleepovers, that they can do things that normal children do, where, to be perfectly frank, doctors and nurses don't have such a good insight into. they're now looking to make films with children with other conditions, like diabetes, epilepsy and cystic fibrosis... for the european final! ..reassuring those who have just been diagnosed that things will get better. it's gone over the neighbours! richard wescott, bbc news, ipswich. oh, dear! in a moment, it will be time for the news at six with sophie raworth. now it's time for a look
5:57 pm
at the weather with helen willetts. hello, good afternoon. a and evening as it heads towards the southwest to them in. thunderstorms north of the uk will tend to fizzle out in the next few hours, but we have had sam around again today, this is a named storm we are talking about in the southwest approaching, that's unusual at this time of year. particular concern sleeping out under canvas or in a caravan. it is this rapidly deepening area of low pressure bringing that stormy weather, notjust winds, but some are soaking rains as well commandos will affect many parts of england and wales as we go through the evening and overnight, as you can see. we could have 15—20 mm of rain as that weather friend moves through. the winds escalating in southwestern approach is stressed about. we could see gusts in excess of 60 mph, as i say come to bring down potentially trees and power lines. perhaps cause some disruption. a morning to me can see that rain has been affected by england and wales, it becomes a
5:58 pm
little drier. certainly not a cold night for anywhere, and it does look as if we will start with some drier weather, rather cloudy ankle cluck restaurant in scotland. 0ne weather, rather cloudy ankle cluck restaurant in scotland. one or two showers here popping up again and for northern ireland, but around our area of low pressure, are a storm across southern areas, we will see happier showers breaking out, with thunder and lightning again, some strong winds can even go for northern ireland, but around our area of low pressure, are a storm across southern areas, we will see happier showers breaking out, with thunder and lightning again, some strong winds can even gale should ease down a little bit to the southwest as we get into the afternoon. at the feel of the day will be compared with today because we've got marcotte around and those heavy downpour is. that's all tied in with that storm sister which moves away for saturday. then we open up to this northerly wind bringing showers southwards. some northerly wind well make it feel cooler, and temperatures will actually be below average be across the northern half of the country in particular. still with those other french close by for the north sea
5:59 pm
coast, the risk of some cloudy periods and some patchy rain, stale and southern areas, the energy there some happier showers to break out, some happier showers to break out, so it is not as unsettled, but it is still not dry, and as a say in the north, it will feel quite cool. similar outlook for sunday, really, by the beginning of the beacon of the beacon of things may start to calm down a little bit more. more detail on that amber warning online.
6:00 pm
at six: prepare for more flooding and higher temperatures as scientists warn climate change is already having an impact on the uk. last year was one of britain's warmest, wettest and sunniest years ever recorded. climate change isn'tjust something that is going to happen in 2050 or we need to worry about towards the end of the century. we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. experts are calling for radical action to prevent the worst consequences of climate change. also on the programme tonight: more young people are urged to get the coronavirus vaccine — as the latest data suggests the jabs have prevented around 60,000 deaths. 32 years after the hillsborough disaster,

11 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on