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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 29, 2021 2:00pm-4:59pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines... england's deputy chief medical officerjonathan van—tam tells bbc news that covid vaccines have prevented 22 million cases — and 60,000 deaths. scientists warn that the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects of climate change — with increased rainfall, more sunshine and higher temperatures. climate change is not something that isjust going to happen in 20 years or 50 years or towards the end of the century, we are very clearly seeing this in our observations now. team gb have secured two more medals at the tokyo games. bronze in the trap shooting and
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silver in the women's canoe slalom. it can mean so much for people, and i hope people see women now as an event that is really high class, there was some amazing paddling out there. half a million fewer people are now on furlough. but experts warn there could be job cuts as government support eases. a coroner concludes that liverpool football fan andy devine — who died this week after suffering life—changing injuries in the hillsborough stadium disaster — is the 97th victim of the tragedy. and itv says there are "no current plans" for another series of the x factor — after reports the show had been axed.
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in the last half—hour, england's deputy chief medical 0fficer, jonathan van—tam, has told the bbc that covid vaccinations have prevented around 22 million new coronavirus cases in england and saved about 60,000 lives. he announced the figures — which are from public health england — while answering questions on the vaccines from bbc newsbeat listeners. let's hear what he had to say. there are some new data coming out today, i'm going to break the news here. i today, i'm going to break the news here. ., �* ~' , today, i'm going to break the news here. ., �* ~ , ., , here. i don't think it is actually out for another _ here. i don't think it is actually out for another few _ here. i don't think it is actually out for another few minutes. l here. i don't think it is actually i out for another few minutes. the latest public health england analysis shows that because of the vaccines, because of this massive third wave we've had, actually watch the vaccines have done is they have prevented now in total, since we got them, 22 million cases of covid infection and 60,000 deaths. so, you
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know, that is truly massive. jonathan van—tam speaking just a few minutes ago. we will get more analysis and detail about what he has been seeing in the next few minutes. the impact of climate change is already being felt across the uk — with more rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. those are the findings of the state of uk climate report 2020, from the met office. it says that 2020 was the third warmest year since 1884. it was the fifth wettest. six of the 10 wettest years have been since 1998. and last year was the eighth sunniest on record. the experts said that, in the space of 30 years, the uk has become 0.9 degrees warmer and 6% wetter. the report's lead author, mike kendon, warns "we are going
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to see more and more extreme weather such as heatwaves and floods" as the climate continues to warm. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. dramatic changes in our skies. in 2020, the uk experienced a year of extremes. from storms in february, which caused chaos across the country, to a summer heatwave where temperatures sweltered above 3a degrees for six consecutive days, and rain in october with the uk's wettest day on record. it's all charted in an annual assessment of the climate which found the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our observations that the uk's climate is already changing, so climate change isn't something that will happen in 2050 or something we need to worry about towards the end of the century, we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now.
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the report compared the most recent three decades with the 30 years before and found that on average the uk was 0.9 degrees hotter. for rainfall, the country was on average 6% wetter and 2020 was the eighth sunniest year recorded in the last 100 years. new defences are under construction, like this tidal barrier in lincolnshire, to cope with future storm surges. but the reality is flooding is having a devastating impact now with some homes being flooded again and again — changes that seem small having a big effect on people's lives. what's interesting about this report is there's lots of data in there, so there's lots of temperature records and percentage changes, but actually what we're seeing are the impacts — the impact to us as humans, to our businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of our eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later this year
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for the united nations�* climate summit and we'll find out if governments can rise to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effects of climate change. right now, the elements show no signs of letting up, with this week's flash floods taking the london by surprise. scientists will continue to track and analyse these events, but they warn that extremes are becoming the new norm. rebecca morrelle, bbc news. we are going to have more on that. we're going to talking to a leading oceanographer in a moment. mallory franklin took silver. and for more on that and the latest from tokyo, let's go to the bbc sport centre right now.
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as day six draws to a close in tokyo, there has been more medal success for team gb. they've won two more medals to take their tally to 18 overall but as andy swiss reports, it could have been even more than a silver and a bronze. from windsor leisure centre to the olympic final, mallory franklin was 0lympic final, mallory franklin was just five when a family day out sparked her passion for paddling. now the ultimate test. the canoe slalom is a sport's wildest white knuckle ride, and after weaving her way through the gates franklin powered into the lead. that is a fabulous performance. relieved? just a bit. the 27—year—old was in gold—medal position. could any of them beat her? they couldn't, until them beat her? they couldn't, until the very last paddler. mallory franklin. but still silver fork
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franklin. but still silver fork franklin and a event making its 0lympic debut for women, it was particularly sweet. it olympic debut for women, it was particularly sweet.— olympic debut for women, it was particularly sweet. it was amazing to have the _ particularly sweet. it was amazing to have the medal _ particularly sweet. it was amazing to have the medal and _ particularly sweet. it was amazing to have the medal and i _ particularly sweet. it was amazing to have the medal and i think- particularly sweet. it was amazing to have the medal and i think it i particularly sweet. it was amazing l to have the medal and i think it can mean so much for people, and i hope people see it as an event that is really high class and there is an amazing paddling out there. there was also success _ amazing paddling out there. there was also success in _ amazing paddling out there. there was also success in the _ amazing paddling out there. there was also success in the shooting. l was also success in the shooting. after breaking his back as a teenager, he turned to a different sport. he soon had a medal in his sights. a bronze for the 26—year—old, which he later described as phenomenal. for british rowing star duo, there was no fairy tale finish. the story of helen glover, who has had three children since the last 0lympics, glover, who has had three children since the last olympics, and polly swann, an nhs doctor, has been one of the game's most compelling. but a medal did not materialise as they finished fourth in their final. glover confirmed it would be her last games, and for most of them the emotion was clear. it’s
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last games, and for most of them the emotion was clear.— emotion was clear. it's been really exceptional- _ emotion was clear. it's been really exceptional- i— emotion was clear. it's been really exceptional. i couldn't _ emotion was clear. it's been really exceptional. i couldn't be - emotion was clear. it's been really exceptional. i couldn't be prouder| exceptional. i couldn't be prouder of her, what we have done together. yeah, it has been a special bride. i just want to say, logan, kitt and beau, _ just want to say, logan, kitt and beau, i— just want to say, logan, kitt and beau, i love you so much, you have been _ beau, i love you so much, you have been my— beau, i love you so much, you have been my inspiration. i never saw myself— been my inspiration. i never saw myself getting back into a rowing boat until— myself getting back into a rowing boat until you all came along. i 'ust boat until you all came along. i just want— boat until you all came along. i just want to say, you can do anything _ just want to say, you can do anything you want to do. trying and failing _ anything you want to do. trying and failing is_ anything you want to do. trying and failing is no— anything you want to do. trying and failing is no problem as long as you try. failing is no problem as long as you t . �* ., , failing is no problem as long as you try. and there was soon more heartbreak- — try. and there was soon more heartbreak. the _ try. and there was soon more | heartbreak. the lightweight... try. and there was soon more i heartbreak. the lightweight... in try. and there was soon more - heartbreak. the lightweight... in a quite extraordinary finish. they were initially shown as joint third, but were later squeezed out of bronze by 100th of a second. britain's fifth fourth—place finish in the rowing. the word frustration does not come close. elsewhere, this pole vault has been ruled out of the
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games after the american tested positive for covid. three australian athletes who came into contact with him are self isolating. but it is been a memorable day for ireland as they won theirfirst been a memorable day for ireland as they won their first gold of the games. all 0'donovan in the lightweight double sculls. although they are not getting too carried away. they are not getting too carried awa . ,., ., ., , away. gold medalwinning athletes, how does that _ away. gold medalwinning athletes, how does that sound? _ away. gold medalwinning athletes, how does that sound? it's _ away. gold medalwinning athletes, how does that sound? it's all- away. gold medalwinning athletes, how does that sound? it's all right, | how does that sound? it's all right, eah. you how does that sound? it's all right, yeah- you can't _ how does that sound? it's all right, yeah. you can't complain _ how does that sound? it's all right, yeah. you can't complain really. . how does that sound? it's all right, l yeah. you can't complain really. and after ireland's _ yeah. you can't complain really. fific after ireland's first ever yeah. you can't complain really. fific after ireland's first ever gold in rowing, they have certainly got plenty to celebrate. andy swiss, bbc news. , ._ ,., ., news. underplaying it somewhat, there. the women's gymnastics all around final hasjust finished— there is a new champion
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as simone biles pulled out. the gadirova twins jessica and jennifer involved, but the gold medal has gone to the us's sunisa lee. more details on the bbc sport website. england's deputy chief medical officer has been saying in the last hour that the covid vaccine has prevented 22 million new coronavirus cases since it was introduced in england, and it is also saved about 60,000 lives stop let's get some more from that. they might be a slight exaggeration, but they are pretty reasonable on the face of it. what they have done is, they have looked at the number of cases and infections we have seen over the last couple of months and
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said, "what if those infections were still killing people at the rate they were before we had the vaccines," so that gives you a rough estimate. and they also stay on top of that," well, the vaccine does prevent some infection." you wouldn't be seeing december or january cases of case numbers at the moment, they would be even higher. in those infections would have gone on to kill people as well. in january we were seeing tens of thousands of people dying within the space of a month, so it is probably not surprising to say that we would be seeing an extra 60,000 deaths if we hadn't locked down. and i think thatis we hadn't locked down. and i think that is where you think the numbers but a slight exaggeration, because if it wasn't for the vaccines, if we were seeing those very high levels of debt, the government would have stepped in and we would have been in a full on lockdown before we got to the cases. it's not controversial to say that it is saved tens of thousands of lives, but the numbers themselves might be a slight push
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because other things would have happened. because other things would have ha ened. , ., ., ., because other things would have ha ened, �* ., ., ., ., ., because other things would have ha ened. �* ., ., ., ., ., ., happened. jonathan van-tam are sa in: happened. jonathan van-tam are saying that _ happened. jonathan van-tam are saying that the — happened. jonathan van-tam are saying that the vaccine _ happened. jonathan van-tam are saying that the vaccine might - happened. jonathan van-tam are | saying that the vaccine might have been even more effective had it not been even more effective had it not been for the delta variant, which is very transmissible. he suggested slightly less effective against that thanit slightly less effective against that than it had been against the original wuhan variant. we than it had been against the original wuhan variant. we do see that that first — original wuhan variant. we do see that that first dose _ original wuhan variant. we do see that that first dose of _ original wuhan variant. we do see that that first dose of the - original wuhan variant. we do see that that first dose of the vaccine l that that first dose of the vaccine doesn't get you quite the same level of protection now that we are facing delta, but it still works the same and the effect is still pretty good at stopping you from getting sick. 0ne dose of the vaccine reduces your chance of going into hospital, even with delta, probably by 75%. every jab does make a real difference. as you said, if we had been facing the christmas variant, we would be in a much better position now. fin christmas variant, we would be in a much better position now.- much better position now. on the case numbers. — much better position now. on the case numbers, we _ much better position now. on the case numbers, we will— much better position now. on the case numbers, we will get - much better position now. on the case numbers, we will get the - much better position now. on the i case numbers, we will get the latest data on how many coronavirus cases there are in the uk in the next hour or so, there are in the uk in the next hour orso, but there are in the uk in the next hour or so, but yesterday we saw a slight
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rise again in seven days of to newell false in the cases, which have taken a lot of people by surprise. scientists sort of struggling to explain why there has been a steady fall until yesterday. i've been very careful about getting too worried, because the way that the scientists tend to look at the data is week on week changes. it is still down. so the overall trend is still down. so the overall trend is still good. those seven days in a row of falling numbers every day is remarkable, and it is a real head scratcher. scientists are still warning we could see case numbers rise in the future. we are probably not finished, as professor van tam said during a session earlier, we are nowhere near the end of this, and we will see cases go up and down in the future. but one day is probably more of a blip that a trend. so probably more of a blip that a trend. ., , �* ., ., trend. so it doesn't mean we are auoin to trend. so it doesn't mean we are going to see _ trend. so it doesn't mean we are going to see an _ trend. so it doesn't mean we are going to see an upward - trend. so it doesn't mean we are going to see an upward trend - trend. so it doesn't mean we are i going to see an upward trend now? robert, thank you very much indeed. that's our head of statistics.
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there are now less than two million people still on furlough, a drop of almost 600,000 since may, and the lowest level since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. the under 25s are leaving the scheme faster than any other age group, but it's unclear whether they're heading back into full—time work. furlough is being reduced, with employers expected to pay more, but some are warming this could triggerjob losses, as firms struggle to meet the costs. here's our consumer affairs correspondent, colletta smith. it had been such a long time coming. just sitting at my desk after a whole 15 months. it just sitting at my desk after a whole 15 months.— just sitting at my desk after a whole 15 months. it was quite excitina. ten days ago, her life got busy again. after so long on furlough, she was over the moon getting the call asking her to come back. i was originally supposed to come back before the december lockdown. when the country went into lockdown at that point, i did feel a bit insecure to the point of the fact that,
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will i be able to come back because i had been anticipating that initial return to work? so i did worry a little bit. staff here have been brought back gradually as business has increased. across the uk, nearly 2 million people are still off work. furlough comes with a 66 billion price tagged from the government, but from next month businesses are going to have to pay more for every member of staff not back in. and that is going to mean some difficult decisions cannot be put off any longer. joe runs a small promotions company and says decisions about who to further or have been very hard. my team have been with me for a long time, you know them very well and their family circumstances and you are weighing up perhaps their financial circumstances, who can you keep and not? because the business has changed so dramatically, to stay on topjoe said she had to let one person go.
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we had a member of staff that had been with me a few years and i really felt it was an account management role and i felt that was not what the business was going to need. as for low winds up over the next two months, lots of companies may use it as an opportunity to cut staff numbers. we are seeing a lot of clients trying to bring in measures like part—time working, reduced hours, temporary pay cuts, as an alternative to people losing theirjobs. but if those things can't be agreed, then the fallback will be that some people will be made redundant. this man says it can't be just back to business as usual. we have had to let a number of our staff go, because we were unsure of how long furlough was going to last. but over the past year as well we have seen a number of our employees leave the industry due to the uncertainties
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around hospitality. for those who have been out of the workplace for so long, hoping to get back to life as normal, the prospect of redundancy is all the more daunting. coletta smith, bbc news. let's go back to that climate story. joining me now is professor ed hill, who is the director of the national 0ceanography centre uk. i know you want to talk particularly about rising sea levels and the impact that that will have with climate change.— impact that that will have with climate change. yes, i think the re ort climate change. yes, i think the report that _ climate change. yes, i think the report that has _ climate change. yes, i think the report that has just _ climate change. yes, i think the report that has just been - climate change. yes, i think the i report that hasjust been published report that has just been published is an excellent one. it is one of a long series of reports that updates the scientific evidence of climate change affecting the uk. the story around sea level is that since 1901 the sea level has risen by about 16.5 centimetres, and rising at a rate of about 1.5 centimetres a
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decade. but that has speeded up since the early 1990s, rising at about 3.5 centimetres a decade. that about 3.5 centimetres a decade. at the present rate. that is quite a scary prospect. how do we best defend ourselves against that? weill. defend ourselves against that? well, of course, defend ourselves against that? well, of course. the _ defend ourselves against that? well, of course, the number _ defend ourselves against that? well, of course, the number one _ defend ourselves against that? -ii of course, the number one defence is to get to the root of the causes of the problem, which is increased c02 the problem, which is increased co2 emissions, and that is really about decarbonising the global economy so that we can proceed with our lives without the dangerous effects of c02 without the dangerous effects of co2 emissions. that's clearly the front line attack and priority. after that, we need to take measures to adapt to some of the inevitability is of what is going to happen. the sea level will continue to rise even if we stop c02 sea level will continue to rise even if we stop co2 emissions today, and so that is something we are going to
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have to live with overtime. hog? so that is something we are going to have to live with overtime.— have to live with overtime. how do we live without? _ have to live with overtime. how do we live without? does _ have to live with overtime. how do we live without? does that - have to live with overtime. how do we live without? does that mean l we live without? does that mean moving communities away from coastal areas, or at least not building new homes in those sort of coastal areas? does it mean building up, which could cost an awful lot of money, sea defences, flood defences? i think the answer is that it is all of the above. there is no one single answer in one particular place for this. certainly, there is heavy investment going on in sea defences, and that is an important part of the whole story. the other thing is the use of natural sea defences. areas like salt marshes are very effective at providing natural sea defences. restoring some of those areas will be very helpful. in some cases, the strategy will be about managing a retreat from some of the more
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difficult to defend areas of the coastline. so there is no single answer, but it will involve change one way or another. in whatever form. in one way or another. in whatever form. ., , , one way or another. in whatever form. . , , ., one way or another. in whatever form. ., , ., ,., form. in a sense, as an island nation, form. in a sense, as an island nation. we — form. in a sense, as an island nation. we are _ form. in a sense, as an island nation, we are particularly - nation, we are particularly vulnerable.— nation, we are particularly vulnerable. ~ . ., , ., vulnerable. we are vulnerable for all sorts of _ vulnerable. we are vulnerable for all sorts of reasons. _ vulnerable. we are vulnerable for all sorts of reasons. we - vulnerable. we are vulnerable for all sorts of reasons. we are - vulnerable. we are vulnerable for all sorts of reasons. we are a - all sorts of reasons. we are a maritime nation. the uk's biggest natural disaster risk comes from storm surge flooding on top of very high tides, and that is an issue for us. and that probably is our single biggest risk relating to climate change in relation to the sea. those numbers sound rather small, but of course they make the extreme events
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of flooding much more likely and more frequent. so that is the issue for us here. more frequent. so that is the issue for us here-— more frequent. so that is the issue for us here. professor, good to talk to ou. for us here. professor, good to talk to you- director— for us here. professor, good to talk to you. director of— for us here. professor, good to talk to you. director of national- to you. director of national 0ceanography centre uk. a football supporter who suffered life—changing injuries at hillsborough has died at the age of 55. an inquest into andrew devine's death — held on wednesday — concluded he'd been unlawfully killed. it makes him the 97th victim of the disaster. 0ur reporter nick garnett is at anfield. suggestions that his name might be added to that memorial behind you at anfield. ., ' ~ added to that memorial behind you at anfield. . ' ~ ., , ., anfield. there are 96 names on the memorial here, _ anfield. there are 96 names on the memorial here, and _ anfield. there are 96 names on the memorial here, and originally - anfield. there are 96 names on the memorial here, and originally 95 i memorial here, and originally 95 people died at the time of the disaster. and tony bland died a
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short time later. his name was added to the list. and then when this memorial was built, all the names were put on in alphabetical order, and now one more name, the 97th person to have been unlawfully killed at the hillsborough disaster at the fa cup semifinal between liverpool and nottingham forest. now, andy devine was just 22 years old when that match took place. he wentjust old when that match took place. he went just to watch a football old when that match took place. he wentjust to watch a football game. but the injuries he received there were life changing. he had to have 24—hour care, around the clock, and he also had to live his life in a wheelchair. he died just two days ago in liverpool general hospital of pneumonia, but when he died the inquest and the coroner was informed, and the coroner has ruled that he was unlawfully killed, although his death happened 32 years after the injury. andrei rebello is
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the coroner. he gave the cause of death as not only pneumonia, which was the actual condition that he had at the end of his life, but also the fact that he had brain and crush injuries from the hillsborough disaster. he said it was proportionate, reasonable and sufficient for him to adopt the findings of the inquest into the 96 other victims which found that they had been unlawfully killed, and to use those same conditioning, because it had been at the same time, so that he could call andy devine's death and unlawful killing as well. margaret's son james death and unlawful killing as well. margaret's sonjames died at the game as well. today, she paid tribute to andy devine and she thinks that his name should be added to the memorial behind me. that is entirely up to the family, obviously. that's a discussion between the family, whether they'd like
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his name put on this. they might have a different view. but, you know, who wants to put another name on this memorial? 96 is enough. now, his family cared for him all the way through and have been with him throughout his life and were there when he died the other day. they have released a statement that said our collective devastation is overwhelming, but so too is the realisation that we were blessed to have andrew with us for 32 years since the hillsborough tragedy. earlier on today, liverpool players played tribute to andy devine by holding a 97 second silence at their pre—season training ground in austria. 0n social media, a message a short time ago, saying his thoughts are with the family and that mr divine will always be remembered." let's get more on the news
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that there are now less than two million people still on furlough, a drop of almost 600,000 since may, and the lowest level since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. the under 25s are leaving the scheme faster than any other age group, but it's unclear whether they're heading back into full—time work. let's go to our business correspondence. me let's go to our business correspondence. let's go to our business corresondence. ~ . . ~ let's go to our business corresondence. . . ., ~ ., correspondence. we are talking about the coronavirus _ correspondence. we are talking about the coronavirus job _ correspondence. we are talking about the coronavirus job retention - the coronavirus job retention scheme. _ the coronavirusjob retention scheme, to date more commonly known as a furlough, _ scheme, to date more commonly known as a furlough, when it was introduced it was really one of the headline _ introduced it was really one of the headline financial aid packages introduced by the government during the pandemic. due date, it has the taxpayer— the pandemic. due date, it has the taxpayer around £50 million. it is wideiy— taxpayer around £50 million. it is widely considered across industries as a lifeline. and it is beginning to wind — as a lifeline. and it is beginning to wind down after multiple extensions, it will end on september 30, this— extensions, it will end on september 30, this sunday, august the 1st...
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ohm _ 30, this sunday, august the 1st. .. oh... , ., ., 30, this sunday, august the 1st. .. oh... , . ., ., oh... telling us that dear date the fewest number _ oh... telling us that dear date the fewest number of _ oh... telling us that dear date the fewest number of people - oh... telling us that dear date the fewest number of people since i oh... telling us that dear date the fewest number of people since it l oh... telling us that dear date the i fewest number of people since it was introduced _ fewest number of people since it was introduced are taking advantage of it. introduced are taking advantage of it less _ introduced are taking advantage of it. less than 2 million. let's talk live to _ it. less than 2 million. let's talk live to daniel thompson, the general manager— live to daniel thompson, the general manager of— live to daniel thompson, the general manager of a hotel in cornwall. wonderful to talk to you. you at your _ wonderful to talk to you. you at your business have utilised the furlough — your business have utilised the furlough scheme with great success, is that— furlough scheme with great success, is that right?— is that right? that's correct. durinu is that right? that's correct. during the _ is that right? that's correct. during the first _ is that right? that's correct. during the first lockdown, . is that right? that's correct. i during the first lockdown, when is that right? that's correct. - during the first lockdown, when we were not quite sure what was going to happen, we started operations to lay people off, and it's quite a difficult thing to do when you look at these people who you spent a lot of time with, who have families, responsibilities, homes, children. and then the furlough scheme was announced and the look ofjoy in
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their eyes. "well, that's great, we're going to get through this, were not going to lose our homes and have to worry about putting food on the table for the children." it really was a life—saver. it had been communicated through to our staff and our team. communicated through to our staff and our team-— and our team. that is fantastic. since the _ and our team. that is fantastic. since the hospitality _ and our team. that is fantastic. since the hospitality industry i and our team. that is fantastic. l since the hospitality industry has started _ since the hospitality industry has started to reopen, what percentage of your— started to reopen, what percentage of your workforce have you been able to bring _ of your workforce have you been able to bring back of furlough? when of your workforce have you been able to bring back of furlough?— to bring back of furlough? when we reo ened to bring back of furlough? when we reopened the _ to bring back of furlough? when we reopened the first _ to bring back of furlough? when we reopened the first time, _ to bring back of furlough? when we reopened the first time, we - to bring back of furlough? when we reopened the first time, we were i reopened the first time, we were able to bring all of our staff back and were recruiting for more staff as we got busier and busier and busier. this time, back in april, we also operate self catering properties as well as a hotel at a spa, we were able to bring approximately 40% of our stuff back in april, with the remaining coming back when we reopened the hotel and our food and beverage operations.
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back when we reopened the hotel and ourfood and beverage operations. so it was really positive. then, back in the beginning ofjuly, we stopped claiming the furlough altogether as a business, because wejust claiming the furlough altogether as a business, because we just thought it was so unfair and not the right thing to do to claim when we were having such a demand for our bedrooms and in the business itself. so a really happy conclusion for you _ so a really happy conclusion for you. looking back, if you had not had access— you. looking back, if you had not had access to the furlough scheme, do you _ had access to the furlough scheme, do you think it would be a very different— do you think it would be a very different story for you and your business? _ different story for you and your business?— different story for you and your business? ' :: :: , , ., , �* business? 100%. if people didn't have that business? 10096. if people didn't have that question _ business? 10096. if people didn't have that question of— business? 10096. if people didn't have that question of furlough i business? 10096. if people didn't. have that question of furlough and were able to keep themselves safe while they know they are not going to lose their homes, i think they would have had to go and find other full—timejobs, which would have had to go and find other full—time jobs, which then would have been harder to recruit and then train. it takes a lot of time and
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energy to train staff to the high levels that we operate, so we would be back at square one. half of the industry is on its knees at the moment with regards to staff shortages, european workers are going home and not coming back because of other things such as brexit. without having a pool of people waiting to come back to work, it would have been very difficult. really interesting to get your thoughts. really interesting. daniel thompson there. then, as i was saying. — thompson there. then, as i was saying. this _ thompson there. then, as i was saying, this coming sunday, august one, another stepping stone in this winding _ one, another stepping stone in this winding down of the furlough scheme, due to _ winding down of the furlough scheme, due to end _ winding down of the furlough scheme, due to end in december. as of sunday. — due to end in december. as of sunday, employees will have to double — sunday, employees will have to double their contribution to 20%. all right, — double their contribution to 20%. all right, alice, thank you very much indeed. and it is weather time now, so let's get the latest forecast for you.
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and amber weather warning has been issued. seasonably windy weather, concerns if you are under canvas but a lot of people at the beaches at the moment, rough conditions and large waves. further heavy showers, potentially scotland, north—east of england, northern ireland, rain elsewhere but the driest brightest warmest weather southern and eastern areas. 0vernight rain pushes in with that storm across much of england and wales. when the escalating, damaging costs which could bring down our lines and trees, unusual for this time of year. not a cold night. wet and windy. the rain clears to showers. strongest wind further east. even here, gusts of 50 potentially. heavy showers. more
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online. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... england's deputy chief medical 0fficerjonathan van tam tells bbc news that covid vaccines have prevented 22 million cases in the country and 60,000 deaths. scientists warn that the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects of climate change, with increased rainfall, more sunshine, and higher temperatures. climate change is notjust something that is just going to happen in 2050 or towards the end of the century, we are very clearly seeing this in our observations now. team gb canoeist mallory franklin has won silver in the women's slalom at the tokyo games. there was also a bronze for matt coward—holley in the men's trap shooting. 500,000 fewer people are now on furlough. but experts warn there could be job cuts, as government support eases. a coroner concludes that liverpool
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football fan andy devine, who died this week after suffering life—changing injuries in the hillsborough stadium disaster, is the 97th victim of the tragedy. and itv says there are "no current plans" for another series of the x factor, after reports the show had been axed. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougall. good afternoon. she said it was stressful, but she coped admirably. a silver for mallory franklin, on her 0lympic debut in the women's canoe slalom. it was tense for a while. franklin was in the gold medal position, after her paddle early on in the final, but she then had to watch others come down the course. a flawless display from australia'sjessica fox, meant the brit had to settle for silver, but still a fantastic performance. franklin is a legacy of london 2012,
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the reason the lee valley white water centre was built, and that's where franklin was been training for this historic moment. it was a really cool, it was so stressful being sat up there on the start line, but i had a moment when i was, "this is really cool and i would not want to be anywhere else." i caught a glimpse and i smiled and that reminded me of the environment and how crazy it all is but it is really cool. no fans are allowed in tokyo of course, so franklin's family, fiance, teammate and coach watched her performance at the lee valley centre in london. it was a nerve—wracking moment, being so far away, but they went through every twist and turn with mallory and they were thrilled with the result. gb's matt coward—holley won bronze in the men's trap shooting. he is the world and european champion, but paid the price for a slow start, missing three of his first 10 targets. the brit recovered with 16 successive hits to climb into the bronze medal position. britain's two—time gold medallist helen glover,
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has ruled out another 0lympics rowing bid after the mother—of—three's hopes of a fairytale finish at tokyo 2020, were ended. glover, who's now 35, finished fourth in the women's pair along with polly swann. after the race glover said that this was definately her last 0lympics, despite saying that in rio. she is also keen to inspire others, after her incredible journey back into the sport, training while her 3 babies slept, saying, "you can do anything you want to do. trying and failing is no problem as long as you try." world number one novak djokovic has kept his hopes of a calendar golden grand slam alive. the serbian is through to the olympic semi—finals after beating home favourite kei nishikori in straight sets, 6—2, 6—0. after complaints from djokovic and daniil medvedev about the tokyo heat and humidity, matches have been pushed back to a later start. but this didn't seem to help a frustrated medvedev, as he crashed out, losing to spains pablo carreno busta.
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elsewhere, the day has been affected by coronavirus. just a day before the start of the track and field events begin, sam kendricks, the world pole vault champion, has withdrawn from the games, having tested postive. he had been expected to contend for a medal in tokyo. the argentinian pole vaulter, german chiaraviglio, has also tested positive. he tweeted that the games are over for him, but better news for the australian track and field team, they have resumed training after having to isolate. however, 3 of their team, who were in close contact with kendricks, are still isolating as a precaution, despite testing negative. after winner a second bronze medal in the taekwondo, bianca walkden has returned to britain, and just look at the reception she got. none of the athletes, have been able to have any of their friends of family, out in tokyo to support them,
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so walkden's family all came to the airport to welcome her home. she tweeted, "the love is unreal" and "family is everything." just to update you on the gymnastics, team gb's jessica gadirova has recorded the best result ever by a british woman in an olympic all—around final afterfinishing 10th. her twinjennifer finished in 13th place. there is a new champion because simone biles pulled out and that is her us team—mate, sunisa lee. more details on that on the bbc sport website. that's all the sport for now. more now on successes of team gb at the tokyo 0lympics, where mallory franklin won a silver in the women's c1 canoe slalom. laura scott was at the lee valley water sports centre speaking to mallory�*s fiance ciaran lee edwards. just so delighted that mallory could go out there and deliver the run that she's capable of doing. we saw that in the heats
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and it's been a big journey to get to the games, jumping through all the covid protocols that they need to and just delighted she was able to put it all out there. it was pretty tense, wasn't it? because there were still some paddlers to go and you needed to work out whether she was going to win that medal. when you knew she had that medal, regardless of the colour, just how proud were you? just delighted, obviously. it was a nervous wait but it's something we talked about. she wanted to be off quite early that final, to really put the pressure on the other girls and she did exactly that to plan. a nervy wait, butjust thrilled and i know she will be so pleased. hearing her coach there, they can celebrate together. beaten by one of her fiercest rivals? yeah, it's really fitting came down to franklin—fox, they have been one and two in the world for many now and exchanging wins at international competitions so for the first c1 women 0lympic game final to come
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down to franklin—fox is just perfect. perfect ending. beyond mallory's silver medal, she is a pioneer in this sport. how proud are you of that role as well? i really remember mallory competing when the women were competing in the same category as the men, so to come through and debut in the first world championships and come through to today, she has really been a role model in pushing that forward. i'm sure you're dying to see her? i can't wait to see her. i believe she gets home saturday afternoon, so i will be there waiting for her at the airport. and then the wedding plans beginning in earnest, don't they? indeed. she's got a busy year still. they have got plans for the world championships later in the year which is really different to a normal year, but we will be full steam ahead for the wedding planning for december. silver medallist mallory franklin's fiance. as we've been hearing, there are now less than two million people still on furlough,
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a drop of almost 600,000 since may, and the lowest level since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. the under—25s are leaving the scheme faster than any other age group, but it's unclear whether they're heading back into full time work. laura kearsley is head of employment law at nelsons solicitors, and canjoin me now. thanks for being with us. as this furlough scheme is tapering off, are we going to see more and more redundancies? morejob losses? i think that will be an unfortunate factor when the scheme continues to wind down. some of the people coming off the scheme will not be going back into work, i'm afraid to say. what's your advice to people worried that they could be about to face redundancy? i that they could be about to face redundancy?— that they could be about to face redundan ? _, , , ,, �*, redundancy? i completely think it's awor in: redundancy? i completely think it's a worrying time _ redundancy? i completely think it's a worrying time for _ redundancy? i completely think it's a worrying time for people, - a worrying time for people, especially anybody has been furloughed since last march and it
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has been a long time. my advice would be to be prepared for the worst and the best things those people can do our make sure that they dig out their original employment contract they signed at the start of theirjob and if they haven't got that, ask for a copy of that and read it and see what the position is. also ask their employer if they have a policy on redundancy or that might be contained in the employee handbook. have a look at that. the other useful source of information as the government's website where there is lots of free information about redundancy processes and redundancy entitlements. employees can use that to be well informed before they go into those processes.— to be well informed before they go into those processes. there has been suggestions — into those processes. there has been suggestions the _ into those processes. there has been suggestions the furlough _ into those processes. there has been suggestions the furlough scheme i into those processes. there has been suggestions the furlough scheme hasj suggestions the furlough scheme has masked the scale of redundancies, the scale of unemployment that the pandemic ultimately will bring. i understand it's still very hard to
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say because even though there will be some redundancies coming, a lot of clients we work with are looking to agree which might mean reductions in pay or hours, changes in the ways of working to try and preserve the status quo a bit. to try to see what happens in the economy. i think the problem there is still so much uncertainty about recovery and specific sectors like hospitality and entertainment, peoplejust don't know, even employers don't know where they stand.— know, even employers don't know where they stand. what do you think ofthe where they stand. what do you think of the furlough _ where they stand. what do you think of the furlough scheme? _ where they stand. what do you think of the furlough scheme? it - where they stand. what do you think of the furlough scheme? it has i where they stand. what do you think of the furlough scheme? it has been j of the furlough scheme? it has been a life—saver for so many of the furlough scheme? it has been a life—saverfor so many people. i a life—saver for so many people. i listened to the person you interviewed earlier and i could relate to how they were saying what clients are saying to us back last year, we had... 0nce clients are saying to us back last year, we had... once it became likely we would go into lockdown, we had a lot of worried employers not
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knowing what they would do for their workforce and it was an absolute lifeline. it was unprecedented in the level of support and it was a lot of detail to implement, but there is absolutely no doubt that it has brought a lot of time for people and businesses to keep their workforce on the books, ready to come back if the work level pick—up. good to talk to you, thank you very much indeed. today has been called earth 0vershoot day by a group of scientists who work out every year how quickly we've used up all the ecological resources the planet can produce in 12 months. and with governments around the world focussed on climate policy in the run—up to the cop26 climate summit in glasgow, the idea of earth 0vershoot day is based on a pretty simple premise. 0ur reality check correspondent chris morris explains.
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the premise is this. humans are consuming more, there are more of us, and we're creating more waste, including greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide that get pumped into the atmosphere. but the size and capacity of our planet remains the same. so something has to give. and how do scientists calculate when earth 0vershoot day occurs every year? basically, by comparing the amount of natural resources the earth is able to generate that year, and working out when human demand for those resources uses them all up. in other words, it's the day we've exhausted a 12—month quota of the earth's resources, and we're starting to reduce them, as well as creating more waste through things like carbon emissions from fossilfuels, which make matters much worse. and, this year, it's today, july the 29th. last year, it was more than three weeks later, but, of course, covid played a role in that. huge amounts of economic activity shut down during the first months of the pandemic.
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since then, carbon emissions have gone up again and the global footprint network reckons our overall carbon footprint has risen by about 6.6% compared to last year. but even if 2020 was something of a blip, look at when 0vershoot day has happened since 1970. it's getting earlier and earlier, although the good news is that the line has flattened a bit over the last few years. these are estimates, but they're based on the latest un data and science. and the pattern is pretty clear. currently, humanity uses 70% more than what earth can renew. it is like if you spend 70% more than what you earn, you can do that for some time but not forever, but the long—term impact, its economic impact is if economies are not resource secure, if we do not have the impact is necessary to maintain the economic machinery, it is going to be hard to maintain it. it's also worth remembering that different countries contribute very differently to the overall picture, based on how much they consume and pollute, and how many people live there. if the global average
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was like qatar, which has a tiny population, but produces huge amounts of oil and gas, 0vershoot day would have happened as early as february. in the uk, it would have been may, and, indonesia, not until december. the average in many poorer countries of course would mean no overshoot at all. but we're already seeing the effects of the overuse of resources, in terms of deforestation or drought, for example, and, of course, waste or pollution, in terms of those greenhouse gases entering the atmosphere. so, what are we doing about it? we are an ingenious species. we can rethink the way we consume and consume more efficiently. we have got technology and we now know what is happening, so we can rethink our consumption and everything that we use, in terms of energy, the food we eat and even to the clothes that we buy and how we travel, all add to this consumption footprint
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and it is something we are all responsible for. to protect the planet and the way we live on it, governments agreed at the last big climate summit in paris to try to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees celsius above pre—industrial levels. big global corporations have a huge role to play, because this is the decade when real action has to be taken if that goal is to be met. the debate in the run—up to the glasgow summit in november is going to be critical in determining whether it will be. a group of colleges and universities is urging the government to step back from its decision to scrap b—tecs in england. education leaders are warning the plan is "reckless", as it will harm the prospects of poorer pupils. ministers insist replacing the vocational qualifications with a new system of t—levels will ensure students leave education with the skills employers want. the number of people being told
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to isolate by the nhs covid app has reached another record high, with almost 700,000 alerts sent in england and wales in the seven days to the 21st ofjuly. the 11% rise on the previous week comes as new figures from the nhs test and trace programme show the number of positive tests in england has climbed to its highest level since mid—january. the foreign secretary, dominic raab, says borisjohnson and president biden have been discussing when britons could be allowed to travel to america again. the uk will welcome more travellers from the states next week, when double—vaccinated people from the us and most eu countries will no longer have to isolate on arrival in england, scotland and wales. earlier, dominic raab said the decision on admitting britons lies with the us government. but ultimately, of course, it will be their decision, they are taking a very careful approach, notjust with the uk, but across the board. we've had conversations, the president's raised it
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with the prime minister, so they clearly would like to proceed and we will work out how we can do that as soon as possible. ultimately, they've got to take that decision for themselves, in the way that many others will and have. what i can tell you, though, is that by taking the approach that we are taking, a lot of countries will then approach us and say, "well, can we get on the uk list of double—vaccinated countries, citizens from countries that can come in?" itv has said there are "no current plans" for another series of the x factor. a statement from broadcaster came, following reports in the sun newspaper that creator simon cowell has axed the programme after 17 years. the newspaper said the programme is being rested for at least five years. the x factor first aired in 2004 and last aired in 2018. it's helped launch the careers of artists including 0ne direction, little mix, 0lly murs and leona lewis.
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our correspondent chi chi izundu is with me. it is no longer got the x factor, it seems? it it is no longer got the x factor, it seems? ., ., , , ., , ., seems? it would appear so but that has been going _ seems? it would appear so but that has been going on _ seems? it would appear so but that has been going on for— seems? it would appear so but that has been going on for a _ seems? it would appear so but that has been going on for a while - seems? it would appear so but that has been going on for a while now. | has been going on for a while now. at its height, it was considered saturday night essential entertainment viewing. it was making the front pages of the sun newspaper and other newspapers, which is virtually unheard of for most entertainment shows. it was cult viewing, it was watershed moments, but right after it started to get billed, i suppose against strictly come dancing, viewers started to lose interest and a number of viewers watching it went from a peak of 17 million to just over 5 million watching the winner in 2018. it did lose its shine, maybe the four became a bit too tried, a bit too tested, a bit too familiar with the audience and they stop watching. sets
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audience and they stop watching. as i mentioned, it launched quite a a few big stars and their careers. little mix, one direction and so on. huge stars and people who might not have gone on to become singers. ryland clark, that famous scene of him crying when he was told he was going through to finals is a huge tv presenter. it has launched and made marks of many people throughout the 17 years it has been on itv. alas, people started to get a bit bored of the same old format, i guess. people queueing to try and sing, people telling their stories, some of them, people got annoyed at the fact they would come in with a really sad story and thejudges would come in with a really sad story and the judges were not as sympathetic or too sympathetic. people got tired of the judges being too aggressive if you like. i guess the format needs to change but the sun is saying it has not been axed, it is just rested for five years.
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whether it comes back as the x factor is a different story. we know simon cowell signed a five—year deal with itv and he is expected to bring more britons got talent but we also know he is on other formats. the x factor could come back in a different guise. i factor could come back in a different guise.— factor could come back in a different guise. i would not be surprised- _ different guise. i would not be surprised. he _ different guise. i would not be surprised. he has— different guise. i would not be surprised. he has made - different guise. i would not be surprised. he has made a i different guise. i would not be surprised. he has made a fair| different guise. i would not be i surprised. he has made a fair few surprised. he has made a fairfew pennies from the programme? it has been freight — pennies from the programme? it has been freight formatted _ pennies from the programme? it i—.3 been freight formatted around the world. it was a huge programme. it lasted three seasons in the united states alone. people still talk about the different characters, it has made memorable people and moments. here in the uk, things have moved on, netflix, the onslaught of streaming and other programme formats have taken precedent. it the x factor needs to make vast changes in order to... to
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x factor needs to make vast changes in order to- - -— in order to... to be honest, nothing lasts forever. _ in order to... to be honest, nothing lasts forever, does _ in order to... to be honest, nothing lasts forever, does it? _ in order to... to be honest, nothing lasts forever, does it? it _ lasts forever, does it? it doesn't, sadl . lasts forever, does it? it doesn't, sadly- and _ lasts forever, does it? it doesn't, sadly- and it _ lasts forever, does it? it doesn't, sadly. and it doesn't _ lasts forever, does it? it doesn't, sadly. and it doesn't have - lasts forever, does it? it doesn't, sadly. and it doesn't have the i lasts forever, does it? it doesn't, sadly. and it doesn't have the x l sadly. and it doesn't have the x factor, as you said. it sadly. and it doesn't have the x factor, as you said.— sadly. and it doesn't have the x factor, as you said. it was great in its time, factor, as you said. it was great in its time. i — factor, as you said. it was great in its time, i have _ factor, as you said. it was great in its time, i have to _ factor, as you said. it was great in its time, i have to say _ factor, as you said. it was great in its time, i have to say that. - yesterday, helen glover returned to the olympics to defend her coxless pairs title, 18 months after giving birth to twins, the first mother to qualify for the british olympic rowing team. bbc sport africa's michelle katami has been speaking to other medal winning mothers from kenya, about the challenges facing them on the long journey back to competition after childbirth. eunice sum and janethjepkosgei know plenty about winning. both are former world champions. it is not the only thing they have in common. they also know how difficult is to be an elite athlete and a mother. when i was still young, i was told, "don't get pregnant because your career will end." it was a bit difficult,
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like, to train, to bring our body back to the track. they think, "ah, you are finished." the two kenyan middle—distance runners have been firm friends for over a decade and have come to rely on each other for child support. 2016, the rio olympics, my child was here with her and it was easier maybe even for me to communicate to my daughter through janeth. my mind was set for the games. even so, they have not always been totally honest with each other. i asked eunice, "have you really stopped breast—feeding?" and she told me, yes. and it was a lie. with such a huge price to pay for becoming a mother, perhaps it is not surprising that only two female athletes have ever successfully defended an olympic title after giving birth in between games. one of those is the cameroonian triple—jumper francoise mbango. kenya's faith kipyegon is aiming to emulate her by retaining the 1,500m title in tokyo. it means a lot to me
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going to tokyo as a mum. i am going there with a strong mind and carrying the flag of kenya and also carrying a flag of my daughter behind me. kipyegon is drawing inspiration from the 2019 world championships, where she watched mothers shelly—ann fraser—pryce of jamaica and american allyson felix making their way into the gold. shelly—ann had a son on the track, but i left my daughter at home. for me, i can't concentrate too much when the baby is there, so it's better when she is at home. despite having the support of her family, the 27—year—old agrees the idea of an informal mums�* club, with athletes assisting each other, is a good one. it will motivate and tell the mothers that everything is possible. i think it is something so nice, having a club for mothers in athletics, because we can exchange our experience, you know? as eunice sum prepares for her third
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olympic games, she will again be relying on herfriend for support. when you are a young mum, there are so many things which, like, you don't know. 0ur friendship has grown beyond athletics. she's not even like a real friend, she's like a mum. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen. hello, good afternoon. the showers should not be as numerous today, but there will still be the odd heavy and thundery one around as we go through the rest of the day. met office have issued an amber warning for storm evert. that is going to bear down on the south—west of england through this evening, with some damaging winds. unseasonably windy, which means there will be large waves, rough conditions at sea. if you are sleeping under canvas, and many heading to the beach, as i say, there will be some rather dangerous conditions around. for the rest of the day, ahead of that system, we will see the driest, brightest and warmest weather in southern and eastern areas. i mention some heavy showers, potential in northern england, northern ireland, southern and eastern scotland.
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in the far north of scotland staying rather cool and cloudy. quite blustery as well today but the winds will escalate further, starting to bring in the rain to pembrokeshire and the south—west by the end of the day. with gale force winds forecast, gusts in excess of 60 mph as we go through the night, potentially, across devon and cornwall. through friday they will migrate further eastwards. accompanying those strong winds, unusually windy weather, some wetter weather working across much of england and wales, the far north escaping. the showers initially quite heavy for the north, they will tend to ease, it will be a cooler night for scotland and northern ireland. friday is a tale of two halves. a lot of cloud in the north and some showery rain but in the south we have more heavy showers, longer spells of rain, and strong winds, gusts of 40—50 mph, even as they spread further southwards into south—east england and east anglia. there will be some rather lively winds causing some disruption both tonight and tomorrow with some heavy downpours again, even some thunder and lightning in the slow moving showers for central areas. temperatures a little bit down,
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just because we have got more cloud tomorrow. into the weekend, the low pressure moves out the way but as it pushes across into the eastern side of europe, it allows this northerly breeze to come down. high pressure still sitting to the west of us. but with that setup and a northerly breeze, it means things will cool down. we have had heat and humidity already through this month but it will be, on average, cooler than it should be through the weekend, particularly for scotland and northern ireland. still some showers around and still potentially heavy for england and wales. the details and the warnings are on the website.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines... england's deputy chief medical 0fficerjonathan van—tam tells bbc news that covid vaccines have prevented 22 million cases cases in the country — and 60,000 deaths. that's truly massive. and the benefit of vaccines is in that secret work that you never see, because if people don't go into hospital and they don't die, you never see that. scientists warn that the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects of climate change — with increased with increased rainfall, more sunshine and higher temperatures
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team gb have secured two more medals at the tokyo games. bronze in the men's trap shooting and silver in the women's canoe slalom. it can mean so much for people, and i hope people see women now as an event that is really high class — there was some amazing paddling out there. a coroner concludes that liverpool football fan andy devine — who died this week after suffering life—changing injuries in the hillsborough stadium disaster — is the 97th victim of the tragedy. and the end for the x factor? itv says there are "no current plans" for another series — after reports the show had been axed. england's deputy chief medical officer, jonathan van—tam,
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has told the bbc that covid vaccinations have prevented around 22 million new coronavirus cases in england and saved about 60,000 lives. he announced the figures — which are from public health england — while answering questions on the vaccines from bbc newsbeat listeners. let's hear what he had to say... there's some new data coming out today. i'm going to break the news here. i don't think it out actually until another few minutes. but the latest public health england analysis shows that because of the vaccines, because of this massive third wave we've had, actually what the vaccines have done is they have prevented now in total, since we got them, 22 million cases of covid infection — and 60,000 deaths. so, you know, that is truly massive. that was jonathan van—tam.
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0ur head of statistics, robert cuffe, has been putting these figures into context. they don't fully account for whether we might have done more lockdown is. but they are pretty reasonable on the face of it, in the ballpark. because what they've done is, they've looked at the number of cases and the number of infections we have seen over the last couple of months, and they've said, "what if those infections were still killing people at the rate they were before we had the vaccines?" so that gives you one number. that gives you a rough estimate of the deaths. and they also say, on top of that, "well, the vaccine does prevent some infection." so, if that was the case, if the vaccines weren't working or weren't here, we wouldn't be seeing december, january—ish numbers of case numbers as we are at the moment, they'd be even higher. and those infections would have gone on to kill people as well. when you think back to december, january, we were seeing tens of thousands of people dying within the space of a month. so it's probably not surprising to say we'd be seeing an extra 60,000 deaths if we hadn't locked down. and i think that's where you think
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the numbers might be a slight exaggeration, because of course, if it weren't for the vaccines, if we were seeing those very high levels of deaths, the government would have stepped in and we will be back in a full—on lockdown before we got to the levels of cases we are seeing at the moment. so that is how they get there. and you can see, it's not controversial to say that it has saved tens of thousands of lives, but the numbers themselves might be a slight push because other things would have happened to get in the way. actually, during that interview, jonathan van—tam was saying the vaccine might have been even more effective had it not been for the delta variant, which is very transmissible. he was suggesting that it's perhaps slightly less effective against that than it had been, for example, against the original wuhan variant. absolutely. we do see that the first dose of the vaccine doesn't get you quite the same a not of protection now that we are facing delta, but it is still worth saying that the effect is still pretty good for stopping you getting really sick. so one dose of the vaccine reduces your chance of going into hospital, even with delta, probably by about 75%. so everyjab does make a real difference. but of course, as you said, if we'd been facing the old school
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christmas variant, we would be in a much better position now than we are facing delta. and one brief question on the case numbers. and we'll get the latest data on how many coronavirus cases there are in the uk in the next hour or two, but yesterday we saw a slight rise again after seven days of continual falls in the number of cases, which have taken a lot of people by surprise. a lot of scientists are struggling to explain why there has been such a steady fall until yesterday. i'd be very careful about getting too worried, because the way that the scientists tend to look at the data is week on week changes. so wednesday versus last wednesday, it's still down. so the overall trend is still good. those rows of falling numbers every day was remarkable, and it is a real head—scratcher. it is really fantastic to have seen those numbers. i mean, scientists are still warning we could see case numbers
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rise in the future. we are probably not finished this, as professor van—tam said during his session earlier. we are nowhere near the end of this. we will see cases come up and down in the future. but one day is probably more of a blip than a trend. team gb have taken their medal tally to 18 at the tokyo 0lympics. matt coward—holley won bronze in the men's trap shooting. in the women's c1 canoe slalom, mallory franklin took silver. let's get a round—up of all of the latest action from tokyo. good afternoon. as day six draws to a close in tokyo, there has been more medal success for team gb. they've won two more medals to take their tally to 18 overall but as andy swiss reports, it could have been even more than a silver and a bronze. from windsor leisure centre to the olympic final, mallory franklin was just five when a family day out
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sparked her passion for paddling. now the ultimate test. the canoe slalom is sport's wildest white knuckle ride, and after weaving her way through the gates franklin powered into the lead. that is a fabulous performance. relieved? just a bit. the 27—year—old was in gold—medal position. but with five more to race and an agonising wait, could any of them beat her? they couldn't, until the very last paddler. australia's jennifer australia'sjennifer fox. but still silverfor franklin and a event making its 0lympic debut for women, it was particularly sweet. it was amazing to have the medal and i think it can mean so much for people, and i hope people see it as an event that is really high class and there is amazing paddling out there. there was also success in the shooting. after breaking his back as a teenager, he turned to a different sport. he soon had a medal in his sights.
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a bronze for the 26—year—old, which he later described as phenomenal. for british rowing star duo, there was no fairy tale finish. the story of helen glover, who has had three children since the last olympics, and polly swann, an nhs doctor, has been one of the games�* most compelling. but a medal did not materialise as they finished fourth in theirfinal. glover confirmed it would be her last games, and for both of them the emotion was clear. it's been really exceptional. i couldn't be prouder of her, what we have done together. yeah, it has been a special ride. ijust want to say, logan, kitt and beau, i love you so much, you have been my inspiration. i never saw myself getting back into a rowing boat until you guys came along. ijust want to say, you can do anything you want to do. trying and failing is no problem as long as you try. and there was soon more heartbreak.
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the lightweight women's double sculls with britain third from the top in a quite extraordinary finish. they were initially shown as joint third, but were later squeezed out of bronze by 100th of a second. britain's fifth fourth—place finish in the rowing. the word frustration does not come close. elsewhere, this pole vaulter has been ruled out of the games after the american tested positive for covid. three australian athletes who came into contact with him are self—isolating. but it's been a memorable day for ireland as they won their first gold of the games.
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paul 0'donovan and fintan mccarthy in the lightweight double sculls. although they are not getting too carried away. gold medal winning athletes, how does that sound? - it's all right, yeah. you can't complain really. and after ireland's first ever gold in rowing, they have certainly got plenty to celebrate. andy swiss, bbc news. within the last hour, america's sunisa lee has won the women's all around gymnastics title. the 18 year old secured the gold with her fourth discipline on the floor. but her uneven bars was the feature of her competition as lee finished just ahead of brazil's rebeca andrade, who won her country's first ever medal in women's gymnastics. lee was supported throughout by simone biles, who watched on from the sidelines alongside her other american teammates. this was one of the four gold medals biles won in rio but she withdrew from the competiton in tokyo to focus on her mental health.
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their vaults providing the best score of their events. jessica's is the best result by a british woman in the all around competition at the olympics. i still can't believe it. coming top 15 isjust— i still can't believe it. coming top 15 isjust amazing, and doing it with— 15 isjust amazing, and doing it withiust — 15 isjust amazing, and doing it withjust as 15 isjust amazing, and doing it with just as well, i couldn't ask for more — with just as well, i couldn't ask for more really. that's all the sport for now. many thanks, we will see way but later on. the impact of climate change is already being felt across the uk — with more rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. those are the findings of the state of uk climate report 2020 it says that 2020 was the third warmest year since 1884. it was the fifth wettest. six of the 10 wettest years
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have been since 1998. and last year was the eighth sunniest on record. the experts said that, in the space of 30 years, the uk has become 0.9c warmer and 6% wetter. the report's lead author, mike kendon, warns "we are going to see more and more extreme weather such as heatwaves and floods" as the climate continues to warm. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. dramatic changes in our skies. in 2020, the uk experienced a year of extremes. from storms in february, which caused chaos across the country, to a summer heatwave where temperatures sweltered above 34 degrees for six consecutive days, and rain in october with the uk's wettest day on record. it's all charted in an annual assessment of the climate which found the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier.
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we can see very clearly from our observations that the uk's climate is already changing, so climate change isn't something that will happen in 2050 or something we need to worry about towards the end of the century, we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. the report compared the most recent three decades with the 30 years before and found that on average the uk was 0.9 degrees hotter. for rainfall, the country was on average 6% wetter and 2020 was the eighth sunniest year recorded in the last 100 years. new defences are under construction, like this tidal barrier in lincolnshire, to cope with future storm surges. but the reality is flooding is having a devastating impact now with some homes being flooded again and again — changes that seem small are having a big effect on people's lives. what's interesting about this report is there's lots of data in there, so there's lots of temperature records and percentage changes, but actually what we're
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seeing are the impacts — the impact to us as humans, to our businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of our eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united nations�* climate summit and we'll find out if governments can rise to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effects of climate change. right now, the elements show no signs of letting up, with this week's flash floods taking london by surprise. scientists will continue to track and analyse these events, but they warn that extremes are becoming the new norm. rebecca morrelle, bbc news. the bbc have confirmed jodie whittaker will step down from her role in doctor who next year. she took over as the 13th doctor back in 2017,
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and was the first woman to play the time lord. with me is our entertainment correspondent, liza mizimba. like all doctors that we've seen over— like all doctors that we've seen over the — like all doctors that we've seen over the past 50 years, some will have _ over the past 50 years, some will have liked — over the past 50 years, some will have liked her and some will have liked _ have liked her and some will have liked other— have liked her and some will have liked other particular doctors that have come in the past. for those of us that— have come in the past. for those of us that grew— have come in the past. for those of us that grew up in the 1990s, the fact that — us that grew up in the 1990s, the fact that doctor who is still on air means— fact that doctor who is still on air means the — fact that doctor who is still on air means the doctor has been a success and kept _ means the doctor has been a success and kept the programme going. it's fair to— and kept the programme going. it's fair to say— and kept the programme going. it's fair to say that when her first episode _ fair to say that when her first episode aired, it got 11.5 million viewers, — episode aired, it got 11.5 million viewers, doctorwho's episode aired, it got 11.5 million viewers, doctor who's biggest audience _ viewers, doctor who's biggest audience for more than a decade. so there _ audience for more than a decade. so there seem — audience for more than a decade. so there seem to be a real groundswell of support, — there seem to be a real groundswell of support, presumably because she was the _ of support, presumably because she was the first female doctor. people were fascinated and really wanted her to _ were fascinated and really wanted her to succeed in the role. it's better— her to succeed in the role. it's better to _ her to succeed in the role. it's better to say that over her first two series _ better to say that over her first two series at the ratings did drop away, _ two series at the ratings did drop away, closer to what they were to her predecessor's during his tenure. so not _ her predecessor's during his tenure. so not as— her predecessor's during his tenure. so not as big — her predecessor's during his tenure. so not as big as it was at the
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start, — so not as big as it was at the start, not— so not as big as it was at the start, not the spectacular ratings that david — start, not the spectacular ratings that david tennant and matt smith were getting in their times. i think people _ were getting in their times. i think people will be delighted by the fact that we _ people will be delighted by the fact that we have had a female doctor who has been _ that we have had a female doctor who has been doing different kinds of stories. — has been doing different kinds of stories, keeping the legacy of doctor— stories, keeping the legacy of doctor who going, and certainly her place _ doctor who going, and certainly her place in _ doctor who going, and certainly her place in history is assured. only 12 people _ place in history is assured. only 12 people have worked on the moon. they have only _ people have worked on the moon. they have only been 13 doctors. so it is a pretty— have only been 13 doctors. so it is a pretty elite group to be in. that is a very good _ a pretty elite group to be in. t'isgt is a very good comparison. and a bit like james bond, there is always speculation about who is going to be the next doctor. that speculation about who is going to be the next doctor.— the next doctor. at this point, we don't even _ the next doctor. at this point, we don't even know— the next doctor. at this point, we don't even know who _ the next doctor. at this point, we don't even know who is _ the next doctor. at this point, we don't even know who is going i the next doctor. at this point, we don't even know who is going to i the next doctor. at this point, we i don't even know who is going to be in charge _ don't even know who is going to be in charge of— don't even know who is going to be in charge of doctor who or when jodie _ in charge of doctor who or when jodie whittaker and the current showrunner do it step down. then last episode will be filmed over the next weeks or months, but it won't io next weeks or months, but it won't go out _ next weeks or months, but it won't go out until— next weeks or months, but it won't go out until november 22 to tie in with the _ go out until november 22 to tie in with the bbc's centenary. we don't who will— with the bbc's centenary. we don't who will be in charge of doctor who
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with the _ who will be in charge of doctor who with the next iteration comes along, and they— with the next iteration comes along, and they presumably will have a big say on _ and they presumably will have a big say on who— and they presumably will have a big say on who it will be. there is always — say on who it will be. there is always speculation. people like mai
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show _ nine months of the year working on a show it— nine months of the year working on a show it is— nine months of the year working on a show it is a — nine months of the year working on a show. it is a hard job. there are people — show. it is a hard job. there are people coming up. there lovely people — people coming up. there lovely people like amari douglas, who we saw in _ people like amari douglas, who we saw in it's— people like amari douglas, who we saw in it's a — people like amari douglas, who we saw in it's a sin. people like hermione _ saw in it's a sin. people like hermione caulfield. if you'd asked me two— hermione caulfield. if you'd asked me two years ago, i might have said florence _ me two years ago, i might have said florence pugh. now she is too big, she is— florence pugh. now she is too big, she is an _ florence pugh. now she is too big, she is an oscar nominee, she is in black— she is an oscar nominee, she is in black widow — she is an oscar nominee, she is in black widow. not she is an oscar nominee, she is in black widow-— she is an oscar nominee, she is in black widow. not too big for doctor who, black widow. not too big for doctor who. surely? _ black widow. not too big for doctor who, surely? the _ black widow. not too big for doctor who, surely? the bbc— black widow. not too big for doctor who, surely? the bbc cannot i black widow. not too big for doctor i who, surely? the bbc cannot compete with the time — who, surely? the bbc cannot compete with the time and _ who, surely? the bbc cannot compete with the time and the _ who, surely? the bbc cannot compete with the time and the cash _ who, surely? the bbc cannot compete with the time and the cash that - with the time and the cash that other— with the time and the cash that other people can offer. i think you really— other people can offer. i think you really have — other people can offer. i think you really have to love doctor who to commit _ really have to love doctor who to commit nine months of your life. the film in _ commit nine months of your life. the film in cardiff at the moment. to do that at— film in cardiff at the moment. to do that at the _ film in cardiff at the moment. to do that at the exclusion of other more lucrative _ that at the exclusion of other more lucrative offers that will be pouring _ lucrative offers that will be pouring in from over the world. i have _ pouring in from over the world. i have no— pouring in from over the world. i have no idea who is going to take over, _ have no idea who is going to take over. then — have no idea who is going to take over. then-— over, then. you took a long time sa in: over, then. you took a long time saying that- _ over, then. you took a long time saying that. you _ over, then. you took a long time saying that. you did _ over, then. you took a long time saying that. you did mention i over, then. you took a long time | saying that. you did mention that showrunner. he has been quite
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important and slightly controversial.- important and slightly controversial. �* , important and slightly controversial. ~ , , controversial. also runners will be controversial— controversial. also runners will be controversial among _ controversial. also runners will be controversial among doctor - controversial. also runners will be controversial among doctor who l controversial. also runners will be i controversial among doctor who fans. doctor _ controversial among doctor who fans. doctor who _ controversial among doctor who fans. doctor who fans are very passionate about _ doctor who fans are very passionate about the _ doctor who fans are very passionate about the show and they have strong opinions, _ about the show and they have strong opinions, a _ about the show and they have strong opinions, a lot of them. so lots of them _ opinions, a lot of them. so lots of them will— opinions, a lot of them. so lots of them will have loved russell t davies — them will have loved russell t davies era when it came along. the same _ davies era when it came along. the same with— davies era when it came along. the same with steven moffat. going back to when— same with steven moffat. going back to when you had producers in charge like john— to when you had producers in charge like john nathan turner, in what we now call— like john nathan turner, in what we now call classic doctor who. he will have been— now call classic doctor who. he will have been pleased to get a massive show _ have been pleased to get a massive show of _ have been pleased to get a massive show of interest, and he was the man that cast _ show of interest, and he was the man that cast a _ show of interest, and he was the man that cast a female doctor so his place _ that cast a female doctor so his place in — that cast a female doctor so his place in history is assured. maybe a bit of— place in history is assured. maybe a bit of disappointment that they didn't— bit of disappointment that they didn't hang onto more of the viewers that came _ didn't hang onto more of the viewers that came in — didn't hang onto more of the viewers that came in with that first flush of excitement when jodie's first episodes — of excitement when jodie's first episodes came along. but as i say, it has— episodes came along. but as i say, it has been— episodes came along. but as i say, it has been a — episodes came along. but as i say, it has been a long haul for us, the fact that _ it has been a long haul for us, the fact that the programme is still on air we _ fact that the programme is still on air we still— fact that the programme is still on air we still see as a big win. and any show— air we still see as a big win. and any show that can deliver another series. _ any show that can deliver another series. i— any show that can deliver another series. ican— any show that can deliver another series, i can take that as a win. who— series, i can take that as a win. who was— series, i can take that as a win. who was your favourite doctor of all time? _ who was your favourite doctor of all time? that— who was your favourite doctor of all time? that is a difficult one. if
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i'm time? that is a difficult one. if i'm being _ time? that is a difficult one. if i'm being absolutely honest, it is a dead _ i'm being absolutely honest, it is a dead heat— i'm being absolutely honest, it is a dead heat between tom baker and david _ dead heat between tom baker and david tennant. but they are all good — david tennant. but they are all good. they all bring something different. and that is the beauty of doctor— different. and that is the beauty of doctor who, different. and that is the beauty of doctorwho, it different. and that is the beauty of doctor who, it can reinvent itself with a _ doctor who, it can reinvent itself with a new — doctor who, it can reinvent itself with a new character in the lead role so — with a new character in the lead role so many times. and that is why it is a _ role so many times. and that is why it is a genius— role so many times. and that is why it is a genius piece of programming and why— it is a genius piece of programming and why so— it is a genius piece of programming and why so many people love it. and it has had some _ and why so many people love it. el“ic it has had some great and why so many people love it. elic it has had some great actors playing that role. our entertainment correspondent. there are now under two million people still on furlough, a drop of almost 600,000 since may, and the lowest level since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. the under 25s are leaving the scheme faster than any other age group, but it's unclear whether they're heading back into full—time work. furlough is being reduced with employers expected to pay more, but some are warming this could triggerjob losses, as firms struggle to meet the costs. here's our consumer affairs correspondent, colletta smith. it had been such a long time coming.
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just sit at my desk after a whole15 months. it was quite exciting. ten days ago, this woman's life got busy again. after so long on furlough, she was over the moon to get the call asking her to come back. i was originally supposed to come back before the december lockdown. and when the country went into lockdown at that point, i did feel a bit insecure — the fact that, will i be able to come back? because i had been anticipating that initial return to work. so i did worry a little bit. staff here have been brought back gradually as business has picked up again. but across the uk, nearly two million people are still off work. furlough comes with a £66 billion price tag for the government, but from next month businesses are going to have to start paying more for every member of staff still not back in. and that's going to mean some difficult decisions can't be put off any longer. joe runs this small promotions company in stockport and says decisions about who to furlough have been
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really ha rd. my team have been with me a long time. you know, most of them have worked for me for years. you know them very well and their family circumstances, and you're trying to weigh up perhaps some of their financial circumstances — who can you keep in, who can you not? because the business has changed so dramatically this year, to stay on topjoe said she had to let one person go. we had a member of staff that had been with me a few years, but i really felt it was an account management role and that was not what the business was going to need. as further winds up over the next two months, lots of companies may use it as an opportunity to cut staff numbers. we're seeing a lot of clients trying to bring in measures like part—time working, reduced hours, temporary pay cuts, as an alternative to people losing theirjobs. but if those things can't be agreed, then the fallback will be that some people will be made redundant.
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this man says it can't be just back to business as usual. we have had to let a number of our staff go, because we were unsure of how long furlough was going to last. but over the past year as well we have seen a number of our employees leave the industry due to the uncertainties around hospitality. for those who have been out of the workplace for so long, hoping to get back to life as normal, the prospect of redundancy is all the more daunting. coletta smith, bbc news. the number of people being told to isolate by the nhs covid app has reached another record high — with almost 700,000 alerts sent in england and wales in the seven days to the 21st ofjuly. the 11% rise on the previous week comes
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as new figures from the nhs test and trace programme show the number of positive tests in england has climbed to its highest level since mid—january. the foreign secretary, dominic raab, says borisjohnson and president biden have been discussing when britons could be allowed to travel to america again. the uk will welcome more travellers from the states next week when double vaccinated people from the us and most eu countries will no longer have to isolate on arrival in england, scotland and wales. earlier, dominic raab said the decision on admitting britons lies with the us government. well, ultimately, of course, it will be their decision, they're taking a very careful approach, notjust with the uk, but across the board. we've had conversations, the president's raised it with the prime minister, so they clearly would like to proceed and we'll work out how we can do that as soon as possible. ultimately, they've got to take that decision for themselves in the way that many others will and have. what i can tell you, though, is that by taking the approach that we are taking, a lot of countries will then
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approach us and say, "well, can we get on the uk list of double vaccinated citizens from countries that can come in?" a football supporter who suffered life—changing injuries at hillsborough has died at the age of 55. an inquest into andrew devine's death — held on wednesday — concluded he'd been unlawfully killed. it makes him the 97th victim of the disaster. our reporter nick garnett is at anfield with the latest. there are 96 names on the memorial here, and originally 95 people died at the time of the disaster. and tony bland died a short time later. his name was added to the list. and then when this memorial was built, all the names were put on in alphabetical order, and now one more name, the 97th person to have been unlawfully killed at the hillsborough disaster at the fa cup semifinal
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between liverpool and nottingham forest in 1989. now, andy devine was just 22 years old when that match took place. he went just to watch a football game. but the injuries he received there were life—changing. he had to have 24—hour care, around the clock, and he also had to live his life in a wheelchair. he died just two days ago in liverpool royal hospital of pneumonia, but when he died the inquest and the coroner was informed, and the coroner has ruled that he was unlawfully killed, although his death happened 32 years after the injury. andre rebello is the coroner. he gave the cause of death as not only pneumonia, which was the actual condition that mr devine had
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at the end of his life, but also the fact that he had brain and crush injuries from the hillsborough disaster. rebello said it was proportionate, reasonable and sufficient for him to adopt the findings of the inquest into the 96 other victims which found that they had been unlawfully killed, and to use those same conditioning, because it had been at the same time, so that he could call mr devine's death and unlawful killing as well. margaret's sonjames died at the game as well. today, she paid tribute to andy devine and she thinks that his name should be added to the memorial behind me. that is entirely up to the family, obviously~ — that is entirely up to the family, obviously. that is a discussion between — obviously. that is a discussion between the family whether they would _ between the family whether they would like his name put on this. they— would like his name put on this. they might have a different view. but he _ they might have a different view. but he wants to put another name on this memorial? 96 is enough. andy devine's family _ this memorial? 96 is enough. andy devine's family cared _ this memorial? 96 is enough. andy devine's family cared for— this memorial? 96 is enough. in devine's family cared for him all the way through, and they were there when he died the other day. they have released a statement saying,
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"our collective devastation is overwhelming, but so too is the realisation that we were blessed to have andrew with us for 32 years since the hillsborough tragedy. i was earlier on today, liverpool players played tribute to andy devine by having a 97 second silence at their preseason training ground in austria. on social media, a message saying his thoughts are with the family, and that andy devine will always be remembered. portsmouth football club has released three academy players, following an investigation into the alleged use of racially abusive language, in a social media chat group. the club began an inquiry after images allegedly showed some players posting offensive words and images in a private under—18 team chat group, following england's defeat by italy in the euro 2020 final earlier this month. all three players have
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the right to appeal. the time is coming up to 3:30pm. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen. an amber weather warning has been issued. stormy weather will bear down overnight. seasonably windy weather, concerns if you are under canvas but a lot of people at the beaches at the moment, rough conditions and large waves. at the moment, rough for at the moment, rough the rest of the day, further heavy for the rest of the day, further heavy showers. the odd spot of rain elsewhere, but i think the driest, brightest, warmest areas will be southern and eastern areas, but then overnight, another bout of rain pushes on with that storm across much of england and wales as wins really escalate, could bring down power lines and trees. it is really quite unusual for this type of year. a wet and windy one. rain clears two
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showers. the strongest winds migrate further eastwards, so even here we are talking about gales and gusts of 50 mph. some heavy showers as more online. hello, this is bbc news with ben brown. the headlines... england's deputy chief medical 0fficerjonathan van tam tells bbc news that covid vaccines have prevented 22 million cases in the country, and 60,000 deaths. that's truly massive. and the benefit of vaccines is in that secret work that you never see, because if people don't go into hospital and they don't die, you never see that. scientists warn that the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects of climate change, with increased rainfall, more sunshine, and higher temperatures. canoeist mallory franklin secures
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a silverfor team gb in the women's slalom event. and there was a bronze for matt coward—holley in men's trap shooting. a coroner concludes that liverpool football fan andy devine, who died this week after suffering life—changing injuries in the hillsborough stadium disaster, is the 97th victim of the tragedy. jodie whittaker is leaving dr who. the thirteenth doctor in the bbc series is stepping down as a time lord next year. her replacement has yet to be announced. sport, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. day six in tokyo has ended with team gb sitting in sixth in the medals table. no golds today.
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but two more medals nonetheless take them to 18 in total. mallory franklin got a silver on her olympic debut in the women's canoe slalom, an event that was also appearing at the games for the first time. franklin went early in the final and posted a time that saw her lead the competition right until the final paddler and a flawless display from australia'sjessica fox, meant the brit had to settle for silver. franklin is a legacy of london 2012, as she's been training at the lee valley white water centre built for those games. it was a really cool, it was so stressful being sat up there on the start line, but i had a moment when i was, "this is really cool and i would not want to be anywhere else." i caught a glimpse and i smiled and that reminded me of the environment and how crazy it all is but it is really cool. the lee valley centre is also where franklin's family watched on at breakfast time this morning. it was a nerve—wracking moment for them being so far away, having to watch on as each competitor went down the course trying to pinch the gold. they look pretty pleased
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with the end result. the other medal today came courtesy of matt coward—holley won bronze in the men's trap shooting. he is the world and european champion but paid the price for a slow start, missing three of his first 10 targets. the brit recovered with 14 successive hits to climb onto the podium. britain's two—time gold medallist helen glover has ruled out competing in any more olympics, after the mother—of—three's hopes of a fairy tale finish at tokyo 2020 were ended. glover, who's now 35, finished fourth in the women's pair along with polly swann. after the race glover said that this was definitely her last olympics, despite saying that in rio. she is also keen to inspire others, after her incredible journey back into the sport, training while her three babies slept. elsewhere, america's sunisa lee has won the coveted women's all around gymnastics title. the 18—year—old secured the gold with her fourth discipline on the floor, but her uneven bars was the feature of her competition as lee finished just ahead of brazil's rebeca andrade, who won her country's first ever
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medal in women's gymnastics. lee was supported throughout by simone biles, who watched on from the sidelines alongside her other american teammates. this was one of the four gold medals biles won in rio, but she withdrew from the competiton in tokyo to focus on her mental health. the gadirova twins, jessica and jennifer, finshed in 10th and 13th respectively for team gb with their vaults providing the best score of their events. jessica's is the best result by a british woman in the all around competition at the olympics. yeah, i still can't believe it. coming away with the bronze medal, top 15 isjust amazing, and doing it with jess as well, i couldn't ask for more really. and the day has also been affected by coronavirus.
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on the eve of the track and field events beginning, sam kendricks, the world pole vault champion, has withdrawn from the games, having tested postive. he had been expected to contend for a medal in tokyo, while his rivalfrom argentina german chiaraviglio has also contracted the virus. kendricks' positive meant that the whole australian track and field team had to temporarily isolate because three of them were determined to be close contacts. those three have tested negative while the rest have returned to training. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the australian state of new south wales has recorded 239 new coronavirus infections, the highest daily rise since the start of the pandemic. people living in eight hotspots in the biggest city, sydney, are being ordered to wear masks outdoors and must stay within five kilometres of their homes. our correspondent, shaima khalil, in sydney explains if the lockdown will work given the lag in the roll—out of vaccination programme and how infection is fast
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increasing in new south wales. after an announcement of an extension yesterday, experts are saying that this may well go beyond the end of august, the government has announced, because new south wales has recorded 239 new locally acquired cases, the highest number notjust since the beginning of the outbreak but since the beginning of the pandemic for the state which shows you how challenging and difficult the situation is in new south wales, especially in greater sydney with the delta variant and how transmissible it as. more than 65 of those cases have been in the community in the entire time of their illness and that is why the new south wales government has announced new restrictions to aid areas in sydney that are considered hotspots. people in those areas will have to wear facemasks when they go outdoors for essential reasons and they cannot travel farther than
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five kilometres from their homes. we heard from the police commissioner, police will be given powers from tomorrow from friday to close down businesses who breach the stay—at—home orders and who breach the lockdown orders and also expect to see much more police presence on the streets, especially in those areas. we also heard from the state premier who gets a daily update and she refused... rejected the criticism that her government failed in containing the virus, failed to go early enough and hard enough and the lockdown came gradually attributing to the rise in case numbers but she did acknowledge that because of the number of people out in the community while infections, cases are going to get worse, numbers are going to get worse before they get any better. yes, experts are saying that
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even though the lockdown has been
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yes, experts are saying that even though the lockdown theyeen jobs would have been lost. they might have been some other way to keep workers on the payroll. kevin the size of the shock we have seen, national income, i think it's fair to say the furlough had a very substantial impact on job. sets a substantial impact on job. as a substantial impact on 'ob. as a result of at substantial impact on 'ob. as a result of it being i substantial impact onjob. as a result of it being tapered off now, how manyjobs you think could simply disappear? in other words, how manyjobs you think could simply disappear? in otherwords, has how manyjobs you think could simply disappear? in other words, has the furlough scheme been artificially protecting quite a lot ofjobs? it has been the case for a while that employers had to contribute something towards employees being unfurlough, had to pay national insurance and contributions and at
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the beginning of this month had to pay towards wages and there will be even more from the beginning of next month. employers keeping staff on the payroll, the fact they are paying something is indicative they are hoping to bring staff back at some point. that said, now they are being asked to pay more, no doubt that does put the pressure on whether they are prepared to pay to keep workers on their books. it has been an incredibly _ keep workers on their books. it has been an incredibly expensive - keep workers on their books. it has been an incredibly expensive scheme, the government state effectively paying the salaries of millions and millions of people around the country? millions of people around the count ? ., , millions of people around the count ? . , , ., country? certainly in the tens of billions, not _ country? certainly in the tens of billions, not too _ country? certainly in the tens of billions, not too far _ country? certainly in the tens of billions, not too far off - country? certainly in the tens of billions, not too far off £100 i billions, not too far off £100 billions, not too far off £100 billion in total which is eye—watering and will soon have to be paying back for some time yet to come. ., ., ., ._ , come. the government have always said it's very — come. the government have always said it's very generous. _ come. the government have always said it's very generous. how- come. the government have always said it's very generous. how has i come. the government have always said it's very generous. how has it i said it's very generous. how has it compared in terms of its generosity with other countries around the
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world? other governments who have had similarjob retention scheme? it seems to be relatively generous from what i can tell from around the world. it's quite important that many other countries already had something a little bit like furlough already in place. lots of european countries when you lose yourjob, you get some fraction of your previous salary paid for three months, six months or something like that which we don't have anything really like that in the uk in normal times. fora really like that in the uk in normal times. for a lot of other countries, they boosted their existing scheme, in the uk the chancellor created a scheme backed last march. want to make good to talk to you. a group of colleges and universities is urging the government to step back from its decision to scrap b—tecs in england. education leaders are warning the plan is "reckless", as it will harm the prospects of poorer pupils. ministers insist replacing
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the vocational qualifications with a new system of t—levels will ensure students leave education with the skills employers want. the availability of covid—19 vaccines varies widely from country to country. in recent months, the shortage in many parts of the world has sparked the a rise in vaccine tourism, with many people heading to the united states to getjabbed. our taipei correspondent, cindy sui returned to her home country, the us, to find out more. these tourists from many countries have come to the united states to get vaccinated against covid—19. it's notjust for brazil the us, it's for the world. everybody wants the world to come back to the normal life. besides latin america, many of the travellers come from asia, including this 84—year—old grandmother who just got off a flight from vietnam. her grand—daughter tells me,
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even at her age, she can't get vaccinated in her country. i tell you, in my country, not enough vaccine. that's why, not enough for everybody. around 50% of us residents are fully vaccinated, but the rates are much lower elsewhere, including around 20% in south america, 10% in asia and just 1.5% in africa. just the san francisco airport alone has vaccinated around 1,000 passengers arriving from over 50 countries since may, and the demand is growing. the shortage of vaccines and the slow vaccination rates in many places around the world, including taiwan and other parts of asia, have driven a trend in vaccine tourism. the us is making it easy, by offering free vaccines to anyone in its territory without requiring residency. we've got a surplus supply, and being able to make that available for others is really a good thing and really helps everyone.
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it helps other countries to vaccinate their population faster. it helps reduce the barriers on international travel that currently exist. and so ultimately, everybody wins when we offer a programme like this. taiwanese people like amberjo, who prefers the two—shot vaccines, have simply walked into us pharmacies and filled out a consent form to get the jabs. she has spent $18,000 just on plane tickets and hotel lodging for a month, but she says it's worth it. i have a daughter who is seven years old and my parents are over 70 years old. i need to protect myself, and then i can protect my family. i feel so happy. cindy sui, bbc news, san francisco. the headlines on bbc news... england's deputy chief medical 0fficerjonathan van tam tells bbc news that covid vaccines have prevented 22 million in the country and 60,000 deaths.
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scientists warn that the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects of climate change, with increased rainfall, more sunshine and higher temperatures. canoeist mallory franklin secures a silverfor team gb in the women's slalom event. and there was a bronze for matt coward—holley in men's trap shooting. today has been called earth overshoot day by a group of scientists who work out every year how quickly we've used up all the ecological resources the planet can produce in 12 months. and with governments around the world focussed on climate policy in the run—up to the cop26 climate summit in glasgow, the idea of earth overshoot day is based on a pretty simple premise. our reality check correspondent chris morris explains. the premise is this. humans are consuming more, there are more of us, and we're creating more waste, including greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide that get pumped
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into the atmosphere. but the size and capacity of our planet remains the same. so something has to give. and how do scientists calculate when earth overshoot day occurs every year? basically, by comparing the amount of natural resources the earth is able to generate that year, and working out when human demand for those resources uses them all up. in other words, it's the day we've exhausted a 12—month quota of the earth's resources, and we're starting to reduce them, as well as creating more waste through things like carbon emissions from fossilfuels, which make matters much worse. and, this year, it's today, july the 29th. last year, it was more than three weeks later, but, of course, covid played a role in that. huge amounts of economic activity shut down during the first months of the pandemic. since then, carbon emissions have gone up again and the global footprint network reckons our overall carbon footprint has risen by about 6.6%
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compared to last year. but even if 2020 was something of a blip, look at when overshoot day has happened since 1970. it's getting earlier and earlier, although the good news is that the line has flattened a bit over the last few years. these are estimates, but they're based on the latest un data and science. and the pattern is pretty clear. currently, humanity uses 70% more than what earth can renew. it is like if you spend 70% more than what you earn, you can do that for some time but not forever, but the long—term impact, its economic impact is if economies are not resource secure, if we do not have the impact is necessary to maintain the economic machinery, it is going to be hard to maintain it. it's also worth remembering that different countries contribute very differently to the overall picture, based on how much they consume and pollute, and how many people live there. if the global average was like qatar, which has a tiny population, but produces huge amounts of oil and gas, overshoot day would have happened as early as february. in the uk, it would have been may,
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and, indonesia, not until december. the average in many poorer countries of course would mean no overshoot at all. but we're already seeing the effects of the overuse of resources, in terms of deforestation or drought, for example, and, of course, waste or pollution, in terms of those greenhouse gases entering the atmosphere. so, what are we doing about it? we are an ingenious species. we can rethink the way we consume and consume more efficiently. we have got technology and we now know what is happening, so we can rethink our consumption and everything that we use, in terms of energy, the food we eat and even to the clothes that we buy and how we travel, all add to this consumption footprint and it is something we are all responsible for. to protect the planet and the way we live on it, governments agreed at the last big
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climate summit in paris to try to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees celsius above pre—industrial levels. big global corporations have a huge role to play, because this is the decade when real action has to be taken if that goal is to be met. the debate in the run—up to the glasgow summit in november is going to be critical in determining whether it will be. as we've heard, scientists have warned the uk is already undergoing disruptive climate change, with increased rainfall, sunshine and temperatures. well, farmers hit by a freak hail storm last week in essex are calling for emergency financial help from the government. 12 farms in the thaxted area were struck by hail stones the size of golf balls. it's estimated up to 90% of some crops have been lost. this from our environment reporter richard daniel. massive hailstones hammering down in thaxted last week. robert, i've never seen
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damage like this before. well, neither have i. first time, absolutely devastated. it looks as if someone has come through here here with a flail. eight days on, robert still can't take it in. the scale of the damage on his 200—acre farm is immense. we hope it's a one—off. we are having trouble getting our heads around it. we just... we don't know what to do now. we've never seen this devastation. this is our year's work. to us, they are more than money. we look after them, we tend them all year, it's... it's quite hurtful, you know? this is what the crop should look like. it is due for harvest in about three weeks. but take a look at this. battered, bruised, a pod split open. they reckon they have lost around 50% of the crop in this field. nearby, an estimated 90% loss
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in a field of oilseed rape. smashed from pods, the seed has now germinated, creating a green carpet on the ground. and in a field of oats once destined for the breakfast table, a similar story. i have been walking crops in north—west essex as an independent agronomist for 35 years and i have never seen devastation like we are seeing in this winter oat field here. we think we have lost about 90% of our oat crop that robert will harvest in two or three weeks' time. it is on the ground and we haven't got machines to hoover it up. 12 farms in a ten—mile stretch of land barely half a mile wide were hit by the storm, just weeks before harvest. the losses are estimated to run to hundreds of thousands of pounds. defra have a disaster fund so farms that suffered severe flooding back in the winter, i understand, have been supported by that fund and i think this is equally devastating. the hailstorm is the latest in
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a series of extreme weather events. for robert, in just a few minutes, it wiped a year's work and threw his business into loss. itv has said there are "no current plans" for another series of the x factor. a statement from broadcaster came following reports in the sun newspaper that creator simon cowell has axed the programme after 17 years. the newspaper said the programme is being rested for at least five years. the x factor first aired in 2004 and last aired in 2018. it's helped launch the careers of artists including one direction, little mix, olly murs and leona lewis. our correspondent chi chi izundu told me that at its peak, the x factor was seen as saturday night essential viewing. it was making the front pages of the sun newspaper and other newspapers, which is virtually unheard of for most entertainment shows.
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it was cult viewing, it was watershed moments, but right after it started to get billed, i suppose against strictly come dancing, viewers started to lose interest and the numbers of people watching it went from a peak of 17 million to just over 5 million watching the winner in 2018. so yes, the x factor did lose its shine, maybe the four became a bit too tried, a bit too tested, a bit too familiar with the audience and they stop watching, basically. as i mentioned, it launched quite a few big stars and their careers. olly murs, little mix, one direction and so on. huge stars and people who might not have gone on to become singers. rylan clark, he was on x factor, that famous scene of him crying when he was told he was going through to finals, he is now a huge tv presenter. it has launched and made marks of many people throughout the 17
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years it has been on itv. but alas, people started to get a bit bored of the same old format, i guess. people queueing to try and sing, people telling their stories, some of them, people got annoyed at the fact they would come on with a really sad story and the judges were not as sympathetic or they were too sympathetic. people got tired of the judges being too aggressive, if you like. i guess the format needs to change, but as you said, the sun is saying it has not been axed in its totality, it is just rested for five years. whether it comes back as the x factor is a different story. we di know simon cowell signed a five—year deal with itv, and he is expected to bring more britain's got talent, but we also know he is working on other formats. the x factor could come back in a different guise. i would not be surprised. he has made a fair few pennies from the programme? it has been formatted around the world. it is a huge programme.
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it lasted i think three seasons in the united states alone. again, people still talk about the different characters, it has launched careers and made memorable people and moments. here in the uk, things have moved on. netflix, the onslaught of streaming and other programme formats have taken precedent. the x factor needs to make vast changes in order to try and capture and capture that golden time of saturday night tv. finally, a slice of prince charles and princess diana's wedding cake has been put up for sale, 40 years after the event. the large slice, from one of the 23 official wedding cakes, features the royal coat—of—arms coloured in gold, red, blue, and silver.
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it's expected to sell for between £300—500 at auction. would—be buyers are advised against eating it. would you eat wedding cake 40 years after the event? you would be a bit crazy if you did. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen. hello, good afternoon. the showers should not be as numerous today, but there will still be the odd heavy and thundery one around as we go through the rest of the day. met office have issued an amber warning for storm evert. that is going to bear down on the south—west of england through this evening, with some damaging winds. unseasonably windy, which means there will be large waves, rough conditions at sea. if you are sleeping under canvas, and many heading to the beach, as i say, there will be some rather dangerous conditions around. for the rest of the day, ahead of that system, we will see the driest, brightest and warmest weather in southern and eastern areas. i mention some heavy showers, potential in northern england, northern ireland, southern and eastern scotland. in the far north of scotland staying rather cool and cloudy.
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quite blustery as well today but the winds will escalate further, starting to bring in the rain to pembrokeshire and the south—west by the end of the day. with gale force winds forecast, gusts in excess of 60 mph as we go through the night, potentially, across devon and cornwall. through friday they will migrate further eastwards. accompanying those strong winds, unusually windy weather, some wetter weather working across much of england and wales, the far north escaping. the showers initially quite heavy for the north, they will tend to ease, it will be a cooler night for scotland and northern ireland. friday is a tale of two halves. a lot of cloud in the north and some showery rain but in the south we have more heavy showers, longer spells of rain, and strong winds, gusts of 40—50 mph, even as they spread further southwards into south—east england and east anglia. there will be some rather lively winds causing some disruption both tonight and tomorrow with some heavy downpours again, even some thunder and lightning in the slow moving showers for central areas. temperatures a little bit down, just because we have got
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more cloud tomorrow. into the weekend, the low pressure moves out the way but as it pushes across into the eastern side of europe, it allows this northerly breeze to come down. high pressure still sitting to the west of us. but with that setup and a northerly breeze, it means things will cool down. we have had heat and humidity already through this month but it will be, on average, cooler than it should be through the weekend, particularly for scotland and northern ireland. still some showers around and still potentially heavy for england and wales. the details and the warnings are on the website.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines: england's deputy chief medical 0fficerjonathan van tam tells bbc news that covid vaccines have prevented 22 million cases in the country and 60,000 deaths. that's truly massive. and the benefit of vaccines is in that secret work that you never see, because if people don't go into hospital and they don't die, you never see that. scientists warn that the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects of climate change — with increased rainfall, more sunshine and higher temperatures. team gb have secured two more medals at the tokyo games.
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bronze in the men's trap shooting and silver in the women's canoe slalom. it can mean so much for people, and i hope people see women now as an event that is really high class, there was some amazing paddling out there. a coroner concludes that liverpool football fan andy devine — who died this week after suffering life—changing injuries in the hillsborough stadium disaster — is the 97th victim of the tragedy. and it's goodbye, doctor — it's confirmed that jodie whittaker will step down from the role next year. england's deputy chief medical officer, jonathan van tam,
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has told the bbc that covid vaccinations have prevented around 22 million new coronavirus cases in england and saved about 60,000 lives. he announced the figures — which are from public health england — while answering questions on the vaccines from bbc newsbeat listeners. let's hear what he had to say: there is some new data coming out today. i'm going to break the news here. i don't think it's out actually until another few minutes, but the latest public health england analysis shows that because of the vaccines and because of this massive third wave we've had, actually what the vaccines have done is they've prevented in total, since we got them, 22 million cases of covid infection and 60,000 deaths. so, you know, that's truly massive. our head of statistics, robert cuffe, has been putting these figures into context.
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they don't fully account for whether we might have done more lockdowns. but they are pretty reasonable on the face of it, in the ballpark. because what they've done is, they've looked at the number of cases and the number of infections we have seen over the last couple of months, and they've said, "what if those infections were still killing people at the rate they were before we had the vaccines?" so that gives you one number. that gives you a rough estimate of the deaths. and they also say, on top of that, "well, the vaccine does prevent some infection." so, if that was the case, if the vaccines weren't working or weren't here, we wouldn't be seeing december, january—ish numbers of case numbers as we are at the moment, they'd be even higher. and those infections would have gone on to kill people as well. when you think back to december, january, we were seeing tens of thousands of people dying within the space of a month. so it's probably not surprising to say we'd be seeing an extra 60,000 deaths if we hadn't locked down. and i think that's where you think the numbers might be a slight exaggeration, because of course, if it
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weren't for the vaccines, if we were seeing those very high levels of deaths, the government would have stepped in and we will be back in a full—on lockdown before we got to the levels of cases we are seeing at the moment. so that is how they get there. and you can see, it's not controversial to say that it has saved tens of thousands of lives, but the numbers themselves might be a slight push because other things would have happened to get in the way. actually, during that interview, jonathan van tam was saying the vaccine might have been even more effective had it not been for the delta variant, which is very transmissible. he was suggesting that it's perhaps slightly less effective against that than it had been, for example, against the original wuhan variant. absolutely. we do see that the first dose of the vaccine doesn't get you quite the same a not of protection now that we are facing delta, but it is still worth saying that the effect is still pretty good for stopping you getting really sick. so one dose of the vaccine reduces your chance of going into hospital, even with delta, probably by about 75%. so everyjab does make a real difference. but of course, as you said, if we'd been facing the old school
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christmas variant, we would be in a much better position now than we are facing delta. and one brief question on the case numbers. and we'll get the latest data on how many coronavirus cases there are in the uk in the next hour or two, but yesterday we saw a slight rise again after seven days of continual falls in the number of cases, which have taken a lot of people by surprise. a lot of scientists are struggling to explain why there has been such a steady fall until yesterday. i'd be very careful about getting too worried, because the way that the scientists tend to look at the data is week—on—week changes. so wednesday versus last wednesday, it's still down. so the overall trend is still good. those seven days in a row of falling numbers every day was remarkable, and it is a real head—scratcher. it is really fantastic to have seen those numbers. i mean, scientists are still warning we could see case numbers rise in the future. we are probably not finished this, as professor van tam said during his session earlier. we are nowhere near the end of this.
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we will see cases come up and down in the future. but one day is probably more of a blip than a trend. we have just had the latest case numbers for the uk. the number of cases is up again from 27,734 yesterday to 31,117. that's the latest number of cases in the last 24 hours. after a week of falling steadily in which case numbers were falling day by day, they went up by around 4000 yesterday and up again by a similar number, about another 4000, so that is another rise in case numbers but nothing like the figures that were being predicted at one stage of perhaps 100,000 although still the effects of the lifting of all restrictions on the 19th ofjuly is still not being felt
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fully according to scientists and the number of deaths, 85 compared to 91 yesterday, so 85 deaths compared to 91 yesterday and on vaccinations, 71.4% of adults in the uk have now had both doses of the covid vaccine so 71.5% of adults in the uk now having both doses. and at half past four, professorjonathan van tam — england's deputy chief medical officer — answers questions from young people on all aspects of the covid vaccine including why he believes they should have it and when they might be offered a booster.
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he was quoting the figures from public health england, 60,000 lives have been saved in england by the vaccine. the impact of climate change is already being felt across the uk with more rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. these are the findings of the state of uk climate report 2020 from the met office. it says that 2020 was the third warmest year since 1884. it was the fifth wettest. six of the ten wettest years have been since 1998. and last year was the eighth sunniest on record. the experts said that, in the space of 30 years, the uk has become 0.9 celsius warmer and 6% wetter. the report's lead author, mike kendon, warns, "we are going to see more and more extreme weather such
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as heatwaves and floods" as the climate continues to warm. our science correspondent, rebecca morelle, reports. dramatic changes in our skies. in 2020, the uk experienced a year of extremes. from storms in february, which caused chaos across the country, to a summer heatwave where temperatures sweltered above 34 degrees for six consecutive days, and rain in october with the uk's wettest day on record. it is all charted in an annual assessment of the climate which found the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our observations that the uk's climate is already changing, so climate change isn't something that will happen in 2050 or something we need to worry about towards the end of the century, we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. the report compared the most recent three decades with the 30 years
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before and found that on average the uk was 0.9 degrees hotter. for rainfall, the country was on average 6% wetter and 2020 was the eighth sunniest year recorded in the last 100 years. new defences are under construction, like this tidal barrier in lincolnshire, to cope with future storm surges. but the reality is flooding is having a devastating impact now with some homes being flooded again and again, changes that seem small having a big effect on people's lives. what's interesting about this report is there's lots of data in there, so there's lots of temperature records and percentage changes, but actually what we are seeing are the impacts — the impact to us as humans, to our businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of our eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united nations climate summit and we'll find out if governments can rise
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to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effects of climate change. right now, the elements show no signs of letting up, with this week's flash floods taking london by surprise. scientists will continue to track and analyse these events, but they warn that extremes are becoming the new norm. rebecca morrelle, bbc news. joining me now is dr yannish naik who is the director at the uk health alliance on climate change. we are going to talk about the health implications in particular from climate change. how do you see those impact on our health in this country especially?— those impact on our health in this country especially? good afternoon. the health impacts _ country especially? good afternoon. the health impacts of _ country especially? good afternoon. the health impacts of climate - country especially? good afternoon. | the health impacts of climate change are going to be really significant. the uk climate change commission does talk about some potential benefits, reduced deaths from warmer winters, more physical activity from longer summers, winters, more physical activity from longersummers, but winters, more physical activity from longer summers, but the evidence is really limited. what we do know is
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that the heat —related deaths are going to go up from 2000 a year at the moment to 7000 deaths a year by 2015. floods have huge impacts on mental health including things like post—traumatic stress disorder and they disrupt health services as we've seen this week in london. climate change is going to make worse existing health inequalities and air pollution, which is a closely related problem driven by many of the similar issues, air pollution is responsible for 40,000 deaths a year so climate change is going to have a really significant negative impact on people's health in the uk. �* , negative impact on people's health in the uk. �*, ., ~ negative impact on people's health in the uk. �*, ., ,, ., ., negative impact on people's health inthe uk. �*, ., ., in the uk. let's take one of those heats, in the uk. let's take one of those heats. we — in the uk. let's take one of those heats. we just — in the uk. let's take one of those heats, we just had _ in the uk. let's take one of those heats, we just had a _ in the uk. let's take one of those heats, we just had a heatwave i in the uk. let's take one of those i heats, we just had a heatwave which was extremely uncomfortable. what sort of mitigating factors can be put in place to deal with that, if that's going to become more frequent and are more common occurrence, heat waves, extreme heat?—
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waves, extreme heat? there's something _ waves, extreme heat? there's something about _ waves, extreme heat? there's something about early - waves, extreme heat? there'sj something about early warning systems, something about people being informed about how to protect themselves from heat, but we also need strong action to reduce the impacts of climate change itself which is why the alliance on climate change in the uk is calling for strong action to limit climate change to 1.5 degrees and large countries to make bigger cuts to that. we've got the countries to make bigger cuts to that- we've go— countries to make bigger cuts to that. we've got the cop26 summit cominu u- that. we've got the cop26 summit coming up in _ that. we've got the cop26 summit coming up in glasgow. _ that. we've got the cop26 summit coming up in glasgow. that's i that. we've got the cop26 summit| coming up in glasgow. that's going to be hugely important in getting the world's leaders together. what do they need to do that isn't being done now, how much more do they need to focus all their attention on this crucial issue?— to focus all their attention on this crucial issue? you quoted the met office reports _ crucial issue? you quoted the met office reports just _ crucial issue? you quoted the met office reportsjust before - crucial issue? you quoted the met office reportsjust before i - crucial issue? you quoted the met office reportsjust before i came i office reportsjust before i came on, the uk has seen a degree of climate change over the last 30 years. we know from the world health organization at 1.5 degrees isn't safe and we'll see harm to millions of people around the world so we
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certainly think everything has to be done this year to make sure that climate change is kept within 1.5 degrees and the health alliance on climate change has called for a number of things like ending fossil fuel subsidies, investment in vulnerable countries, but we really have a decade to make a lot of difference. latte have a decade to make a lot of difference-— have a decade to make a lot of difference. ~ . , ., ., difference. we are still not going fast enough _ difference. we are still not going fast enough or— difference. we are still not going fast enough or far _ difference. we are still not going fast enough or far enough - difference. we are still not going fast enough or far enough in i difference. we are still not going. fast enough or far enough in other words. .,. , fast enough or far enough in other words.- thank _ fast enough or far enough in other words.- thank you - fast enough or far enough in other words.- thank you very i fast enough or far enough in other. words.- thank you very much words. exactly. thank you very much for bein: words. exactly. thank you very much for being with _ words. exactly. thank you very much for being with us, _ words. exactly. thank you very much for being with us, doctor. _ words. exactly. thank you very much for being with us, doctor. thanks i for being with us, doctor. thanks for being with us, doctor. thanks for havin: for being with us, doctor. thanks for having me. _ there are now under two million people still on furlough, a drop of almost 600,000 since may, and the lowest level since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. the under 25s are leaving the scheme faster than any other age group, but it's unclear whether they're heading back into full time work. furlough is being reduced with employers expected to pay more, but some are warming this could triggerjob losses, as firms struggle to meet the costs.
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frances o'grady is the general secretary of the trade union congress. what are your fears about unemployment in this country, as the furlough scheme gradually tapers away? furlough scheme gradually tapers awa ? , ., ., , ., away? first of all we should recognise — away? first of all we should recognise that _ away? first of all we should recognise that second i away? first of all we should recognise that second only | away? first of all we should i recognise that second only to the nhs's recognise that second only to the nhs's look to the vaccine, furlough has been the single most successful policy intervention working with employers and what we've seen is the numbers unfurlough —— on furlough reduced, helping families get back on theirfeet, but reduced, helping families get back on their feet, but the worry is as and when the government withdraws support and expects employers to
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contribute more, that will trigger redundancies so what we are seeing is that there are still some parts of the economy that still need that support, particularly culture, particularly hospitality and food and even in manufacturing there are nearly 200,000 people still dependent on furlough for their livelihoods, some full—time, some part time, but we need the government to recognise that they should continue to support furlough, continue to use it for as long as it's needed where those jobs and industries are viable. but it's needed where those 'obs and industries are viableh industries are viable. but they can't, industries are viable. but they can't. there — industries are viable. but they can't, there isn't _ industries are viable. but they can't, there isn't a _ industries are viable. but they} can't, there isn't a bottomless industries are viable. but they . can't, there isn't a bottomless pit of government money, a line has to be drawn somewhere. i of government money, a line has to be drawn somewhere.— of government money, a line has to be drawn somewhere. i think what we need is to get — be drawn somewhere. i think what we need is to get around _ be drawn somewhere. i think what we need is to get around the _ be drawn somewhere. i think what we need is to get around the table - be drawn somewhere. i think what we need is to get around the table and i need is to get around the table and look at how we can genuinely support industry like culture that we know are incredibly important for this country can generate lots of money for this country and we all want to
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see them succeed but they are going to continue to need some support to get back on their feet until we really have got the virus under control and people are confident in the numbers that we need to see going back into the industry and using the industry. [30 going back into the industry and using the industry.— going back into the industry and using the industry. do you think the furlouah using the industry. do you think the furlough scheme _ using the industry. do you think the furlough scheme has _ using the industry. do you think the furlough scheme has artificially - furlough scheme has artificially been protecting a lot ofjobs that are effectively gone? jobs that companies can no longer employ to keep, in other words, as it ends, there will inevitably be large numbers of people who are going to be made unemployed? i numbers of people who are going to be made unemployed?— numbers of people who are going to be made unemployed? i hope not but we mustn't withdraw _ be made unemployed? i hope not but we mustn't withdraw support - be made unemployed? i hope not but we mustn't withdraw support to - be made unemployed? i hope not but we mustn't withdraw support to soon | we mustn't withdraw support to soon and end up with that false economy are paying people benefits to stay at home and do nothing as opposed to helping them get back into work. i think furlough has been really successful. we had over 9 million
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people at its peak dependent on furlough, 9 million livelihoods, but what's happened is that by providing that support in the vast majority of cases, industries and jobs, families, have been able to get back off their knees onto their feet and are generating wealth for the country, being paid wages that are spent in local shops and businesses so it's been a big success story that has allowed our economy to get back to health much more quickly than otherwise would have been the case so don't waste that opportunity with particular industries like culture and aviation that are still struggling but we know are absolutely vital for the future of this country and deserve our support. this country and deserve our su . ort, ., . , this country and deserve our suuort. ., ., �*,.,, this country and deserve our suuort. ., . , �*, ., ~' this country and deserve our suuort, ., ., �*, ., support. frances o'grady, thank you for bein: support. frances o'grady, thank you for being with _ support. frances o'grady, thank you for being with us. _ support. frances o'grady, thank you for being with us. thank— support. frances o'grady, thank you for being with us. thank you. - the number of people being told
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to isolate by the nhs covid app has reached another record high with almost 700,000 alerts sent in england and wales in the seven days to the 21st ofjuly. the 11% rise on the previous week comes as new figures from the nhs test and trace programme show the number of positive tests in england has climbed to its highest level since mid—january. a football supporter who suffered life—changing injuries at hillsborough has died at the age of 55. an inquest into andrew devine's death — held on wednesday — concluded he'd been unlawfully killed. it makes him the 97th victim of the disaster. the bbc have confirmed jodie whittaker will step down on her role in doctor who next year. she took over as the 13th doctor back in 2017 and was the first woman to play the time lord. earlier, i spoke to the our entertainment correspondent
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lizo mzimba about her legacy and who might in the running to replace her. some will have liked her and some will have liked other particular doctors that have come in the past. for those of us that grew up in the 1990s, the fact that doctor who is still on air means the doctor has been a success and kept the programme going. it's fair to say that, when her first episode aired, it got 11.5 million viewers, doctor who's biggest audience for almost a decade. so, there seemed to be a real groundswell of support, presumably because she was the first female doctor. people were fascinated and really wanted her to succeed in the role. it's fair to say that over her first two series, the ratings did drop away to closer to what they were for her predecessor peter capaldi's ratings were during his tenure, so not as big as it was at the start but still delivering what the bbc hope, if not
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the spectacular ratings that david tennant and matt smith were getting in their time. i think people will be delighted by the fact that we have had a female doctor, who has been doing different kinds of stories, keeping the legacy of doctor who going, and certainly her place in history is assured. only 12 people have walked on the moon, there have only been 13 doctors, so it's a pretty elite group to be in! that's a very good comparison! and a bit like james bond, there's always speculation about who is going to be the next doctor. at this point, we don't even know who is going to be in charge of doctor who for when jodie whittaker and the current showrunner chris chibnall do step down. their last episode will be filmed over the next few weeks and months, but it won't go out until november 2022, to tie in with the bbc's centenary. we don't who will be in charge of doctor who when the next incarnation comes along, and they presumably will have a big say in who it will be. there is always speculation in the papers of people
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like michaela coel, very much a performer of the moment. i'd be very surprised because she's doing incredibly well doing her own material, stretching out in all sorts ofareas, big here, big in the united states, big around the globe. and it's a big commitment to do something like doctor who, to come in and spent eight or nine months of the year filming on just one show. so, you need to catch people at that sweet point when they are coming along and have lots of talent, but before they are too massively big that other people can come along and swamp them with bigger offers or more control orjust better use of their time. people talked about phoebe waller—bridge before jodie whittaker was appointed. she has got a huge, 20 million+ deal with amazon, she's doing her own material all over the place, does she really want to spend nine months of the year working on a show
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that she doesn't write and isn't involved in except acting, which is a hard job, five, six—day weeks for three quarters of the year. there are people coming up, lovely people like amari douglas, who we saw in russell t davies' it's a sin, actresses like hermione corlfield. if you'd asked me two years ago, i might have said florence pugh, but again, now she's too big, she's an oscar nominee, she's in black widow, she's doing massive stuff all over the globe. not too big for doctor who, surely? the bbc can't compete with the time and the cash that other people can offer. i think you really have to love doctor who to commit nine months of your life. they film in cardiff at the moment, to do that to the exclusion of other, more lucrative offers that will be pouring in from over the world. itv has said there are "no current plans" for another series of the x factor. a statement from broadcaster came following reports in the sun newspaper that creator simon cowell has axed the programme after 17 years.
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the newspaper said the programme is being rested for at least five years. the x factor first aired in 2004 and last aired in 2018. it's helped launch the careers of artists including one direction, little mix, olly murs and leona lewis. team gb have won further medals in tokyo, on that and the other action at the games, let's cross now to my colleague lucy hockings in tokyo. interesting to hear you talk about stars of the screen. we have a new start at the olympics. she will be a household name for sure in the next 24 household name for sure in the next 2a hours because sunisa lee from the usa has won the women's gymnastic eventin usa has won the women's gymnastic event in the past hour. it's an event in the past hour. it's an event everyone looks forward to
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because of the sheer talent and skill obviously on display. this event was under quite a lot of scrutiny because simone biles pulled out of the competition, citing her mental health. sunisa lee is only 18 years old and has made history for other reasons as well, she's become the first american from the hmong community to win a gold medal at these olympic games and while we are talking about simone biles as well, the stadiums here are empty but team usa had support staff in the stands and one of the loudest voices was simone biles cheering on the team. team gb have had a good day with mallory franklin taking silver. the 27—year—old is a former world champion and a multiple medallist at all levels but had been denied a
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shot at olympic glory before the category was included for the first time here. meanwhile, here in tokyo coronavirus infections have hit a new high — nearly four thousand, twice the daily level a week ago. olympic officials say there's no evidence that the games had contributed to the rise. japanese media say that for the first time national daily coronavirus cases have exceeded 10,000. a lot of concern here injapan about these rising rates, the numbersjust go these rising rates, the numbersjust 9° up these rising rates, the numbersjust go up every day. let's get more on this from william pesek, and american columnist based in tokyo. can you put these cases in perspective for us? for some countries they would still seem so low but how are they being seen in japan, relative to how the hospitals
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and health care systems can cope? these numbers are off the charts certainly and there is a sense of, here we go, because there were a lot of predictions that we would see a very big ramping up of cases and we are seeing that as we speak. as you mention, the caseloads here from the us, relative to japan, has not had a bad covid experience but the idea of having this massive, in—person, 80,000 people arriving from around the world into a country that is getting better with vaccinations but is still behind the curve was always quite a big risk and we don't really know where we will be a month from now so there is this kind of sense here that people were worried about this happening and it is happening. olympic officials say it is not the olympics that is causing this rise in infections. are they simply ignoring the fact that the japanese are winning gold medals? people are
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gathering together to watch the olympics and they are hearing a mixed message? on one hand, stay inside, on the other hand, here are all the athletes performing in these venues. it all the athletes performing in these venues. , �* , 2 venues. it isn't 'ust the ioc, it's the venues. it isn'tjust the ioc, it's the government _ venues. it isn'tjust the ioc, it's the government as _ venues. it isn'tjust the ioc, it's the government as well. - venues. it isn'tjust the ioc, it's the government as well. in - venues. it isn'tjust the ioc, it's the government as well. in the | venues. it isn'tjust the ioc, it's - the government as well. in the prime ministers asked about rising covid cases, he smiles and says, we are winning all these medals, and there is this kind of schizophrenia here because you see people excited about the fact japan because you see people excited about the factjapan suddenly has something to celebrate, the economy has not been great for years and now japan is beating china, the us, south korea and people think, shouldn't we be celebrating? look at all this hardship in the world, cases in our city and our country are surging, where might we be in six weeks? there is this kind of schizophrenia between celebration and trepidation.— and trepidation. what's the situation with _ and trepidation. what's the situation with testing - and trepidation. what's the situation with testing in - and trepidation. what's the - situation with testing in japan? i situation with testing injapan? i
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notice it's an incredibly expensive place to get a coronavirus test. do you suspect the figures every day are a true reflection of what's happening?— are a true reflection of what's haueninu? �* . ~ ., happening? we've always known the cases were a — happening? we've always known the cases were a lot _ happening? we've always known the cases were a lot higher. _ happening? we've always known the cases were a lot higher. tests - happening? we've always known the cases were a lot higher. tests are i cases were a lot higher. tests are harder to get, reservations are difficult to get and expensive. what we've looked at morris hospitalisations and the extent to which the health care system was stretched and at the moment it is quite stretched so in many ways the caseload probably is a lot higher than we know and with the delta variant, who knows where we will be in six weeks or four weeks but the delta variant is tearing through asia, tearing through delta variant is tearing through asia, tearing throuthapan, showing up asia, tearing throuthapan, showing up all over the country. we've seen four different prefectures today announce states of emergency as well so japan is now moving in the right direction and the medals are terrific but who knows what to expect four weeks from now? thank
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ou for expect four weeks from now? thank you for your — expect four weeks from now? thank you for your thoughts. _ expect four weeks from now? thank you for your thoughts. that - expect four weeks from now? thank you for your thoughts. that is - expect four weeks from now? thank you for your thoughts. that is the i you for your thoughts. that is the feeling here at the moment, things possibly under control but what about autumn as infection rates keep going up? in terms of the olympics, sunisa lee, the first member of the hmong community to represent the usa at the olympics taking gold with a simone biles watching from the stand. those of the images being beamed around the world at the moment. now, the weather with helen. good afternoon. an amber warning has been issued by the met office for an impending very windy weather. the storm will bear down on the southwest of england overnight, bringing unseasonably windy weather so concerns if you are under canvas, a lot of people at the beach is the moment and there will be rough conditions and large waves. some heavy showers for scotland and
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eastern parts of england, possibly northern ireland and the spot of rain elsewhere but overnight another bout of rain pushes in with that storm across much of england and wales. the winds are really damaging and could bring down power lines and trees, it's unusualfor and could bring down power lines and trees, it's unusual for this time of year. not a cold night but a wet and windy one. the rain clears to showers through friday, the strongest winds migrate further eastwards so we are talking about gales, gusts of 50 miles an hour and some heavy showers. there is more online. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: england's deputy chief medical 0fficerjonathan van—tam tells bbc news that covid vaccines have prevented 22 million cases in the country, and 60,000 deaths. scientists warn that the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects of climate change, with increased
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rainfall, more sunshine and higher temperatures. canoeist mallory franklin secures a silverfor team gb in the women's slalom event in tokyo. and there was a bronze for matt coward—holley in men's trap shooting. and it's goodbye, doctor — it's confirmed that jodie whittaker will step down from the role next year. now a special edition of your questions answered with professorjonathan van—tam, responding to questions from newsbeat listeners and people watching bbc news. hello, i'm ben mundy. welcome to this special edition of your questions answered. today, we'rejoined by england's deputy chief medical officer,
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jonathan van—tam, answering questions on the coronavirus vaccine from bbc newsbeat listeners, as well as those of you watching at home today. and there's still time to get involved. we're @bbcnews on twitter, yse the hashtag #your0uestionsanswered. so, let's get going. good afternoon, professor van—tam, thanks forjoining us on bbc news. hello, how are you doing? very good. and we'll go straight to the first question, from priya in birmingham. good afternoon, priya. good afternoon, hi there. hi — so, my first question is, before i get into the question, ijust wanted to mention that i'm all in favor of individuals taking the vaccine if they feel they need it, whatever the reason, be that age, vulnerability, etc. however, i'm young, i'm only 25, i would say relatively fit, and i recently had covid. and we were told that the vaccine would reduce the serious illness and hospitalization amongst the old or that it affects the older generation more and it's pretty rare to see young
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people, you could say, hospitalized or suffering. so, i was wondering why would i or any other young person be inclined to get the vaccine for individual reasons? yeah, thanks for the question. let me begin by saying that, yesterday, i was out and about in the hospitals in lincolnshire and speaking to some of the respiratory consultants who are looking after these patients who are very poorly with covid. and they were telling me they've got several people already in their 20s in this third wave who are on the intensive care unit, some barely in their 20s, and some sadly who are not going to survive at that age. so the idea that covid is less serious to the young is right, but the idea that it is not pretty serious indeed for some young people is sadly wrong.
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and then, of course, on top of that, there is the risk of long covid, which we don't fully understand yet, except that we know it's severe and we know it is really debilitating for people who get it. if you kind of go back to january this year, when we were kind of at the height of the second wave, about two thirds of the hospital admissions with covid were in people over 65. if you look at those stats now, it's two thirds who are under 65, and i actually have got a few stats i can give you here. so, how old did you say you were? 25. 25, here we are. so, 25 to sa—year—olds at the start of january, this isjust a kind of seven—day figure at the start of january, 1% of admissions for covid were in your age group. now it's 6%. if we look at your same age
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group, again, 25 to sa, back injanuary, 3% of patients who needed to be ventilated because of covid were your age group. now it is 11%. so, it is a changing picture. and, you know, we've seen enough stories, you canjust look around in the media, you can look in this country, can look abroad, and you get all these really sad stories of young people who are either dying of covid or have died of covid. and they're saying things like, well, you know, i didn't really take it seriously, i didn't think this is about me and look at me now, so. you know, i'm very pleased that you only had covid mildly, but sadly, it's not the case for some people. priya, a comprehensive answer there from professor van—tam, does it change anything in your mind and maybe you can give us a bit
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of reaction from your friends? what are your friends telling you about the vaccinations? well, my friends are telling me to have the vaccination, but one thing that i'm interested in is, i think stats are really useful and some of the stats that you gave were quite useful as well, but i think we're still hearing one side of the story. we don't really have, every few days we get updates on how many people have had the vaccine. i would love to see some data on how many people are suffering from long covid. and i would love to see some information on, for example, these young people that are being hospitalized, whether they are overweight, whether they're vulnerable. our lifestyle in the west is very different from other countries. you know, in some respects, stress, overprocessed food could be a contributor to illness. so, i think some of these things make a big difference
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and it would be interesting, when the data comes out, to see where these differences lie. yes, very good points, and to come back on them, on the point about food, definitely, obesity has been a very big risk factor for covid. we know that and we've seen that in multiple countries, including our own. i gather that your friends are encouraging you to have a vaccine. in actual fact, one of the things that's just kind of silently creeping up without many young people realising is now that 65% of the 18 to 29s have now had at least one dose. and so, actually, we're getting to the point where, well, we are already past the point where people who haven't had the vaccine are actually starting to be in a minority, and that's a good thing. and, you know, there are many other things to consider as well.
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once we have a very highly vaccinated adult population, that includes the youngsters 18 to 25 and so forth, then the chances of us needing another lockdown are much lower. it's not for me as a medical adviser to say what ministers will decide about, for example, access to certain venues like nightclubs in the future, but the prime minister's made an announcement of the direction of travel. and it's not for me, it's for governments, both the uk government and those abroad, to say what this is going to mean in the future for travel and covid—19 vaccines. but vaccines already are a condition of travel to places like saudi arabia, for the hajj, to various countries where there's a yellow fever problem and you need a certificate of vaccination. so, it isn't entirely unexpected if we get to that kind of world where covid vaccines are going to be needed for travel.
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but on the nightclubs piece, i can absolutely say that any kind of closed, crowded, high—contact venue full of vaccinated people will always be massively safer than that same venue, same conditions, but with the unvaccinated. and covid is not going to disappear, it's going to be here for many, many years to come. and let mejustjump in there. priya in birmingham, thank you very much for your involvement in your questions answered this afternoon. lots of questions to get through. remember, you can get involved by using @bbcnews and the hashtag #yourquestionsanswered. so, priya, unvaccinated as it stands at the moment. let's bring in adam in middlesbrough, who's had one jab, and also shani in coventry, who is unvaccinated at the moment. shani, we'll come to you first, your question for professor van—tam? hi there. so, my question was, why should a healthy
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individual like myself who's had covid and has experienced nothing more than cold, flu symptoms, be willing to take a vaccine that we don't know the long term effects of at the moment? right. we certainly know that long—term covid has effects for people and we know that long—term covid will be here forever. i can tell you that it is four billion doses of covid vaccines have been given out around the world, and 84 million in the uk. so, if there was anything very major going on in terms of side effects and long—term consequences, we would by now, i think, have seen those signals and, you know, wejust haven't. and, you know, it's back to my point that we've got to learn to live with covid. it may well be that, in the future, it's going to be more and more difficult to access certain
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venues and to go on holiday without having been vaccinated. adam, let's turn to you, you have had one jab, you've had coronavirus as well. you say you lost your sense of smell for six months. what is your question and what are your thoughts, listening to the professor there? yeah, hi. my question is in regards to, i i live in the northeast of england and covid seems to be| spreading like wildfire. my question is, i know so many- people who have been double jabbed and still cutting covid. so i'd like a bit of clarity around the purpose of the vaccine i and what's actually designed to do, is it designed to stop people - actually catching covid or is it i designed to limit the side effects if people do catch covid? because, like i say, - and in my region especially, there's been a lot of people i who have actually been double jabbed already and still seem to be catching covid. - so, that's my question. i think that's an absolutely brilliant question, i really do. and the truth of the matter is that,
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when we went after covid vaccines, and i personally started this quest with various other people in the uk government back in march 2020, we were primarily after something that would stop people dying. so, that's the kind of first base, if you like, that you want a vaccine to get to when you're faced with a lethal disease, but the kind of second base, if you like, if you can get another run out of it, as it were, is that you want it to do more than stopping people dying, you want to keep them out of hospital so that that protects the nhs. and then the holy grail is that you stop people getting infected to such a large extent that actually you stop transmission. and if we still had the original wuhan strain of the of the virus
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in circulation, then we would, i think by now, have been very close to all of those goals. but what we've now got and, you know, it's all over the country, frankly, but it's certainly way up there in the north east at the moment, you've got the delta variant, which has changed and the vaccines are not quite as good as the delta variant. but what we do already know is that is they are still very good at largely stopping people dying of covid. and that's why this time, although we have that kind of massive wave in the third wave in the uk, the deaths have gone up by very little in comparison and really minor compared to the second wave and the first wave. and hospitalisations again, yes, they've gone up, that's for sure, i wouldn't pull a punch, you know, i don't tend to do that, but they haven't gone up to anything
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like the same extent as they did the first time. so, of your mates and the people you know who've been double jabbed and who've had covid as well, who are kind of going, well, the jab didn't work for me, i still got infected, the probable truth is that a proportion of them, what they should be saying is, well, i still got infected, but i didn't end up in hospital. and if i hadn't had thejob and i'd got infected, i probably would have ended up in hospital or worse. and that's what is really, really important. there's some new data coming out today, i'm going to break the news here, i don't think it's out actually until another few minutes. but the latest public health england analysis shows that, because of the vaccines and because of this massive third wave we've had, actually, what the vaccines have done is they prevented now in total, since we got them, 22 million cases of covid infection and 60,000 deaths.
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so, that's truly massive. and the benefit of vaccines is in that kind of secret work that you never see, because if people don't go into hospital and they don't die, you never see that. and that's the bit, that's really where the big wins have been, in what otherwise would have this would have looked like if we hadn't had the vaccines. shani, let's return to you just quickly before we move on. listening to that and that conversation between adam and professor van—tam, does that reassure you? does that make you more likely to pursue the vaccination? shani, that's to you? oh, to me, sorry. not really, if i'm honest, just because i don't think we've had enough time. i don't think we've had enough time to know the long term effects of the vaccine. it's been around not
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even a year yet. and so i think, personally, that'sjust not enough for me. ok, well, both thank you forjoining us on your questions answered, like i say, lots of questions coming into us. professor van—tam, i just want to clarify something. you mentioned 22 million cases prevented there, can i check whether you are referring to the uk or england? iam... do you know, i can't tell you the answer to that. 0k, 0k. well, we'll get clarification later here on bbc and bring it to you as soon as we can. let's turn to siobhan from greater manchester. she's lined up, double vaccinated, primary school teacher. hi, siobhan, thank you forjoining us on your questions answered. your question? so, we found parents are looking to test our children because of the nature of the test. i'm presuming that primary school age children are not going to be vaccinated, but potential spread is my concern,
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that undiagnosed cases are going to cause high levels of transmission. so, what do we do about that? and how are schools safe without bubbles any more? right. ok, so what we know is that in primary school children, ok, so, what we know is that, in primary school children, the likelihood of infection is lower than in teenagers and the risk to these small children is exceptionally low. and you would never get into a situation where you were vaccinating children for the benefit of adults. and i'm glad you have been vaccinated, as have, i hope, almost all of the teaching workforce. and that's going to be really important. but matters of vaccination of children are still under consideration by thejcvi, and it's going to be a difficult and finely balanced decision
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that they need to take time over. and i don't think they should be rushed into it. so, we're alljust going to have to wait for the advice i give. and i did just have one further question, sorry. if there is a third wave, at what point will schools close and return back to home learning that we've seen this academic year? yeah. so, we're in the third wave now. i'm sure you mean the fourth wave. if there is a fourth wave and we do not know if there will be a fourth wave, i think you'll probablyjust confirm for me that you're kind of referring to autumn, winter this year. yeah. so i think what we can say at the moment is that covid, you know, i've heard people say in the media and i've seen a few headlines that, you know, this is all over.
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i wish it was. this is not all over. i hope the worst is behind us. but i think it's quite possible that we're going to have one or two bumpy periods in the autumn and in the winter, not only through covid, but also through flu and other respiratory viruses as well. you have to remember that, with the kind of lockdowns that we had over the last winter, all of the things we did is we completely shut out pretty much all of the other respiratory viruses. and if we don't have further lockdowns, and i hope we don't, then i think other respiratory viruses like flu are also going to come back this winter. and it's going to be equally important that people who are called for their flu vaccines actually make sure come forward and get them this winter.
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siobhan, thank you very much for your questions to professor van—tam. enjoy the summer school holidays! on education and looking towards the autumn, professor van—tam, we've got a text from the mum of a student who is off to university in the autumn. she says there will be students going who have only just turned 18, so have onlyjust had their first vaccination. it is causing anxiety for lots of parents and students. and that is on top of that line from the foreign secretary today, saying that students will get advance warning if they need to have vaccines before moving into halls of residence. so, can you reassure some of the students out there? yeah, i'm sure there'll be operational flexibility in the way that the vaccine programme is administered to make sure that people who are going off to university have had two doses of vaccine. and i personally would like them to have had two doses of vaccine and then seven days, because vaccines don't work instantly.
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and we know that the antibody response to the second dose takes at least seven days, probably seven to ten days to kind of get up to its peak. and so what we want is students going off to university so that they are fully vaccinated so that we don't get the outbreaks in the halls of residence that we had last year in the pre—vaccine era. and so, when those students go off to university and they want to go to the bars and the clubs in the city of their choice, and one anticipates, based on the prime minister's signal on the direction of travel, it will be necessary to be vaccinated, to go into those venues, that they can jolly well get in them and have as normal and as full—on a student experience as possible. you know, it's a unique time in your life. so, you know, they need to enjoy it. and i want them to have those access to those kind of venues, which is so important when you're
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that age, and want to go on holiday with friends from university and so forth. so, you know, these are reasons why, frankly, vaccination is going to be indeed. on travel, let's bring in dana in exeter and we've also got isabelle in birmingham. good afternoon to the two of you. dana, do you want to raise your point with professor fantham first? yes, good afternoon, i'm 22 and i had my two jabs in march this year in romania. when should i be expecting my booster? also on that point, because i had myjobs in romania, does not going to affect when i'm going to get my booster in the uk at all or not? right. ok, so you've had the pfizerjab. i'm really pleased to hear that.
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well done. and you had it twice. that's excellent. and you had it in romania. it really doesn't affect me as a doctor and as a scientist, it doesn't bother me where in the world you've had a good vaccine because it won't work any less just because you have it not as part of the nhs system. it will be absolutely fine and it will be protecting you just the same as any other pfizer vaccine is protecting someone who's had it. so, from that point of view, you know, that, scientifically, is where i am. on the point about boosters, obviously, cos you're on this call, i'm guessing you're pretty young? i'm 22. yeah, so at the moment, the uk has issued advice about who — and it's only interim advice — about who they think will be in for the booster programme from the autumn. and that will be those that we've already vaccinated as part of the uk programme,
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which is basically starting at the very elderly and moving down to 50 years of age and people in risk conditions below that age, adults from 18 to 65 with up to 50 with risk conditions. so, at the moment, i don't think you will, unless you have an underlying illness, and please don't say anything like that on the call, but unless you do, then right now, the interim advice is not that you would be in a group where the booster programme would be prioritized, but do i think, in the fullness of time, we are going to get into a position where quite a lot of us are going to need some kind of boosting? yes, it's possible, but that is something that the jcvi
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will deliberate on and we'll ask them to keep on looking at as the months and years roll by. professor van—tam, let me just quicklyjump in there. can you just quickly clarify for those that have joined us from bbc news late this afternoon what the jcvi is? oh, sorry. yes, thejcvi is thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. i ought to be able to tell you when it was formed, but it was formed decades and decades ago in the uk. and it is a group of public health, medical and vaccine experts who independently advise the government on the entirety of our vaccine programme. that is all we need, the clarification on that. thank you. final question to round up, isobel, in birmingham. professor van—tam, i realise we're not out of the woods _ with coronaviruses yet, -
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but looking towards the future as a 29—year—old, what is i the likelihood i will experience another pandemic of this i magnitude in my lifetime? yeah, ok, thanks for the question. so, when i when i teach medical students about pandemics because, you know, i've been studying pandemics for 20+ years, one of the things i say to these medical students is there will be a pandemic in your professional lifetime. and for the ones that i've talked to fairly recently, they've already had two pandemics in their professional lifetime — the swine flu pandemic in 2009 and then, of course, the covid pandemic as it's just unfolded. we think a lot of these pandemics are going to emerge when new organismsjump from an animal species into humans. and the closer our relationship becomes with animals, in intensive farming and the food
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chain, then i think it is inevitable that we are more likely rather than less likely to have future pandemics. will there ever be one in the remainder of my professional lifetime or yours that is quite as serious as this one has been? it's an unknowable, unknowable answer. and we are i'm really sorry to interrupt, professor, but we are unfortunately out of time. but a big thank—you to isabel and dana for your questions on your questions answered. and a big thank—you to you as well. you forjoining us here on bbc news. just a reminder, you can hear a special newsbeat on bbc radio one at 5:45 this evening on all of this. thanks for watching.
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good afternoon, and amber warning has been issued by the met office for impending windy weather. a storm will bear down on england later tonight bringing unseasonably windy weather. so concerns if you're under canvas, a lot of people on the beaches at the moment, there will be rough conditions and large waves. heavy showers for scotland, northern england, possibly northern ireland, but the brightest weather will be in the southern and eastern areas. another bout of rain pushing it with that storm, across much of and wales, the winds escalating, damaging gas which could bring down power lines and trees, it's really unusualfor power lines and trees, it's really unusual for this time of year. not a cold night as you can see but a wet and windy one. the rain clears two showers through the night, we are talking about scales, cost up to
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50mph potentially, some heavy showers. there's more online. this is bbc news. i'm clive myrie. the headlines... england's deputy chief medical officer, tells bbc news, that covid vaccines have saved around 60,000 lives across the country, and prevented 22 million new infections. that's truly massive. and the benefit of vaccines is in that secret work that you never see, because if people don't go into hospital and they don't die, you never see that. new cases in the uk have now risen over 31,000, while there were 85 deaths, in the latest 24—hour period. scientists warn the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects of climate change, with more rain, more sunshine, and higher temperatures.
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team gb secure two more medals at the tokyo games —

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