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tv   Your Questions Answered  BBC News  July 29, 2021 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ben mundy. welcome to this special edition of your questions answered. today, we'rejoined by england's deputy chief medical officer, jonathan van—tam, answering questions on the coronavirus vaccine from bbc newsbeat listeners — as well as those of you watching. and there's still time to get involved. we're @bbcnews on twitter — use the hashtag yourquestionsanswered. so, let's get going... good afternoon, professor van—tam. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. hello, how are you doing? trier? news. hello, how are you doing? very nood, we news. hello, how are you doing? very good. we will — news. hello, how are you doing? very good. we will go _ news. hello, how are you doing? very good, we will go straight to the first question. priya is in birmingham. good afternoon. so my question is,
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before _ good afternoon. so my question is, before i_ good afternoon. so my question is, before i get— good afternoon. so my question is, before i get straight into the question, i wanted to mention that i am all— question, i wanted to mention that i am all in _ question, i wanted to mention that i am all in favour of individuals taking — am all in favour of individuals taking the vaccine if they needed, whatever— taking the vaccine if they needed, whatever the reason, be it age, vulnerability, etc, however, i whatever the reason, be it age, vulnerability, etc, however, lam younger, — vulnerability, etc, however, lam younger, i— vulnerability, etc, however, lam younger, i am only 25, i stay relatively— younger, i am only 25, i stay relatively fit and i recently had covid — relatively fit and i recently had covid and _ relatively fit and i recently had covid and we were told that the vaccine — covid and we were told that the vaccine would reduce serious illness and hospitalisation amongst the old, or it affects the older generation more _ or it affects the older generation more than — or it affects the older generation more than the young and it is pretty rare to _ more than the young and it is pretty rare to see — more than the young and it is pretty rare to see young people, you could say hospitalised or suffering, so i was wondering why would i or any other— was wondering why would i or any other young person be inclined to -et other young person be inclined to gel the _ other young person be inclined to get the vaccine for individual reasons? _ get the vaccine for individual reasons? . ., ~', get the vaccine for individual reasons?— get the vaccine for individual reasons? . ., ., reasons? yeah, thanks for the question- _ reasons? yeah, thanks for the question. let _ reasons? yeah, thanks for the question. let me _ reasons? yeah, thanks for the question. let me begin - reasons? yeah, thanks for the question. let me begin by - reasons? yeah, thanks for the i question. let me begin by saying that, yesterday, i was out and about in the hospitals in lincolnshire and speaking to some of the respiratory consultants, who are looking after
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these patients who are very poorly with covid and they were telling me they had got several people already in their 20s in this third wave who are on the intensive care unit. some barely into their 20s and some, sadly, who are not going to survive at that age, so the idea that covid is less serious to the young is right, but the idea that it is not pretty serious indeed for some younger people is, sadly, wrong. and then of course on top of that, there is the risk of long covid, which we don't fully understand yet except that we know it is severe and really debilitating for people who get it. if you go back to january this year, when we were kind of at the height of the second wave, about two thirds of the second wave, about two thirds of the second wave, about two thirds of the hospital admissions with covid were in people over 65. if you
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look at those stats now, it is two thirds who are under 65, and i have a few stats i can give you. how old did you say you were? 25. so, 25 to 34—year—olds, at the start of january, to get a seven—day figure, at the start of january, 1% of admissions for covid where in your age group. now is 6%. if we look at the same age group again, 25—34, backin the same age group again, 25—34, back injanuary, 3% of patients who needed to be ventilated because of covid where your age group. now it is ii%. covid where your age group. now it is 11%. so it is a changing picture and coming era, we have seen enough stories. you can look around in the media, in this country, look abroad, you get all these really sad stories of young people who are either dying
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of young people who are either dying of covid or have died of covid and they are saying things like, well, you know, i didn't really take it seriously, i didn't think this was about me and look at me now. so i'm very pleased that you only had covid mildly, but, sadly, it's not the case for some people.- mildly, but, sadly, it's not the case for some people. priya, a comprehensive _ case for some people. priya, a comprehensive answer - case for some people. priya, a comprehensive answer from i case for some people. priya, a - comprehensive answer from professor van—tam, does it change anything in your mind and maybe even give us a bit of reaction from your friends? what are your friends telling you about vaccinations?— what are your friends telling you about vaccinations? well, my friends are are telling _ about vaccinations? well, my friends are are telling me _ about vaccinations? well, my friends are are telling me to _ about vaccinations? well, my friends are are telling me to have _ about vaccinations? well, my friends are are telling me to have the - are are telling me to have the vaccination, but one thing that i'm interested — vaccination, but one thing that i'm interested in is i think stats are really— interested in is i think stats are really useful, some of the stats that you — really useful, some of the stats that you gave there were quite useful— that you gave there were quite useful as — that you gave there were quite useful as well, but i think we are still hearing one side of the story.
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so, still hearing one side of the story. so. you _ still hearing one side of the story. so, you know, every few days we get updates _ so, you know, every few days we get updates on _ so, you know, every few days we get updates on how many people have had the vaccine, _ updates on how many people have had the vaccine, but i would love to see some _ the vaccine, but i would love to see some data — the vaccine, but i would love to see some data on how many people are suffering _ some data on how many people are suffering from long covid and i would — suffering from long covid and i would love to see some information on for— would love to see some information on for example these young people who are _ on for example these young people who are being hospitalised. where they overweight? were they vulnerable? our lifestyle in the vulnerable? 0ur lifestyle in the west— vulnerable? 0ur lifestyle in the west is— vulnerable? our lifestyle in the west is very different from other countries — west is very different from other countries. in some respects, stress, over processed food could be a contributor to illness, so i think some _ contributor to illness, so i think some of— contributor to illness, so i think some of these things make a big difference and it would be interesting, when the data comes out, to— interesting, when the data comes out, to see — interesting, when the data comes out, to see where these differences lie. out, to see where these differences he an— out, to see where these differences lie. �* , ., ., out, to see where these differences lie. �* , ,., lie. all very good points and if i can come _ lie. all very good points and if i can come back _ lie. all very good points and if i can come back on _ lie. all very good points and if i can come back on them, - lie. all very good points and if i can come back on them, on - lie. all very good points and if i i can come back on them, on the lie. all very good points and if i - can come back on them, on the point about food, definitely obesity has been a very big risk factor for covid, we have seen that in multiple countries, including our own. i gatheryour countries, including our own. i gather your friends are encouraging you to have the vaccine. in actual
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fact, one of the things that is silently creeping up without many young people realising is that 65% of the 18—29s have now had at least one dose, so, actually, we are getting to the point, or we are already past the point, where people who haven't had the vaccine are starting to be in the minority, and thatis starting to be in the minority, and that is a good thing and, you know, there are many other things to consider as well. once we have a very highly vaccinated adult population, that includes, you know, the youngsters, 18—25 and so forth, then the chances of us needing another lockdown are much lower. it is not for me as a medical advisor to say what ministers will decide about, for example, access to certain venues like nightclubs in the future, but the prime minister has made an announcement on the
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direction of travel and it is not for me, it is for governments, the uk government and those abroad, to say what this is going to mean in the future for travel and covid—19 vaccines, blood, you know, vaccine already are a condition of travel to places like saudi arabia, the hajj, various countries where there is a yellow fever problem and you need a certificate of vaccination so it is not entirely unexpected, if we get to that kind of world, where covid vaccinations are going to be needed for travel but on the night clubs, i can absolutely say that any kind of closed crowded, high contact the venue, full of vaccinated people will always be massively safer than that same venue, same conditions but with the unvaccinated. and covid is not going to disappear, it is going to be here for many, many years to come. . .
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to be here for many, many years to come. . , , come. that may 'ust “ump in there, pri a, come. that may 'ust “ump in there, priya. thank _ come. that may 'ust “ump in there, priya. thank youh come. that mayjustjump in there, priya, thank you very _ come. that mayjustjump in there, priya, thank you very much - come. that mayjustjump in there, priya, thank you very much for - come. that mayjustjump in there, priya, thank you very much for your involvement in your questions answered this afternoon. lots of questions to get through. you can get involved by using @bbcnews and the hashtag #yourquestionsanswered. so, priya unvaccinated as it stands. add in middlesbrough has had one jab. —— adam. i'm alsojoined by sharnie in coventry. she is unvaccinated. your question first. ma; she is unvaccinated. your question first. y , ., she is unvaccinated. your question first. g , ., , , she is unvaccinated. your question first. g ,., , _., she is unvaccinated. your question first. g ,., , ., first. my question is why should a healthy individual _ first. my question is why should a healthy individual like _ first. my question is why should a healthy individual like myself - first. my question is why should ai healthy individual like myself who has had _ healthy individual like myself who has had covid and experienced nothing — has had covid and experienced nothing except flu—like symptoms, should _ nothing except flu—like symptoms, should need to take a back saying we don't know— should need to take a back saying we don't know the long—term effects of at the _ don't know the long—term effects of at the moment? —— take a vaccine. we at the moment? -- take a vaccine. we certainl at the moment? —— take a vaccine. certainly know at the moment? —— take a vaccine. - certainly know that long—term covid has effects on people and long term covid will be here forever. i can tell you that it is 4 billion doses
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of covid vaccines have been given out around the world and 84 million in the uk, so if there was anything very major going on in terms of side effects and long—term consequences, we would, by now, i think i've seen those signals. and, you know, we just haven't. and it is back to my point that we have got to learn to live with covid and it may well be that, in the future, it is going to be more and more difficult to access certain venues and go on holiday without having been vaccinated. adam, let's turn to you. you have had a one jab, you have had coronaviruses well and you lost your sense of smell for six months. what are your thoughts listening to the professor? are your thoughts listening to the rofessor? ., ~ , , ., , professor? hello. my question is, i live in the north-east _ professor? hello. my question is, i live in the north-east of— professor? hello. my question is, i live in the north-east of england i live in the north—east of england and covid — live in the north—east of england and covid seems _ live in the north—east of england and covid seems to _ live in the north—east of england and covid seems to be _
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live in the north—east of england | and covid seems to be spreading live in the north—east of england - and covid seems to be spreading like wildfire _ and covid seems to be spreading like wildfire appear, — and covid seems to be spreading like wildfire appear. my— and covid seems to be spreading like wildfire appear, my question - and covid seems to be spreading like wildfire appear, my question is - and covid seems to be spreading like wildfire appear, my question is i- wildfire appear, my question is i know— wildfire appear, my question is i know so— wildfire appear, my question is i know so many— wildfire appear, my question is i know so many people _ wildfire appear, my question is i know so many people who - wildfire appear, my question is i know so many people who have | wildfire appear, my question is i- know so many people who have been double _ know so many people who have been double iabbed — know so many people who have been double jabbed who _ know so many people who have been double jabbed who are _ know so many people who have been double jabbed who are still _ know so many people who have been double jabbed who are still catching i double jabbed who are still catching covid, _ double jabbed who are still catching covid, so _ double jabbed who are still catching covid, so i — double jabbed who are still catching covid, so i would _ double jabbed who are still catching covid, so i would like _ double jabbed who are still catching covid, so i would like a _ double jabbed who are still catching covid, so i would like a bit - double jabbed who are still catching covid, so i would like a bit of- covid, so i would like a bit of clarity — covid, so i would like a bit of clarity around _ covid, so i would like a bit of clarity around the _ covid, so i would like a bit of clarity around the purpose i covid, so i would like a bit of clarity around the purpose ofj covid, so i would like a bit of- clarity around the purpose of the vaccine _ clarity around the purpose of the vaccine and _ clarity around the purpose of the vaccine and what _ clarity around the purpose of the vaccine and what it _ clarity around the purpose of the vaccine and what it is _ clarity around the purpose of the vaccine and what it is designed l clarity around the purpose of the i vaccine and what it is designed to do. vaccine and what it is designed to do is _ vaccine and what it is designed to do is it— vaccine and what it is designed to do. is it designed _ vaccine and what it is designed to do. is it designed to _ vaccine and what it is designed to do. is it designed to stop- vaccine and what it is designed to do. is it designed to stop peoplel do. is it designed to stop people catching — do. is it designed to stop people catching covid _ do. is it designed to stop people catching covid or— do. is it designed to stop people catching covid or designed - do. is it designed to stop people catching covid or designed to - do. is it designed to stop people i catching covid or designed to limit the side _ catching covid or designed to limit the side effects— catching covid or designed to limit the side effects if— catching covid or designed to limit the side effects if people - catching covid or designed to limit the side effects if people do? - the side effects if people do? because. _ the side effects if people do? because, like _ the side effects if people do? because, like i— the side effects if people do? because, like i say, - the side effects if people do? because, like i say, in- the side effects if people do? because, like i say, in my. the side effects if people do? i because, like i say, in my rage especially, _ because, like i say, in my rage especially, there _ because, like i say, in my rage especially, there have - because, like i say, in my rage especially, there have been . because, like i say, in my rage especially, there have been a i because, like i say, in my rage i especially, there have been a lot because, like i say, in my rage - especially, there have been a lot of peopte _ especially, there have been a lot of peopte who — especially, there have been a lot of peopte who have _ especially, there have been a lot of people who have been _ especially, there have been a lot of people who have been double - especially, there have been a lot of. people who have been double jabbed —— in people who have been double jabbed -- in my— people who have been double jabbed -- in nty region _ people who have been double jabbed -- in nty region and _ people who have been double jabbed —— in my region. and they— people who have been double jabbed —— in my region. and they still- people who have been double jabbed —— in my region. and they still seem| —— in my region. and they still seem to be _ —— in my region. and they still seem to be catching — —— in my region. and they still seem to be catching covid. _ —— in my region. and they still seem to be catching covid. [— -- in my region. and they still seem to be catching covid.— to be catching covid. i think that is a brilliant _ to be catching covid. i think that is a brilliant question, _ to be catching covid. i think that is a brilliant question, i - to be catching covid. i think that is a brilliant question, i really i to be catching covid. i think thatj is a brilliant question, i really do and the truth of the matter is that when we went after covid vaccines, and i personally started this quest with various other people in the uk government back in march 2020, we were primarily after something that would stop people dying. so that is the kind of first base, if you like, that you want a vaccine to get to when you are faced with a lethal
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disease, but the kind of second base, if you like, if you can get another run out of it as it were, is that you want it to do more than stopping people dying, you want to keep them out of hospital, so that that protects the nhs, and then the holy grail is that you stop people getting infected to such a large extent that, actually, you stop the transmission. and if we still had the original wuhan strain of the virus in circulation, then we would, i think, by now, be very close to all of those goals. but what we have now got, and it is all over the country, frankly, but certainly way up country, frankly, but certainly way up there in the north—east at the moment, you have the delta variant, which has changed and the vaccines are not quite as good at the delta variant. but what we do already know
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is that they are still very largely stopping people dying of covid, and thatis stopping people dying of covid, and that is why, this time, although we have had that massive wave, third wave in the uk, the deaths have gone up wave in the uk, the deaths have gone up but by very little in comparison and really minor compared to the second wave and at the first wave. and hospitalisations, again, yes they have gone up, that's for sure, i wouldn't pull a punch, you know i don't tend to do that but they haven't gone up to anything like the same extent they did the first time, so of your mates and the people you know who have been double jabbed who have had covid as well, who are kind of going, well, the jab didn't work, i still got infected, the probable truth is that a proportion of them, what they should be saying is, well i still got infected but i didn't end up in hospital and if i hadn't had the jab and i'd got infected, i
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probably would have ended up in hospital or worse, and that is what is really important. there is some new data coming out today, i'm going to break the news here, i don't think it is out for another few minutes, but the latest public health england analysis shows that, because of the vaccines and because of this massive third wave we have had, actually, what the vaccines have done is they have prevented now, in total since we got them, 22 million cases of covid infection and 60,000 deaths. so, you know, that is truly massive and the benefit of vaccines is in that kind of secret work that you never see, because if people don't go into hospital and they don't die, you never see that, and that is the bit, that is where the big wins have been in what otherwise would have, what this would have looked like if we hadn't had vaccines.—
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had vaccines. sharnie, let's return to ou had vaccines. sharnie, let's return to you quickly _ had vaccines. sharnie, let's return to you quickly before _ had vaccines. sharnie, let's return to you quickly before we _ had vaccines. sharnie, let's return to you quickly before we move - had vaccines. sharnie, let's return| to you quickly before we move on, listening to that conversation between adam and professor van—tam, does that reassure you? does it make you more likely to pursue the vaccination?— you more likely to pursue the vaccination? not really, if i'm honest, vaccination? not really, if i'm honest. just _ vaccination? not really, if i'm honest, just because - vaccination? not really, if i'm honest, just because i - vaccination? not really, if i'm honest, just because i don't l vaccination? not really, if i'm - honest, just because i don't think we've _ honest, just because i don't think we've had — honest, just because i don't think we've had enough time, personally i don't _ we've had enough time, personally i don't think— we've had enough time, personally i don't think we have had enough time to know— don't think we have had enough time to know the — don't think we have had enough time to know the long—term effects of the vaccine _ to know the long—term effects of the vaccine it _ to know the long—term effects of the vaccine. it has been around are not even _ vaccine. it has been around are not even a _ vaccine. it has been around are not even a year— vaccine. it has been around are not even a year yet and so, personally, that is— even a year yet and so, personally, that isiust — even a year yet and so, personally, that isjust not enough for me. gk, that is 'ust not enough for me. 0k, both that isjust not enough for me. 0k, both of you. _ that isjust not enough for me. oil, both of you, thank you forjoining us on your questions answered. lots of questions coming into us. professor van—tam, of questions coming into us. professorvan—tam, i of questions coming into us. professor van—tam, i want to clarify something, you mention 22 million cases prevented, can i check whether you are referring to the uk or england? i you are referring to the uk or encland? ., ., you are referring to the uk or england?— you are referring to the uk or encland? ., ., ,, ., you are referring to the uk or encland? l, l, ,, l, �* england? i am... you know, i can't tell ou england? i am... you know, i can't tell you the — england? i am... you know, i can't tell you the answer _
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england? i am... you know, i can't tell you the answer to _ england? i am... you know, i can't tell you the answer to that. - england? i am... you know, i can't tell you the answer to that. well, | tell you the answer to that. well, we will get _ tell you the answer to that. well, we will get clarification _ tell you the answer to that. well, we will get clarification later - tell you the answer to that. well, we will get clarification later on i we will get clarification later on bbc news and bring it to you as soon as you can. siobhan is in greater manchester, double vaccinated, primary school teacher. thank you for joining primary school teacher. thank you forjoining us, your question. brute forjoining us, your question. we found parents are reluctant to test children _ found parents are reluctant to test children because of the nature of the test — children because of the nature of the test and presuming that primary school— the test and presuming that primary school age _ the test and presuming that primary school age children aren't going to be vaccinated but will still be potential spreaders, my be vaccinated but will still be potential spreaders, my concern is that undiagnosed cases are going to cause _ that undiagnosed cases are going to cause high— that undiagnosed cases are going to cause high levels of transmission, so what _ cause high levels of transmission, so what do — cause high levels of transmission, so what do we do about that and how was so what do we do about that and how was school _ so what do we do about that and how was school safe without bubbles any more? _ was school safe without bubbles any more? , l, l, was school safe without bubbles any more? l, ,, l, was school safe without bubbles any more? l, ,. l, , more? right, ok. so what we know is that, in primary _ more? right, ok. so what we know is that, in primary school— more? right, ok. so what we know is that, in primary school children, - that, in primary school children, the likelihood of infection is lower than in teenagers and the risk to the schoolchildren is exceptionally
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low. and you would never get into a situation where you were vaccinating children for the benefit of adults and that you have been double vaccinated, as i hope have almost all of the teaching workforce, that is going to be really important, but matters on vaccination of children are still under consideration by the jcvi and it is going to be a difficult and finely balanced decision that they need to take time over and i don't think they should be rushed into it, so we are all going to have to wait for the advice they give. find going to have to wait for the advice the rive. �* l, l, they give. and i did have one further question, _ they give. and i did have one further question, sorry. - they give. and i did have one further question, sorry. ofi they give. and i did have one - further question, sorry. of course. if there further question, sorry. of course. if there is — further question, sorry. of course. if there is a _ further question, sorry. of course. if there is a third _ further question, sorry. of course. if there is a third wave, _ further question, sorry. of course. if there is a third wave, at - further question, sorry. of course. if there is a third wave, at what i if there is a third wave, at what point _ if there is a third wave, at what point will— if there is a third wave, at what point will schools close and return to the _ point will schools close and return to the home learning we have seen this academic year? so, to the home learning we have seen this academic year?— this academic year? so, we are in the third wave _ this academic year? so, we are in the third wave now, _ this academic year? so, we are in the third wave now, i'm _ this academic year? so, we are in the third wave now, i'm sure -
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this academic year? so, we are in the third wave now, i'm sure you | the third wave now, i'm sure you mean the fourth wave, if there is a fourth wave and we do not know if there will be a fourth wave, i think, can you confirm whether you are referring to autumn and winter this year? are referring to autumn and winter this ear? . are referring to autumn and winter this ear? , , l, l, this year? yes, sorry, autumn and winter when _ this year? yes, sorry, autumn and winter when we _ this year? yes, sorry, autumn and winter when we return _ this year? yes, sorry, autumn and winter when we return back - this year? yes, sorry, autumn and winter when we return back to - winter when we return back to schoot~ — winter when we return back to school. . winter when we return back to school. , , l, winter when we return back to school. , ,, l, school. yes, so i think what we can sa at school. yes, so i think what we can say at the — school. yes, so i think what we can say at the moment _ school. yes, so i think what we can say at the moment is _ school. yes, so i think what we can say at the moment is that - school. yes, so i think what we can say at the moment is that covid, i say at the moment is that covid, i've heard people saying in the media and i seen a few headlines saying this is all over bar the shouting. i wish it was so. this is not all over bar the shouting. i hope the worst is behind us but i think it's quite possible that we are going to have one or two bumpy periods in the autumn and in the winter, not only through covid but also through flu and other respiratory viruses as well. you have to remember that with the kind of lockdown is that we had over the
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last winter, one of the things we did is we completely shut out pretty much all of the other respiratory viruses and if we don't have further lockdown sound i hope we don't, then —— further lockdown sound i hope we don't, i think other further respiratory viruses likely will come back this winter and it is equally important that people who are called for their flu vaccines come forward and have them this winter. siobhan, think of your — and have them this winter. siobhan, think of your questions _ and have them this winter. siobhan, think of your questions to _ and have them this winter. siobhan, think of your questions to professor| think of your questions to professor van—tam, enjoy the school summer holidays. on education and looking towards the autumn, professor van—tam, we have a text from a mum of a student of the university in the autumn. she says there will be students going who have onlyjust turned 18, onlyjust had their first vaccination. it is causing anxiety for lots of parents and students and thatis for lots of parents and students and that is on top of the line from the foreign secretary today saying that students will get advanced warning
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if they need to have vaccines before moving into halls of residence, so can you reassure that mum of the student? �* . can you reassure that mum of the student? �* , , student? i'm sure there will be operational _ student? i'm sure there will be operational flexibility _ student? i'm sure there will be operational flexibility in - student? i'm sure there will be operational flexibility in the - student? i'm sure there will be | operational flexibility in the way that the vaccine programme is administered to ensure people who are going off to university have had two doses of vaccine and i personally would like them to have had two doses of vaccine and then seven days, because vaccines don't work instantly and we know that at the antibody response to the second dose takes at least seven days, probably seven to ten days, to get up probably seven to ten days, to get up to its peak, so what we want is students going off to university so that they are fully vaccinated, so that they are fully vaccinated, so that we don't get the outbreaks in the halls of residence that we had last year in the pre—vaccine era, and so when those students go off to university and they want to go to the late bars and clubs in the city
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of their choice, and one anticipates, based on the prime minister's signal on the direction of travel, it will be necessary to be vaccinated to go into those venues, that they can jolly well get in them and have a normal and full honours student experience as possible —— full on student experience. it is a unique time in your life and so they need to ensure it and i want them to have that access to those kinds of venues which are so important when you are that age and i want them to be able to go on holiday with their friends and university friends and so forth, so these are reasons why vaccination will be very important for this age group. fin will be very important for this age urou -. l. will be very important for this age i rou . _ ., �* , will be very important for this age urou -. l, �* , , group. on travel, let's bring in dana in exeter_ group. on travel, let's bring in dana in exeter and _ isobel in exeter and birmingham.
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iam22 i am 22 and iam 22 andi i am 22 and i had pfizerjobs in romania. i am 22 and i had pfizer “obs in miami i am 22 and i had pfizer “obs in romania. l , l, , l iam 22 and i had pfizer “obs in romania. , l, , l l, iam 22 andihad pfizer “obs in romania. , l, , l l, romania. when should i expect a post a ruestion romania. when should i expect a post a question mark— romania. when should i expect a post a question mark and _ romania. when should i expect a post a question mark and because - romania. when should i expect a post a question mark and because i - romania. when should i expect a post a question mark and because i had - romania. when should i expect a post a question mark and because i had myj a question mark and because i had my 'obs a question mark and because i had my jobs in _ a question mark and because i had my jobs in romania, will it affect whether— jobs in romania, will it affect whether i_ jobs in romania, will it affect whether i get my poster in the uk at all or— whether i get my poster in the uk at all or not? _ whether i get my poster in the uk at all or not? l, l. whether i get my poster in the uk at all or not? l, l, l, , all or not? you had the pfizer “ab, i'm really pleased i all or not? you had the pfizer “ab, i'm really pleased to i all or not? you had the pfizer “ab, i'm really pleased to heart all or not? you had the pfizerjab, i'm really pleased to hear that - all or not? you had the pfizerjab, | i'm really pleased to hear that and you had it twice, and you had it in romania. for me, as a doctor and a scientist, it doesn't bother me where in the world you have had a good vaccine, because it won't work any less just because you had it not as part of the nhs system. it will be absolutely fine and it will be protecting you just the same as any other pfizer vaccine is protecting someone who has had it, so, from that point of view, you know, that scientifically is where i am. on the point about a boosters, obviously, if you are on this call, i am
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getting back a delayed guessing you are pretty young. —— i am guessing you are pretty young. i am are pretty young. -- i am guessing you are pretty young-— are pretty young. -- i am guessing you are pretty young.- at l you are pretty young. i am 22. at the moment. — you are pretty young. i am 22. at the moment, the _ you are pretty young. i am 22. at the moment, the jcvi _ you are pretty young. i am 22. at the moment, the jcvi in - you are pretty young. i am 22. at the moment, the jcvi in the - you are pretty young. i am 22. at the moment, the jcvi in the uk | you are pretty young. i am 22. at i the moment, the jcvi in the uk has the moment, thejcvi in the uk has issued advice, only interim advice, about who they think will be in for the booster programme from the autumn and that will be the cohorts 1-9 that autumn and that will be the cohorts 1—9 that we have already vaccinated as part of the uk programme, starting at the very elderly and moving down to 50 years of age, and people in risk conditions below that age, adults from 18—65, with risk conditions. so, at the moment, i don't think you, unless you have an underlying illness and please don't say anything like that on the call,
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but unless you do, then, right now, the interim advice from jcvi is you would be in a group where the booster programme —— you would not be in a group where the booster programme would be recommended but do i think in the fullness of time we will be in a position where quite a lot of us will need some kind of boosting? yes, it is possible but thatis boosting? yes, it is possible but that is something thejcvi will deliberate on and we will ask them to keep on looking at as the months and the years roll by. let to keep on looking at as the months and the years roll by.— and the years roll by. let me 'ust cuickl and the years roll by. let me 'ust quickryjump fl and the years roll by. let me 'ust quickryjump in. i and the years roll by. let me 'ust quickryjump in. can fl and the years roll by. let me 'ust quicklyjump in, can you i and the years roll by. let me just quicklyjump in, can you quickly l quicklyjump in, can you quickly clarify for those who have joined us from bbc news beat what theyjcvi is? from bbc news beat what they jcvi is? . g l, from bbc news beat what they jcvi is? , i l, l, l, is? yes, the joint committee on vaccination _ is? yes, the joint committee on vaccination and _ is? yes, the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation. l is? yes, the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation. i ought to be able to tell you when it was formed, but it was formed decades and decades ago in the uk and it is a group of public health,
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medical and vaccine experts who independently advise the government on the entirety of our vaccine programme in the uk. speak a word thatis programme in the uk. speak a word that is all we need further clarification thank you. the final question until around europe on your questions answered, isobel in birmingham. questions answered, isobel in birmingham-— questions answered, isobel in birmingham. questions answered, isobel in birminuham. l, l, , l, birmingham. hello. i realise we are not out of birmingham. hello. i realise we are rrot out of the _ birmingham. hello. i realise we are not out of the woods _ birmingham. hello. i realise we are not out of the woods with _ not out of the woods with coronavirus _ not out of the woods with coronavirus yet _ not out of the woods with coronavirus yet but - not out of the woods with. coronavirus yet but looking not out of the woods with - coronavirus yet but looking towards the future, — coronavirus yet but looking towards the future, as— coronavirus yet but looking towards the future, as a _ coronavirus yet but looking towards the future, as a 29—year—old, - coronavirus yet but looking towards the future, as a 29—year—old, what| the future, as a 29—year—old, what is the future, as a 29—year—old, what is the _ the future, as a 29—year—old, what is the likelihood _ the future, as a 29—year—old, what is the likelihood i— the future, as a 29—year—old, what is the likelihood i will— the future, as a 29—year—old, what is the likelihood i will experience l is the likelihood i will experience another— is the likelihood i will experience another pandemic— is the likelihood i will experience another pandemic of— is the likelihood i will experience another pandemic of this - is the likelihood i will experience i another pandemic of this magnitude my lifetime? — another pandemic of this magnitude my lifetime? 0k: _ another pandemic of this magnitude my lifetime?— my lifetime? ok, thanks for the cuestion. my lifetime? ok, thanks for the question- so. — my lifetime? ok, thanks for the question. so, when _ my lifetime? ok, thanks for the question. so, when i _ my lifetime? ok, thanks for the question. so, when i teach - my lifetime? ok, thanks for the i question. so, when i teach medical students about pandemics, because, you know, i have been studying pandemics over 20 plus years, one of the things i say to these medical students is there will be a pandemic in your professional lifetime, and
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for the ones i have taught very recently, they have already had to pandemics in their professional lifetime, the swine flu pandemic in 2009 and then of course the covid pandemic as it has just unfolded. we think a lot of these pandemics are going to emerge when new organisms jumperfrom an animal going to emerge when new organisms jumper from an animal species going to emerge when new organisms jumperfrom an animal species into humans and the closer our relationship becomes with animals and intensive farming and the food chains, then i think it is inevitable that we are more likely, rather than less likely, to have future pandemics. will there ever be one in the remainder of my professional lifetime or yours, that is quite as serious as this one has been, it is an unknowable answer. i been, it is an unknowable answer. i am really sorry to interrupt,
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professor van—tam, we are unfortunately at a time. a big thank you for your questions on your questions answered and a big thank you to you as well, professor van—tam, thank you forjoining us on bbc news. just a reminder, you can hear a special bbc newsbeat on radio one at 5:45pm this evening on all of this and thanks for watching. hello, good afternoon. the showers should not be as numerous today but there will still be the odd heavy and thundery one around as we go through the rest of the day. the met office have issued an amber warning for storm evert. that is going to bear down on the south—west of england through this evening, with some damaging winds. unseasonably windy which means there will be large waves, rough conditions at sea. if you are sleeping under canvas, and many heading to the beach, as i say, there will be some rather dangerous conditions around. for the rest of the day, ahead of that system, we will see the driest,
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brightest and warmest weather in southern and eastern areas. i mention some heavy showers, potential in northern england, northern ireland, southern and eastern scotland. in the far north of scotland staying rather cool and cloudy. quite blustery as well today but the winds will escalate further, starting to bring in the rain to pembrokeshire and the south—west by the end of the day. with gale force winds forecast, gusts in excess of 60 mph as we go through the night, potentially, across devon and cornwall. through friday they will migrate further eastwards. accompanying those strong winds, unusually windy weather, some wetter weather working across much of england and wales, the far north escaping. the showers initially quite heavy for the north, they will tend to ease, it will be a cooler night for scotland and northern ireland. friday is a tale of two halves. a lot of cloud in the north and some showery rain but in the south we have more heavy showers, longer spells of rain, and strong winds, gusts of 40—50 mph, even as they spread further southwards into south—east england and east anglia.
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there will be some rather lively winds causing some disruption both tonight and tomorrow with some heavy downpours again, even some thunder and lightning in the slow moving showers for central areas. temperatures a little bit down, just because we have got more cloud tomorrow. into the weekend, the low pressure moves out the way but as it pushes across into the eastern side of europe, it allows this northerly breeze to come down. high pressure still sitting to the west of us. but with that setup and a northerly breeze, it means things will cool down. we have had heat and humidity already through this month but it will be, on average, cooler and it should be on average, cooler than it should be through the weekend, particularly for scotland and northern ireland. still some showers around and still potentially heavy for england and wales. the details and the warnings are on the website.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines... england's deputy chief medical officerjonathan van—tam tells bbc news that covid vaccines have prevented 22 million cases — and 60,000 deaths. scientists warn that the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects of climate change — with increased rainfall, more sunshine and higher temperatures. climate change is not something that isjust going to happen in 20 years or 50 years or towards the end of the century, we are very clearly seeing this in our observations now. team gb have secured two more medals at the tokyo games. bronze in the trap shooting and silver in the women's canoe slalom.

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