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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 29, 2021 12:30pm-1:31pm BST

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i thought no—one could really understand. so it would have probably helped if i'd had videos of people that did understand. this is for the children to watch the video, but how useful do you think it will be for the parents? even better, because often, although there is social media out there, often you find these parents in isolation, i was in isolation to begin with. the new video treatment has been pioneered by doctors at addenbrooke�*s hospital in cambridge. feeling better and coping better is not only about medication. it is not only about the doctor prescribing things. it is also about helping you cope with your day—to—day challenges, with your peers, with your school. and i think that's what this broader view of each condition gives these kids — ways that they can go and play sport, that they can have sleepovers, that they can do things that normal children do, where, to be perfectly frank, doctors and nurses don't have such a good insight into.
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they're now looking to make films with children with other conditions, like diabetes, epilepsy and cystic fibrosis... for the european final! ..reassuring those who have just been diagnosed that things will get better. it's gone over the neighbours! richard wescott, bbc news, ipswich. oh, dear! time for a look at the weather. here's helen willetts. we have a storm bearing down on us, the met _ we have a storm bearing down on us, the met office issued a amber warning — the met office issued a amber warning or storm evert in the south—west, expecting and seasonal rough _ south—west, expecting and seasonal rough conditions over the sea and some _ rough conditions over the sea and some large — rough conditions over the sea and some large waves coming in. so this is the low pressure _ some large waves coming in. so this is the low pressure that _ some large waves coming in. so this is the low pressure that has - some large waves coming in. so this is the low pressure that has brought | is the low pressure that has brought us all the heavy showers and thunderstorms, and they should not be as many of them, more likely
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where it is cloudier, across northern scotland, we have a little bit of cloudy, patchy rain coming through northern england and wales. i had of that storm system, the warmest weather, quite breezy out there, but that will obviously escalate further. temperature is not far away from where they should be at this time of year. the rain is coming in by the end of play today, then the winds will strengthen as then the winds will strengthen as the storm approaches, bringing wet weather through this evening across devon, cornwall, the isles of scilly, dorset, then spreading rain across many parts of england and wales, accompanied by strengthening winds, gusts in excess of 60 mph in more exposed parts, obviously a concern with a lot of people sleeping under canvas and heading off to the coast. there will be some quite dangerous conditions. dry in the north once the showers finally fade away, as we start tomorrow morning it looks dry for scotland
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and northern ireland, but this slow moving band of rain or heavy showers, with an area of low pressure, that storm, and with stronger winds, pressure, that storm, and with strongerwinds, pushing pressure, that storm, and with stronger winds, pushing eastwards, possibly not as strong as the south—west, 40—50 mph, but still unusually windy for the time of year, and more downpours, hailand stand are potentially as well. 18—20 is a little down on today in the south, a little up on the north. the far north of scotland quite cool and cloudy. the weekend — is that area of low pressure does move away, that storm, it allows a northerly breeze, a northerly breeze, into the weekend, bringing down some of that arctic air. so although things look little less intense over the weekend, a little bit more settled, it is not going to be warm, temperatures a little bit below par, and still some showers for the east coast and certainly across england and wales. a reminder of our top story:
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scientists warn the disruptive effects of climate change are already being felt in the uk, with increased rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. that's it, so goodbye from me. now on bbc one, let'sjoin our news teams where you are. good afternoon. it was the longest and most nerve wracking half an hour of her sporting life, but, in the end, the wait was worth it, for mallory franklin, who won silver for team gb, as women's canoe slalom made a dramatic olympic debut. franklin was in the gold medal position after her paddle early on in the final, but then she had to watch others come down the course and a flawless display from australia'sjessica fox, meant the british star had to settle for silver — but still a brilliant performance, and a legacy of london 2012 for which the lee valley whitewater centre was built, and that's where franklin was been training
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for this historic moment. it was a really cool, it was so stressful sat on line, but i had a moment when i was, "this i really cool and i would not want to be anywhere else," "this is really cool and i would not want to be anywhere else," the cameras panning around me and i caught a glimpse and i smiled and that reminded me of the environment and how crazy it all is but it is really cool. and with no fans allowed in tokyo, this was franklin's family, fiance, teammate and coach watching her performance at the lee valley centre in london. being thousands of miles away, doesn't mean they can't feeljust as involved, going through every twist and turn with mallory and they were understandably over the moon with her efforts. britain's two—time gold medallist helen glover, has ruled out another olympics rowing bid after the mother—of—three's hopes of a fairytale finish at tokyo 2020, were dashed. glover is now 35 and along with polly swann, finished fourth in the women's pair. after the race glover said, "in rio, i said it was my last one. "this time i'm saying no, it's definitely it." she is also keen to inspire others,
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after her incredible journey back into the sport — training while her three babies slept — saying, "you can do anything you want to do. "trying and failing is no problem as long as you try." better news for team gb�*s matt coward—holley in men's trap shooting, as he won bronze — britain's 17th medal of the tokyo olympics. he is the world and european champion, but paid the price for a slow start, missing three of his first 10 targets. the briton recovered with 14 successive hits to climb into the bronze medal position. and joy for ireland as they celebrated the country's first ever olympic rowing gold, in the lightweight double sculls. it was fintan mccarthy and paul o'donovan who made history, holding off a late surge from the germans, to add to the silver won five years ago in rio. they said the streets back home would be flowing with porter. and just look at this — their team ireland team mates gave them a very special welcome back to the olympic village.
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their women's 4s had earlier picked up a bronze for the rowing team. the heroes of all of ireland back home having won a first ever rowing medal at the rio games. after winner a second bronze medal in the taekwondo, bianca walkden has returned to england, and this is the reception she got. of course, none of the athletes have been able to have any of their friends of family, of their friends or family out in tokyo to support them — so walkden�*s family wasted no time in welcoming her home. she tweeted that "the love is unreal" and "family is everything." elsewhere, the day has been dominated by covid—i9. just a day before the start of the track and field events starting, sam kendricks, the world pole vault champion, has withdrawn from the games, having tested postive for covid. he had been expected to contend for a medal in tokyo. and the argentinian pole vaulter, german chiaraviglio, has also tested positive. he tweeted that the games are over for him.
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but better news for the australian track and field team — they have resumed training, having earlier had to isolate, but three of their team who were in close contact with kendricks are still isolating as a precaution, despite testing negative. those three are expected to compete when the time comes. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. mike, thank you very much. today marks day 6 of olympic games action in tokyo with team gbs action in tokyo with team gb�*s women's hockey squad back in play. in a repeat of the rio final, where the team won gold, they are facing the netherlands in their quest for a podium position. team gb pulled off a victory in 2016 thanks to the goalkeeping skills of maddie hinch in the penalty shoot—out. joining me now is catherine hinch, her mum. you must be bursting with pride
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watching your daughter in tokyo. i am bursting with nerves at the moment because we just narrowly missed equalising and drawing with the mighty dutch, but the whole team played well today and we can take a lot from it, because the dutch are in a league of their own when it comes to hockey and we had a really good game with them and maddie played really well. i good game with them and maddie played really well.— good game with them and maddie played really well. i played quite a bit of hockey _ played really well. i played quite a bit of hockey a _ played really well. i played quite a bit of hockey a long _ played really well. i played quite a bit of hockey a long time - played really well. i played quite a bit of hockey a long time ago - played really well. i played quite a bit of hockey a long time ago and l played really well. i played quite aj bit of hockey a long time ago and i never, ever wanted to go in goal. what attracted her to that position? honestly, it is bizarre. next year will be 20 years since maddie was first introduced to the game of hockey at school and she took to it, you know, and ijust remember thinking, oh, goalkeeper, all that smelly kit, my pretty little girl all covered up in goal keeping kids! i thought maybe she won't take to it but she did and she loved it and we
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realised pretty early on that this was going to be her chosen sport, because she was always very sporty, she was lucky that she could play most boards to a decent level but hockey was the one for her. and i guess, at about 16, when she left her school prom early because she was going to go and play hockey for exmouth ladies club, league club, and i thought, my goodness, what 16 year does that? so she is super keen to do well in this game.— to do well in this game. there is no doubtin: to do well in this game. there is no doubting just _ to do well in this game. there is no doubting just how— to do well in this game. there is no doubting just how focused - to do well in this game. there is no doubting just how focused and - doubting just how focused and determined you have to be. what are the sacrifices that she and you as a family have had to make to get her to this level? i family have had to make to get her to this level?— to this level? i think, 'ust, you know, to this level? i think, 'ust, you know. with t to this level? i think, 'ust, you know, with sport, _ to this level? i think, 'ust, you know, with sport, at h to this level? i think, just, you know, with sport, at any - to this level? i think, just, you | know, with sport, at any stage, certain international level it is heightened, but any stage, sport does have massive highs and lows and you just have to, ride with the
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highs and when the lows are very bad, she was at her lowest ebb when she didn't get the number two shirt at the home games in 2012 in london, she thought she would get the number two shirt and she would be involved, but she didn't and she was very, very down about that but she bounced back and she became very focused and very determined to get that number one shirt and she said, when i get that shirt, i'm going to keep it and that shirt, i'm going to keep it and thatis that shirt, i'm going to keep it and that is what she's done. i that shirt, i'm going to keep it and that is what she's done.— that is what she's done. i don't blame her. _ that is what she's done. i don't blame her, there _ that is what she's done. i don't blame her, there are _ that is what she's done. i don't blame her, there are so - that is what she's done. i don't blame her, there are so few. that is what she's done. i don't - blame her, there are so few people in the world who ever get that sort of accolade. we have seen, particularly these games, with the gymnast simone biles talking about the pressure on her, just how much attention there is on these athletes. how difficult has it been for maddie and her team—mates going to tokyo knowing that you can't travel with them?— travelwith them? yes, i think su ort travelwith them? yes, i think suoport is— travelwith them? yes, i think suoport is huge. _ travelwith them? yes, i think support is huge, you - travelwith them? yes, i think support is huge, you know, i
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travel with them? yes, i think - support is huge, you know, knowing that your loved ones are in the stands there, rooting for you, it is huge and you get a glimpse every now and then can i get a bit of eye contact and it makes a big difference but it is what it is, all of the disciplines have the same disadvantage so we have got to still go out there as team gb and give it our best. you know, maddie is a very... i mean, pressure, yes, but she also realises that to play for your country is a huge, huge accolade and every time we see her standing out there with her team—mates, singing to the national anthem, we are moved to tears. we cry, really, you know? i anthem, we are moved to tears. we cry, really, you know?— cry, really, you know? i do, i am not even — cry, really, you know? i do, i am not even related _ cry, really, you know? i do, i am not even related to _ cry, really, you know? i do, i am not even related to the - cry, really, you know? i do, i am not even related to the people i cry, really, you know? i do, i am| not even related to the people on the podium and i get moved to tears. it is good to see you are wearing the right clothing today! finally, then, when you are defending a gold medal, what approach are they
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taking? the expectations back home are enormous. i taking? the expectations back home are enormou— are enormous. i know, and what --eole are enormous. i know, and what people don't _ are enormous. i know, and what people don't realise _ are enormous. i know, and what people don't realise is _ are enormous. i know, and what people don't realise is it - are enormous. i know, and what people don't realise is it has - are enormous. i know, and what people don't realise is it has notj people don't realise is it has not just been for years, it has been five years in the making and along those five years, there have been injuries to our players, long—term injuries, and then you start to worry about whether the team will be fit enough to present their best team at these vital times, so there is all that added pressure as well, but, you know, we have missed, you know, the experience of people like alex danson and, you know, so it has been hard, but maddie, she is a very grounded girland been hard, but maddie, she is a very grounded girl and she is very magnanimous and it is not that long ago that she said to me, just out of the blue, you know, we wouldn't be having the fairy tale gold medal if the likes of nicola white had inferred that a third goal in to to
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take us a penalty shoot—out —— had put that third goal in. she's very grounded and magnanimous, maddie, she's a good kid. she grounded and magnanimous, maddie, she's a good kid-— she's a good kid. she has you as her mum, she's a good kid. she has you as her mum. i'm — she's a good kid. she has you as her mum. i'm sure _ she's a good kid. she has you as her mum, i'm sure she _ she's a good kid. she has you as her mum, i'm sure she gets— she's a good kid. she has you as her mum, i'm sure she gets some - she's a good kid. she has you as her mum, i'm sure she gets some of. she's a good kid. she has you as her mum, i'm sure she gets some of it i mum, i'm sure she gets some of it from you. we wish them all the very best, thank you very much talking to us. . ~' best, thank you very much talking to us. . ~ , ., best, thank you very much talking to us. ., ~ _ _ more now on climate change. scientists at the met office say it is already being felt across the uk, with increased rainfall, sunshine and temperatures. dr sharon george, director of environmental sustainability and green technology at the university of keele, said the report demostrates the real impact of climate change. part of the problem is that we've, you know, for years, scientists have been warning about this and saying that the likelihood of this is happening, but it's quite difficult for people to imagine that this intangible, invisible gas that we are producing in our everyday lives is causing these real effects. especially when the numbers that we talk about are so small. you mention 0.9 degrees, that doesn't sound like very much, but, actually, over a period
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of time, and that much energy over an entire, you know, area, it creates chaos and creates more instability and that is what we are seeing now and this is what climate change looks like. it is happening now and it's only going to go in one direction. the met office report comes as a new paper from the climate crisis advisory group, founded by the former uk chief scientist professor sir david king, asks whether rapid heating in the arctic region is driving changes in the jet stream in a way that influenced the recent weather extremes. professor king explained the current situation in the arctic circle region. it's very clear, if we look at what's happening... first of all, let me deal with the arctic circle region, where the temperature rise was about 3.5 centigrade last year above the preindustrial level, and this is that trend, it's rising faster and faster
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over the arctic circle region and the reason is basically very simple. we've seen a much faster loss of the sea ice covering the arctic sea over the last 20 years than the theoretical climate scientists were predicting, so that, today, during the arctic polar summer, which is, of course, a 24—hour summer, the period of the summer is about three months, centred around june 215t, we can see that the sea is exposed about 50% to the sunlight, so this means, whereas the ice was reflecting sunlight back into space, the sea is absorbing it and that region of the planet is now heating up faster than the rest of the planet, which is about 1.2, 1.5 degrees centigrade above the preindustrial level. now, what happens during the arctic summer, when you've got a hot area around the north pole, and it is hot...
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i mean, one of the members of the climate crisis advisory group is in northern finland, he is a representative of the sami people up there, he spoke to me six weeks ago, when the temperature there was —30 and then, two weeks ago, when the temperatures was plus 31 centigrade, a 61—degree change in less than six weeks. the headlines on bbc news... there is a warning from scientists that the uk is already experiencing the disrupting effects of climate change, with increased rainfall, more sunshine and higher temperatures. team gb have secured two more medals at the tokyo games, bronze in trap shooting and a silver in the women's canoe slalom. half a million fewer people are now on furlough, but experts warned there could bejob on furlough, but experts warned there could be job cuts as government support eases.
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a little bit of breaking a little bit of breaking news a little bit of breaking news from a little bit of breaking news from downing street, where we are told that more than 260 testing centres are now up and running for workers who are allowed exemption from isolation. a spokesman for the prime minister said a further 800 testing centres are expected to be operational shortly, which means either tomorrow or over the weekend. the government has committed to setting up 2,000 testing centres in total in england, which would allow workers in certain sectors of the economy to be tested, instead of having to isolate after coming into contact with someone who has tested positive for covid. —— covid. the government will establish the remaining number in the coming days and weeks, but 260 of the aim of 2,000 already up and running. the nhs says a record number of alerts were sent to users of the covid—19 app in england
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and wales in the week to the 21st ofjuly. joining me now is the bbc�*s head of statistics robert cuffe... how many people are isolating because of this?— how many people are isolating because of this? nearly 700,000 alerts are sent _ because of this? nearly 700,000 alerts are sent by _ because of this? nearly 700,000 alerts are sent by the _ because of this? nearly 700,000 alerts are sent by the app - because of this? nearly 700,000 alerts are sent by the app but - because of this? nearly 700,000 | alerts are sent by the app but that is not the whole story because you have all the people who have tested positive and asked to isolate through the call centres, so 300,000 positives to the weight to the 21st ofjuly, another 540,000 people, so the best part of 900,000 people who had been isolating that week. people watching may think we were talking about a million a week ago, there is about a million a week ago, there is a small number sped last week we were including all of the kids who are isolating at school, they are off now, so to get near a million people is a pretty huge number and, on top of that, you add all of the alerts, this record number being sent by the app, nearly 700000 and it is a lot of people staying at home. so it is a lot of people staying at home. it is a lot of people staying at home, ., ., it is a lot of people staying at home. ., ., ., ., , , home. so in total, how many is it, do ou home. so in total, how many is it, do you reckon? — home. so in total, how many is it, do you reckon? it _ home. so in total, how many is it, do you reckon? it is _ home. so in total, how many is it, do you reckon? it is hard - home. so in total, how many is it, do you reckon? it is hard to - home. so in total, how many is it, do you reckon? it is hard to say, l do you reckon? it is hard to say, ou
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do you reckon? it is hard to say, you could _ do you reckon? it is hard to say, you could get — do you reckon? it is hard to say, you could get pinged _ do you reckon? it is hard to say, you could get pinged by - do you reckon? it is hard to say, you could get pinged by the - do you reckon? it is hard to say, | you could get pinged by the app, called by test and trace and had tested positive yourself, so if you add them all up, you get, a quick check, probably around 126 million, but you could be having more than a million comfortably and you add up all of the kids are still serving their time, we all of the kids are still serving theirtime, we are all of the kids are still serving their time, we are talking comfortably a million and beyond that. so comfortably a million and beyond that. comfortably a million and beyond that, ., comfortably a million and beyond that. ., , ., , , that. so given that this has been auoin on that. so given that this has been going on a _ that. so given that this has been going on a long _ that. so given that this has been going on a long time _ that. so given that this has been going on a long time now- that. so given that this has been going on a long time now and i going on a long time now and businesses are struggling to keep people in work if they get pinged, how many people are being tempted to delete the app? is it positive to put in —— possible to put a number on that? it put in -- possible to put a number on that? , ., .,, ., _ put in -- possible to put a number onthat? , ., on that? it is not as easy as the number of _ on that? it is not as easy as the number of cases _ on that? it is not as easy as the number of cases but _ on that? it is not as easy as the number of cases but we - on that? it is not as easy as the number of cases but we can - on that? it is not as easy as the i number of cases but we can show on that? it is not as easy as the - number of cases but we can show the audience the number of times people have been checking into venues and that shows that that has fallen pretty significantly since the start ofjune. you can see at the start of june, you're talking at 14 million, maybe more, and that has come down pretty steadily as society has been opening up. the last week, goes to
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the 21st ofjuly, then you no longer had to check in so some of that last staggering fall may be that restaurants and pubs aren't making you do it any more but you see a pretty clear pattern and it could be that people are maybe just being a little bit more careful, they are going into restaurants less or they are getting pinged less because when they are sitting beside somebody, they are sitting beside somebody, they carefully move their phone to metres away. fir they carefully move their phone to metres away-— they carefully move their phone to metres away.- we - they carefully move their phone to metres away.- we don't l metres away. or it off. we don't have the data _ metres away. or it off. we don't have the data on _ metres away. or it off. we don't have the data on that _ metres away. or it off. we don't have the data on that but - metres away. or it off. we don't have the data on that but when l metres away. or it off. we don't i have the data on that but when you combine the fall in the number of checkins combine the fall in the number of check ins and the fact that we are seeing fewer pinks per person who test positive, they are starting to paint a picture of certainly less use of the app or less bringing your phone with you. use of the app or less bringing your phone with you-— phone with you. robert, thank you very much- — today has been dubbed earth 0vershoot day — a group of scientists work out every year how quickly we've used up all the ecological resources the planet can produce in 12 months. and with governments around the world focussed on climate policy in the run—up to the cop26 climate summit in glasgow, the idea
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of earth 0vershoot day is based on a pretty simple premise. 0ur reality check correspondent chris morris is here. yes, the premise is this — humans are consuming more, there are more of us, and we're creating more waste, including greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide that get pumped into the atmosphere. but the size and capacity of our planet remains the same. so, something has to give. and how do scientists calculate when earth 0vershoot day occurs every year? basically, by comparing the amount of natural resources the earth is able to generate that year, and working out when human demand for those resources uses them all up. in other words, it's the day we've exhausted a 12—month quota of the earth's resources, and we're starting to reduce them, as well as creating more waste through things like carbon emissions from fossil fuels which make matters much worse. and, this year, it's today — july the 29th. last year, it was more than three weeks later — but, of course, covid played a role in that. huge amounts of economic activity
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shut down during the first months of the pandemic. since then, carbon emissions have gone up again and the global footprint network reckons our overall carbon footprint has risen by about 6.6% compared to last year. but even if 2020 was something of a blip — look at when 0vershoot day has happened since 1970. it's getting earlier and earlier, although the good news is that the line has flattened a bit over the last few years. these are estimates — but they're based on the latest un data and science. and the pattern in pretty clear. currently, humanity uses 70% more than what earth can renew. it is like if you spend 70% more than what you earn, you can do that for some time but not forever, but the long—term are not resource secure, if we do not have the impact is necessary to maintain
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it is going to be hard to maintain it. it's also worth remembering that different countries contribute very differently to the overall picture, based on how much they consume and pollute, and how many people live there. if the global average was like qatar, which has a tiny population but produces huge amounts of oil and gas, 0vershoot day would have happened as early as february. in the uk, it would have been may, and, indonesia, not until december. the average in many poorer countries of course would mean no overshoot at all. but we're already seeing the effects of the overuse of resources in terms of deforestation or drought, for example, and, of course, waste or pollution in terms of those greenhouse gases entering the atmosphere. so, what are we doing about it? we are an ingenious species. we can rethink the way we consume and consume more efficiently. we have got technology and we now know what is happening, so we can rethink our consumption and everything that we use, in terms of energy, the food we eat and even to the clothes that we buy
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and how we travel, they all add to this consumption footprint and it is something we are all responsible for. to protect the planet and the way we live on it, governments agreed at the last big climate summit in paris to try to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees celsius above pre—industrial levels. big global corporations have a huge role to play, because this is the decade when real action has to be taken if that goal is to be met. the debate in the run—up to the glasgow summit in november is going to be critical in determining whether it will be. chris morris. time for a look at the weather _ chris morris. time for a look at the weather. �* , ., chris morris. time for a look at the weather. �* ,., ,., , ., ., weather. oh, i'm so sorry, i gotta tell ou weather. oh, i'm so sorry, i gotta tell you about _ weather. oh, i'm so sorry, i gotta tell you about wedding _ weather. oh, i'm so sorry, i gotta tell you about wedding cake, i weather. oh, i'm so sorry, i gotta tell you about wedding cake, let l weather. oh, i'm so sorry, i gotta l tell you about wedding cake, let me tell you about wedding cake, let me tell you about wedding cake, let me tell you before we do the weather. pretend that didn't happen. a slice of prince charles and princess diana's wedding cake has been put up for sale 40 years after the event. it is expected to sell for between
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300 and £500. however, caveat emptor, would—be buyers are advised against eating it. why would you want to buy it? well, it is a piece of history, it belonged to moira smith, a member of the queen mother's household at clarence house, who preserved the topping with cling film. now it is time for the weather, with helen! good afternoon. the sharers shouldn't be as numerous today that there will still be the odd heavy understand everyone around us we go through the rest of the day. the met office have issued an amber warning for storm micro waikato. unseasonably windy, rough conditions at sea if you are sleeping under canvas and many heading to the beach, as i say, rather dangerous conditions around. for the rest of the day ahead of the system, will see the driest and brightest and
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warmest weather in southern and eastern areas. quite blustery as well today but the winds will escalate further, starting to bring in the rain to pembrokeshire and the south—west by the end of the day. with gale force winds forecast, gusts in excess of 60 mph as we go through the night, potentially, across devon and cornwall. through friday they will migrate further eastwards. accompanying those strong winds, unusually windy weather, some wetter weather working across much of england and wales, the showers initially quite heavy for the north, they will tend to ease, it will be a cooler night for scotland and northern ireland. friday is a tale of two halves. a lot of cloud in the north and some showery rain but in the south we have more heavy showers, longer spells of rain, and strong winds, gusts of 40—50 mph, even as they spread further southwards into south—east england and east anglia. there will be some rather lively winds causing some disruption both tonight and tomorrow with some heavy downpours again, even some thunder and lightning in the slow moving
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showers for central areas. temperatures a little bit down, just because we have got more cloud tomorrow. into the weekend, the low pressure moves out the way but as it pushes across into the eastern side of europe, it allows this northerly breeze to come down. high pressure still sitting to the west of us. but with that setup and a northerly breeze, it means things will cool down. we have had heat and humidity already through this month but it will be, on average, cooler and it should be through the weekend, particularly for scotland and northern ireland. still some showers around and still potentially heavy for england and wales. the details and the warnings are on the website.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: a warning from scientists that the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects, of climate change, with increased rainfall, more sunshine and higher temperatures. climate change is not something that is just going to happen climate change is not something that isjust going to happen in 20 years or 50 years or towards the end of the century, we are very clearly seen this in our observations now. team gb have secured two more medals at the tokyo games. bronze in trap shooting, and silver in the women's canoe slalom. it can mean so much for people and i hope people see more women now as an event that is really high class, there was some amazing paddling out there. half—a—milion fewer people are now on furlough. but experts warn there could be job
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cuts, as government support eases. a coroner concludes that liverpool football fan andy devine, who died this week after suffering life—changing injuries in the hillsborough stadium disaster, is the 97th victim of the tragedy. and cambridge doctors prescribe videos to children with long term illnesses, showing other youngsters offering support. sometimes there was a lot of pain and they were acting normal and then paying and then normal, and they can carry on. the met office says climate change is "already being felt" across the uk, and that 2020 was the third warmest year on record.
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in its latest report on the state of britain's climate, meteorologists say increased rainfall as well as higher temperatures are now recognisable features of our weather. as well as being the third warmest year on record, 2020 was also the fifth wettest and the eighth sunniest. here's our science correspondent, rebecca morell. dramatic changes in our skies. in 2020, the uk experienced a year of extremes. from storms in february, which caused chaos across the country, to a summer heatwave where temperatures sweltered above 34 degrees for six consecutive days, and rain in october with the uk's wettest day on record. it is all charted in an annual assessment of the climate which found the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our observations that the uk's climate is already changing, so climate change isn't something that will happen in 20,
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50 or something we need to worry about towards the end of the century, we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. the report compared the most recent three decades with the 30 years before and found that on average the uk was 0.9 degrees hotter. for rainfall, the country was on average 6% wetter and 2020 was the eighth sunniest year recorded in the last 100 years. new defences are under construction, like this tidal barrier in lincolnshire, to cope with future storm surges. but the reality is flooding is having a devastating impact now with some homes being flooded again and again, changes that seem small having a big effect on people's lives. what's interesting about this report is there's lots of data in there, so there's lots of temperature records and percentage changes, but actually what we are seeing are the impacts — the impact to us as humans,
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to our businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of our eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united nations climate summit and we'll find out if governments can rise to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effects of climate change. right now, the elements show no signs of letting up, with this week's flash floods taking the london by surprise. scientists will continue to track and analyse these events, but they warn that extremes are becoming the new norm. rebecca morrelle, bbc news. dr sharon george, director of environmental sustainability and green technology at the university of keele, said the report demostrates the real impact of climate change. part of the problem is that we've, you know, for years, scientists have been warning about this and saying that the likelihood of this is happening, but it's quite difficult for people to imagine that this intangible,
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invisible gas that we are producing in our everyday lives is causing these real effects. especially when the numbers that we talk about are so small. you mention 0.9 degrees, that doesn't sound like very much, but, actually, over a period of time, and that much energy over an entire, you know, area, it creates chaos and creates more instability and that is what we are seeing now and this is what climate change looks like. it is happening now and it's only going to go in one direction. the met office report comes as a new paper from the climate crisis advisory group, founded by the former uk chief scientist professor sir david king, asks whether rapid heating in the arctic region is driving changes in the jet stream in a way that influenced the recent weather extremes. professor king explained the current situation in the arctic circle region. it's very clear, if we look at what's happening... first of all, let me deal
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with the arctic circle region, where the temperature rise was about 3.5 centigrade last year above the preindustrial level, and this is the trend, it's rising faster and faster over the arctic circle region and the reason is basically very simple. we've seen a much faster loss of the sea ice covering the arctic sea over the last 20 years than the theoretical climate scientists were predicting, so that, today, during the arctic polar summer, which is, of course, a 24—hour summer, the period of the summer is about three months, centred around june 23rd, we can see that the sea is exposed about 50% to the sunlight, so this means, whereas the ice was reflecting sunlight back into space, the sea is absorbing it and that region of the planet is now heating up faster than the rest of the planet, which is about 1.2, 1.5 degrees centigrade above the preindustrial level.
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now, what happens during the arctic summer, when you've got a hot area around the north pole, and it is hot... i mean, one of the members of the climate crisis advisory group is in northern finland, he is a representative of the sami people up there, he spoke to me six weeks ago, when the temperature there was —30 and then, two weeks ago, when the temperatures was plus 31 centigrade, a 61—degree change in less than six weeks. a football supporter who suffered life—changing injuries at hillsborough has died at the age of 55. an inquest into andrew devine's death — held on wednesday — concluded he'd been unlawfully killed. it makes him the 97th victim of the disaster. james reynolds reports: andrew devine was 22 when he was seriously injured at hillsborough. at first he was given no more
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than six months to live. but with 24—hour care, he survived for another 32 years. his family say he was the centre of their lives. 0ur devastation over his death, they say, is overwhelming. 96 more liverpool fans died of their injuries at hillsborough. two years after the disaster, an inquest ruled their deaths were accidental. the families refused to accept this verdict. after years of campaigning, they succeeded in obtaining a new inquest. in 2016, this hearing recorded that the fans were unlawfully killed. in a later trial though, the police commander at the game was cleared of gross negligence manslaughter. the liverpool coroner's court has now ruled that andrew devine was, like the 96 others, unlawfully
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killed. and so more than three decades on, the total number of dead from hillsborough rises to 97. james reynolds, bbc news. 0ur correspondent in anfield, nick garnett, had the latest. andrew devine was 22 and a lifelong liverpool fan when he went to watch them play at hillsborough in 1989. the injuries he received were life changing. he needed round the clock care and use a wheelchair for 32 years until he died two days ago in hospital surrounded by his family. liverpool players today paid tribute by holding a 97 second silence at their preseason training ground in austria. the reason his death is able to be recorded as unlawful killing 32 years after he was injured has been given by the coroner, he gave the cause of death is not only pneumonia but brain and
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crush injuries which were a direct result of what happened at hillsborough. he said it was proportionate, reasonable and sufficient for him to adopt the findings of the inquest into the other 96 victims of the disaster and as such he ruled andrew devine had been unlawfully killed. that is entirely up to the family obviously, that is a discussion between the family, whether they would like his name put on this, they might have a different view but who wants to put another name on this memorial? 96 is enough. mr divine's family who have cared for him ever since he was injured released a statement in which they said our collective devastation is overwhelming but so is the realisation we were blessed to have
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had andrew with us for 32 years since the hillsborough tragedy. portsmouth football club has released three academy players, following an investigation into the alleged use of racially abusive language, in a social media chat group. the club began an inquiry after images allegedly showed some players posting offensive words and images, in a private under—18 team chat group, following england's defeat by italy in the euro 2020 final earlier this month. all three players have the right to appeal. the amount of people on the scheme fell from 2.4 million at the end of may to 1.9 miliion by the end ofjune. 0n the 25s leaving at the biggest
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rate. our business correspondent colletta smith reports on getting back to work for over 2million people still using the scheme. it had been such a long time coming. i was so excited to get ready, pick out the outfit of coming back to work and just seeing my friends that i hadn't gotten to see at work. and just sit at my desk after a whole 15 months, it was quite exciting. ten days ago, her life got busy again. after so long on furlough, she was over the moon getting the call asking her to come back. originally supposed to come back before the december lockdown. when the country went into lockdown at that point, i did feel a bit insecure to the point of the fact that, will i be able to come back because i had been anticipating that initial return to work? i did worry a little bit. staff here have been brought back gradually as business has increased. further comes with a £66 billion price tag from the government but
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from next month companies will have to pay more, 20%, for each team member on furlough. that will mean tough decisions for many firms. joe runs a small promotions company and says decisions about who to further or have been very hard. mr; further or have been very hard. my team further or have been very hard. ij�*i team have been further or have been very hard. ij�*i1: team have been with further or have been very hard. i’i1 team have been with me further or have been very hard. ii1: team have been with me for a further or have been very hard. i’i1 team have been with me for a long time, you know them very well and theirfamily time, you know them very well and their family circumstances and you are weighing up perhaps their financial circumstances, who can you keep and not? because the business has changed so dramatically, to stay on topjoe said she had to let one person go. we had a member of staff that had been with me a few years and i really felt it was an account management role and i felt that was not what the business was going to need. as further winds up over the next two months lots of companies may use it as a moment to cut staff numbers. we are seeing a lot of clients trying to bring in measures like part—time working, reduced
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hours, temporary pay cuts, as an alternative to people losing theirjobs. but if those things can't be agreed, then the fallback will be that some people will be made redundant. simon says it couldn't be back to business as usual. we have had to let a number of our staff go, because we were unsure of how long furlough was going to last. but over the past year as well we have seen a number of our employees leave the industry due to the uncertainties around hospitality. for those who have been out of the workplace for so long, hoping to get back to life as normal, the prospect of redundancy is all the more daunting. coletta smith, bbc news. tony wilson is director of the institute for employment studies. thank you very much. what are you seein in thank you very much. what are you seeing in terms _ thank you very much. what are you seeing in terms of _ thank you very much. what are you seeing in terms of trends _ thank you very much. what are you seeing in terms of trends with i thank you very much. what are you seeing in terms of trends with the l seeing in terms of trends with the reduction in support? as you report said, we are seeing
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quite significant falls in the number of people on further and just over1 million people are still fully off work. it's fair to say the rate of decline has slowed between may and june and that probably reflects that a lot of those people who would have come back to work have now gone back, particularly in hospitality and retail. we've got some way to go yet before we are able to fully wind up the furlough scheme. until now, what have we seen in terms of changes to the unemployment level? , , ., , level? this is the really interesting _ level? this is the really interesting thing. i level? this is the really - interesting thing. unemployment level? this is the really _ interesting thing. unemployment is falling again, below 5%. there are no signed redundancies are picking up no signed redundancies are picking up or drop exits are picking up. the declining number of people on further appears to be fuel going back to work rather than becoming unemployed. that's a good sign for the future but it also means for those employers are looking to recruit, nearly1 million vacancies
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in the economy with many people still on furlough, we need to do more to help employers to fill the jobs and help those in further back into work. ., . ., , into work. how clear is it with eo - le into work. how clear is it with people are — into work. how clear is it with people are choosing - into work. how clear is it with people are choosing to i into work. how clear is it with people are choosing to stay i into work. how clear is it with | people are choosing to stay in into work. how clear is it with i people are choosing to stay in the labour market or go and do something else? the labour market or go and do something else? ., ,., ., ,, labour market or go and do something else? ., ., ~' labour market or go and do something else? ., ,., ., ,, .,, ., else? the labour market has got smaller as _ else? the labour market has got smaller as a _ else? the labour market has got smaller as a consequence i else? the labour market has got smaller as a consequence of i else? the labour market has got smaller as a consequence of this crisis. two things are adamant that, there are lots more young people staying in education, the number of young people in education is increased by about 400,000 from last year. we have fewer people who are not uk born, down by about 200,000. the labour market has got lots more there many of those people who were on furlough, particularly younger people, they have gone back to education rather than back into work. ., ., , work. how enduring are the different wa s in work. how enduring are the different ways in which — work. how enduring are the different ways in which people _ work. how enduring are the different ways in which people were _ work. how enduring are the different ways in which people were forced i work. how enduring are the different ways in which people were forced to | ways in which people were forced to work for the pandemic? particularly obviously an opportunity to work from home but also how that has
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caused or forced from home but also how that has caused orforced companies to from home but also how that has caused or forced companies to adapt how they operate? i caused or forced companies to adapt how they operate?— how they operate? i think... the crisis led to _ how they operate? i think... the crisis led to some _ how they operate? i think... the crisis led to some really - how they operate? i think... the crisis led to some really acute i how they operate? i think... the | crisis led to some really acute and immediate temporary impact but they are increasingly becoming permanent, particularly with hybrid working models, working at home and in the office, i think that will be a permanent change. we also see the effect of things that online shopping, for example, quite large numbers of people on furlough and retailjobs on high streets, many of whom probably will not have jobs to go back to ultimately when furlough ends because it is becoming quite permanent changes. the crisis is accelerated some of these changes particularly around more remote working and more flexible working and also more young people staying in education. in terms of those less adaptable and may be older sectors of the economy,
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which were the areas that were most found one thing that could not really meet the challenges of the pandemic? i really meet the challenges of the andemic? ~ . , really meet the challenges of the andemic? ,, ., , , , ., pandemic? i think as things stand riht now pandemic? i think as things stand right now the _ pandemic? i think as things stand right now the industry _ pandemic? i think as things stand right now the industry that - pandemic? i think as things stand right now the industry that are i right now the industry that are still struggling how find it much harder to reopen, this is coming clearly in the data, still part of hospitality and retail that are really affected but also air transport and the travel industry and tourism are still, quite significant numbers on furlough, more than half of tour operator workers are on furlough. when we talk about the scheme ending at the end of september, i do not think we won't get any significant liver market shocks or see unemployment noticeably rise —— labour market shocks. but there could be long running impacts for specific industries so we need to think how we help them, and also people who have not been able to go back to theirjobs, they need active help to
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re—skill and retrain and take up new jobs, so the big lesson is moving away from these passive measures that protect the jobs, to more active support focused on individuals to help them get back into work in newjobs. tony wilson, thank you very much for talking to us. team gb have secured two more medals at the tokyo games — bronze in trap shooting, and silver in the women's canoe slalom. for more on that and the other action at the games, let's cross now to my colleague lucy hockings in tokyo. hello and welcome to tokyo, where it is now day six of the olympic games. team gb canoeist mallory franklin has won the silver medal in the women's single slalom — with matt coward—holley collecting a shooting bronze in the men's trap final. there has been an upset in the athletics, with reigning world pole vault champion, sam kendricks, ruled out of the games after testing positive for covid—19.
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australia's track and field team briefly isolated as a precaution after coming into contact with him, but have resumed normal activities. they have returned negative tests. here in tokyo, coronavirus infections have hit a new high — nearly 4,000 — twice the daily level a week ago. olympic officials say there's no evidence that the games had contributed to the rise. nationally, new cases have exceeded 9,500 for the first time. mariko 0i is also in tokyo with the latest.
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it has now been reported that the state of emergency will be expanded to include the three surrounding prefectures of tokyo, as well as osaka, so that is going to start on monday and, also, the state of emergency for tokyo as well as okinawa, that has been extended by about ten days until the end of august. how effective that will be remains to be seen, because, of course, the capital ofjapan has been under the state of emergency for quite some time now, but we are seeing this continued surge in covid—19 cases, as you mentioned and, you know, the ioc has emphasised that this search has nothing to do with the olympics. i don't think people here think that athletes and officials are spreading the virus but the very fact that the olympics are taking place in this city, that really sends the wrong message. as you can see around me, people are still out and about, there's no sense of emergency. this is the fourth state of emergency for the japanese capital and it's become somewhat
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of the norm and that is why, you know, medical experts are saying that the government has to do something more. what they can do, we still don't know and we still need to find out. let's get more on the sporting action from day six of the games. and mallory franklin has become only the second british woman to win a medal in olympic canoe slalom by taking silver in the c1 class in tokyo. the 27—year—old is a former world champion and multiple medallist at all levels but had been denied a shot at olympic glory before the category was included for the first time here. there has been an upset in the athletics, with american reigning world pole vault champion, sam kendricks. he is now ruled out of the games after testing positive for covid—19. australia's track and field team briefly isolated as a precaution after coming into contact with him, but have resumed normal activities. meanwhile, more medals have been won
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in the pool and on the water. america's caeleb dressel won gold in the 100 metres freestyle swimming. he's being called the new michael phelps — the olympian with the most medals ever. he has talked about the pressure on him and he has done exceedingly well, talking about the pressure on him and to perform at this level. china won the women's 4x200m freestyle relay in a world record time of 7:40.33. the time bettered australia's record from the 2019 world championships. and ireland has won its first gold medal of the olympics. fintan mccarthy and paul o'donovan have made history by winning ireland's first olympic rowing gold in the men's lightweight double sculls. the south korean archer an san — who bagged two olympic gold medals — has been flooded
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with messages of support from women after she received online abuse from men for her short hairstyle. let's get more on this from our correspondent, laura bicker in seoul. it's hard to imagine an san receiving anything other than overwhelming love and support for winning two gold medals, what is a problem some men have with her style? problem some men have with her s le? , ., , style? the problem here in south korea is some _ style? the problem here in south korea is some men, _ style? the problem here in south korea is some men, a _ style? the problem here in south korea is some men, a small, i style? the problem here in south. korea is some men, a small, vocal minority, believe short hair is associated with feminism, they see feminism as unfairly attacking men. it's become a bit of a dirty word in south korea and so what you are scene played out against this national hero who won two olympic medals, what we're seeing it a symptom of a wider here in south korea. you have young woman who came
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onto the street two years ago to protest in their thousands at the way they were being treated. south korea has the, the lowest in the oecd for gender equality, there are fewer women in the workplace and they really struggle to get equal pgy- they really struggle to get equal pay. when it comes to that fight they are becoming more vocal and what happened on the other side as young men feel they are being unfairly targeted and they say they have to do two years national service which women do not have to do. and they believe feminism is unfairly attacking men and that is why they are saying, she has short hair, she goes to a woman's at university, she must be a feminist. some even said she should be stripped of her medal are allowed backin stripped of her medal are allowed back in the country. that has met women in their thousands called for support for an san, there is even a poster doing the rounds that they hope to put in the centre of seoul.
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she went on her instagram to see that short hair is convenient. an san getting lots of support from ordinary women in south korea, issue getting support at the political level, too? a, getting support at the political level. too?— level, too? a few politicians especially — level, too? a few politicians especially left-wing - level, too? a few politicians i especially left-wing politicians especially left—wing politicians have said this is ridiculous, feminism in itself should not be a dirty word and should not be a bad thing to be a feminist but that does not really mean shot here equals feminism. it is an ideal, i think, many people here try to put on korean women that they are also trying to fight and they have done for many years. trying to fight and they have done for many years-— trying to fight and they have done for many years. thank you so much for many years. thank you so much for 'oinin for many years. thank you so much forjoining us. _ for many years. thank you so much forjoining us, laura. _ that's all from us here in tokyo, back to london.
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jonathan van—tam will be answering your questions in a moment, but first, the weather with helen. hello, good afternoon. the showers should not be as numerous today but there will still be the odd heavy and thundery one around as we go through the rest of the day. the met office have issued an amber warning for storm evert. that is going to bear down on the south—west of england through this evening, with some damaging winds. unseasonably windy which means there will be large waves, rough conditions at sea. if you are sleeping under canvas, and many heading to the beach, as i say, there will be some rather dangerous conditions around. for the rest of the day, ahead of that system, we will see the driest, brightest and warmest weather for a southern and eastern areas. i mention some heavy showers, potential in northern england, northern ireland, southern and eastern scotland. in the far north of scotland staying rather cool and cloudy. quite blustery as well today
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but the winds will escalate further, starting to bring in the rain to pembrokeshire and the south—west by the end of the day. with gale force winds forecast, gusts in excess of 60 mph as we go through the night, potentially, across devon and cornwall. through friday they will migrate further eastwards. accompanying those strong winds, unusually windy weather, some wetter weather working across much of england and wales, the far north escaping. the showers initially quite heavy for the north, they will tend to ease, it will be a cooler night for scotland and northern ireland. friday is a tale of two halves. a lot of cloud in the north and some showery rain but in the south we have more heavy showers, longer spells of rain, and strong winds, gusts of 40—50 mph, even as they spread further southwards into south—east england and east anglia. there will be some rather lively winds causing some disruption both tonight and tomorrow with some heavy downpours again, even some thunder and lightning in the slow moving showers for central areas. temperatures a little bit down,
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just because we have got more cloud tomorrow. into the weekend, the low pressure moves out the way but as it pushes across into the eastern side of europe, it allows this northerly breeze to come down. high pressure still sitting to the west of us. but with that setup and a northerly breeze, it means things will cool down. we have had heat and humidity already through this month but it will be, on average, cooler than it should be through the weekend, particularly for scotland and northern ireland. still some showers around and still potentially heavy for england and wales. the details and the warnings are on the website.
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hello, i'm ben mundy. welcome to this special edition of your questions answered. today, we'rejoined by england's deputy chief medical officer, jonathan van—tam, answering questions on the coronavirus vaccine from bbc newsbeat listeners — as well as those of you watching. and there's still time to get involved. we're @bbcnews on twitter — use the hashtag yourquestionsanswered. so, let's get going... good afternoon, professor van—tam. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. hello, how are you doing? izierr; news. hello, how are you doing? very ood, we news. hello, how are you doing? very good. we will — news. hello, how are you doing? very good. we will go _ news. hello, how are you doing? very good, we will go straight to the first question. priya is in birmingham. good afternoon. so my question is,
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before _ good afternoon. so my question is, before i_ good afternoon. so my question is, before i get— good afternoon. so my question is, before i get straight

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