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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 29, 2021 10:00am-12:01pm BST

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i'm lucy hockings live in tokyo, with all the latest on the medals and records at the games. the american pole vaulter sam kendricks, one of the favourites to win gold at the tokyo olympics, has been ruled out after testing positive for coronavirus. silverfor team gb's mallory franklin after a thrilling finish to the women's canoe slalom — australia'sjessica fox took gold. and this is annita mcveigh in london. scientists warn that the uk is already undergoing disruptive climate change — with increased rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. are you worried about what's happening to the climate? what are you doing to cut carbon emissions? we'd love to hear from you.
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get in touch @annita—mcveigh #bbcyourquestions from monday travellers arriving in england, scotland and wales who've been fully—vaccinated in the eu or us won't need to isolate when entering from an amber—list country. uk foreign secretary dominic raab defended the move. the answer to your question why we are taking this step, we are doing it opening up internationally in the same way we are domestically in a sure—footed, careful way with the safeguards in place to make sure that we can do it in a sustainable way. a coroner concludes that liverpool football fan andy devine — who died this week after suffering life—changing injuries in the hillsborough stadium disaster — is the 97th victim of the tragedy.
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hello and welcome to tokyo, where it is now day six of the olympic games. there has been an upset in the athletics, with reigning world pole vault champion, sam kendricks, ruled out of the games after testing positive for covid—19. australia's track and field team briefly isolated as a precaution after coming into contact with him, but have resumed normal activities. meanwhile, more medals have been won in the pool and on the water. team gb canoeist mallory franklin has won the silver medal in the women's single slalom — with matt coward—holley collecting a shooting bronze in the men's trap final. we can now speak to mike bushell in the bbc sports centre. a real shot in the athletics and a devastating blow for sam kendricks.
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all four news, yes. the kind of news i suppose we had to expect at some point but the timing for the athletics couldn't be worse with the track and field events starting on friday. sam kendricks won olympic bronze in rio five years ago. his father, scott, who is also his coach said thankfully his son is not experiencing any symptoms. what about the knock—on effect? we have already seen that an argentinian pole vault has returned a positive test as well. he has tweeted on social media that the games are over for him. better news is you are mentioning all 68 members of australia's track and field team who had been isolating as a precautionary measure, most of them nearly all of them now have been able to resume training. one pole
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walter who was enclosed contact along with other close associates have been able to resume training. there has been a lot of talk, mike, on the mental health pressure on some of the athletes here in tokyo. yeah, he's still only 2a and dealing with all the pressure of being called the new michael phelps. he has a second gold medal now for america. the first individual gold so that will release some of the pressure and ease the mental health side of things you would hope at least as he looks to become one of the most successful swimmers are any single olympic games. he set an olympic record winning gold in a time of 47.02. and if if he deals
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with that pressure he may have more medals in his bag. tell us about team gb today, some success but disappointments as well? yes, mixed fortunes. mallory franklin saved her best run until last and when it mattered in the final. as women's canoe slalom made a dramatic olympic debut. franklin was in the gold medal position until a flawless display from australia's jessica fox meant that she had to settle for silver but a legacy really this of london 2012 because there was this lee valley white water centre built just north of london for the 2012 games and that is where franklin has been training for this historic moment. but it was no very stale finish contract for britain's two—time gold medallist helen glover
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who was ruled out definitely, finally, after the mother of three's hopes were dashed. they finished fourth in the women's pairs. she said in rio it was her last one and then she was tempted back. now she is saying, no, it is definitely it. but she is keen to inspire others. training while her three babies slept. she is saying you can do anything that you want to do, trying and failing is not problem, as long as you try. what a message whatever we do. absolutely, mike, it was an inspirational press conference she gave after the event and great to hear from gave after the event and great to hearfrom her. here in tokyo, coronavirus infections have hit a new high — nearly 4,000 — twice the daily level a week ago. olympic officials say there's no
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evidence that the games had contributed to the rise. nationally, new cases have exceeded 9,500 for the first time. we can now speak to our reporter mariko oi who is also in tokyo. olympic official saying it is not because of the olympics that we are seeing the infection rate going up, so what is it?— so what is it? well, i don't think an one so what is it? well, i don't think anyone here _ so what is it? well, i don't think anyone here thinks _ so what is it? well, i don't think anyone here thinks that - so what is it? well, i don't think anyone here thinks that those i anyone here thinks that those athletes or officials are spreading the virus but the fact that the olympics are going on, that makes people feel less, feel relaxed about the whole situation, even though the city is under a state of emergency, people don't feel obliged to stay at home. that is what we have been hearing on the street that you can't tell us to stay at home when it was a government's decision to go ahead with the olympics, despite the strong public opposition. and of
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course people were warning this could become a super spreader event. we have learned today that two olympic officials have tested positive and have been hospitalised here in tokyo. and that is raising eyebrows because just last night, here in tokyo. and that is raising eyebrows becausejust last night, as we were saying, a tokyo governor told the people of tokyo that if your symptoms are mild and if you are living alone than stay at home instead of putting extra pressure on the tokyo hospital system. and now of course two people are going to put pressure on the medical system but the same time people are wondering are these officials and athletes get in the priority over japanese citizens and that is causing controversy on social media. also on social media i have seen quite a lot of concern from other cities injapan because the infection rate is rising elsewhere. from osaka for example people are talking about what happened earlier in the plaza to pandemic when people died at home. in the plaza to pandemic when people died at home-—
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died at home. that's right. we are exectin: died at home. that's right. we are exoecting three — died at home. that's right. we are expecting three surrounding - expecting three surrounding prefectures of tokyo to go under a state of emergency later this week as well as osaka. and as you said, earlier in the year or sack we saw a real surge in covid—19 cases and some patients couldn't even get admitted to the hospitals and unfortunately some of them died at home. and that is what people here are concerned about. that with the number of thing—mac cases rises, that kind of medical situation could happen. we have been hearing from medical experts as well as doctors and nurses that this was going to happen, the hospitals would be overwhelmed if we weren't careful. and the fact that the olympics are taking place, people as you can see around me, people are not staying at home and as a result the number of people out and about has only gone down about 2% during the fourth state of emergency and that is partly why seeing this spike in thing—mac cases. —— thing—mac. we
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thing-mac cases. -- thing-mac. we will see you — thing—mac cases. —— thing—mac. we will see you again soon. the impact of climate change is already being felt across the uk — with more rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. these are the findings of the state of uk climate report 2020 from the met office. it says that 2020 was the third warmest year since 1884. it was the fifth wettest. six of the 10 wettest years have been since 1998. and last year was the eighth sunniest on record. the experts said that, in the space of 30 years, the uk has become 0.9c warmer and 6% wetter. the report's lead author, mike kendon, warns "we are going to see more and more extreme weather such as heatwaves and floods" as the climate continues to warm. our science correspondent
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rebecca morelle reports. dramatic changes in our skies. in 2020, the uk experienced a year of extremes. from storms in february, which caused chaos across the country, to a summer heatwave, when temperatures sweltered above 34 degrees for six consecutive degrees. and rain in october with the uk's wettest day on record. it is all charted in an annual assessment of the climate. the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our observation that the uk climate is already changing. so climate change isn't something that is just going to happen in 2050, or we need to worry about towards the end of the century. we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. the report compared the most recent three decades with the 30 years before, and found an average of the uk were 0.9 degrees hotter.
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for rainfall, the country was an average of 6% wetter. and 2020 was the eighth sunniest year recorded in the last 100 years. new defences are under construction, like this tidal barrier in lincolnshire, to cope with future storm surges. but the reality is flooding is having a devastating impact now, with some homes being flooded again and again. changes that seem small are having a very big effect on people's lives. what's interesting about this report is there is lots of data. so there are lots of temperature records and percentage changes. but what we are seeing are the impacts, the impacts to us as humans, to our businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of our eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united nations climate summit. we will find out if governments can rise to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effects of climate change.
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right now, the elements show no signs of letting up, with this week's flash floods taking london by surprise. scientists will continue to track and analyse these events, but they warn that extremes are becoming the new norm. rebecca morelle, bbc news. the met office report comes as a new paper from the climate crisis advisory group, founded by the former uk chief scientist professor sir david king, asks whether rapid heating in the arctic region is driving changes in the jet stream in a way that influenced the recent weather extremes. professor king joins us now. thank you very much for your time today and obviously your focus is a more global one. you have asked that question about rapid heating and whether that is being driven by changes heating in the arctic region driving changes in thejet changes heating in the arctic region driving changes in the jet stream. have you come to any conclusions on that? , ., ~
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have you come to any conclusions on that? , . ~ , that? yes, we have. i think it is very clear— that? yes, we have. i think it is very clear if— that? yes, we have. i think it is very clear if we _ that? yes, we have. i think it is very clear if we look _ that? yes, we have. i think it is very clear if we look at - that? yes, we have. i think it is very clear if we look at what - that? yes, we have. i think it is very clear if we look at what is l very clear if we look at what is happening first of all let me deal with the arctic circle region where the temperature rise is about 3.5 celsius last year above the preindustrial level and this is the trend, it is rising faster and faster over the arctic circle region and the reason is basically very simple. we have seen a much faster loss of the sea ice covering the arctic sea over the last 20 years than in the theoretical climb scientists were predicting. so that today during the arctic polar summer, which is of course a 24—hour summer, which is of course a 24—hour summer, the period of the summer is about three months, that the sea is exposed about 50% of the sunlight. so this means wearers the ice was reflecting sunlight back into space, the sea is absorbing and that region
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of the planet is now heating up faster than the rest of the planet, which is about 1.2, 1.25 celsius above the preindustrial level. and what happens during the arctic summer, when you have got a hot area around the north pole, and it is hot. i mean, one of the members of the group is in northern finland, he is representative of the people up there, he spoke to me six weeks ago when the temperature was —30 and then two weeks ago when the temperature was plus 31 celsius. that is incredible, in six weeks. in that is incredible, in six weeks. in less than six weeks. that's - that is incredible, in six weeks. in | less than six weeks. that's interest in pincus we _ less than six weeks. that's interest in pincus we spoke _ less than six weeks. that's interest in pincus we spoke to _ less than six weeks. that's interest in pincus we spoke to an _ less than six weeks. that's interest in pincus we spoke to an arable - in pincus we spoke to an arable farmer a while ago and she was talking about the very sudden and extreme changes that she was observing and the impact of that on her crops. we seem to be losing these magical changes in seasons and
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seasonality varies around the world. these gradual changes and seasons that we would have once expected. is that we would have once expected. is that right? that we would have once expected. is that riuht? ~ ,,., , ., that right? absolutely right. you asked me about _ that right? absolutely right. you asked me about the _ that right? absolutely right. you asked me about the jet - that right? absolutely right. you asked me about the jet stream l that right? absolutely right. you i asked me about the jet stream and what we show in some detail is if we look at north america, there is a very clear response of the climate system. so the jet stream, which very clear response of the climate system. so thejet stream, which is basically a circular wind blowing around the north pole keeping cold air in the north pole region and warm airfrom the air in the north pole region and warm air from the equatorial region to the south of that. now, what has happened is you create this hot spot in the centre there and the cold air moves away and so the jet stream becomes distorted. those areas pushed by the cold air create a colder region than normal. you might have noticed that in texas temperature this year of —16 degrees
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centigrade was observed and this is exactly described by the shape of the jet stream. the cold air being pushed out of the south and at the same time warm air goes up. so you get a new york experiencing extreme heat. and also california. so the shape of the jet stream over north america does explain very clearly why california and at the same time western canada have experienced extreme heat and on the other side, eastern united states, extreme heat, and in the centre very cold weather. so what is now very clear is that what is happening in the arctic circle region doesn't stay there, it is disturbing the entire weather systems of the northern hemisphere. you have explained that incredibly clearly to us. and we have been talking to our viewers about this story today about the subject and
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one of them has been in touch on twitter and says i heard points earlier about personal action which is good but we are past the point of individual action, we need total systemic change to prevent catastrophe. do you agree with that? is it all about government action at this point if we are to stop global temperatures rising beyond 1.5 celsius or can individual actions to make a difference?— celsius or can individual actions to make a difference? here we are at a ulobal make a difference? here we are at a global average _ make a difference? here we are at a global average of— make a difference? here we are at a global average of 1.25 _ make a difference? here we are at a global average of 1.25 and _ make a difference? here we are at a global average of 1.25 and we - make a difference? here we are at a global average of 1.25 and we have l global average of 1.25 and we have already passed the tipping point in the arctic circle region. so this is a global emergency requiring all governments to club together and act accordingly. we are pushing for three ours. reduce emissions as deeply and rapidly as possible. the fossilfuel deeply and rapidly as possible. the fossil fuel era deeply and rapidly as possible. the fossilfuel era is over, let's move on to cleaner energy production for
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example. secondly, we have put too much greenhouse gases into the atmosphere there. we all need to collaborate to find means of removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and in particular we need to remove at scale. by which i mean perhaps 30 to 40 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases need to be removed every year. that would still take to the end of the century to get us down to a manageable level, which i believe is about 350 ppm compared to today's 500. so what else do we need today's 500. so what else do we need to do? we need to buy time. so what we're looking at is how do we keep ice covering the arctic during the polar summer. ice covering the arctic during the polarsummer. if ice covering the arctic during the polar summer. if we achieve that we buy time to allow us to get these other possibilities going. so it is reduce, remove and repair the damage thatis reduce, remove and repair the damage that is being caused by the arctic circle region.—
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circle region. that is interesting, those are the _ circle region. that is interesting, those are the three _ circle region. that is interesting, those are the three rs _ circle region. that is interesting, those are the three rs that - circle region. that is interesting, those are the three rs that you | circle region. that is interesting, - those are the three rs that you want people to focus on. looking towards cop26 in glasgow at the end of the year, clearly those of the things that you want people to focus on as a government level as well. if the carat isn't enough watts to can be used? do we need serious discussions on carbon tax? film. used? do we need serious discussions on carbon tax?— on carbon tax? 0h, undoubtedly. and i think that on carbon tax? 0h, undoubtedly. and | think that what — on carbon tax? 0h, undoubtedly. and | think that what | — on carbon tax? 0h, undoubtedly. and i think that what i would _ on carbon tax? 0h, undoubtedly. and i think that what i would want - on carbon tax? 0h, undoubtedly. and i think that what i would want to - i think that what i would want to push for is a different form of carbon tax that lets tax know that carbon tax that lets tax know that carbon that is obtained at source from below the surface of the earth, in other words lets tax coal, gas and oil producers at source because that undoubtedly would give a very clear message to any company that is involved in those endeavours that in order to consider a future for their own company, they will have to use their resources to move away into clean energy systems. i would say
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thatis clean energy systems. i would say that is critically important. but let's not forget the other challenge is from the impacts of climate change. all of these impacts in the northern hemisphere this summer have created hundreds and hundreds of fatalities, of deaths. so what we're looking at, this isjust fatalities, of deaths. so what we're looking at, this is just the tip of the storm. what we are looking at is the storm. what we are looking at is the beginning of a crisis for the whole planet. we need to the nature of the crisis but we mustn't give up what we know is that we can still manage, provided, iwould what we know is that we can still manage, provided, i would say we have got no more than five years to get everything in place and then operated at scale if we want to manage a safe future for future generations. manage a safe future for future generations-— manage a safe future for future generations. professor sir david kin: generations. professor sir david king thank _ generations. professor sir david king thank you _ generations. professor sir david king thank you so _ generations. professor sir david king thank you so much - generations. professor sir david king thank you so much for - generations. professor sir david king thank you so much for your time. chair of the climate crisis advisory group. rules are to be relaxed on international travel so that fully vaccinated people from the us and most eu countries will no longer
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have to self isolate when they arrive in england, scotland or wales. but the changes — which will be introduced from four o'clock on monday morning — will not apply to visitors from france. northern ireland has not yet made a decision on the rule change. let's take a closer look at the changes which the government says will help to reunite family and friends whose loved ones live abroad. people who were fully vaccinated in the eu or us will not need to isolate when coming to england, scotland and wales from an amber list country. transport secretary grant shapps said it would apply to people who have been fully vaccinated with a jab approved by the eu or us. travellers will still need to take either a lateral flow or pcr test pre—departure and a pcr test on the second day after they arrive. let's have more from our political correspondent helen catt. so, helen, still a lot of questions for the government about this and the rationale behind this with some
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suggesting that perhaps it is not quite the right time to do this, to make this move. so how has dominic raab been defending the idea? yes. raab been defending the idea? yes, there are a few— raab been defending the idea? yes there are a few concerns have been raised around issues like lower quality protection perhaps from vaccines that haven't been approved for use in the uk or people might fraudulently use the system to say they have been jabbed when they haven't been. so dominic raab has been out addressing some of those concerns this morning. so in the first one, the quality of the vaccines, he has stressed that it would only apply to people who have been jabbed with vaccine has been approved by an eu regulator, the uk or us regulators, so people with the chinese vaccine wouldn't be included. dominic raab said there would be checks for eu citizens, it would be checks for eu citizens, it would be checks for eu citizens, it would be a digitalform to would be checks for eu citizens, it would be a digital form to show that they have been jabbed. would be a digital form to show that they have beenjabbed. for would be a digital form to show that they have been jabbed. for people from the us it is paper—based, they
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have a card but they will also have the residency checked as an additional check. so trying to provide some sort of reassurance there on those questions. and the big concern that labour is concerned about is the potential for importing new variants into the country. the results of this issue of reciprocity because at the moment uk visitors can't go on holiday to the us because the body controls there are very strict. so in terms of does that mean that we will see the us reciprocate here is what dominic raab had to say on that. ultimately of course it — raab had to say on that. ultimately of course it will _ raab had to say on that. ultimately of course it will be _ raab had to say on that. ultimately of course it will be their _ raab had to say on that. ultimately of course it will be their decision, i of course it will be their decision, they're _ of course it will be their decision, they're taking a very careful approach notjust with they're taking a very careful approach not just with the uk they're taking a very careful approach notjust with the uk but across_ approach notjust with the uk but across the — approach notjust with the uk but across the board. we have had conversations and the president has raised _ conversations and the president has raised it_ conversations and the president has raised it with the prime minister so clearly— raised it with the prime minister so clearly they would like to proceed and we _ clearly they would like to proceed and we will work out how we can do that as _ and we will work out how we can do that as soon — and we will work out how we can do that as soon as possible. ultimately they have _ that as soon as possible. ultimately they have to take that decision for themselves in the way that many others _ themselves in the way that many others will and have. what i can tell you — others will and have. what i can tell you though is that by taking the approach that we are taking a lot of— the approach that we are taking a lot of countries will then approach
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us and _ lot of countries will then approach us and say— lot of countries will then approach us and say can we get on the uk list of double _ us and say can we get on the uk list of double vaccinated countries, citizens — of double vaccinated countries, citizens from countries that can come _ citizens from countries that can come in — citizens from countries that can come in. , . , citizens from countries that can come in. ,. , .,, ., ., , come in. he described as a virtuous cle and come in. he described as a virtuous cycle and had _ come in. he described as a virtuous cycle and had already _ come in. he described as a virtuous cycle and had already been - come in. he described as a virtuous cycle and had already been getting | cycle and had already been getting messages from other countries overnight asking if they could join a similar scheme. labour though have sums concerns about this. they say that the government's track record in borders has been one of recklessness and confusion and i want to open up safely. there has also been a bit of anger from french ministers today who are angry of course that france doesn't qualify for this because it is the only country in this amber plus category that the government has created which means that people coming from france don't have this exemption. helen, thank you very much. we were mentioning a little earlier today about the furlough figures for the uk and we now do have those figures in. so another 590,000 people were
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removed from the government's furlough support programme injune. that is the headline figure. 2.4 million people were on furlough at the end of may. roughly around 1.9 million staff still on furlough with 540,000 fewer people on furlough now compared to the previous month. the coronavirus job compared to the previous month. the coronavirusjob retention scheme, as it was formally known, began taping support for businesses earlier this month with the government contributing less to the wage bill and employers having to pay more. so from the 1st of august this will change again with employers expected to top up 20% of workers's pay for the scheme comes to an end in the autumn. a football supporter who suffered life—changing injuries at the 1989 hillsborough stadium disaster in england has died at the age of 55. an inquest into andrew devine's death — held on wednesday — concluded he'd been unlawfully killed. it makes him the 97th victim of the disaster. james reynolds reports:
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andrew devine was 22 when he was seriously injured at hillsborough. at first he was given no more than six months to live. but with 24—hour care, he survived for another 32 years. his family say he was the centre of their lives. our devastation over his death, they say, is overwhelming. 96 more liverpool fans died of their injuries at hillsborough. two years after the disaster, an inquest ruled their deaths were accidental. the families refused to accept this verdict. after years of campaigning, they succeeded in obtaining a new inquest. in 2016, this hearing recorded that the fans were unlawfully killed. in a later trial though, the police commander at the game was cleared of gross negligence manslaughter. the liverpool coroner's court has now ruled that andrew devine was,
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like the 96 others, unlawfully killed. and so more than three decades on, the total number of dead from hillsborough rises to 97. james reynolds, bbc news. we've been speaking to dan kay who covered hillsborough for a number of years for the liverpool echo. he said the news of andrew devine's death has been felt deeply by many people in the city. the news which broke yesterday evening i think has shocked many people. it comes obviously on the back of the disappointment of the abject failure of the criminal trials at the end of may. and it is a reminder that for many people, hillsborough is something that does not go away and will not go away. to what extent, i mean, obviously people there are thinking about this all the time i'm sure but to what extent does andrew's death bring up a real soul searching
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about what went on that day? well, i think if there is soul—searching to be going on really it should be amongst the people who have evaded any kind ofjustice or accountability. there still remains a very deep sense of injustice within the city and beyond for everybody affected by hillsborough because astonishingly, despite the inquest finding of unlawful killing, no one has been found accountable apart from the sheffield wednesday official who was found guilty of the health and safety offence. not one police officer has lost a day's pay or any kind of accountability at all. the reality is andrew will now become known as the 97th victim but the truth is no one will ever really know the true number of lives of hillsborough and the suicides and stress and strain that have occurred since. the stress and strain not just amongst the family but the heroic survivors, many of whom would have died on the day.
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they were blamed for many years despite the inquest proving that they have no part in the disaster. and they have had to live with that for all those years. so this latest news, will only make thatjourney even more arduous for them. and do you think andrew's family will appreciate, take some measure of comfort if that is quite the right way of putting it, the coroner has speedily concluded that andrew was unlawfully killed when you consider the long years of fighting that the families of the other 96 victims had to get the coroner to come to that conclusion? well, the statement they released yesterday evening did indicate that they welcomed the coroner's adjudication that andrew was unlawfully killed. and itjust puts into perspective their astonishing support and love that they have shown for andrew and his carer is of course for all these years.
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and that is indicative of the wider support that has been very, very prevalent within the liverpool community and also the wider hillsborough community and wider just community of good people who realise that a terrible thing happened. a great injustice was perpetuated for many years and andrew's family spirit and keeping going very much ties into the wider spirit of the families and the survivors that campaign for many, many years during a long, long dark period of time when it seemed like nothing would ever change. the way the criminal prosecutions went actually puts into even more miraculous context the fact that the original inquest verdicts of accidental death were overturned in 2016 to the correct verdict of unlawful killing. the headlines on bbc news... world champion pole vaulter sam kendricks — one of the favourites to win gold at the tokyo olympics — has been ruled out after testing
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positive for coronavirus and there was silver for team gb's mallory franklin in the women's canoe slalom final. australia'sjessica fox took gold scientists warn that disruptive climate change is already making itself felt in the uk — which is becoming wetter, warmer and sunnier. from monday travellers arriving in england, scotland and wales who've been fully—vaccinated in the eu or us won't need to isolate when entering from an amber—list country. uk foreign secretary dominic raab defended the move the answer to your question why we are taking this step, we are doing it, opening up internationally in the same way as we are domestically in the sure—footed careful way with the safeguards in place to make sure that we can do it in a sustainable way. great britain have just missed out on two more medals at the olympics. helen glover and polly swann were fourth in the women's pair, the same place that emily craig and imogen grant finished in the lightweight women's double sculls, though they were pipped by the narrowest of margins
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let's head to bristol where our sport's correspondent eleanor roper is waiting for us. with one of the people who knows helen glover are based. yes. with one of the people who knows helen glover are based.— helen glover are based. yes, she knows her — helen glover are based. yes, she knows her well, _ helen glover are based. yes, she knows her well, we _ helen glover are based. yes, she knows her well, we are _ helen glover are based. yes, she knows her well, we are joined - helen glover are based. yes, she knows her well, we are joined by| helen glover are based. yes, she i knows her well, we are joined by our knows her well, we arejoined by our double olympic gold medallist, you won them both in the boat with helen. have you been awake all night? helen. have you been awake all niuht? ,, , ,., ., ., , ., night? super proud of what they have done. the night? super proud of what they have done- they have _ night? super proud of what they have done. they have had _ night? super proud of what they have done. they have had an _ night? super proud of what they have done. they have had an amazing - done. they have had an amazing journey, — done. they have had an amazing journey, and it is a different journey— journey, and it is a different journey from the one me and helen went on— journey from the one me and helen went on but— journey from the one me and helen went on but i am so proud. what is it like watching _ went on but i am so proud. what is it like watching her _ went on but i am so proud. what is it like watching her race _ went on but i am so proud. what is it like watching her race and - went on but i am so proud. what is it like watching her race and not. it like watching her race and not being there? is there any part of you wanted to be in the boat? hi i am very happy with my choices. helen and ollie, i am their number one fan, i love watching them race, they
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are incredible athletes and it is very exciting to see them racing. they won the world championship in 2013, lets not forget that, both of them are amazing. number one fan and love watching them raise it has them are amazing. number one fan and love watching them rais- love watching them raise it has been described as — love watching them raise it has been described as the _ love watching them raise it has been described as the mother _ love watching them raise it has been described as the mother of - love watching them raise it has been described as the mother of all - described as the mother of all comebacks, had three children, documented herjourney back into the boat. what do you make of that? it was by no means easy with lockdown and three small children. yes. and three small children. yes, phenomenal- _ and three small children. yes, phenomenal. she _ and three small children. yes, phenomenal. she had - and three small children. yes, phenomenal. she had the - and three small children. 1a: phenomenal. she had the children, going through locked in with one child is hard, having three, yes, helen is amazing, and managed to get back into training as well, it is a credit to her and her husband who supported her. they are an amazing team. i think she had a dream, she
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wanted to see where it could go and absolutely hats off to her and super proud of her for putting herself out there. the gold was different, if i could only get on the plane to tokyo, and make it into the final, disappointing to come forth but she said they were so proud of what they had achieved even though they were not on the podium. yes. had achieved even though they were not on the podium.— not on the podium. yes, she should be, her priorities _ not on the podium. yes, she should be, her priorities are _ not on the podium. yes, she should be, her priorities are so _ not on the podium. yes, she should be, her priorities are so different. be, her priorities are so different to what they were when we race together, 2012 and 2016, it was vastly different, all we did was rowing. now she has a family. the world are so different, the pandemic has thrown many things up in the air, notjust for helen but for both of them. their training was so different than 2016 respectively. it is amazing, you cannot take that away from them. yes, they are both
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racers, they are competitive, they would have loved to come home with a medal but we are at home are cheering on team gb and we are no less proud for what they have achieved. forth is a horrible place to be but they are still champions. we have to mention polly, but this is about more than a medal. do you think there is a bigger message here in terms of inspiring other women and mothers?— in terms of inspiring other women and mothers? �* ., ., ., , and mothers? both helen and polly, comared and mothers? both helen and polly, compared to — and mothers? both helen and polly, compared to the _ and mothers? both helen and polly, compared to the last _ and mothers? both helen and polly, compared to the last campaigns, - compared to the last campaigns, their lives are so different, things have put life into perspective, hailing with the children and polly is a trained doctor and working in i see you this time last summer. their lives are different. the olympics were different. they stepped back from that, it is raw now but they will step back and say, look what we
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have achieved considering what we were up against. i think it is phenomenal.— were up against. i think it is henomenal. ., , ,._ phenomenal. helen has tweeted saying thank ou phenomenal. helen has tweeted saying thank you for— phenomenal. helen has tweeted saying thank you for the _ phenomenal. helen has tweeted saying thank you for the support _ phenomenal. helen has tweeted saying thank you for the support and - phenomenal. helen has tweeted saying thank you for the support and how- thank you for the support and how pleased she is. she says this is the last time for her. thank you so much. president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will soon be required to confirm they are vaccinated, orface more testing. the numbers of coronavirus cases are rising with the director of the us national public health agency, the cdc, saying cases have increased over 300% nationally since mid—june. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. infection rates are rising, the delta variant is spreading rapidly and the number of vaccines is lower
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than the president wants to see. he is about to announce that all government workers be vaccinated against covid—19 or be required to submit to regular testing. tote against covid-19 or be required to submit to regular testing. we have a lot of people — submit to regular testing. we have a lot of people not _ submit to regular testing. we have a lot of people not vaccinated. - submit to regular testing. we have a lot of people not vaccinated. the - lot of people not vaccinated. the pandemic we have now is the pandemic of the known vaccinated. please, please, get vaccinated. protect yourself and your children out there. it is important. shall there. it is important. all americans _ there. it is important. all americans are _ there. it is important. all americans are being advised to wear face mats again indoors and public spacesin face mats again indoors and public spaces in parts of the country with substantial or high transmission rates, 67% of counties, up in 24 hours from 63%. some of the big tech companies such as facebook and google have said their staff must be vaccinated before stepping back into the office. netflix has made vaccines compulsory for all cast and crew members on us productions. the
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enforcement of vaccination policies is now a huge challenge facing much of corporate america.— of corporate america. private companies — of corporate america. private companies have _ of corporate america. private companies have to _ of corporate america. private companies have to make - of corporate america. private j companies have to make that of corporate america. private - companies have to make that decision where they are going to mandate vaccination or if not, to allow people to come into work not vaccinated insist on verification, but the private company has to do the verification because the government has not stepped in to do that. there is a role for government here that has not been filled adequately. one, with millions of americans onlyjust getting used to life again as it used to be, there is growing unease that the pandemic is growing unease that the pandemic is far from over. the australian state of new south wales has recorded two—hundred—and—thirty—nine new coronavirus infections — the highest daily rise since the start of the pandemic. people living in eight hotspots in the biggest city, sydney, are being ordered to wear masks outdoors and must stay within five kilometres of their homes. our correspondent shymaa khalil in sydney explains if the lockdown will work given
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the lag in the rollout of vaccination programme and how infection is fast increasing in new south wales. after an announcement of an extension yesterday, experts are saying that this may well go beyond the end of august, the government has announced, because new south wales has recorded 239 new locally acquired cases, the highest number notjust since acquired cases, the highest number not just since the acquired cases, the highest number notjust since the beginning of the outbreak but since the beginning of the pandemic for the state which shows you how challenging and difficult the situation is in new south wales, especially in greater sydney with the delta variant and how transmissible it as. more than 65 of those cases have been in the community in the entire time of their illness and that is why the new south wales government has announced new restrictions to aid areas in sydney that are considered hotspots. people in those areas will have to wear facemasks when they go
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outdoors for essential reasons and they cannot travel farther than five kilometres from their homes. we heard from the police commissioner, police will be given powers from tomorrow from friday to close down businesses who breach the stay—at—home orders and who breach the lockdown orders and also expect to see much more police presence on the streets, especially in those areas. we also heard from the state premier who gets a daily update and she refused... rejected the criticism that her government failed in containing the virus, failed to go early enough and hard enough and the lockdown came gradually attributing to the rise in case numbers but she did acknowledge that because of the number of people out in the community while infections, cases are going to get worse, numbers are going to get worse before they get any better. experts are saying that even though the
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lockdown has been extended until the end of august, the 28th of august, given how things are right now, the trajectory of these cases, it will go beyond that may be. president biden says he was honoured to meet the exiled belarusian opposition leader, svetlana tika nofskaya, at the white house. she said the visit would prove inspirational to her opposition movement —— which is trying to oust president lukashenko from power —— after what they claim was a rigged election last year. mark lobel has more and his report contains flashing images. this was the state's response to protesters disputing what they called a rigged election back in august. few here believe the country's long—time president alexander lukashenko when he claimed he had won re—election with 80% of the vote, and neither did governments in the eu, uk, canada and the us. and this is the woman who says she won that election,
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svetla na ti kha novs kaya. she met president biden at the white house on wednesday. this is a very significant meeting, a message to the whole world that the greatest country in the world is with us and this meeting is like success of all of the belarusians that are fighting at the moment. they include thousands of civilians taking to the streets for months, at risk of their own security. but the opposition is not being tolerated by the man dubbed europe's last dictator. keen to rally the beleaguered opposition, president biden tweeted he was honoured to meet the exiled opposition leader, adding that the united states stands with the people of belarus in their quest for democracy and universal human rights. it's like inspiration for our people
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to move forward, not to give up, although people are not giving up, for sure, but it's one more signal that we have strong allies beside us. but despite sanctions on his regime and internationalflight bans, president lukashenko has dug in with russian support. we talked about multiple points of pressure on the regime, for the regime to stop violence, release political prisoners and start dialogue with belarus, and you know, i'm sure that belarus can be an example of non—violent transition of power. she told the president the us could be an invaluable future partner to an independent belarus, but for that to become a reality, the situation on the ground would have to look vastly different to this, with no immediate sign it will. mark lobel, bbc news.
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the headlines on bbc news... the american pole vaulter sam kendricks, one of the favourites to win gold at the tokyo olympics, has been ruled out after testing positive for coronavirus. scientists warn that the uk is already undergoing disruptive climate change with increased rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. a coroner concludes that liverpool fan andy devine, who died this week after suffering life—changing injuries in the hillsborough stadium disaster, is the 97th victim of the tragedy. today has been dubbed earth overshoot day — a group of scientists work out every year how quickly we've used up all the ecological resources the planet can produce in 12 months. and with governments around the world focussed on climate policy in the run—up to the cop26 climate summit in glasgow, the idea
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of earth overshoot day is based on a pretty simple premise. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here. yes, the premise is this: humans are consuming more, there are more of us, and we're creating more waste, including greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide that get pumped into the atmosphere. but the size and capacity of our planet remains the same. so, something has to give. and how do scientists calculate when earth overshoot day occurs every year? basically, by comparing the amount of natural resources the earth is able to generate that year, and working out when human demand for those resources uses them all up. in other words, it's the day we've exhausted a 12—month quota of the earth's resources, and we're starting to reduce them, as well as creating more waste through things like carbon emissions from fossil fuels which make matters much worse. and this year it's today — july the 29th. last year it was more than three weeks later — but of course covid played a role in that. huge amounts of economic activity
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shut down during the first months of the pandemic. since then, carbon emissions have gone up again and the global footprint network reckons our overall carbon footprint has risen by about 6.6% compared to last year. but even if 2020 was something of a blip — look at when overshoot day has happened since 1970. — it's getting earlier and earlier, although the good news is that the line has flattened a bit over the last few years. these are estimates — but they're based on the latest un data and science. and the pattern in pretty clear. currently humanity uses 70% more of what earth can produce. it's like spending 70% more than what you earn, you can get for some time but not for ever. the long—term economic impact is that if the economy is not research secure and does not have the input to maintain the economic machinery, it is going to be very hard to maintain the machinery.
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it's also worth remembering that different countries contribute very differently to the overall picture, based on how much they consume and pollute, and how many people live there qatar feb 9 united states march 14 uk may 19 china june 7 and indonesia dec f the global average was like qatar, which has a tiny population but produces huge amounts of oil and gas, overshoot day would have happened as early as february. in the uk it would have been may, and indonesia not until december. the average in many poorer countries of course would mean no overshoot at all. but we're already seeing the effects of the overuse of resources in terms of deforestation or drought, for example, and of course, waste or pollution in terms of those greenhouse gases entering the atmosphere. we are an ingenious species and we have got technology, we can rethink our consumption and everything that we use in terms of the energy, the
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food we eat, even the clothes that we buy and how we travel, all add to this consumption footprint and it is something that we are all responsible for. to protect the planet and the way we live on it, governments agreed at the last big climate summit in paris to try to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees celsius above pre—industrial levels. big global corporations have a huge role to play, because this is the decade when real action has to be taken if that goal is to be met. the debate in the run—up to the glasgow summit in november is going to be critical in determining whether it will be. as we've heard, scientists have warned the uk is already undergoing disruptive climate change, with increased rainfall, sunshine and temperatures. well, farmers hit by a freak hail storm last week in the south east of england are calling for emergency financial help from the government. 12 farms in the thaxted area were struck by hail stones the size of golf balls. it's estimated up to 90% of some
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crops have been lost. this from our environment reporter richard daniel. massive hailstones hammering down in thaxted last week. robert, i've never seen damage like this before. well, neither have i. first time, absolutely devastated. here with a flail mower. eight days on, robert still can't take it in. the scale of the damage on his 200 acre farm is immense. we hope it's a one—off. we are having trouble getting our heads around it. we just... we don't know what to do now. we've never seen this devastation. this is our year's work. to us, they are more than money. we look after them, we tend them all year, it's... it's quite hurtful, you know? this is what the crop should look like. it is due for harvest in about three weeks. but take a look at these.
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battered, bruised, a pod split open. they reckon they have lost around 50% of the crop in this field. nearby, an estimated 90% loss in a field of oilseed rape. smashed from pods, the seed has now germinated creating a green carpet on the ground. and in a field of oats once destined for the breakfast table, a similar story. i have been working crops in north—west essex as an independent agronomist for 35 years and i have never seen devastation like we are seeing this winter oat field here. we think we have lost about 90% of our oat crop that will be harvested in two or three weeks' time. it is on the ground and we haven't got machines to hoover it up. 12 farms in a ten—mile stretch of land barely half a mile wide were hit by the storm, just weeks before harvest. the losses are estimated to run to hundreds of thousands of pounds. defra have a disaster fund so farms that suffered severe
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flooding back in the winter, i understand, have been supported by that fund and i think this is equally devastating. the hailstorm is the latest in a series of extreme weather events. for robert, in just a few minutes, it wiped a year's work and threw his business into loss. earlier i spoke to amy geddes, an arable farmer from arbroath in scotland, and asked her about the impacts of climate change she has noticed. i think ithink in i think in terms of what we have seen locally here this year, it has been incredibly dry. the extremes have been very noticeable, we have gone from a weight me to an incredibly dryjune and july, less than 20 millimetres of rain for both
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months. it has an impact, not as devastating as the hailstones down south. ~ . . ., ,, devastating as the hailstones down south. ~ . . ., devastating as the hailstones down south. . . devastating as the hailstones down south. ~ . . ., ., ., south. what crops do you grow and what impact _ south. what crops do you grow and what impact is _ south. what crops do you grow and what impact is it _ south. what crops do you grow and what impact is it having _ south. what crops do you grow and what impact is it having on - south. what crops do you grow and what impact is it having on these . what impact is it having on these crops right now in terms of your planning for the next few years? oilseed rape crops are easily damaged by heavy rain or torrential hailstones, our crops are very pure this year. it has been a combination of factors, i think insect and pest damage, the cabbage stem flea beetle which we have not been bothered with but is starting to take effect. incredibly cold, dry winter preceded by unprecedented rainfall in october after the crop was just one month stone, and the coldness over the winter caused frost heave so the
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plants were affected by heave out of the ground which will affect the yield and as it came into spring we saw incredibly cold dry weather followed by the weight spell in may and the crop has not had a good year. it takes a full year to come to harvest and a lot can happen in that time. we will question whether we continue to grow oilseed rape, i think wee well this year because we have bought the seed, we are hoping for a better season and we will continue to think of alternatives that might replace that in our rotation. turkish authorities have launched an investigation into a massive forest fire that spread to a town in southern turkey. it comes as a bee keeper in greece has been charged with negligence over a similar fire there on tuesday — as extreme weather conditions continue to sweep across europe, as richard forrest reports. another day of devastating weather events in europe. hundreds evacuated here near turkey's mediterranean
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coast, as a forest fire spread to towns following days of flooding and landslides in the north—east. the cause of this is under investigation, as the fire was started at four separate points. translation: we hope that we will put out this far without any casualties. we hope to put out the fire. all aspects of the incident will be investigated. in greece, strong winds are hampering efforts to extinguish another fire burning out of control. a day after a forest fire damaged homes in the northern suburb of athens, a 64—year—old beekeeper has been charged with negligence. in northern lebanon, wildfires burning across a mountainous region, where the army has been dispatched and help has been requested from cyprus, with more extreme weather expected across parts of europe later this week. richard forrest, bbc news.
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you're watching bbc news now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett hello. we have got some unusually windy weather for the time of year on the way tonight across the southwest. today, breezy out there for many areas, the shower is not as widespread, not as heavy as we have seen over recent days. most of the downpours have come near the area of low pressure which is pulling away, fewer showers, this is the low pressure that will bring windy weather from the south—west overnight. through the afternoon, the cloud continues to bring in a few showers across scotland, northern ireland, northern england, heavier later. sunshine to the south before the cloud increases in the south—west with rain later on in the
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day. blustery winds, coming in from the west or south—west, the best of the west or south—west, the best of the sunshine likely to be across the midlands towards the south—east of england, high temperatures of 22 celsius. heavy showers for the first part of the night across scotland and perhaps northern ireland, we focus on the south—west, the area of low pressure deepens and brings rain and strengthens the winds. windy across devon and cornwall, 50 or 60 mph around coastal areas, strong winds in the english channel. temperatures by the end of the night in double figures with the rain having got as far north as northern england. windy weather on friday, they will ease down, showers and longer spells of rain for england and wales, thundery downpours threatening across eastern parts of england as the showers is west. showers for southern scotland,
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northern scotland cool and cloudy and temperatures a bit lower than today. the weekend, high—pressure looks like it will remain in the atlantic. low pressure is still heading toward scandinavia influencing our weather in the way that it means we have got more of a northerly breeze lowering our way over the weekend, not particularly warm. sunshine this weekend, some showers, mind you, may be heavy across england and wales, still around into sunday, top temperatures disappointing, around 21 celsius.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: scientists warn that the uk is already experiencing disruptive climate change — with more rainfall and sunshine and higher temperatures. a silver medalfor team gb's mallory franklin in the women's canoe slalom event in tokyo. from monday travellers arriving in england, scotland and wales who've been fully—vaccinated in the eu or us won't need to isolate when entering from an amber—list country. in the united states president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will soon be required to confirm they are vaccinated — orface more testing. latest government figures show that half—a—million fewer people are now on furlough — as life gets back to
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normal after lockdowns. and coming up — england's deputy chief medical officer jonathan van tam will be answering your questions here on the news channel from 1.30pm. the impact of climate change is already being felt across the uk, with more rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. these are the findings of the state of uk climate report 2020 from the met office. it says that 2020 was the third warmest year since 1884. it was the fifth wettest. six of the 10 wettest years have been since 1998. and last year
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was the eighth sunniest on record. the experts said that, in the space of 30 years, the uk has become 0.9c warmer and 6% wetter. the report's lead author, mike kendon, warns "we are going to see more and more extreme weather such as heatwaves and floods" as the climate continues to warm. our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. dramatic changes in our skies. in 2020, the uk experienced a year of extremes. from storms in february, which caused chaos across the country, to a summer heatwave, when temperatures sweltered above 34 degrees for six consecutive days. and rain in october with the uk's wettest day on record. it is all charted in an annual assessment of the climate. the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier.
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we can see very clearly from our observations that the uk's climate is already changing. so climate change isn't something that is just going to happen in 2050, or we need to worry about towards the end of the century. we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. the report compared the most recent three decades with the 30 years before, and found on average the uk was 0.9 degrees hotter. for rainfall, the country was an average of 6% wetter. and 2020 was the eighth sunniest year recorded in the last 100 years. new defences are under construction, like this tidal barrier in lincolnshire, to cope with future storm surges. but the reality is flooding is having a devastating impact now, with some homes being flooded again and again. changes that seem small are having a very big effect on people's lives. what's interesting about this report is there is lots of data. so there are lots of temperature records and percentage changes. but what we are seeing
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are the impacts, the impacts to us as humans, to our businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of our eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united nations climate summit. we will find out if governments can rise to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effects of climate change. right now, the elements show no signs of letting up, with this week's flash floods taking london by surprise. scientists will continue to track and analyse these events, but they warn that extremes are becoming the new norm. rebecca morelle, bbc news. dr sharon george, director of environmental sustainability and green technology at the university of keele, said the report demostrates the real impacts of climate change. part of the problem is that we've, you know, for years, scientists have been warning about this and saying that the likelihood of this is happening, but it's quite difficult
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for people to imagine that this intangible, invisible gas that we are producing in our everyday lives is causing these real effects. especially when the numbers that we talk about are so small. you mention 0.9 degrees, that doesn't sound like very much, but, actually, over a period of time, and that much energy over an entire, you know, area, it creates chaos and creates more instability and that is what we are seeing now and this is what climate change looks like. it is happening now and it's only going to go in one direction. the met office report comes as a new paper from the climate crisis advisory group, founded by the former uk chief scientist professor sir david king, asks whether rapid heating in the arctic region is driving changes in the jet stream in a way that influenced the recent weather extremes. professor king explained the current situation in the arctic circle region. it's very clear, if we look at what's happening...
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first of all, let me deal with the arctic circle region, where the temperature rise was about 3.5 centigrade last year above the preindustrial level, and this is that trend, it's rising faster and faster over the arctic circle region and the reason is basically very simple. we've seen a much faster loss of the sea ice covering the arctic sea over the last 20 years than the theoretical climate scientists were predicting, so that, today, during the arctic polar summer, which is, of course, a 24—hour summer, the period of the summer is about three months, centred around june 21st, we can see that the sea is exposed about 50% to the sunlight, so this means, whereas the ice was reflecting sunlight back into space, the sea is absorbing it and that region of the planet is now heating up faster than the rest of the planet,
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which is about 1.2, 1.5 degrees centigrade above the preindustrial level. now, what happens during the arctic summer, when you've got a hot area around the north pole, and it is hot... i mean, one of the members of the climate crisis advisory group is in northern finland, he is a representative of the sami people up there, he spoke to me six weeks ago, when the temperature there was —30 and then, two weeks ago, when the temperatures was plus 31 centigrade, a 61—degree change in less than six weeks. in the last hour, great britain's mallory franklin has won a silver medal in the women's c1 canoe slalom — for more on that and a round up of the latest from tokyo, here's mike bushell at the bbc�*s sports centre. it was the longest and most nerve
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wracking half an hour of her sporting life. but in the end the wait was worth it, for malory franklin, who won silver, for team gb, as women's canoe slalom, made a dramatic olympic debut. franklin was in the gold medal position after her paddle early on in the final, but then she had to watch others come down the course, and a flawless display from australia'sjessica fox, meant the british star, had to settle for silver. but still a brilliant performance, and a legacy of london 2012, for which the lee valley white water centre was built, and that's where franklin was been training for this historic moment. it was a really cool, it was so stressful sat on the startling but i had a moment when i this was really cool and i would not want to be anywhere else, the cameras panning around me and i caught a glimpse and i smiled and that reminded me of the environment and how crazy it all is but it is really cool. and with no fans allowed in tokyo — this was franklin's family, fiance, teammate and coach watching her performance at the lee valley centre in london —
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being thousands of miles away, doesn't mean they can't feeljust as involved, going through every twist and turn with mallory and they were understandably over the moon with her efforts. britain's two—time gold medallist helen glover, has ruled out another olympics rowing bid after the mother—of—three's hopes, of a fairytale finish at tokyo 2020, were dashed. glover, is now 35, and along with polly swann, finished fourth in the women's pair. after the race glover said "in rio, i said it was my last one. this time i'm saying �*no, it's definitely it'. she is also keen to inspire others, after her incredible journey back into the sport — training while her three babies slept, saying "you can do anything you want to do. trying and failing is no problem as long as you try." better news for team gb's matt coward—holley, in men's trap shooting as he won bronze — britain's 17th medal of the tokyo olympics. he is the world and european champion, but paid the price for a slow start, missing three of his first 10 targets. the briton recovered with 14
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successive hits to, climb into the bronze medal position. and joy for ireland, as they celebrated the country's first ever olympic rowing gold, in the lightweight double sculls. it was fintan mccarthy and paul o'donovan, who made history, in the lightweight double sculls, holding off a late surge from the germans, to add to the silver won five years ago in rio. and just look at this — their team ireland team mates gave them a very special welcome back to the olympic village. their women's 4s had earlier picked up a bronze, the rowing team. the heroes of all of ireland back home, having won a first ever rowing medal at the rio games. after winning a second bronze medal in the taekwondo, bianca walkden has returned to england, and this is the reception she got. of course none of the athletes have
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been able to have any of their friends of family out in tokyo to support them — so walkdens' family wasted no time, in welcoming her home. she tweeted that �*the love is unreal�* and �*family is everything.�* elsewhere the day has been dominated, by covid 19, just a day before the start of the track and field events starting, sam kendricks, the world pole vault champion, has withdrawn from the games, having tested postive for covid. he had been expected to contend for a medal in tokyo. and the argentinian pole vaulter german chiaraviglio has also tested positive — he tweeted that the games are over for him. but better news for the australian track and field team. they have resumed training, having earlier had to isolate, but their pole vaulter, kurtis marschall, and close associaties have returned negative tests. the track and field starts tomorrow. that�*s all the sport for now. you can find more on all those
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stories on the bbc sport website. rules are to be relaxed on international travel so that fully vaccinated people from the us and most eu countries will no longer have to self isolate when they arrive in england, scotland or wales. but the changes — which will be introduced from four o�*clock on monday morning — will not apply to visitors from france. northern ireland has not yet made a decision on the rule change. let�*s take a closer look at the changes which the government says will help to reunite family and friends whose loved ones live abroad. people who were fully vaccinated in the eu or us will not need to isolate when coming to england, scotland and wales from an amber list country. transport secretary grant shapps said it would apply to people who have been fully vaccinated with a jab approved by the eu or us. travellers will still need to take either a lateral flow or pcr test pre—departure and a pcr test on the second day after they arrive. let�*s have more from our political correspondent helen catt.
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as you said, these new rules which come in from next week, widening the exemptions. previously it was newquay citizens who had been double jab returning from an amber list country didn�*t have to quarantine and that has been extended to fully jabbed eu and american citizens. there are some concerns, critics have worried about whether that could open the door to people coming in with a lower level of protection, a vaccine that the uk does not approve, for example. the foreign secretary talked about these being high trust countries and said it would only apply to people who have been given a vaccine approved either by the european court us or uk regulators, ruling out people who had the chinese jab. there are also concerns about how to stop people for generally saying they�*ve had two jobs, there were some reassurance from dominic raab on that as well and he said it is done digitally for
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people coming from the eu, from the us it is paper—based, but they will also check their residency. there are more concerns about the issue, for example labour is very worried about the potential for importing new variants, and there are also questions about the issue of reciprocity, well other countries do this for us? america is the big one because they have stricter border controls which means visitors are from the uk are not allowed so as does move likely to change that? here is what dominic raab, the foreign secretary, had to say. well, ultimately, of course, it will be their decision, they are taking a very careful approach, notjust with the uk, but across the board. we've had conversations, the president's raised it with the prime minister, so they clearly would like to proceed and we will work out how we can do that as soon as possible. ultimately, they've got to take that decision for themselves in the way that many others will and have. what i can tell you, though, is that by taking the approach that we are taking,
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a lot of countries will then approach us and say, well, can we get on the uk list of double vaccinated countries, citizens from countries that can come in? dominic raab said he already received messages from other countries doing precisely that, asking to join the scheme and said it was a sure—footed way of reopening a throttle travel. labour said the government has a track record of recklessness and confusion when it comes to borders and they say we�*ve not had any exposure and white the government did not add india to the red list when it should have or on the changing policy about france and there are also concerns raised in france about this, one french minister on social media this morning saying the policy was incomprehensible and discriminatory. helen, for the moment, thank you very much. and at half past one, we�*ll bejoined by professorjonathan van tam — england�*s deputy chief medical officer — to answer your questions about vaccine take—up amongst young people. get in touch with the hashtag
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#bbcyourquestions — or you can text 61124, or send an email to yourquestions@bbc.co.uk the headlines on bbc news... scientists warn the uk is already experience disruption from climate change — with more rainfall and sunshine and higher temperatures. silverfor team gb at the tokyo olympics as mallory franklin finishes second in the women�*s canoe slalom final. from monday travellers arriving in england, scotland and wales who�*ve been fully—vaccinated in the eu or us won�*t need to isolate when entering from an amber—list country. a football supporter who suffered life—changing injuries at hillsborough has died at the age of 55. an inquest into andrew devine�*s death — held on wednesday — concluded he�*d been unlawfully killed. it makes him the 97th
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victim of the disaster. james reynolds reports. andrew devine was 22 when he was seriously injured at hillsborough. at first he was given no more than six months to live. but with 24—hour care, he survived for another 32 years. his family say he was the centre of their lives. our devastation over his death, they say, is overwhelming. 96 more liverpool fans died of their injuries at hillsborough. two years after the disaster, an inquest ruled their deaths were accidental. the families refused to accept this verdict. after years of campaigning, they succeeded in obtaining a new inquest. in 2016, this hearing recorded that the fans were unlawfully killed. in a later trial though, the police commander at the game was cleared
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of gross negligence manslaughter. the liverpool coroner�*s court has now ruled that andrew devine was, like the 96 others, unlawfully killed. and so more than three decades on, the total number of dead from hillsborough rises to 97. james reynolds, bbc news. we�*ve been speaking to dan kay, who reported on the hillsborough disaster for a number of years for the liverpool echo. he said the news of andrew devine�*s death has been felt deeply by many people in the city. well, i think if there is soul—searching to be going on, really, it should be amongst the people who have evaded any kind of justice or accountability. there still remains a very deep sense of injustice within the city and beyond for everybody affected by hillsborough, because, astonishingly, despite the inquest of a finding of unlawful killing, no one has been found accountable, apart from the sheffield wednesday official graham mackrell, who was found guilty
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of a health and safety offence. not one police officer has lost a day�*s pay or had any kind of accountability at all. the reality is that andrew will now become known as the 97th victim, but the truth is no one will ever really know the true number of lives that hillsborough and its aftermath has cost, because there have been numerous suicides, lives cut short because of the stress and strain of it and lives also damaged, notjust among the family members, but amongst the heroic survivors, without whom many more would have died on the day, who were blamed for many years, despite the inquest proving that they had no part in the disaster and they�*ve had to live with that for all these years, so this latest news will only, will only make that journey even more arduous for them. the uk is already undergoing disruptive climate change, with increased rainfall, sunshine and temperatures, according to scientists. well, farmers hit by a freak hail
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storm last week in essex are calling for emergency financial help from the government. 12 farms in the thaxted area were struck by hail stones the size of golf balls. it�*s estimated up to 90% of some crops have been lost. this from our environment reporter richard daniel. massive hailstones hammering down in thaxted last week. robert, i�*ve never seen damage like this before. well, neither have i. first time, absolutely devastated. it looks as if someone has come through here here with a flail. eight days on, robert still can�*t take it in. the scale of the damage on his 200 acre farm is immense. we hope it's a one—off. we are having trouble getting our heads around it. we just... we don't know what to do now. we've never seen this devastation. this is our year's work. to us, they are more than money. we look after them, we tend them all year, it's... it's quite hurtful, you know?
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this is what the crop should look like. it is due for harvest in about three weeks. but take a look at these. battered, bruised, a pod split open. they reckon they have lost around 50% of the crop in this field. nearby, an estimated 90% loss in a field of oilseed rape. smashed from pods, the seed has now germinated creating a green carpet on the ground. and in a field of oats once destined for the breakfast table, a similar story. i have been working crops in north—west essex as an independent agronomist for 35 years and i have never seen devastation like we are seeing this winter oat field here. we think we have about 90% of our oat crop that will be harvested in two or three weeks�* time. it is on the ground and we haven�*t got machines to hoover it up. 12 farms in a ten—mile stretch of land barely half a mile wide were hit by the storm,
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just weeks before harvest. the losses are estimated to run to hundreds of thousands of pounds. defra have a disaster fund so farms that suffered severe flooding back in the winter, i understand, have been supported by that fund and i think this is equally devastating. the hailstorm is the latest in a series of extreme weather events. for robert, in just a few minutes, it wiped a year�*s work and threw his business into loss. a group of colleges and universities is urging the government to step back from its decision to scrap b—tecs in england. education leaders are warning the plan is "reckless", as it will harm the prospects of poorer pupils. ministers insist replacing the vocational qualifications with a new system of t—levels will ensure students leave education with the skills employers want. i�*m joined now by julie mcculloch, director of policy at the association of school and college leaders.
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thank you forjoining us. can you explain what these t—levels would be like? 50 explain what these t-levels would be like? ,, ., , ., explain what these t-levels would be like? , ., ., like? so t-levels on a new vocational— like? so t-levels on a new vocational qualification - like? so t-levels on a new vocational qualification atl like? so t-levels on a new i vocational qualification at the government recently brought in, students have not worked all their way through the courses yet, they have just started them. they are very large vocational qualifications that basically the equivalent of three a—levels, students would sit them between in most cases 16 and 18, they are courses that would lead towards a particular occupation, for example, you might do a t—levels in digital media that would lead to two occupations in that area. they are very different and new qualifications that we think has the potential but as yet are untested. why is that so much opposition to them? if they are about equipping young people with skills that
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employers need, that would seem like a good idea. employers need, that would seem like a aood idea. ~ , a good idea. absolutely, the opposition — a good idea. absolutely, the opposition is _ a good idea. absolutely, the opposition is not _ a good idea. absolutely, the opposition is not to - a good idea. absolutely, the opposition is not to the - a good idea. absolutely, the i opposition is not to the second themselves at all. the organisations that have been sending this letter, we are very positive about second set and think lots of students, they will be great. the trouble is the proposal is as t—levels are brought in, to remove at the same time other qualifications such as b—tecs, which are a very effective and very popular and well—respected qualification and very different from t—levels. the b—tecs is more like the same size of an a—level so a student could take a couple of a—levels and b—tecs that would keep options open to them. the challenge with having only a—levels or t—levels a students have to make that decision in most cases at the
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age of 16, and that may close quite age of 16, and that may close quite a lot of options to them as they work through those courses, we are concerned we think there needs to be both options available and notjust one. both options available and not 'ust one. ., . , both options available and not 'ust one. ., ., , ., ., , one. one of the arguments against caettin rid one. one of the arguments against getting rid of— one. one of the arguments against getting rid of b-tecs _ one. one of the arguments against getting rid of b-tecs is _ one. one of the arguments against getting rid of b-tecs is it _ one. one of the arguments against getting rid of b-tecs is it would - getting rid of b—tecs is it would particularly affect students from more disadvantaged backgrounds. why are b—tecs so appealing to those students? they offer a different route through those last couple of years of school or college, basically. the statistics on this are quite stark. we now 44% of white working—class students who go to university after did at least one b—tecs, 37% of black students who go to university enter with just b—tecs. so they are a different type of qualification that appealed to a different type of student sometimes and they are incredibly effective in helping students getting onto the next eight
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whether higher education or work. and we are really concerned particularly about more disadvantaged students and the impact this might have. the education — impact this might have. the education secretary has said there needs to be a streamlining of the number of qualifications, how are schools and colleges meant to run a—levels and first set and second set when they are already stressed? we are not opposed to any of you, the education secretary is right to be looking at the number of qualifications and it is huge and that can be confusing for students and employers. we think is right to look at that. but most schools and colleges are very experienced in thinking about what is the best route for students and talking to them about aspirations. and finding them about aspirations. and finding the right qualifications for them. absolutely no issue with the review
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and streamline it but itjust feels precipitous to remove those qualifications which we now are so effective, particularly for more disadvantaged young people, at this point. disadvantaged young people, at this oint. , disadvantaged young people, at this oint., ~. disadvantaged young people, at this oint., n ., ,, disadvantaged young people, at this oint. n ., ,, ,., point. julie mcculloch, thank you very much _ point. julie mcculloch, thank you very much for— point. julie mcculloch, thank you very much forjoining _ point. julie mcculloch, thank you very much forjoining us. - now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello there. it is going to be another breezy day for most of us today. more places probably getting away with a dry day, mind you, the showers not quite as widespread today. most of the cloud bringing showers into scotland, northern ireland and northern england, some heavy ones later. to the south of that, a decent amount of dry weather and sunshine but we will see cloud increasing in the south—west with rain arriving later on. sunnier skies continuing through the midlands towards the south east of england and it is here we will see the highest temperatures. let�*s focus on that wetter weather in the south—west. low pressure moving in here, strengthening winds too. gusts, 50, 60 mph in devon and cornwall overnight. windy weather spreading through the english channel, unusually windy for the time of year. and the rain bands getting as far
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north as northern england. in scotland and northern ireland, any heavy showers fading away overnight. but we�*ve got showers and longer spells of rain across england and wales with a threat of some thunderstorms, particularly in the east, the winds do gradually ease then, a few showers in northern ireland and quite a lot of cloud for northern scotland. quite cool as well. change in this is bbc news. the headlines... scientists warn that the uk
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is already experiencing disruptive climate change — with more rainfall and sunshine — and higher temperatures. silverfor team gb at the tokyo olympics as mallory franklin finishes second in the women�*s canoe slalom final. from monday, travellers arriving in england, scotland and wales who�*ve been fully—vaccinated in the eu or us won�*t need to isolate when entering from an amber—list country. in the united states, president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will soon be required to confirm they are vaccinated — or face more testing. latest government figures show that half a million fewer people are now on furlough — as life gets back to normal after the lockdowns. let�*s return now to our main story — the impact of climate change already being felt across the uk — with heavier rainfall, more sunshine and higher temperatures. that�*s according to the state of uk climate report 2020 from the met office.
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professor liz bentley is the chief executive of the royal meteorological society. which shejoins us which she joins us now, which shejoins us now, thank which she joins us now, thank you forjoining us. which she joins us now, thank you forjoining us— forjoining us. when people talk about climate _ forjoining us. when people talk about climate change, - forjoining us. when people talk about climate change, they - forjoining us. when people talk. about climate change, they often think it is just going to get hotter. what is the reality? this re ort hotter. what is the reality? this report clearly — hotter. what is the reality? this report clearly is _ hotter. what is the reality? try 3 report clearly is highlighting the number of things, it is a report that looks back at 2020 but also the most recent decade compared to our climate of the last century, for example, and it is clear evidence that our climate in the uk is not only warming, so temperatures are rising by around about 1.1 degrees over the last 50 years, but it is also getting wetter and it is getting sunnier and last year, we had our third warmest, for wettest and eighth sunniest, the very first year we have been in the top ten for all of those categories, whether it is temperature, rainfall or sunshine, so we are noticing changes, noticing records being broken and this really sets the tone
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for what the future looks like in the uk. ~ ., ., .., , the uk. we often hear politicians, at the big summits, _ the uk. we often hear politicians, at the big summits, talking - the uk. we often hear politicians, at the big summits, talking about| at the big summits, talking about targets for 2030 odd targets for 2050, which feels like it is quite a long way. how helpful is this report in showing, actually, it has already arrived. 50 in showing, actually, it has already arrived. , , ,, ., in showing, actually, it has already arrived. , , ~ ., ., arrived. so i guess we know our climate is _ arrived. so i guess we know our climate is changing, _ arrived. so i guess we know our climate is changing, we - arrived. so i guess we know our climate is changing, we have i arrived. so i guess we know our i climate is changing, we have seen that around the world and we have seen it in recent weeks, heatwaves in north america, flooding in europe and china, for example. this report focuses on what is happening in the uk and it is clearly highlighting it is changing here. as you say, there are nations, the uk as well, pledging that they want to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by the end of this decade or halfway through the century, 2050. we had targets they are aiming to meet to get to net zero, but it really does highlight that action is required now, so it is all very well having pledges and policies in place, action is needed now to start to
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mitigate, so we limit the amount of heat that we put into the atmosphere.— heat that we put into the atmosphere. heat that we put into the atmoshere. ~ . , ., atmosphere. we have seen that part of our infrastructure _ atmosphere. we have seen that part of our infrastructure can't _ atmosphere. we have seen that part of our infrastructure can't cope - of our infrastructure can�*t cope with these temperatures at times, but more humanely than that, if you like, people often can�*t cope with it as well. how these people�*s health and fatalities affected? that is important _ health and fatalities affected? that is important here _ health and fatalities affected? that is important here because this report has lots of facts and figures, numbers and percentages, but it is actually the impact all these changes have on us as humans and the infrastructure around us and it is those real kind of life stories that have been played out, you know, when people who are trying to cope in extreme heat. last year, we had one of our most severe heatwaves we have seen in over 60 years and the impact it has on us as humans, the impact it has on mortality rates, which go up, the frequency of heatwaves is increasing, the duration when we get them is much longer and, when they do happen, they are more intense and
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that has an impact on us. the flooding as well, as we said, our climate is now wetter than it used to be, we are seeing more flood events, more extreme events and that has an impact on us both personally and for our buildings, businesses and for our buildings, businesses and infrastructure, so it is the impact, i think, and infrastructure, so it is the impact, ithink, that and infrastructure, so it is the impact, i think, that really does hit home. ., , �* , hit home. professor liz bentley, thank ou hit home. professor liz bentley, thank you very _ hit home. professor liz bentley, thank you very much _ hit home. professor liz bentley, thank you very much for - hit home. professor liz bentley, thank you very much for your - hit home. professor liz bentley, i thank you very much for your time. latest figures show a new record of number of people have been told to self—isolate by the nhs covid—19 app. nearly 690,000 alerts were sent to users of the app in england and wales in the week tojuly the 21st telling them they had been in close contact with someone who had tested positive for coronavirus. that�*s up from the previous week when almost 619,000 people were pinged by the app. the government has said that some essential workers can now use daily testing to avoid having to isolate. plans for a national holocaust memorial next to parliament have been approved.
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the decision comes in the wake of a public inquiry after the project was initially rejected by westminster city council. the idea has received significant backing from mps and peers — however the former independent reviewer of terror laws, lord carlile qc, warned it would create a "trophy site" for terrorists. the communities secretary robert jenrickjoins me now. thank you very much forjoining us. why are you so keen to see this memorial in place, given what lord carlile has said, that it could become a trophy side. i carlile has said, that it could become a trophy side. i think it is an important _ become a trophy side. i think it is an important moment _ become a trophy side. i think it is an important moment for - become a trophy side. i think it is an important moment for the - become a trophy side. i think it is - an important moment for the country, we will now have a national holocaust memorial and learning centre and we will have one in the most prominent position, beside the houses of parliament. it will be an opportunity for us as a country, for the first time, to properly remember the first time, to properly remember the tragedy and horror of the holocaust and to do so within living
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memory of survivors, some of whom havejoined me here at memory of survivors, some of whom have joined me here at the site this morning, and also to educate and inform future generations about the horrors of the holocaust and where racism and discrimination of any kind, in particular anti—semitism, can lead if it goes unchecked. it has had the support of all living prime ministers, the leading faith leaders of the country, like the chief rabbi and the archbishop of canterbury and, most importantly, many, many survivors of the holocaust, who want to see this built before they sadly passed away, so they can leave this lasting legacy for future generations. it is legacy for future generations. it is also, legacy for future generations. it is also. according — legacy for future generations. it is also, according to the board of british dues, about commemorating the holocaust but also commemorating people who were persecuted during the second world war. how do you protect it from people, terrorists,
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or people who deny these events ever happen? i or people who deny these events ever ha--en? ~ . or people who deny these events ever ha en? ., . , or people who deny these events ever ha en? o’ ., , ., happen? i think that is the reason we need to _ happen? i think that is the reason we need to have _ happen? i think that is the reason we need to have a _ happen? i think that is the reason we need to have a memorial- happen? i think that is the reason we need to have a memorial andl happen? i think that is the reason | we need to have a memorial and a learning centre, notjust to commemorate and as a place where those people impacted by the holocaust and their families can come, but as a way of educating future generations and we hope that millions of young people from this country and international tourists passing through london will visit the learning center in the years to come and it will provide them with a better understanding as to what happened during the holocaust, what caused it, what the british role in the tragedy was, the things that we did right as a country and the things we did wrong, and, also, it will be a place where you can learn about discrimination, racism and subsequent genocides, so i think it will be a very important place for the whole country to come together and will help to educate and to tackle discrimination for many years
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to come. �* ., i. tackle discrimination for many years to come. �* ., y., ., to come. before we let you go, i wanted to _ to come. before we let you go, i wanted to talk _ to come. before we let you go, i wanted to talk to _ to come. before we let you go, i wanted to talk to you _ to come. before we let you go, i wanted to talk to you about - to come. before we let you go, i wanted to talk to you about the l wanted to talk to you about the covid app and the nhs app, we have seen 690,000 people in the week ending 21st ofjuly told to self—isolate. how realistic is it that we can continue having this number of people in isolation when they are showing no symptoms and then go on, in a large part, to test negative with a pcr test?- negative with a pcr test? well, i a- reciate negative with a pcr test? well, i appreciate it _ negative with a pcr test? well, i appreciate it is — negative with a pcr test? well, i appreciate it is a _ negative with a pcr test? well, i appreciate it is a significant - appreciate it is a significant number of people and it can be frustrating, but the app is doing what we asked of it. it is helping us to trace those people who have come into contact with people who had tested positive. we still ask people if they are pinged to take the steps that they are required to do and to self—isolate, but we have the expectation that, by the middle of august, we will be moving into a different period where those people who are double jabbed will not have to do so, they will have to follow
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testing requirements but not have to self—isolate, so there isn�*t very long to go until we reach that point and the government has also set out slightly different arrangements for certain critical workers, such as those working within the emergency services and within critical infrastructure such as the food industry, to help us through the remaining two or three weeks before those new rules come into place. robertjenrick, thank you very much for talking to us. the latest government data reports half a million fewer people on furlough. the amount of people on the scheme fell from 2.4 million at the end of may to 1.9 million by the end ofjune. it comes as the government continues to reduce the level of financial support it offers to businesses, and life begins to return to normal. from next month, employers will have to contribute more towards their wage bill, which many labour market experts warn could triggerjob cuts when companies can�*t make ends meet. our business correspondent colletta smith reports on getting
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back to work for over two million people still using the scheme. it had been such a long time coming. i was so excited to get ready, pick out the outfit of coming back to work and just seeing my friends that i hadn�*t gotten to see at work. and just sit at my desk after a whole 15 months, it was quite exciting. ten days ago, her life got busy again. after so long on furlough, she was over the moon getting the call asking her to come back. originally supposed to come back before the december lockdown. when the country went into lockdown at that point, i did feel a bit insecure to the point of the fact that, will i be able to come back because i had been anticipating that initial return to work? i did worry a little bit. as the weeks became months, the best thing was to kind of build a routine and just keep a positive mental attitude. that is what helped me
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get up in the mornings. staff here have been brought back gradually as business has increased. from next month companies will have to pay more, 20%, for each team member on furlough. that will mean tough decisions for many firms. we are seeing a lot of clients that are trying to bring in measures like part—time working, reduced hours, temporary pay cuts, as an alternative to people losing theirjobs. but if those things can't be agreed, then the fallback will be that some people will be made redundant. lots of companies have already faced up to the challenge and made some redundancies. simon says it couldn�*t be back to business as usual. we have had to let a number of our staff go, because we were unsure of how long furlough was going to last. but over the past year as well, we have seen a number of our employees leave the industry due to the uncertainties around hospitality.
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for those who have been out of the workplace for so long, hoping to get back to life as normal, the prospect of redundancy is all the more daunting. coletta smith, bbc news. our business correspondent alice baxter has more. thank you, yes, we are talking about the coronavirus job thank you, yes, we are talking about the coronavirusjob retention scheme today, more commonly known as furlough, it is thought that, to date,it furlough, it is thought that, to date, it has cost the taxpayer around £50 million. as you have been saying, it is coming to an end on the 30th of september, and it is slowly winding down after multiple extensions and, then, on sunday that the 1st of august, we will see the employee contribution double to 20%. but many industries and workers out there have described it as a lifeline and, this morning, we got the latest numbers out from hmrc as to the number of people still on
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furlough. with me now is charlie mccurdy, economist, at the resolution foundation. it is good to talk to you. we now know that according to hmrc, for the first time, the number of people on furlough has dropped below 2 million since the scheme began, what you make of the numbers?— since the scheme began, what you make of the numbers? that's right, the data which _ make of the numbers? that's right, the data which takes _ make of the numbers? that's right, the data which takes us _ make of the numbers? that's right, the data which takes us up - make of the numbers? that's right, the data which takes us up to - make of the numbers? that's right, the data which takes us up to the i the data which takes us up to the end ofjune tells us that there is still around to million word workers that remain on the furlough scheme and this is a really critical time, as you have laid out. we have the next two big faces coming that will ultimately lead to the end of the furlough scheme in september and i guess what the data does say is the difference is at play across the economy, and that is true, if you split the economy up into different sectors. so the latest data shows that some sectors are struggling to reopen, they are still around half
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of all staff in passenger transport and travel agencies still on furlough, and if you look at different parts of the country, it is true. so as the crisis has evolved, london has very much become the focus of the furlough concentrations, so of all of the local authorities, concentrations, so of all of the localauthorities, nine concentrations, so of all of the local authorities, nine of the ten local authorities, nine of the ten local authorities, nine of the ten local authorities with the highs furlough rates are in the capital and the big picture thing here is that the scheme is coming to an end in september and there are still a lot of people at risk of potentially becoming unemployed. bud lot of people at risk of potentially becoming unemployed.— lot of people at risk of potentially becoming unemployed. and that is the ke auestion becoming unemployed. and that is the key question here, _ becoming unemployed. and that is the key question here, isn't _ becoming unemployed. and that is the key question here, isn't it, _ becoming unemployed. and that is the key question here, isn't it, that, - key question here, isn�*t it, that, even just this sunday, when we see employee contributions doubled to 20%, is there still a risk? many say we haven�*t really seen up until this point mass redundancies taking
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place, do you think we could see a spike after this sunday and then again after the end of the scheme on september the 30th? iatrui’eiiii. again after the end of the scheme on september the 30th?— september the 30th? well, i think if we look at the _ september the 30th? well, i think if we look at the timeline _ september the 30th? well, i think if we look at the timeline of _ september the 30th? well, i think if we look at the timeline of the - we look at the timeline of the scheme and how the numbers are responding to changes in restrictions and also even, you know, just the employee contributions up to 10%, we have seen a big falloff in the number of furloughs and, as i said, particularly for certain industries. the big risk really is in september. you know, we still have these really high rates in london boroughs, in workers working in tourism, and there is nothing to fall back on and i guess that poses another question about what should take the place of the furlough scheme and we have said consistently throughout the crisis that the government support and particularly the furlough scheme should respond to what is going on with the virus. you know, if and
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when it does come to an end, i think other support schemes will need to step in place and, you know, that speaks to more traditional stuff likejob search support speaks to more traditional stuff like job search support for some of the sectors and places that have been hardest hit. the chancellor rishi sunak _ been hardest hit. the chancellor rishi sunak has _ been hardest hit. the chancellor rishi sunak has a _ been hardest hit. the chancellor rishi sunak has a responded - been hardest hit. the chancellor rishi sunak has a responded to l been hardest hit. the chancellor- rishi sunak has a responded to these numbers released by hmrc, saying it is fantastic to see businesses across the uk open, employees returning to work on the number of furloughjobs falling to returning to work on the number of furlough jobs falling to their lowest levels since the scheme began. he also said in the last three months, younger people have moved off the scheme twice as fast as all other age brackets and that is another interesting detail about the numbers, how they cover industries and geographies but also industries and geographies but also in terms of age, who is still using furlough. in terms of age, who is still using furlou:h. . v in terms of age, who is still using furlou:h. . �*, ,. furlough. that's right. so, young workers have _ furlough. that's right. so, young workers have been _ furlough. that's right. so, young workers have been really - furlough. that's right. so, young workers have been really quick l furlough. that's right. so, young| workers have been really quick to leave the furlough scheme as the sectors that they work in over the last two months have opened up. so
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hospitality, the grand reopening we saw in may has seen huge falls in the number and share of workers who are under 25 furloughed. but, at the same time, the demography of the furlough scheme has flipped a little bit and older workers, so those aged 65 and above, are those with the higher share of being furloughed, and i guess there is a real riskier that those older workers are being parked on furlough as younger workers return to work —— a real risk here. workers return to work -- a real risk here-— workers return to work -- a real risk here. . , , ., risk here. really interesting to get our view risk here. really interesting to get your view on _ risk here. really interesting to get your view on these _ risk here. really interesting to get your view on these latest - risk here. really interesting to get your view on these latest numbers risk here. really interesting to get i your view on these latest numbers by hmrc, telling us that the number of people on furlough is at its lowest levels since the scheme began, having dropped to below 2 million at the end ofjune. charlie mccurdy, really good to talk to you, back to you, martin. alice baxter, thank you very much.
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today has been dubbed earth overshoot day — a group of scientists work out every year how quickly we�*ve used up all the ecological resources the planet can produce in 12 months. and with governments around the world focussed on climate policy in the run—up to the cop26 climate summit in glasgow, the idea of earth overshoot day is based on a pretty simple premise. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here. plus, it is only the 29th ofjuly. yes, the premise is this — humans are consuming more, there are more of us, and we�*re creating more waste, including greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide that get pumped into the atmosphere. but the size and capacity of our planet remains the same. so, something has to give. and how do scientists calculate when earth overshoot day occurs every year? basically, by comparing the amount of natural resources the earth is able to generate that year, and working out when human demand for those resources uses them all up.
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in other words, it�*s the day we�*ve exhausted a 12—month quota of the earth�*s resources, and we�*re starting to reduce them, as well as creating more waste through things like carbon emissions from fossil fuels which make matters much worse. and, this year, it�*s today — july the 29th. last year, it was more than three weeks later — but, of course, covid played a role in that. huge amounts of economic activity shut down during the first months of the pandemic. since then, carbon emissions have gone up again and the global footprint network reckons our overall carbon footprint has risen by about 6.6% compared to last year. but even if 2020 was something of a blip — look at when overshoot day has happened since 1970. it�*s getting earlier and earlier, although the good news is that the line has flattened a bit over the last few years. these are estimates — but they�*re based on the latest un data and science. and the pattern in pretty clear.
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currently, humanity uses 70% more than what the earth can produce. it is like if you spend 70% more than what you earn, you can do that for some time but not forever, that the long—term impact, its economic impact is if it if economies are not a secure, if we do not have the impact is necessary to maintain the economic machinery, it is going to... it�*s also worth remembering that different countries contribute very differently to the overall picture, based on how much they consume and pollute, and how many people live there. if the global average was like qatar, which has a tiny population but produces huge amounts of oil and gas, overshoot day would have happened as early as february. in the uk, it would have been may, and, indonesia, not until december. the average in many poorer countries of course would mean no overshoot at all. but we�*re already seeing the effects of the overuse of resources in terms of deforestation or drought, for example, and, of course, waste or pollution in terms of those greenhouse gases entering the atmosphere. so, what are we doing about it?
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we are an ingenious species. we rethink— we are an ingenious species. we rethink the — we are an ingenious species. we rethink the way we consume and consume — rethink the way we consume and consume more efficiently. we have -ot consume more efficiently. we have got technology and we now know what is happening, so we can rethink our consumption and everything that we use, in_ consumption and everything that we use, in terms of energy, the food we eat and _ use, in terms of energy, the food we eat and even— use, in terms of energy, the food we eat and even to the clothes that we buy and _ eat and even to the clothes that we buy and how we travel, they all add to this _ buy and how we travel, they all add to this consumption footprint and it is something we are all responsible for. to protect the planet and the way we live on it, governments agreed at the last big climate summit in paris to try to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees celsius above pre—industrial levels. big global corporations have a huge role to play, because this is the decade when real action has to be taken if that goal is to be met. the debate in the run—up to the glasgow summit in november this is going to be critical in determining whether it will be.
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lam sure i am sure we will be talking about climate _ i am sure we will be talking about climate a — i am sure we will be talking about climate a lot more. it is i am sure we will be talking about climate a lot more.— climate a lot more. it is a really helful climate a lot more. it is a really helpful indicator, _ climate a lot more. it is a really helpful indicator, just _ climate a lot more. it is a really helpful indicator, just to - climate a lot more. it is a really helpful indicator, just to know l climate a lot more. it is a really - helpful indicator, just to know when that exact day is. and we are already over the resources _ and we are already over the resources we have.- and we are already over the resources we have. , ., resources we have. maybe end what we should be doing. _ resources we have. maybe end what we should be doing, thank _ resources we have. maybe end what we should be doing, thank you _ resources we have. maybe end what we should be doing, thank you -- - resources we have. maybe end what we should be doing, thank you -- way - should be doing, thank you —— way beyond. president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will soon be required to confirm they are vaccinated — orface more testing. the numbers of coronavirus cases are rising, with the director of the us national public health agency, the cdc, saying cases have increased over 300% nationally since mid—june. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. there�*s a growing sense of urgency. about half the population is fully vaccinated, but infection rates are rising, the delta variant is spreading rapidly, and the number ofjabs in arms is still much lower thanjoe biden wants to see. the president is about to announce that all government workers and contractors be vaccinated against covid—19 or be required
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to submit to regular testing. we still have a lot of people not vaccinated. the pandemic we have now is a pandemic of the unvaccinated, so please — please, please, please — get vaccinated. protect yourself and your children out there. it is important. all americans are being advised to wear face masks again — indoors, in public spaces — in parts of the country with substantial or high transmission rates. that applies to 67% of counties — up in just 24 hours from 63%. some of the big tech companies like facebook and google have said their staff must be vaccinated before stepping back into the office. netflix has reportedly made jabs compulsory for all cast and crew members on us productions. the enforcement of vaccination policies is now a huge challenge facing much of corporate america. private companies have to make the decision whether they are going to mandate
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vaccination, or if they are not going to mandate it, they will allow people to come into work not vaccinated but insist on verification, but the private companies are the ones that will have to do the verification because the government hasn't stepped in to do that. so i think there is a role for government here that has not been filled adequately. with millions of americans onlyjust getting used to life again as it used to be, there�*s a growing unease that the pandemic is far from over. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. earlier this month, organisers of the tokyo olympics announced that "nursing children" can accompany athletes to the games when necessary. bbc sport africa�*s michelle katami has been speaking to medal winning mothers from kenya, to learn more about the juggling act that is required just to get to the start line. eunice sum and janethjepkosgei know plenty about winning. both are former world champions. it is not the only thing
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they have in common. they also know how difficult is to be an elite athlete and a mother. when i was still young, i was told, don�*t get pregnant because your career will end. it was a bit difficult, like, to train, to bring the body back to the track. they think, you are finished. the two kenyan middle—distance runners have been firm friends for over a decade and have come to rely on each other for child support. 2016 rio olympics, my child was here with her and it was easier maybe even for me to communicate to my daughter through janeth. my mind was set for the games. even so, they have not always been totally honest with each other. i asked eunice have you really stopped breast—feeding? and she told me, yes, and it was a lie. with such a huge price to pay for becoming a mother, perhaps it is not surprising that only two female athletes have ever successfully defended an olympic title after giving birth in between games. in between games. one of those is the cameroonian
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triple jumper francoise mbango. kenya�*s faith kipyegon is aiming to emulate her in the 1,500m title in tokyo. it means a lot to me going to tokyo. i am going there with a strong mind and with the flag of kenya and carrying a flag of my daughter behind me. she is drawing inspiration from the 2019 world championships, where she watched mothers shelly—ann fraser—pryce of jamaica and american allyson felix making their way into the gold. shelly—ann had a son on the track but i left my daughter at home. for me, i can�*t concentrate too much when the baby is there so it�*s better when i leave her at home. despite having the support of her family, the 27—year—old agrees the idea of an informal mums�* club with athletes assisting each other is a good one. it will motivate and tell the mothers that everything is
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possible. i think it is something so nice having a club for mothers in athletics, because we can exchange our experience, you know? as sum prepares for her third olympic games, she will again be relying on her friend for support. when you are a young mum, there are so many things which, like, you don�*t know. ourfriendship has grown beyond athletics. she�*s not even like a real friend, she�*s like a mum. a slice of prince charles and princess diana�*s wedding cake has been put up for sale, 40 years after the event. it�*s expected to sell for between three and five hundred pounds. would—be buyers are advised against eating it. now, the weather with darren. hello, there, we�*ve got some unusually windy weather for the time of year on the way tonight across more south—western parts of the uk. but, during today, it�*s still going to be quite breezy out there for many areas. the showers not as widespread,
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perhaps not as heavy as we�*ve seen over recent days as well. most of the downpours recently have come near that area of low pressure. that is starting to pull away, hence fewer showers, but this is the low pressure that will bring some wet and windy weather in from the south—west overnight tonight. this is the picture, though, through the afternoon and most of the cloud continues to bring in a few showers across scotland, northern ireland, northern england, one or two heavy ones later. plenty of sunshine for a while to the south of that before we see the cloud increasing to the south—west and the rain arriving later on in the day. quite blustery winds today, the wind generally coming in from the west or south—west, but, with the rest of the sunshine but, with the best of the sunshine likely to be still across the midlands towards the south—east of england, it�*s here we�*ll see the highest temperatures, 22, possibly 23 degrees. still some heavy showers, though, for the first part of the night across scotland and perhaps northern ireland. we focus on the south—west, though, that area of low pressure continuing to deepen, bringing in the rain and strengthening the winds as well. unusually windy across devon and cornwall for this time of year,
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gusts of maybe 50 or 60 mph around coastal areas, strong winds running through the english channel as well. temperatures by the end of the night still, generally speaking, in double figures, with the rain having got as far north as northern england. so we�*ve got some windy weather to start with on friday. the winds do gradually ease down a bit, we�*ve got these showers or longer spells of rain for england and wales, some thundery downpours threatening to arrive across and eastern parts of england as the showers ease further west. a few showers in northern ireland, southern scotland. northern scotland looks quite cool and cloudy and, generally speaking on friday, temperatures will be a little bit lower than today. let�*s head into the weekend. we are looking for high pressure and the high pressure looks like it�*s going to remain here in the atlantic, over the azores. low pressure still heading towards scandinavia but influencing our weather in a way that it means we�*ve got more of a northerly breeze blowing our way over the weekend. a northerly breeze, even at this time of the year, not particularly warm. still got some sunshine around this weekend, still got some showers,
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mind you, maybe some heavy ones, particularly across england and wales. still around into sunday. and top temperatures, bit disappointing, around 20 or 21 celsius. second place, behind simone biles. so not only could bit history with a medal,
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scientists warn that the uk is already experiencing the disruptive effects, of climate change. increased rainfall, more sunshine and higher temperatures are now established features of our weather. climate change isn�*tjust something that will happen in 20, 50 all we need to worry about towards the end about towards the end of the century. we are seeing this very clearly
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in our observations now. 2020 was the third warmest across the uk, on record.

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