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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 29, 2021 9:00am-10:00am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. scientists warn that the uk is already undergoing disruptive climate change — with increased rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. are you worried about what's happening to the climate? what are you doing to cut carbon emissions? we'd love to hear from you. get in touch @annita—mcveigh #bbcyourquestions how many years has that been in the making? at the tokyo olympics a thrilling finish in the women's canoe slalom — australia'sjessica fox takes gold — with silver for team gb's mallory franklin. from monday travellers arriving in england,
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scotland and wales who've been fully—vaccinated in the eu or us won't need to isolate when entering from an amber—list country. foreign secretary dominic raab defended the move. the answer to your question why we're doing this step is internationally opening up in the same way we are domestically with the safeguards in place to make sure we can do it in a sustainable way. official figures are expected to show another fall in people on furlough — as life gets back to normal after lockdown. but experts warn job losses might follow cuts in government support. a coroner concludes that liverpool fan andy devine, who died this week after suffering life—changing injuries in the hillsborough stadium disaster — is the 97th victim of the tragedy.
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hello and welcome to bbc news. the impact of climate change is already being felt across the uk — with more rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. these are the findings of the state of uk climate report 2020 from the met office. it says that 2020 was the third warmest year since 1884. it was the fifth wettest. six of the ten wettest years have been since 1998. and last year was the eighth sunniest on record. the experts said that, in the space of 30 years, the uk has become 0.9c warmer and 6% wetter. the report's lead author, mike kenton, warns "we are going to see more and more extreme weather such as heatwaves and floods" as the climate continues to warm. our science
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correspondent rebecca morelle reports. dramatic changes in our skies. in 2020, the uk experienced a year of extremes. from storms in february, which caused chaos across the country, to a summer heatwave, where temperatures sweltered above 3a degrees for six consecutive days. and rain in october with the uk's wettest day on record. it is all charted in an annual assessment of the climate. the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our observation that the uk climate is already changing. so climate change isn't something that is just going to happen in 2050, or we need to worry about towards the end of the century. we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. the report compared the most recent three decades
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with the 30 years before, and found that on average the uk were 0.9 degrees hotter. for rainfall, the country was an average of 6% wetter. and 2020 was the eighth sunniest year recorded in the last 100 years. new defences are under construction, like this tidal barrier in lincolnshire, to cope with future storm surges. but the reality is flooding is having a devastating impact now, with some homes being flooded again and again. changes that seem small are having a very big effect on people's lives. what's interesting about this report is there is lots of data. so there are lots of temperature records and percentage changes. but actually what we are seeing are the impacts, the impacts to us as humans, to our businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of our eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united nations climate summit. we will find out if governments can rise to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effects
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of climate change. right now, the elements show no signs of letting up, with this week's flash floods taking london by surprise. scientists will continue to track and analyse these events, but they warn that extremes are becoming the new norm. rebecca morelle, bbc news. dr sharon george is the director of environmental sustainability and green technology at the university of keele. doctor george, the morning to you. what we are seeing here according to this report is climate change not as some slightly abstract concept but in the here and now.— in the here and now. yes, this is what we are _ in the here and now. yes, this is what we are seeing _ in the here and now. yes, this is what we are seeing playing - in the here and now. yes, this is what we are seeing playing out. | in the here and now. yes, this is| what we are seeing playing out. i think part of the problem is that for years scientists have been warning about this and saying that the likelihood of this happening. but it is quite difficult for people to imagine that this intangible invisible gas that we are producing invisible gas that we are producing in our everyday lives is causing
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these real effects. and especially when the numbers that we talk about are so small. you mentioned their 0.9 degrees. it doesn't sound like very much but actually over a period of time that much energy over an entire area and it creates chaos, it creates more instability. and that is what we are seeing now and this is what we are seeing now and this is what we are seeing now and this is what climate change looks like, it is happening now. and it is only going to go in one direction. yes. going to go in one direction. yes, as we saw— going to go in one direction. yes, as we saw in _ going to go in one direction. yes, as we saw in that _ going to go in one direction. yes, as we saw in that report - going to go in one direction. yes, as we saw in that report from the comments from the lead reporter we are going to see more extremes. and extremes are relative i guess and we haven't seen extremes here in uk that we have with the us wildfires, the floods in germany and wildfires in siberia but you think people here are really starting to think about the climate and what they need to do to make their contribution to making
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a difference? i to make their contribution to making a difference?— a difference? i think so. i think is these things _ a difference? i think so. i think is these things become _ a difference? i think so. i think is these things become more - a difference? i think so. i think is| these things become more visible a difference? i think so. i think is- these things become more visible and as people can note unusual weather. and what we are seeing how these extremes are happening at a much more frequent rate. and that is the rate of change that is happening. so we are beating more and more records, more and more often. so this is where people will start to notice and start to make those changes hopefully in their everyday lives. . ., ., ., , lives. the challenge for governments of course is — lives. the challenge for governments of course is to _ lives. the challenge for governments of course is to stop _ lives. the challenge for governments of course is to stop temperatures - of course is to stop temperatures rising, to do their bit to stop global temperatures rising, the focus of cop26 in glasgow later this year. on what level is the uk playing its part? year. on what level is the uk piaying its part?— year. on what level is the uk playing its part?— year. on what level is the uk playing its part? year. on what level is the uk -la in: its art? ., , ., ., playing its part? the moves that are ha enin: playing its part? the moves that are happening are _ playing its part? the moves that are happening are promising, _ playing its part? the moves that are happening are promising, it's- playing its part? the moves that are happening are promising, it's greatl happening are promising, it's great to cut emissions, is just a pity that this didn't happen sooner.
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every single molecule of co2 that we put into the atmosphere stays there for a very long time. and so have been targets in the future hasn't been targets in the future hasn't been helpful up until this point. so i really hope that the uk government is going to act and act drastically and act urgently. because we are already seeing the impact and we are going to see this impact much more often in extreme events that are going to have an economic impact. and have impacts on our daily lives if we don't act drastically.— if we don't act drastically. doctor sharon george _ if we don't act drastically. doctor sharon george from _ if we don't act drastically. doctor sharon george from keele - if we don't act drastically. doctor - sharon george from keele university thank you very much for your time today. let mejust thank you very much for your time today. let me just tell you that later on i will be talking to a farmer in arbroath about how changes in climate change are affecting what she does. let me read out some of your comments about the state of the uk climate report from the met office. one says as a young person it is scary to have the
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responsibility to reverse the adverse effects of climate change. it makes me worry about raising children in such extremes. my contribution to help the environment is my vegan diet. another says i would like to see less houses being built. more protected green spaces. what do i do she asks? lots of small changes, she buys seagrass to help offset my carbon emissions. and this from david, climate change, i'm putting the lights off, not having my fire pit burning. washing hands more using the cold tap. i have to confess i'm not sure what the differences with the hot tap but, david, thank you. if you would like to get in touch with me about this we would love to hear your comments about this report on the state of the uk climate. you can get in touch with me on twitter. use the hashtag
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bbc your questions. now moving away from climate ijust want bbc your questions. now moving away from climate i just want to bbc your questions. now moving away from climate ijust want to let bbc your questions. now moving away from climate i just want to let you know about something that we are doing at hoppers one. we arejoined by the deputy chief medical officer and he is going to be answering your questions about the coronavirus vaccine among young people. you can get in touch with that hashtag. you can also text your questions or send an e—mail. ignore what it says on the strap on your screen. that is today at 130. it says tomorrow there but it is today at 130. get your questions in four england's deputy chief medical officer.
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in the last hour, great britain's mallory franklin has won a silver medal in the women's c1 canoe slalom — for more on that and a round up of the latest from tokyo here's mike bushell at the bbc�*s sports centre. good morning. she saved her best until last and when it mattered, and in final of the women's slalom canoeing, mallory franklin won the silver medal, for team gb, as women's canoe slalom made a dramatic olympic debut. franklin was in the gold medal position until a flawless display from australia'sjessica fox, meant the british star had to settle for silver, but still a brilliant performance, and a legacy of london 2012, for which the lee valley white water centre was built and that's where franklin has been training for this historic moment. earlier on, there was a bronze medalfor team gb�*s matt coward—holley in men's trap shooting. britain's 17th medal of the tokyo olympics. he is the world and european champion, but paid the price for a slow start, missing three of his first ten targets. the briton recovered with 1a successive hits to climb into the bronze medal position.
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next, to the drama in the rowing, as britain's helen glover came so close, to an incredible podium finish, on her return to an olympic rowing final. the mother—of—three's hopes of a fairy tale finish at tokyo 2020 were dashed, but what a comeback this has been asjoe lynskey reports. helen glover had planned to watch these games from home but she got backin these games from home but she got back in a boat during lockdown while her babies were asleep. now she was backin her babies were asleep. now she was back in an olympic final. and alongside her was polly swann, who trained for the last year while working as a doctor. the two are only here because the games were delayed but a fairy tale medal was just out of reach. i’m delayed but a fairy tale medal was just out of reach.— just out of reach. i'm great britain 'ust over just out of reach. i'm great britain just over the _ just out of reach. i'm great britain just over the line _ just out of reach. i'm great britain just over the line now _ just out of reach. i'm great britain just over the line now in _ just out of reach. i'm great britain just over the line now in fourth - just over the line now in fourth place — just over the line now in fourth place and _ just over the line now in fourth place. and regardless of the position—
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place. and regardless of the position here, you have to take your hat off _ position here, you have to take your hat off to _ position here, you have to take your hat off to them. the position here, you have to take your hat off to them.— hat off to them. the way we have attacked this _ hat off to them. the way we have attacked this project _ hat off to them. the way we have attacked this project has - hat off to them. the way we have attacked this project has been - attacked this project has been really exceptional. and i couldn't be prouder of her, of what we have done together. it has been special. ijust done together. it has been special. i just want to say, i love you done together. it has been special. ijust want to say, i love you so much, — ijust want to say, i love you so much, you _ ijust want to say, i love you so much, you have been my inspiration. i much, you have been my inspiration. i never_ much, you have been my inspiration. i never saw— much, you have been my inspiration. i never saw myself getting back in a row bowing — i never saw myself getting back in a row bowing to you guys came along. i want to— row bowing to you guys came along. i want to say— row bowing to you guys came along. i want to say that you can do anything you want_ want to say that you can do anything you want to — want to say that you can do anything you want to do, trying and failing is no _ you want to do, trying and failing is no problem as long as you try. and that — is no problem as long as you try. and that goes out to not just my chiidren— and that goes out to not just my children for anybody out there. those — children for anybody out there. those maybe glover's parting words to a sport she has loved and left her mark on. to a sport she has loved and left her mark on— to a sport she has loved and left her mark on. such fabulously well done there- _ her mark on. such fabulously well done there. olympic _ her mark on. such fabulously well done there. olympic champion . her mark on. such fabulously well done there. olympic champion in | her mark on. such fabulously well- done there. olympic champion in this race in london _ done there. olympic champion in this race in london and _ done there. olympic champion in this race in london and rio, _ done there. olympic champion in this race in london and rio, one - done there. olympic champion in this race in london and rio, one more - race in london and rio, one more medal was just race in london and rio, one more medal wasjust a fraction race in london and rio, one more medal was just a fraction away. and
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for british rowing, tokyo has been a case of getting so close. emily craig and imaging grants were in a thrilling race. this lightweight double sculls would go to the line. great britain and netherlands with the photo — great britain and netherlands with the photo finish _ great britain and netherlands with the photo finish there. _ great britain and netherlands with the photo finish there. craig - great britain and netherlands with the photo finish there.— the photo finish there. craig and grant were _ the photo finish there. craig and grant were half _ the photo finish there. craig and grant were half a _ the photo finish there. craig and grant were half a second - the photo finish there. craig and grant were half a second from . the photo finish there. craig and i grant were half a second from gold but they came forth, missing bronze tjy but they came forth, missing bronze by 100th of a second. but italy, the winners, the tiny margin meant so much. gb's rowers have now come forth five times. more medals have come in the water instead of on it. the race of the night was in freestyle as the world watched the black cap of the us a's next michael phelps. it is his first individual
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gold, at 2a he is quickly learning that the olympics years of training can come down to the touch of a wall. yes, fine margins indeed. elsewhere, the day has been dominated, by covid 19. just a day before the start of the track and field events starting, sam kendricks, the world pole vault champion, has withdrawn from the games, having tested postive for covid. he had been expected to contend for a medal in tokyo. kendricks' father scott, who is also his coach, said on social media his son is not experiencing symptoms. and we are now already seeing a knock on effect. we have also now heard that the argentinian pole vaulter, chaereman tiara viglio, has now returned a postive test and has tweeted that the games are over for him....but better news for the australian track and field team...they have resumed training, having earlier had to isolate but their pole vaulter, and close associaties have returned negative tests. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website.
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the changes will not apply for france. northern ireland hasn't yet made a decision on the rule change. let's take a closer look at the changes which the government said it will help to reunite families with loved ones who live abroad. transport secretary grant shapps said it would apply to people who have been fully vaccinated with a jab approved by the eu or us. travellers will still need to take either a lateral flow or pcr test pre—departure and a pcr test
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on the second day after they arrive. let's have more from our political correspondent helen catt. still a lot of questions for the government about this, such as whether some of the vaccines from people coming into the uk are vaccines that meet uk approval. and also questions about possible reciprocal arrangements. yeah, quite a few questions _ reciprocal arrangements. yeah, quite a few questions around _ reciprocal arrangements. yeah, quite a few questions around this. - reciprocal arrangements. yeah, quite a few questions around this. some i a few questions around this. some reassurance from the foreign secretary dominic rob this morning who addressed a couple of those issues, the issue around the issue that people could have. they will need to be vaccines that people have been approved by the eu or us regulator it does rule out some including the chinese and russian vaccines. there was also a bit more
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detail about how it would be proved at the border, so people coming from the eu it is going to be a digital proof. for people coming from the us it is a paper—based card but then they would have to prove their residency. foras they would have to prove their residency. for as you said there is that issue around reciprocity because at the moment uk visitors even with this arrangement can't go to the united states because their rules are very strict, they have very strict border controls in place. so dominic raab was suggesting that by making this move you might see a virtuous cycle where other countries come to the uk and want to have a similar arrangement. whether there will be that reciprocal arrangement with the us this is what he had to say. ultimately of course it will be their— ultimately of course it will be their decision. they're taking a very— their decision. they're taking a very careful approach not just with the uk _ very careful approach not just with the uk but — very careful approach not just with the uk but across the board. we have had conversations so clearly they would _ had conversations so clearly they would like — had conversations so clearly they would like to proceed and we can work— would like to proceed and we can work out — would like to proceed and we can work out how we can do that as soon
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as possible — work out how we can do that as soon as possible. ultimately, they have -ot as possible. ultimately, they have got to— as possible. ultimately, they have got to take that decision for themselves in the way that many others _ themselves in the way that many others will have. what i can tell you though is that by taking the approach — you though is that by taking the approach that we are taking, a lot of countries will then approach us and say— of countries will then approach us and say well can we get on the uk list of— and say well can we get on the uk list of double vaccinated countries, citizens _ list of double vaccinated countries, citizens from countries that can come _ citizens from countries that can come in? — citizens from countries that can come in? ,., . citizens from countries that can come in? . ., ., , citizens from countries that can comein? . ,. , , come in? dominic raab described this as a sure-footed _ come in? dominic raab described this as a sure-footed way _ come in? dominic raab described this as a sure-footed way of _ come in? dominic raab described this as a sure-footed way of opening - as a sure—footed way of opening international travel but there are doubts. the labour party is not sure that this should be happening. they've talked about the government's record on board has been one of recklessness. they want to open international travel safely. they're calling for a clear green and red list and they data to back it up. and red list and they data to back it u -. . ~ and red list and they data to back it u. ., ~' ,, and red list and they data to back itu. ., , and red list and they data to back itu. . , . a football supporter who suffered life—changing injuries at hillsborough has died at the age of 55. an inquest into andrew devine's death — held on wednesday — concluded he'd been unlawfully killed. it makes him the 97th victim of the disaster. james reynolds reports:
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andrew devine was 22 when he was seriously injured at hillsborough. at first he was given no more than six months to live. but with 24—hour care, he survived for another 32 years. his family say he was the centre of their lives. our devastation over his death, they say, is overwhelming. 96 more liverpool fans died of their injuries at hillsborough. two years after the disaster, an inquest ruled their deaths were accidental. the families refused to accept this verdict. after years of campaigning, they succeeded in obtaining a new inquest. in 2016, this hearing recorded that the fans were unlawfully killed. in a later trial though, the police commander at the game was cleared of gross negligence manslaughter.
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the liverpool coroner's court has now ruled that andrew devine was, like the 96 others, unlawfully killed. and so more than three decades on, the total number of dead from hillsborough rises to 97. james reynolds, bbc news. dan kay has worked for the liverpool echo and has covered hillsborough for a number of years. damn, thank you for your time this morning. andrew's family talking about their collective devastation and i'm sure knowing what we do about the community there both the immediate community where andrew lived and the wider liverpool family, there will be an outpouring of sympathy and support for his family. of sympathy and support for his famil . , . ,., , . family. very much so. the news which broke yesterday _ family. very much so. the news which broke yesterday evening _ family. very much so. the news which broke yesterday evening i _ family. very much so. the news which broke yesterday evening i think- family. very much so. the news which broke yesterday evening i think has i broke yesterday evening i think has shocked many people. it comes obviously on the back of the disappointment of the abject failure
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of the criminal trials at the end of may. and it is a reminder that for many people, hillsborough is something that does not go away and will not go away. to something that does not go away and will not go away-— will not go away. to what extent, i mean, obviously _ will not go away. to what extent, i mean, obviously people _ will not go away. to what extent, i mean, obviously people there - will not go away. to what extent, i mean, obviously people there are| mean, obviously people there are thinking about this all the time i'm sure but to what extent does andrew's death bring up a real soul searching about what went on that day? searching about what went on that da ? ~ ~ , day? well, i think if there is soul-searching _ day? well, i think if there is soul-searching to _ day? well, i think if there is soul-searching to be - day? well, i think if there is soul-searching to be going l day? well, i think if there is i soul-searching to be going on day? well, i think if there is - soul-searching to be going on and soul—searching to be going on and really it should be amongst the people who have evaded any kind of justice or accountability. there still remains a very deep sense of injustice within the city and beyond that everybody affected by hillsborough because astonishingly, despite the inquest finding it unlawful killing, no one has been found accountable apart from the sheffield wednesday official who was found guilty of the health and safety offence. not one police officer has lost a day's pay or any kind of accountability at all. the
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reality is andrew will now become known as the 97th victim but the truth is no one will ever know the true number of lives of hillsborough and the suicides and stress and strain that have occurred since. the stress and strain notjust amongst the family but the heroic survivors, many of whom would have died on the day. they were blamed for many years despite the inquest proving that they have no part in the disaster. and they have had to live with that for all those years. so this latest news, will only make thatjourney even more arduous for them. find news, will only make that journey even more arduous for them. and you andrew's family _ even more arduous for them. and you andrew's family will _ even more arduous for them. and you andrew's family will appreciate, - andrew's family will appreciate, take some measure of comfort is that if quite the right way of putting it, the coroner has speedily concluded that andrew was unlawfully killed when you consider the long years of fighting that the families of the other 96 victims had to get the coroner to come to that
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conclusion?— the coroner to come to that conclusion? ~ , ., , conclusion? well, the statement they released yesterday _ conclusion? well, the statement they released yesterday evening _ conclusion? well, the statement they released yesterday evening did - released yesterday evening did indicate that they welcomed the coroner's adjudication that andrew was unlawfully killed. and itjust puts into perspective their astonishing support and love that they have shown for andrew and his carer is of course for all these years. and that is indicative of the wider support that has been very, very prevalent within the liverpool community and also the wider hillsborough community and wider just community of good people who realise that a terrible thing happened. the greatest injustice was perpetuated for many years and andrew's family spirit and keeping going very much ties into the wider spirit of the families and the survivors that campaign for many, many years during a long, long dark period of time when it seemed like nothing would ever change. the way the criminal prosecutions went actually puts into even more
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miraculous context the fact that the original inquest verdicts of accidental death were overturned in 2016 to the correct verdict of unlawful killing.— 2016 to the correct verdict of unlawful killing. dan, thanks very much. unlawful killing. dan, thanks very much- dan _ unlawful killing. dan, thanks very much- dan k _ unlawful killing. dan, thanks very much. dan k there _ unlawful killing. dan, thanks very much. dan k there in _ unlawful killing. dan, thanks very much. dan k there in liverpool. l official uk figures are expected to show another fall in the number of people still on furlough, as the government continues to reduce the level of financial support it offers to businesses, and life begins to return to normal. from next month, employers will have to contribute more towards their wage bill, which many labour market experts warn could triggerjob cuts when companies can't make ends meet. our business correspondent alice baxter has more. good morning. as you say, big changes on the horizon this sunday when employees will be expected to double their furlough contributions to 20%. butjoining me live now is
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lucy walker evans, she used to work in hospitality. she was made redundant in january after furlough last year. she now works for charity. lucy, thank you for speaking to us. you would put on furlough in march of last year. how was that experience for you? after? was that experience for you? very surreal. was that experience for you? very surreal- we _ was that experience for you? very surreal. we went _ was that experience for you? very surreal. we went home _ was that experience for you? very surreal. we went home from work one day and _ surreal. we went home from work one day and we _ surreal. we went home from work one day and we just didn't go back. i think— day and we just didn't go back. i think that — day and we just didn't go back. i think that thing that helped is that all of— think that thing that helped is that all of my— think that thing that helped is that all of my colleagues were obviously all of my colleagues were obviously all in the _ all of my colleagues were obviously all in the same boat so we were able to support _ all in the same boat so we were able to support each other. but very odd. a lot _ to support each other. but very odd. a lot of— to support each other. but very odd. a lot of guilt — to support each other. but very odd. a lot of guilt because you are not doing _ a lot of guilt because you are not doing anything stop yeah, very strange — doing anything stop yeah, very stranue. �* . doing anything stop yeah, very stranue. . ., .,, ., strange. and what was the extent of it in our strange. and what was the extent of it in your organisation? _ strange. and what was the extent of it in your organisation? because - strange. and what was the extent of it in your organisation? because you worked for a big hotel group, you were a senior in that organisation. were a lot of your colleagues in the same boat?—
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were a lot of your colleagues in the same boat? ~ , ,., , ., same boat? absolutely. yeah, there was a very small _ same boat? absolutely. yeah, there was a very small number _ same boat? absolutely. yeah, there was a very small number of - same boat? absolutely. yeah, there was a very small number of the - same boat? absolutely. yeah, there| was a very small number of the team who stayed _ was a very small number of the team who stayed on. but even they have their hours — who stayed on. but even they have their hours cut because the rest of us were _ their hours cut because the rest of us were losing out financially, so in that— us were losing out financially, so in that sense they were very fair. but, _ in that sense they were very fair. but, yeah. — in that sense they were very fair. but, yeah, it was drastic, very, very— but, yeah, it was drastic, very, very drastic _ but, yeah, it was drastic, very, very drastic-— but, yeah, it was drastic, very, ve drastic. . ., , ., very drastic. and what did you do? as ou very drastic. and what did you do? as you say. _ very drastic. and what did you do? as you say. you — very drastic. and what did you do? as you say, you suddenly - very drastic. and what did you do? as you say, you suddenly found i as you say, you suddenly found yourself with a lot of free time that you haven't wanted. how did you begin to find a new way to fill the days, to fill the weeks? we begin to find a new way to fill the days, to fill the weeks?— days, to fill the weeks? i've got two children, _ days, to fill the weeks? i've got two children, so _ days, to fill the weeks? i've got two children, so they _ days, to fill the weeks? i've got two children, so they kept - days, to fill the weeks? i've got two children, so they kept me l days, to fill the weeks? i've got - two children, so they kept me busy. one of— two children, so they kept me busy. one of whom was going through gcses which was _ one of whom was going through gcses which was a _ one of whom was going through gcses which was a really difficult time for her~ — which was a really difficult time for her~ it— which was a really difficult time for her. it was very strange. i took up for her. it was very strange. i took up running. — for her. it was very strange. i took up running. i— for her. it was very strange. i took up running, i tried to teach myself ukulele _ up running, i tried to teach myself ukulele which was fun. but as time went— ukulele which was fun. but as time went on— ukulele which was fun. but as time went on you — ukulele which was fun. but as time went on you realise that this scenario— went on you realise that this scenario was going to keep going and then it _ scenario was going to keep going and then it became quite a difficult
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time _ then it became quite a difficult time to— then it became quite a difficult time to deal with emotionally. you know, _ time to deal with emotionally. you know. you — time to deal with emotionally. you know, you go through periods of depression and so much uncertainty. but again. _ depression and so much uncertainty. but again, like i said, luckily i had _ but again, like i said, luckily i had a — but again, like i said, luckily i had a great support network with my friends _ had a great support network with my friends who — had a great support network with my friends who are going through the same _ friends who are going through the same thing and we helped each other. yeah, _ same thing and we helped each other. yeah, such— same thing and we helped each other. yeah, such a _ same thing and we helped each other. yeah, such a difficult time. so talk me through how you then found this charity which you now work for. so it is a very large organisation in wales, — it is a very large organisation in wales, where i live, and i knewl wanted _ wales, where i live, and i knewl wanted to— wales, where i live, and i knewl wanted to work, the furlough gave me the chance _ wanted to work, the furlough gave me the chance to really look at what i wanted _ the chance to really look at what i wanted and what i enjoyed. and it .ave wanted and what i enjoyed. and it gave me _ wanted and what i enjoyed. and it gave me the time to research what i wanted _ gave me the time to research what i wanted to— gave me the time to research what i wanted to do and i found a role that i applied _ wanted to do and i found a role that i applied for. i didn't think i would — i applied for. i didn't think i would get in a million years because i would get in a million years because i have _ would get in a million years because i have come — would get in a million years because i have come from a sales and corporate _ i have come from a sales and corporate background. i now work with youngsters between the ages of 16 and _ with youngsters between the ages of 16 and 2a— with youngsters between the ages of 16 and 24 who have found themselves
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homeless _ 16 and 24 who have found themselves homeless and they need that additional support. and we are there for them _ additional support. and we are there for them 24 — additional support. and we are there for them 24 hours a day. it has changed — for them 24 hours a day. it has changed everything for me, i love it. changed everything for me, i love it the _ changed everything for me, i love it. the charity has been amazing, their— it. the charity has been amazing, their work— it. the charity has been amazing, their work they do is so valuable and my— their work they do is so valuable and my time on furlough help me appreciate different things in life. and the _ appreciate different things in life. and the small things i am able to do for the _ and the small things i am able to do for the youngsters that we support means— for the youngsters that we support means so— for the youngsters that we support means so much to me. and i hope they go on _ means so much to me. and i hope they go on to— means so much to me. and i hope they go on to then _ means so much to me. and i hope they go on to then have very fulfilled lives _ go on to then have very fulfilled lives. with a bit of support and a bit of— lives. with a bit of support and a bit of love — lives. with a bit of support and a bit of love from us. it lives. with a bit of support and a bit of love from us.— bit of love from us. it sounds transformational, _ bit of love from us. it sounds transformational, it - bit of love from us. it sounds transformational, it is - bit of love from us. it sounds transformational, it is so - bit of love from us. it sounds - transformational, it is so wonderful to hear such a positive story to have come out of your furlough experience. lucy, many, many thanks forsharing experience. lucy, many, many thanks for sharing your story with us. lucy walker evans there. and yes, anita, big changes on the horizon on sunday, employee having to double theirfurlough sunday, employee having to double their furlough contributions to 20%.
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the time is almost 930 am. let's have a look at the weather. hello there. it is going to be another breezy day for most of us today. more places probably getting away with a dry day, mind you, the showers not quite as widespread today. most of the cloud bringing showers into scotland, northern ireland and northern england, some heavy ones later. to the south of that, a decent amount of dry weather and sunshine but we will see cloud increasing in the south—west with rain arriving later on. sunnier skies continuing through the midlands towards the south east of england and it is here we will see the highest temperatures. let's focus on that wetter weather in the south—west. low pressure moving in here, strengthening winds too. gusts, 50, 60 mph in devon and cornwall overnight. windy weather spreading through the english channel, unusually windy for the time of year. and the rain bands getting as far north as northern england. in scotland and northern ireland, any heavy showers fading away overnight. but we've got showers and longer spells of rain across england and wales with a threat of some thunderstorms, particularly in the east, the winds do gradually ease then, a few showers in northern ireland and quite a lot of cloud for northern scotland.
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quite cool as well. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: scientists warn that the uk is already undergoing disruptive climate change — the country is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier after a thrilling final at the tokyo olympics — team gb's mallory franklin takes silver in the women's canoe slalom from monday travellers arriving in england, scotland and wales who've been fully—vaccinated in the eu or us won't need to isolate when entering from an amber—list country. foreign secretary dominic raab defended the move official figures are expected to show another fall in people on furlough — as life gets back to normal after lockdown. but experts warn job losses might follow cuts in government support a coroner concludes that liverpool fan andy devine — who died this week after suffering life—changing injuries in
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the hillsborough stadium disaster — is the 97th victim of the tragedy sport and now for a full round up of action from the olympics, from the bbc sport centre. good morning. during the lockdowns, mallory franklin had to practice her paddling on an inflatable ball in her back garden, as she couldn't get onto the water, but all her hard work has paid off as she's won silver, for team gb, as women's canoe slalom, made a dramatic olympic debut franklin was in the gold medal position until a flawless display from australia's jessica fox, meant the british star, had to settle for silver, but still a brilliant performance, and a legacy of london 2012 for which the lee valley white water centre was built, and that's where franklin was been training for this historic moment
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before the pandemic. it before the pandemic. was so stressful being on th! start it was so stressful being on the start line, but i had a moment where i thought it was really cool and i wouldn't want to be anywhere else, the camera, i smiled, and wouldn't want to be anywhere else, the camera, ismiled, and it reminded me about the environment and how crazy it all is but it was just really cool. this is where it all happen. this is where silver was made today. it has been a privilege _ where silver was made today. it has been a privilege to _ where silver was made today. it has been a privilege to be _ where silver was made today. it has been a privilege to be here - where silver was made today. it ya; been a privilege to be here today to watch web part family who are unable to travel. they were watching the final today on the big screen, a lot of people do canoe slalom here at the centre. i am joined by her fellow gb athlete. you have just got back from tokyo when you've finished
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fourth in the equivalent of mallory�*s event. what does it mean? i am so proud of her. we knew she could _ i am so proud of her. we knew she could watch — i am so proud of her. we knew she could watch it... she could do it. she was— could watch it... she could do it. she was the _ could watch it... she could do it. she was the first person to see me at the _ she was the first person to see me at the finish — she was the first person to see me at the finish line in my races and i am gutted — at the finish line in my races and i am gutted i— at the finish line in my races and i am gutted i was not there to celebrate with her today but nice to be back— celebrate with her today but nice to be back here with everyone, so proud of her~ _ be back here with everyone, so proud of her~ she _ be back here with everyone, so proud of her~ she is— be back here with everyone, so proud of her. she is amazing. what be back here with everyone, so proud of her. she is amazing.— of her. she is amazing. what hard work and determination _ of her. she is amazing. what hard work and determination has - of her. she is amazing. what hard work and determination has gone | of her. she is amazing. what hard - work and determination has gone into that silver medal? i work and determination has gone into that silver medal?— that silver medal? i have known hart since we were _ that silver medal? i have known hart since we were ten _ that silver medal? i have known hart since we were ten years _ that silver medal? i have known hart since we were ten years old, - that silver medal? i have known hart since we were ten years old, and - that silver medal? i have known hart since we were ten years old, and we | since we were ten years old, and we have seen— since we were ten years old, and we have seen her progress and the way she has— have seen her progress and the way she has been at the olympics, the way she _ she has been at the olympics, the way she has grown as a person as well and — way she has grown as a person as well and i— way she has grown as a person as well and i am almost more proud of that than— well and i am almost more proud of that than anything else. she has been _ that than anything else. she has been absolutely in her element, the time of— been absolutely in her element, the time of her— been absolutely in her element, the time of her life and to top it off with— time of her life and to top it off with silver, it's brilliant. how
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were they — with silver, it's brilliant. how were they conditions? - with silver, it's brilliant. how were they conditions? it - with silver, it's brilliant. how were they conditions? it was | with silver, it's brilliant. how- were they conditions? it was really tou . h, were they conditions? it was really tough. quite _ were they conditions? it was really tough, quite similar— were they conditions? it was really tough, quite similar to _ were they conditions? it was really tough, quite similar to the - were they conditions? it was really tough, quite similar to the centre i tough, quite similar to the centre here _ tough, quite similar to the centre here we — tough, quite similar to the centre here. we tried to replicate the key sections _ here. we tried to replicate the key sections over there,. they set a difficult — sections over there,. they set a difficult course for us, we like to act, _ difficult course for us, we like to act, we — difficult course for us, we like to act, we are _ difficult course for us, we like to act, we are and we train here on the hard— act, we are and we train here on the hard core _ act, we are and we train here on the hard core says. not quite to be in the end _ hard core says. not quite to be in the end for— hard core says. not quite to be in the end for me but i had a great time _ the end for me but i had a great time. a, ., , the end for me but i had a great time. ., , , ., the end for me but i had a great time. mallory is a pioneer in her sort. time. mallory is a pioneer in her sport- could _ time. mallory is a pioneer in her sport. could you _ time. mallory is a pioneer in her sport. could you talk _ time. mallory is a pioneer in her sport. could you talk about - time. mallory is a pioneer in her sport. could you talk about her. time. mallory is a pioneer in her. sport. could you talk about her role as a pioneer? you sport. could you talk about her role as a pioneer?— sport. could you talk about her role as a pioneer? you don't need to talk about her as — as a pioneer? you don't need to talk about her as a _ as a pioneer? you don't need to talk about her as a top _ as a pioneer? you don't need to talk about her as a top women _ as a pioneer? you don't need to talk about her as a top women canoe - about her as a top women canoe athlete — about her as a top women canoe athlete, she is a top canoe athlete. i athlete, she is a top canoe athlete. i train _ athlete, she is atop canoe athlete. i train with— athlete, she is a top canoe athlete. i train with our everyday and she will beat — i train with our everyday and she will beat me sometimes and i have
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-ot will beat me sometimes and i have got to— will beat me sometimes and i have got to go— will beat me sometimes and i have got to go faster. she is amazing and she is— got to go faster. she is amazing and she is going — got to go faster. she is amazing and she is going to inspire so many women — she is going to inspire so many women to— she is going to inspire so many women to get into canoe slalom. we could _ women to get into canoe slalom. we could not— women to get into canoe slalom. we could not be — women to get into canoe slalom. we could not be prouder. it women to get into canoe slalom. we could not be prouder.— could not be prouder. it used to be an exhibition _ could not be prouder. it used to be an exhibition event _ could not be prouder. it used to be an exhibition event where - could not be prouder. it used to be an exhibition event where the - could not be prouder. it used to be i an exhibition event where the women were given flowers, but now she is coming home with a silver olympic medal. the the coming home with a silver olympic medal- th— coming home with a silver olympic medal. th ~. , ., ., , ., , medal. the the standards in the way men and it was _ medal. the the standards in the way men and it was announced _ medal. the the standards in the way men and it was announced it - medal. the the standards in the way men and it was announced it was - men and it was announced it was going _ men and it was announced it was going to — men and it was announced it was going to be — men and it was announced it was going to be in tokyo and the level shot up _ going to be in tokyo and the level shot up it — going to be in tokyo and the level shot up. it has got better and better— shot up. it has got better and better every year. all the three runs _ better every year. all the three runs on— better every year. all the three runs on the podium were amazing. can ou sum runs on the podium were amazing. you sum up runs on the podium were amazing. can you sum up what it was like to watch her? she had some paddlers to go after her, the medal was not guaranteed until the last few minutes. can you talk as to how nail—biting it was? the minutes. can you talk as to how nail-biting it was?— minutes. can you talk as to how nail-biting it was? the plan for her to auali nail-biting it was? the plan for her to qualify in _ nail-biting it was? the plan for her to qualify in the — nail-biting it was? the plan for her to qualify in the semifinal - nail-biting it was? the plan for her to qualify in the semifinal with - nail-biting it was? the plan for her to qualify in the semifinal with an i to qualify in the semifinal with an early— to qualify in the semifinal with an early start— to qualify in the semifinal with an early start can be a nice place to
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be, early start can be a nice place to be you — early start can be a nice place to be you do— early start can be a nice place to be, you do not hear the commentary and you _ be, you do not hear the commentary and you do— be, you do not hear the commentary and you do not know what is going on. and you do not know what is going on we _ and you do not know what is going on. we knew she had smashed it. i thought— on. we knew she had smashed it. i thought she'd won it to be honest. i thought— thought she'd won it to be honest. i thought there was only one person in the world _ thought there was only one person in the world who could have beaten her which _ the world who could have beaten her which was _ the world who could have beaten her which was jessica fox who was of last _ which was jessica fox who was of last she — which was jessica fox who was of last. she deserves that gold as well _ last. she deserves that gold as well but— last. she deserves that gold as well. but it was nail—biting for us. nice _ well. but it was nail—biting for us. nice to _ well. but it was nail—biting for us. nice to be — well. but it was nail—biting for us. nice to be here with her family and friends, _ nice to be here with her family and friends, yes. nice to be here with her family and friends. yes-— friends, yes. brilliant to talk to ou. friends, yes. brilliant to talk to you- thank _ friends, yes. brilliant to talk to you- thank you _ friends, yes. brilliant to talk to you. thank you for _ friends, yes. brilliant to talk to you. thank you for sharing - friends, yes. brilliant to talk to | you. thank you for sharing your thoughts with us. it has been a very special day for mallory�*s family and friends but they will have to wait if you more days to celebrate in person. this medal is not only for mallory but will have an impact on canoe slalom as a whole for this trailblazing athlete. ef canoe slalom as a whole for this trailblazing athlete.— canoe slalom as a whole for this trailblazing athlete. ef even if you are a beginner _ trailblazing athlete. ef even if you
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are a beginner you _ trailblazing athlete. ef even if you are a beginner you can _ trailblazing athlete. ef even if you are a beginner you can book- trailblazing athlete. ef even if you are a beginner you can book a - are a beginner you can book a session on the course behind you and you can adjust their course to suit your difficulty so you can give it a go later on. we your difficulty so you can give it a go later on— your difficulty so you can give it a go later on. we have seen a lot of --eole go later on. we have seen a lot of people on — go later on. we have seen a lot of people on the _ go later on. we have seen a lot of people on the water— go later on. we have seen a lot of people on the water this - go later on. we have seen a lot of people on the water this morning | go later on. we have seen a lot of. people on the water this morning and we know from the olympics it leads to a spike in interest and different sport. we get the sense that this silver medal this morning could lead to more people taking up canoe slalom in the future.— to more people taking up canoe slalom in the future. more from laura scott _ slalom in the future. more from laura scott later— slalom in the future. more from laura scott later on _ slalom in the future. more from laura scott later on where - slalom in the future. more from laura scott later on where it - was all made. helen glover has ruled out another olympic bid after her fairy tale finish was dashed at the end. helen glover and polly swann finished fourth in the race. in rio dejaneiro i said it was the last, but now it is definitely the last. she is keen to inspire others,
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training while her baby slept. you can do anything you want. trying and failing is no problem as long as you try. that was not the only fourth—place finish, emily craig and imogen grant missed out in women's goals afterfinishing. earlier on, there was a bronze medal, for team gb's matt coward—holley in men's trap shooting.....britain's 17th medal of the tokyo olympics... he is, the world and european champion, but paid the price for a slow start, missing three of his first 10 targets. the briton recovered with 14 successive hits to, climb into the bronze medal position. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport.
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president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will soon be required to confirm they are vaccinated — orface more testing. the numbers of coronavirus cases are rising with the director of the us national public health agency. the cdc, saying cases have increased over 300% nationally since mid—june. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. there's a growing sense of urgency. about half the population is fully vaccinated, but infection rates are rising, the delta variant is spreading rapidly, and the number ofjabs in arms is still much lower thanjoe biden wants to see. the president is about to announce that all government workers and contractors be vaccinated against covid—19 or be required to submit to regular testing. we still have a lot of people not vaccinated. the pandemic we have now is a pandemic of the unvaccinated, so please — please, please, please — get vaccinated.
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protect yourself and your children out there. it is important. all americans are being advised to wear facemasks again — indoors, in public spaces — in parts of the country with substantial or high transmission rates. that applies to 67% of counties — up in just 24 hours from 63%. some of the big tech companies like facebook and google have said their staff must be vaccinated before stepping back into the office. netflix has reportedly made jabs compulsory for all cast and crew members on us productions. the enforcement of vaccination policies is now a huge challenge facing much of corporate america. private companies have to make the decision whether they are going to mandate vaccination, or if they are not going to mandate it, they will allow people to come into work not vaccinated but insist on verification, but the private companies are the ones that will have to do the verification
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because the government hasn't stepped in to do that. so i think there is a role for government here that has not been filled adequately. with millions of americans onlyjust getting used to life again as it used to be, there's a growing unease that the pandemic is far from over. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. a group of colleges and universities is urging the government to step back from its decision to scrap b—tecs in england. education leaders are warning the plan is "reckless", as it will harm the prospects of poorer pupils. ministers insist replacing the vocational qualifications with a new system of t—levels will ensure students leave education with the skills employers want. farmers hit by a freak hail storm last week in essex are calling for emergency financial help from the government. 12 farms in the thaxted area were struck by hail stones the size of golf balls. it's estimated up to 90% of some crops have been lost. this from our environment reporter richard daniel.
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massive hailstones hammering down in thaxted last week. robert, i've never seen damage like this before. well, neither have i. first time, absolutely devastated. it looks as if someone has come through here here with a flail. eight days on, robert still can't take it in. the scale of the damage on his 200 acre farm is immense. we hope it's a one—off. we are having trouble getting our heads around it. we just... we don't know what to do now. we've never seen this devastation. this is our year's work. to us, they are more than money. we look after them, we tend them all year, it's... it's quite hurtful, you know? this is what the crop should look like. it is due for harvest in about three weeks. but take a look at these. battered, bruised, a pod split open. they reckon they have lost around 50% of the crop in this field.
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nearby, an estimated 90% loss in a field of oilseed rape. smashed from pods, the seed has now germinated creating a green carpet on the ground. and in a field of oats once destined for the breakfast table, a similar story. i have been working crops in north—west essex as an independent agronomist for 35 years and i have never seen devastation like we are seeing this winter oat field here. we think we have lost about 90% of our oat crop that will be harvested in two or three weeks' time. it is on the ground and we haven't got machines to hoover it up. 12 farms in a ten—mile stretch of land barely half a mile wide were hit by the storm, just weeks before harvest. the losses are estimated to run to hundreds of thousands of pounds. defra have a disaster fund so farms that suffered severe flooding back in the winter, i understand, have been supported by that fund and i think this is equally devastating.
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the hailstorm is the latest in a series of extreme weather events. for robert, in just a few minutes, it wiped a year's work and threw his business into loss. listening to that report was amy geddes, who is an arable farmer in arbroath in scotland. good to have you with us today, we are talking as the met office state of uk climate 2020 report says there is more rainfall, more sunshine and higher temperatures. you are at the opposite end of the uk to those farmers, what impact have you noticed from climate change? i think in terms of what _ noticed from climate change? i think in terms of what we _ noticed from climate change? i think in terms of what we have _ noticed from climate change? i think in terms of what we have seen - in terms of what we have seen locally here this year it has been very dry. the extremes have been very dry. the extremes have been very noticeable, we have gone from a
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weight me into an incredibly dry june and july, less than 20 millimetres of rain for both months and that has an impact, not as sudden or devastating as the report said. ~ . sudden or devastating as the report saidr ., _, ,, ., sudden or devastating as the report said. ~ ., . ., ., ., said. what crops do you grow and what impact _ said. what crops do you grow and what impact is — said. what crops do you grow and what impact is that _ said. what crops do you grow and what impact is that having - said. what crops do you grow and what impact is that having on - said. what crops do you grow and l what impact is that having on those crops now and in terms of planning for the next few years? the oilseed ra -e cro for the next few years? the oilseed rape crop which _ for the next few years? the oilseed rape crop which is _ for the next few years? the oilseed rape crop which is easily _ for the next few years? the oilseed rape crop which is easily damaged i for the next few years? the oilseed i rape crop which is easily damaged by heavy rain or torrential hail stones, are oilseed rape crop is very poor this year. a combination of factors, insect and pest damage, the cabbage stem flea beetle which has not bothered as but is taking effect now, incredibly cold, dry winter preceded by unprecedented rainfall in october after the crop
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was one month or two stone, and the cold in the winter caused frost heave so the plants were affected by heave so the plants were affected by heave out of the ground which will affect the yield and as it came into spring, we saw cold dry weather followed by the rain on me. the crop has not had a good year and it is a full year to come to harvest and a lot can happen in that time. we will question whether we continue to grow oilseed rape. ithink question whether we continue to grow oilseed rape. i think we will this year because we have bought the seed and we are hoping for a better season, and we will continue to think of alternatives that might replace that in our rotation. the re ort replace that in our rotation. the report talks _ replace that in our rotation. the report talks about trees and shrubs but one can extrapolate to arable crops to some extent, how plants are responding to climate change, in spring, leaves appearing 10.4 days
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earlier, in autumn, trees going bare 4.3 days earlier. as you look to the future and changing props potentially, how challenging is it going to be to adapt and obviously the margins are already tight, what are the financial challenges in all of that as well? the are the financial challenges in all of that as well?— of that as well? the immediate financial challenge _ of that as well? the immediate financial challenge is _ of that as well? the immediate financial challenge is dealing i of that as well? the immediate i financial challenge is dealing with the unprecedented events, incredible hailstones, torrential rain, unseasonable wind, these things have happened in the past but they are happening more frequently and farmers are seeing it happening in front of their eyes. that will factor in their consideration as to what types of crops to grow. plant breeding has a lot to do with it. we have great scientific institutes in britain, the james hutton institute in dundee, we will rely and should
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cooperate more closely with these institutes to look to plant breeding and what might be more suitable in the future for growing on our farms here in scotland orfurther the future for growing on our farms here in scotland or further south where the forecast temperature increase is greater. so, yes, there is a lot we can plan to do, but dealing with the immediate effects is very difficult and farmers will need support for dealing with that. thank you very much for giving us an insight into how climate is affecting your work. great britain have just missed out on two more medals at the olympics. helen glover and polly swann were fourth in the women's pair, the same place that emily craig and imogen grant finished in the lightweight women's double sculls, though they were pipped by the narrowest of margins. sport psychologistjenna woolven can tell us more involved in helen glover's return
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to the olympics. good to have you with us. helen glover coming back after a break of several years, three children last year, and she was working out on the rowing machine during lockdown and she thought she really wanted to have another go. if you are a successful olympian, that desire never quite goes away, does it? it’s never quite goes away, does it? it's an never quite goes away, does it? it�*s an amazing story. that don't drive and desire to be a champion has stayed with her throughout the time of having children. what is amazing as the emotional, physical, mental investment that you have to give to a sport like rowing. tojuggle everything she is juggling and putting in the investment, be proud of herself in the olympics which is what they have been saying and is
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amazing to hear. flan what they have been saying and is amazing to hear.— what they have been saying and is amazing to hear. can you give us an insiaht amazing to hear. can you give us an insight into — amazing to hear. can you give us an insight into the _ amazing to hear. can you give us an insight into the psychology - amazing to hear. can you give us an insight into the psychology of - insight into the psychology of someone who can take that step and separates them from everyone else? it is huge. so much of an elite the identity of being a rower is huge for helen and paulie. they have other identities, a mother and a doctor, but they are rowers deep down and you can see that shine bright when you see the effort and dedication that they put an end. the team are, they come together and the broader team and coach and support staff to pull through and have an olympics they can be proud of. to what extent do you think they will have prepared for not winning a medal? they are in a winning mindset but do competitors think about how they are going to prepare themselves if they do not reach the targets
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they set? if they do not reach the targets the set? �* , . if they do not reach the targets the set? �*, ., ., , ., they set? it's a good mentality to have going _ they set? it's a good mentality to have going into — they set? it's a good mentality to have going into the _ they set? it's a good mentality to have going into the game - they set? it's a good mentality to have going into the game is, - they set? it's a good mentality to have going into the game is, to i they set? it's a good mentality to | have going into the game is, to be prepared for all eventualities. like you see, a winning mentality, the desire to achieve the gold medal will always be there, but the same time, they had an element of realism. the new in the heats going into that i know that would be tough, they will have set their expectations, set their standards appropriately, to be able to have the perspective that they both have, to be proud of coming forth. it is wonderful and a credit to them both. that message when helen glover was asked after the competition, what was the message for her children? it was the message for her children? it was all about having a go and trying and that was the whole point and that was the message she was sending to everyone else as well. i wonder how much she had thought about that in advance. an incredibly positive
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message from her. it is in advance. an incredibly positive message from her.— in advance. an incredibly positive message from her. it is and it comes from the heart- _ message from her. it is and it comes from the heart. an _ message from her. it is and it comes from the heart. an olympian - message from her. it is and it comes from the heart. an olympian will. from the heart. an olympian will always dream of gold, but, like you say, they have come so far in their journey, they are proud of what they have achieved and the effort they have achieved and the effort they have put into it and they can look back and think what a successful year they have had. in back and think what a successful year they have had.— back and think what a successful year they have had. in some quarters in social media _ year they have had. in some quarters in social media over— year they have had. in some quarters in social media over the _ year they have had. in some quarters in social media over the last - year they have had. in some quarters in social media over the last few - in social media over the last few days there have been negative comments about people not finishing in gold possession. what do you make of those? , ., ., , ., in gold possession. what do you make of those? ., , of those? everyone has a different mentality going — of those? everyone has a different mentality going into _ of those? everyone has a different mentality going into the _ of those? everyone has a differentj mentality going into the olympics, people do what they have to do to be at the top of their game. everyone's opinion is valid but i think it's up to the individual to decide how the
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behave in that environment. thank ou ve behave in that environment. thank you very much- _ behave in that environment. thank you very much. turkish _ behave in that environment. thank you very much. turkish authorities| you very much. turkish authorities have launched an investigation into a forest fire and charted. it as a beekeeper was criticised for a forest fire in greece. our another day of devastating weather events in europe. our in europe. hundreds evacuated here near turkey's mediterranean coast, as a forest fire spread to towns following days of flooding and landslides in the north—east. the cause of this is under investigation, as the fire was started at four separate points. translation: we hope that we will put out this far without any casualties.
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we hope to put out the fire. all aspects of the incident will be investigated. in greece, strong winds are hampering efforts to extinguish another fire burning out of control. a day after a forest fire damaged homes in the northern suburb of athens, a 64—year—old beekeeper has been charged with negligence. in northern lebanon, wildfires burning across a mountainous region, where the army has been dispatched and help has been requested from cyprus, with more extreme weather expected across parts of europe later this week. richard forrest, bbc news. your reaction to the report from the met office. the need to repair and recycle clothing. some people are feeling a little bit deflated about the prospect of what impact individual action can take. this measured says i am doing what i can, recycling, growing my own
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vegetables, but what is the point with the vanity projects going into space? another message, i am trying to use my automobile less about where she lives there are plans to remove the local cycle lanes. this message says that everyone has to do their bit for the climate emergency but it is not for individuals to fix it, immediate political action is required and the bbc needs to emphasise that. we are looking ahead to cop 26, we will be there later this year talking about cop 26 and the big governmental action that is being talked about to tackle climate change. thank you for your comments and please contact us on twitter. thank you for your comments and please contact us on twitter.
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unusually windy weather for the time of year across unusually windy weather for the time of year the south. today, breezy out there for many areas, the shower is not as widespread, not as heavy over recent days as well. most of the down peers near the area of low which is pulling away so fewer showers. low pressure will bring wet and windy weather from the south—west overnight. through the afternoon, the cloud brings showers across scotland, northern ireland and northern england. plenty of sunshine to the south of that before the cloud increases and some rain later on in the day. blustery winds to do, coming in from the west or best of the sunshine across the midlands and south east of england, high temperatures of 22 celsius. heavy showers for the first part of the night for scotland and northern ireland. on the south—west, the area
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of low pressure deepens and brings an rain and strengthening the wind as well. windy across devon and cornwall, 50 or 60 mph, strong winds running through the english channel. by running through the english channel. by the end of the night, temperatures in double figures with the rain as far north as northern england. windy weather on friday, they will ease down a bit, showers and longer spells of rain for england and wales, thundery downpours across eastern england as the showers ease waste. showers for northern ireland and southern scotland. northern scotland, cool and cloudy. temperatures lower than today. the weekend, high pressure is going to remain in the atlantic. low pressure heading toward scandinavia, influencing our weather in the way that it means we will have a northerly breeze blowing our way
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over the weekend, not particularly warm. some sunshine around, showers also, heavy ones across england and wales, still around into sunday and top temperature is 20 or 21 degrees celsius.
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i'm lucy hockings live in tokyo, with all the latest on the medals and records at the games. the american pole vaulter sam kendricks, one of the favourites to win gold at the tokyo olympics, has been ruled out after testing positive for coronavirus. silverfor team gb's mallory franklin after a thrilling finish to the women's canoe slalom — australia'sjessica fox took gold. and this is annita mcveigh in london. scientists warn that the uk is already undergoing disruptive climate change — with increased rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. are you worried about what's happening to the climate? what are you doing to cut carbon emissions? we'd love to hear from you.

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