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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 29, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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this is bbc news, i'm victoria fritz. welcome to our viewers in the uk and around the globe. our top stories. prove you've been vaccinated, or face daily testing — president biden prepares a nationwide immunisation push, as us covid cases continue to soar. the climate state we're in — british scientists prove the past two decades have been warmer, wetter and sunnier than the 20th century average. the exiled belarusian opposition leader meets the us president at the white house, and gets a strong show of support. message and gets a strong show of support. to the whole w: greatest message to the whole world of the greatest country in the world is with us will stop and this meeting is like a success.
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day six of the tokyo 2020 olympics, and us swimming star caeleb dressel has blazed his way to victory in the men's 100 metre freestyle. and from behind the decks to centre stage — the world's most famous music producer, mark ronson, tells us about his new documentary series. hello and thanks for being with us. let's start in the united states. president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will soon be required to confirm they are vaccinated, orface more testing. the numbers of coronavirus cases are rising, with the director of the us national public health agency, the cdc, saying cases have increased over 300% nationally since mid—june.
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our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. there's a growing sense of urgency. about half the population is fully vaccinated, but infection rates are rising, the delta variant is spreading rapidly, and the number ofjabs in arms is still much lower thanjoe biden wants to see. the president is about to announce that all government workers and contractors be vaccinated against covid—19 or be required to submit to regular testing. we still have a lot of people not vaccinated. the pandemic we have now is a pandemic of the vaccinated, so please — please, please, please — go vaccinate. protect yourself and your children out there. it is important. all americans are being advised to wear face masks again — indoors, in public spaces — in parts of the country with substantial or high
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transmission rates. that applies to 67% of counties — up in just 2a hours from 63%. some of the big tech companies like facebook and google have said their staff must be vaccinated before stepping back into the office. netflix has reportedly made jabs compulsory for all cast and crew members on us productions. the enforcement of vaccination policies is now a huge challenge facing much of corporate america. private companies have to make the decision whether they are going to mandate vaccination, or if they are not going to mandate it, they will allow people to come into work not vaccinated but insist on verification, but the private companies are the ones that will have to do the verification because the government hasn't stepped in to do that. so i think there is a role for government here that has not been filled adequately. with millions of americans onlyjust getting used to life again as it used to be, there's a growing unease
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that the pandemic is far from over. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. let's get some of the day's other news. republican and democratic leaders in the us senate have reached agreement on the key elements of a $1.3 trillion infrastructure programme. the package is supported by president biden, who said the breakthrough showed that american democracy could "function, deliver and do big things". the vote takes place on wednesday. the ever given container ship, which blocked the suez canal for nearly a week in march, will finally arrive in the dutch port of rotterdam today. the ship, which grounded at the end of march, sealing shut one of the world's busiest waterways and causing a backlog in global trade, spent more than three months impounded by the suez canal authority during a dispute over compensation with its owners. a woman has beenjailed for five and a half years, for stealing diamonds worth more than £4 million, or 5.5 million us dollars from a jeweller in london.
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the court heard that lulu lakatos, who is 60 and was born in romania, swapped the gems for pebbles. prosecutors said it was the highest value theft of its kind in the uk. dusty hill, the bass playerfor zz top, has died at the age of 72, according to a statement from his bandmates. they say he passed away in his sleep at his home in houston, texas. hill was one of the long—bearded musicians behind such hits as sharp dressed man. the band toured for nearly half a century, and was inducted to the rock and roll hall of fame in 200a. a report by the meteorological office says the impact of climate change is already being felt across the uk, with increased rainfall, sunshine and temperatures. last year was the third warmest, the fifth wettest and the eighth sunniest on record. it's the only year to score in the top ten,
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for all three categories. our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. dramatic footage from storms in debris which caused chaos across the country. dramatic changes in our skies. in dramatic changes in our skies. in 2020, dramatic changes in our skies. 2020, the dramatic changes in our skies. in 2020, the uk experienced a year of extremes. from storms in february, which caused chaos across the country, to a summer heatwave, when temperatures sweltered above 36 degrees for six consecutive degrees. in the uk's wettest on record in october. the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier. we october. the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier._ october. the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from — warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our _ warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our observation - warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our observation is - warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our observation is that i clearly from our observation is that the uk climate is already changing. so climate change isn't something thatis so climate change isn't something that is just going to happen so climate change isn't something that isjust going to happen in 2050, orwe that isjust going to happen in 2050, or we need to worry about towards the end of the century. we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. the
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are seeing this very clearly in our observations now.— observations now. the report compares _ observations now. the report compares the _ observations now. the report compares the most _ observations now. the report compares the most recent. observations now. the report i compares the most recent three decades with the 30 years before and found an average of the uk were 0.9 degrees hotter. for rainfall, the country was an average of 6% wetter. and 2020 was the eighth sunniest year recorded in the last 100 years. new defences are under construction, like this tidal barrier in lincolnshire, to cope with future storm surges. but the reality is flooding its having a devastating impact now, with some homes being flooded again and again. changes that seem small having a very big effect on people's lives.— effect on people's lives. what's interesting _ effect on people's lives. what's interesting about _ effect on people's lives. what's interesting about this _ effect on people's lives. what's interesting about this report . effect on people's lives. what's interesting about this report is| interesting about this report is there is lots of data. so there are lots of temperature records and percentage changes. but what we are seeing at the impacts, the impacts to us as humans, to our businesses, to us as humans, to our businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of our eyes. is being played out in front of our e es. ., ., ., , ., eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading _ eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to _
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eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow - eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later- will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united will be heading to glasgow later this yearfor the united nations climate summit. we will find out if governments can rise to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effects of climate change. right now, the elements show no signs of letting up, with this week's flash floods taking london by surprise. scientists will continue to track and analyse these events, but they warned that extremes are becoming the new norm. rebecca morelle, bbc news. a football supporter who suffered life—changing injuries at hillsborough has died at the age of 55. an inquest into andrew devine's death — held on wednesday — concluded he'd been unlawfully killed, making him the 97th victim of the disaster. james reynolds reports. andrew devine was 22 when he was seriously injured at hillsborough. at first he was given no more than six months to live. but with 24—hour care, he survived for another 32 years. his family say he was the
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centre of their lives. our devastation over his death, they say, is overwhelming. 96 more liverpool fans died of their injuries at hillsborough. two years after the disaster an inquest ruled their deaths were accidental. the families refused to accept this verdict. after years of campaigning they succeeded in obtaining a new inquest. in 2016, this hearing recorded that the fans were unlawfully killed. in a later trial though, the police commander at the game was cleared of gross negligence manslaughter. the liverpool coroner's court has now ruled that andrew devine was, like the 96 others, unlawfully killed. and so more than three decades on, the total number of dead from hillsborough rises to 97. james reynolds, bbc news.
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day six of the olympic games is underway, and there has been an upset in the athletics, with reigning world pole vault champion sam kendricks ruled out of the tokyo olympics after testing positive for covid—19. australia's entire track and field are now isolating as a precaution. meanwhile, more medals have been won in the pool and on the water, as our sports presenter sarah mulkerrins, who is covering all the action in tokyo, explains. it has been a very good thursday morning for the swimming sensation from the usa, caleb dressel. there has been so much focus and attention on him in the usa in the build—up to these games. many people think he is these games. many people think he is the area to michael phelps. we know all about him and the medals he won. caleb dressel was going on his first individualfinal caleb dressel was going on his first individual final of these games. until that point all his olympic golds, he has three so far, they all
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came in relays. he has ever won a gold in an individual race before. this was the blue ribbon event, the 100 metres freestyle final, two lengths of the pool, and they go as fast as they can. he got a brilliant start. he was forced to return and he just hung on. start. he was forced to return and hejust hung on. he almost start. he was forced to return and he just hung on. he almost got pipped to the wall by the 2016 champion from australia, who finished in second. a great result for caleb dressel. and also, in the last few minutes, we have had a world record in the pool, because china's women have won the four by 200 metres freestyle relay. they were against the australians and the americans in that. australia lead with their star swimmer titmus but they could only finish third and it was the usa who finished second. there has also been plenty of action on the rowing. we have had a first gold medal in rowing for ireland.
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paula donovan and fenton mccarthy won gold for ireland in the lightweight men's double sculls. paul moral —— poll won silver in rio or with his brother, but they were able to upgrade that to gold today. another pairing of brothers of swords, the cink of h brothers from croatia, they won gold in 2016 in a different class of boat, the double scull mights. here they won gold in the pairs. plenty of talent on offer. when we talk about big names at these olympics, many people, when you ask them who they were looking forward to seeing, it was going to be simone biles in the gymnastics. but we know over the last few days things have not gone to plan for her. she removed herself from the team event and she has also removed herself from the final this evening in the all—round event. we know there is potential she may appear for the individualfinal there is potential she may appear for the individual final is a little bit later in the week. let's speak
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to a former gymnast, now a physical therapist, who deals with the athlete, also corresponded with insider gymnastics. gina, lovely to get you on the programme. firstly, you were there when it all happened and you have been speaking to a lot of the athletes within the camp over the past couple of days. i wonder what the reaction has been and how they are feeling, and whether this is —— has come in a strange way, perhaps galvanised them? the athletes are _ perhaps galvanised them? the athletes are nothing but supportive of what _ athletes are nothing but supportive of what simon is going through. i truly— of what simon is going through. i truly believe it can happen to any one of— truly believe it can happen to any one of them at any time, as many of them_ one of them at any time, as many of them have _ one of them at any time, as many of them have said on social media. so an overwhelming amount of support for her. _ an overwhelming amount of support for her. just — an overwhelming amount of support for her, just taking care of her physical— for her, just taking care of her physical self and emotional health, and making sure that at the end of the day— and making sure that at the end of the day the — and making sure that at the end of the day the games stay safe from injuries, — the day the games stay safe from injuries, which is the goal. and
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'ust talk injuries, which is the goal. and just talk to _ injuries, which is the goal. and just talk to us _ injuries, which is the goal. fific just talk to us about this injuries, which is the goal. 2:1c just talk to us about this term, which people not familiar with gymnastics may not be familiar with... what goes through an athlete's mind when it is happening? sure. everybody knows where their body is _ sure. everybody knows where their body is in _ sure. everybody knows where their body is in space. some people are scared _ body is in space. some people are scared to — body is in space. some people are scared to go on roller—coasters is because — scared to go on roller—coasters is because of— scared to go on roller—coasters is because of the feeling of dropping. there _ because of the feeling of dropping. there are _ because of the feeling of dropping. there are people who sometimes don't know upside _ there are people who sometimes don't know upside down from right side up when _ know upside down from right side up when they— know upside down from right side up when they start flipping in the sport — when they start flipping in the sport. when you get to the national team _ sport. when you get to the national team and _ sport. when you get to the national team and the world stage, they happen— team and the world stage, they happen less often but they still do happen, _ happen less often but they still do happen, especially when we are doing 2.5 happen, especially when we are doing 25 twist, _ happen, especially when we are doing 2.5 twist, triple twist, you are twisting — 2.5 twist, triple twist, you are twisting and flipping at the same time, _ twisting and flipping at the same time, so — twisting and flipping at the same time, so your gyroscope is off. it is not _ time, so your gyroscope is off. it is not so — time, so your gyroscope is off. it is not so simple is to try it again. sometimes — is not so simple is to try it again. sometimes it takes days and or weeks to get— sometimes it takes days and or weeks to get over~ _ sometimes it takes days and or weeks to get over. you can go back and start— to get over. you can go back and start to — to get over. you can go back and start to do — to get over. you can go back and start to do drills to understand
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where — start to do drills to understand where you are, maybe do vault blocking — where you are, maybe do vault blocking and a single twist instead of a double. but when you are lost in space _ of a double. but when you are lost in space it — of a double. but when you are lost in space it is — of a double. but when you are lost in space it is incredibly confusing. as a _ in space it is incredibly confusing. as a road — in space it is incredibly confusing. as a road about a physics article i did as _ as a road about a physics article i did as welt — as a road about a physics article i did as well. that explains how death—defying the sport is and how this layer— death—defying the sport is and how this layer of fear, this physical layer— this layer of fear, this physical layer of— this layer of fear, this physical layer of fear, is very much separating things like downhill skiing — separating things like downhill skiing and aerial skiing, diving, gymnastics, from other sports that might— gymnastics, from other sports that mightiust — gymnastics, from other sports that mightjust have a fear of disappointment and performance. stay with us on bbc news. still to come... one of the world's most famous music producers, mark ronson, speaks to us about his new documentary series.
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this is bbc news. the latest headlines. president biden prepares a nationwide vaccination push,
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as us covid cases continue to soar. federal employees could be told, getjabbed or face daily testing. coronavirus cases are also surging in parts of australia. our correspondent shaimaa khalil joins me now from sydney. australia has faced difficulty rolling out its vaccination programme and many are wondering whether this latest lockdown in sydney will work?— sydney will work? that's right. there is fear _ sydney will work? that's right. there is fear already _ sydney will work? that's right. there is fear already after - sydney will work? that's right. there is fear already after the | there is fear already after the announcement of an extension yesterday. experts are saying that this may go well beyond the end of august, that the government has announced. new south wales has recorded 239 new locally acquired cases. that is the highest number, notjust cases. that is the highest number, not just since the cases. that is the highest number, notjust since the beginning of the outbreak, but since the beginning of the pandemic for the state. it shows
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you how challenging and difficult the situation here in new south wales is, especially in greater sydney with the delta variant and how transmissibility is. more than 65 of those cases have been in the community in the entire time of their illness, and that's why the new south wales government has announced new restrictions to eight areas in sydney considered for hotspots. people in those areas will have to wear masks, even when they go outdoors, only for essential reasons, and they cannot travel further than five kilometres from their homes. we also heard from the police commissioner that police will be given powers from tomorrow, from friday, to close down businesses who breach these stay at and who breach the lockdown orders. but also, he said, expect to see more police presence on the street, especially in those areas. we also heard from the state premier, of course, who gives the daily update on covid cases. she rejected the criticism
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that her government failed to contain the virus, failed to go early enough and hard enough and that lockdown came gradually, which many a tribute the case numbers, but she did acknowledge that because of the number of people out in the community, infectious cases are going to get worse, the numbers will get worse before they get better. and yes, experts are saying that even though the lockdown has been extended until the end of august, the 28th of august, given how things are right now, the trajectory of these cases, it will go beyond that, maybe. taste these cases, it will go beyond that, ma be. ~ ., ., maybe. we will leave it there for the moment- — maybe. we will leave it there for the moment. thank _ maybe. we will leave it there for the moment. thank you - maybe. we will leave it there for the moment. thank you very - maybe. we will leave it there for l the moment. thank you very much maybe. we will leave it there for - the moment. thank you very much for your time. president biden says he was honoured to meet the exiled belarusian opposition leader, svetla na tikhanovskaya at the white house. she said the visit would prove inspirational to her opposition movement, which is trying to oust president lukashenko from power after what they claim was a rigged election last year.
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mark lobel has more and his report contains flashing images. this was the state's response to protesters disputing what they called a rigged election back in august. few here believe the country's long—time president alexander lukashenko when he claimed he had won re—election with 80% of the vote, and neither did governments in the eu, uk, canada and the us. and this is the woman who says she won that election, svetla na ti kha novs kaya. she met president biden at the white house on wednesday. this is a very significant meeting, a message to the whole world that the greatest country in the world is with us and this meeting is like success of all of the belarusians versions that are fighting at the moment.
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they include thousands of civilians taking to the streets for months, at risk of their own security. but the opposition is not being tolerated by the man dubbed europe's last dictator. keen to rally the beleaguered opposition, president biden tweeted he was honoured to meet the exiled opposition leader adding that the united states stands with the people of belarus in their quest for democracy and universal human rights. it's like inspiration for our people to move forward, not to give up, although people are not giving up, for sure, but it's one more signal that we have strong allies beside us. but despite sanctions on his regime and internationalflight bans, president lukashenko has dug in with russian support. we talked about multiple points of pressure on the regime for the regime to stop violence,
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release political prisoners and start dialogue with belarus, and you know, i'm sure that belarus she told the president the us could be an invaluable future partner to an independent belarus, but for that to become a reality, the situation on the ground would have to look vastly different to this, with no immediate sign it will. mark lobel, bbc news. a draft law in the scottish parliament has been amended to exempt the queen's land from measures to encourage green energy after her lawyers raised concerns. the changes meant land owned by the royal household — such as the balmoral estate — could not be subject to compulsory purchase orders without the monarch's approval. the correspondence between buckingham palace and the scottish government was first reported in the guardian.
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mark ronson is the multi—award winning music producer behind some of pop's biggest hits. now he's taking centre stage with a new documentary series: watch the sound on apple tv plus. he talked to my colleague, reeta chakrabarti, about his time working as an intern at rolling stone magazine at the age of 12. my voice hadn't even broken yet, i had this high—pitched squeak and they let me answer the switchboard phones, in those days it was like the old—school buttons and i'd be like, "hi, rolling stone!" it's amazing what they let me do. but ijust wanted to be around music and i think because i wasn't some piano, guitar prodigy or something i thought, maybe i'll write about it, maybe i'll make it, i'm not sure. i just want to be around it all the time. so in this new series that you've made for apple tv+ you are charting the history of music production, tell us a little bit about what you look at?
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yeah, well, we all know what a great song is, but behind that in a great recording and our favourite classic recordings, whether it's eleanor rigby or skepta, it's the sounds and we don't even realise how much goes into that, so going to talk to people like paul mccartney or tame impala or the beastie boys about the revolutionary technologies that they use, even at the beginning the beatles were revolutionising technologies, so was t—pain, so was charli xcx, and they take these sounds that are very outside in the beginning and bringing them to the mainstream with their talents so i wanted to get behind that and talk to these people and i have always been so fascinated with sound, the first time i'm met amy winehouse the first thing she said is, "i want my album to sound like this" and she played me some 60s girl group pop, so sound has always been front and centre when i've been thinking about music. and you had so many big names when you were making this series
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including paul mccartney, was that intimidating talking to him, or not? you know, in this show i'm sort of more the interviewer so i'm just more thinking ok, i don't want to ask paul mccartney some question that his answered like 700 times, what can we talk about that i know he will get excited about too and maybe shed new light on something that he's still never talked about, so that's where my head was at. i have so much respect forjournalism, music journalism, all of it. i thought, i'm not going tojust go in there and be some kind of unprepared idiot because that would be a wasted opportunity to sit with some of these brilliant people, so ijust over prepared like hell, just like i always do. finally, a slice of prince charles and princess diana's wedding cake has been put up for sale, 110 years after the event. it's expected to sell for between £300 and £500 at an auction in cirencester next month. the valuers said the cake was in good condition, but would—be buyers were advised against eating it. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @ v fritz news.
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plenty more business news in five minutes. hello. wednesday brought us another day of some sunny spells but some really heavy downpours and frequent thunderstorms, with lightning and hail. this was the picture in telford on wednesday afternoon. the outlook is for the unsettled theme to continue. thursday will bring another day of sunshine and showers. it will be cool and breezy. the showers will not be as frequent or heavy as recent days. that is down to this area of low pressure bringing the showery weather. it is drifting off towards the north and north—east. we have got another area of low pressure developing in the west. that will be more of a player on thursday night into friday. for much of northern ireland, scotland and northern england, quite a cloudy start with some showery rain. across
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england and much of wales, largely dry with sunshine. more brightness in the north in the afternoon. down towards the south—west expect some rain to arrive later in the day. the breeze picking up. it will be a blustery filling day at a not particularly warm for this time of year. 18 to 22 degrees for most. not too bad towards the south—east. a drier day than recently. into thursday night, the showers in the north are going to gradually ease away. but our attention turns to the south—west of england where this area of heavy rain will move its way in. look at those wind gusts. 110 to 50 mph, unseasonably strong, through the english channel, the bristol channel as well. blustery in the south first thing on friday morning and a pretty wet start to the day. the north is looking mostly dry to start your friday. quite a bit of dry weather for friday it was of scotland, northern ireland and northern england. just a few showers. furthersouth, rain and
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brisk winds, which is cleared through the day. then a return to sunshine and scattered showers. temperatures are cooler than recent days. 17 to 20 degrees on friday. heading towards the weekend, low pressure not far away. it is moving towards the east. we have got a northerly air flow coming down. higher pressure out in the atlantic is trying to nudge its way in. between weather systems as we head through the course of the weekend. perhaps one or two showers around. wait a bit of dry weather through saturday and sunday. temperatures in the cool side for this time of the year.
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this is bbc news broadcasting to the uk and around the globe. i'm victoria fritz. our top stories... making progress. america's central bank says vaccinations have helped get the economy back on track. but it's not time to start removing support. we are clearly a way away from considering raising interest rates. it's not something on our radar screen right now. we have a deal. the us senate votes to move forward with president biden's trillion dollar plan to renew america's infrastructure soaring screen time. facebook revenuejumps as we spend more of our life — and money — online. but could the boom soon be over? plus, trading up. online broker robinhood makes its stock market debut — with a valuation of more than $30 billion.
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welcome. we start in the us — where the central bank says the economy is making progress towards recovery thanks to widespread vaccinations. as expected, the federal reserve has kept interest rates on hold, near zero, after its two—day meeting. fed chairjerome powell says now�*s not the time to start thinking about raising borrowing costs — despite rising inflation. on thursday, the first official figures could show the world's biggest economy grew more than 8% in the three months to june. from new york, here's michelle fleury. from this to this. new york is back. home sales are up, the reopening of
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offices and restaurants as the city sizzling again and americans, feeling flush, want to be here. itruiith feeling flush, want to be here. with the vaccine — feeling flush, want to be here. with the vaccine out _ feeling flush, want to be here. with the vaccine out and _ feeling flush, want to be here. tn the vaccine out and everything it makes you more inclined to be outside. ., ,., makes you more inclined to be outside. ., ., outside. having some freedom back clearly helps. _ outside. having some freedom back clearly helps, stretch _ outside. having some freedom back clearly helps, stretch our— outside. having some freedom back clearly helps, stretch our legs, - outside. having some freedom back clearly helps, stretch our legs, all l clearly helps, stretch our legs, all of us, _ clearly helps, stretch our legs, all of us, to— clearly helps, stretch our legs, all of us, to see things we haven't seen in awhile _ of us, to see things we haven't seen in awhile. ., ., ., ., , in awhile. paid to go to the museum because it's — in awhile. paid to go to the museum because it's open, _ in awhile. paid to go to the museum because it's open, go _ in awhile. paid to go to the museum because it's open, go to _ in awhile. paid to go to the museum because it's open, go to the - because it's open, go to the restaurants— because it's open, go to the restaurants you _ because it's open, go to the restaurants you couldn't - because it's open, go to the restaurants you couldn't goi because it's open, go to the l restaurants you couldn't go to before — restaurants you couldn't go to before yeah, _ restaurants you couldn't go to before. yeah, spending - restaurants you couldn't go tol before. yeah, spending money restaurants you couldn't go to - before. yeah, spending money on that type of— before. yeah, spending money on that type of stuff _ before. yeah, spending money on that type of stuff hie — before. yeah, spending money on that type of stuff-— type of stuff. we bought some art, some clothing. _ type of stuff. we bought some art, some clothing, things _ type of stuff. we bought some art, some clothing, things like - type of stuff. we bought some art, some clothing, things like that. - some clothing, things like that. home improvement. big home improvement bills.— home improvement. big home improvement bills. with its newly remodelled _ improvement bills. with its newly remodelled 92,000 _ improvement bills. with its newly remodelled 92,000 square-footl improvement bills. with its newly - remodelled 92,000 square-foot store, remodelled 92,000 square—foot store, bed bath and beyond is more than ready to greet those able to splurge. ready to greet those able to s - lurr e. ready to greet those able to slurae. . , ., ready to greet those able to slurae. . ,., . ., splurge. the custom has changed, the world is changing, _ splurge. the custom has changed, the world is changing, retail— splurge. the custom has changed, the world is changing, retail is _ world is changing, retail is changing. world is changing, retail is changing-— world is changing, retail is chanauin. ~ .,, changing. mark, who became the resident changing. mark, who became the president and _ changing. mark, who became the president and ceo _ changing. mark, who became the president and ceo of— changing. mark, who became the president and ceo of bed - changing. mark, who became the president and ceo of bed bath i changing. mark, who became the. president and ceo of bed bath and beyond for the pandemic says people have switched from buying things they need to do things they want. in they need to do things they want. in the early piece of the pandemic,
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cleaning, health, safety were number one. it then moved into i've been looking at these walls for a long time and i don't think they look great and i don't think they look great, and i want new towels, i'm experimenting with cooking. bill 01 experimenting with cooking. all of this heled experimenting with cooking. all of this helped power _ experimenting with cooking. all of this helped power the _ experimenting with cooking. all of this helped power the american economic rebound in consumer shopping counts for two thirds of all economic activity but with stimulus money coming to an end and higher prices of setting the wage gains, is the us in for a period of slower growth? and inside the american central bank, they are not looking just at that, but also the danger that the now rampant delta variant of covid might turn booming to bust. ~ variant of covid might turn booming tobust. _. ,, variant of covid might turn booming tobust. ,.. ,, ., , variant of covid might turn booming tobust. ,.. ,, ., to bust. with successive waves of covid over— to bust. with successive waves of covid over the _ to bust. with successive waves of covid over the past _ to bust. with successive waves of covid over the past year - to bust. with successive waves of covid over the past year and - to bust. with successive waves of covid over the past year and over| covid over the past year and over some months, there has tended to be less in the way of economic implications from each wave and it's only possible people might pull back from some activities because of the
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risk of infection, going out, travelling, and schools might not reopen. fin travelling, and schools might not reo en. ., . ., travelling, and schools might not reoen. ., . ., ., ~ , reopen. on financial markets, the dow jones tanked _ reopen. on financial markets, the dow jones tanked recently - reopen. on financial markets, the dow jones tanked recently with i dowjones tanked recently with investors worried that new covid variants could disrupt commerce but while financial markets fret about the future at bed bath and beyond, the future at bed bath and beyond, the ceo is more sanguine. i the future at bed bath and beyond, the ceo is more sanguine.- the ceo is more sanguine. i think the customers _ the ceo is more sanguine. i think the customers have _ the ceo is more sanguine. i think the customers have learnt - the ceo is more sanguine. i think the customers have learnt to - the ceo is more sanguine. i think the customers have learnt to be i the customers have learnt to be agile and so have we so people still have needs and wants and they may change slightly but i think we will be there for them and ready to service them in whatever way we see. there could be a further big boost to the us economy after the senate voted to move forward on a trillion dollar infrastructure plan being pushed by president biden. if it passes, congress it would see huge federal investment in roads, bridges, transport and green energy. the president told workers at a truck plant in pennsylvania that the bill had bi—partisan support — and would meanjobs for americans. today i'm here to talk about the
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commitment that is sacred to me, and central to our efforts to keep things moving. it is a straightforward solution. support and grow more american —based companies. put more americans to work in union jobs. strengthen american manufacturing and secure critical supply change —— chains, and confront the climate crisis which is all aboutjobs. confront the climate crisis which is allaboutjobs. i can confront the climate crisis which is all aboutjobs. i can sum it up into words. by american. buy american. so will this bill effectively transform america's economy as president biden has suggested? anna macdonald, fund manager at amati global investors in edinburgh,
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gave her assessment. i think that the pandemic has really focused their minds on what they need to do to be able to ensure their own supply chains, as he was saying. we really have seen some issues with, for example, semiconductor shortages so they really want to put serious amounts of investment to work in building and build up their infrastructure in the first tranche of this is improving waterways and green energy and bridges but there's also an additional $3.5 trillion packages that will be what they call a once in a generation bit of spending on education and social welfare so they want to make some progress and there has to be numbers in terms of this in terms of buying american. he is saying there will be a requirement
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for a federal government to move the amount of american sourcing they have from 55% currently to 60% and “p have from 55% currently to 60% and up to 75% so they are putting tangible numbers on these action points. tangible numbers on these action oints. �* , . . tangible numbers on these action oints. fl. . ., points. let's circle back to something _ points. let's circle back to something you _ points. let's circle back to something you were - points. let's circle back to l something you were talking points. let's circle back to - something you were talking about there, the social or human infrastructure investment that we are talking about, the second slice, if you like, and we understand the bill has been close to collapse several times. wider support for social capital expenditure appear to be so controversial? —— why does support? 1 be so controversial? -- why does su ort? ~ , . be so controversial? -- why does su--ort? ~ ,., support? i think it is a political matter and _ support? i think it is a political matter and you _ support? i think it is a political matter and you have _ support? i think it is a political matter and you have got - support? i think it is a political- matter and you have got republicans in the senate and the house of representatives that feel that the government should not be interfering to that extent and they are obviously worried about this additional level of debt that will
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be added to the us economy, which is already considerably indebted. speaking of which, the total cost of the bite bill is expected to be around £550 billion and with this companion bill, the total is expected to be slightly over1 trillion. where does all of this money come from to pay for these ambitions? is it all debt or is it coming from other sources? it’s coming from other sources? it's auoin to coming from other sources? it's going to be _ coming from other sources? it�*s going to be debt and the us economy, its growing really fast, as you mentioned in the earlier segments. and we are anticipating nearly 8.5% growth in the last quarter as we continue to recover from the pandemic, so if there were serious concerns about the ability of the us economy to support this level of debt, you would see the cost of borrowing would be increasing but it's actually still at very low
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levels and that has been helped by quantitative easing continuing at the same level we have seen but to borrow money in the us costs around 1.3% and when you take inflation into account, that is a negative interest rate.— into account, that is a negative interest rate. lets stay in the us because facebook _ interest rate. lets stay in the us because facebook has _ interest rate. lets stay in the us because facebook has become l interest rate. lets stay in the us l because facebook has become the latest of the big tech giants to report a surge in earnings. it says revenue jumped 56% in the three months to the end ofjune— tojust over 29 billion dollars — most of that from advertising. 2.9 billion people now use one of facebook�*s services at least once a month. but the company has also warned revenue growth will �*decelerate significantly�* in the coming months — sending shares down sharply. so, what's the problem? i asked doug astrop who is managing partner at exponential investment partners in atlanta, georgia. well, we don't think there is a
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problem, actually. we think the numbers they reported were pretty amazing and as you pointed out, 56% revenue growth and this is a company valued at over $1 trillion, that is incredible growth on the top line and i think facebook was just being and i think facebook was just being a bit cautious on setting expectations for the next two quarters because the accounts are going to get more difficult year over year so i think they were being a bit conservative that they're still looking at 20 or 30% growth which is fantastic.— which is fantastic. apple's new -riva which is fantastic. apple's new privacy policies _ which is fantastic. apple's new privacy policies do _ which is fantastic. apple's new privacy policies do ban - which is fantastic. apple's new privacy policies do ban abs - which is fantastic. apple's newj privacy policies do ban abs and advertisers from collecting data about iphone users without their consent, so what impact will those changes have on facebook revenues? probably not overly significant. they did warn that could be a little bit of a headwind but they seem to
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think it was not going to be any kind of a game changer. so prospects still look very good. they have two thirds of the worlds internet users using facebook and billions of people checking in daily, so it's an incredible audience that they captured and also the users love the service. it's hard to find anyone in the ecosystem who is not really happy with facebook.— the ecosystem who is not really happy with facebook. there are lots of users who — happy with facebook. there are lots of users who would _ happy with facebook. there are lots of users who would consider- happy with facebook. there are lots of users who would consider it - happy with facebook. there are lots of users who would consider it and l of users who would consider it and some of its other services like a necessary evil, something they need to do in order to stay in touch and in some ways stay relevant in their own social circles and with their own social circles and with their own work circles. and i wonder if data becomes harder and targeting becomes more difficult because of
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that and what other avenues are open to facebook to make money? thea;r to facebook to make money? they have that treat to facebook to make money? they have that great ecosystem _ to facebook to make money? they have that great ecosystem with _ to facebook to make money? they have that great ecosystem with all _ to facebook to make money? they have that great ecosystem with all of - that great ecosystem with all of those users, so they can broaden out into other services and they are getting them to get into payments and also some media activity with music and video, so they have an ecosystem much like apple where they have captive users who love the service who are using it regularly so there's endless possibilities for them to broaden out, like they've done with instagram and some other services and i think the payment system is a great opportunity for facebook and they are already heading down that path. let's stay with that theme — because south korean tech giant samsung has also been reaping
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the benefits of the pandemic demand for screen time. the world's biggest smartphone maker says profits soared by more than 73 per cent in the three months to the end ofjune. katie silver is following this for us in our singapore bureau it is its best result in two years and a real beneficiary of the pandemic and the tech boom we have seen, so the part of the business that did particularly well was memory chips and we've been speaking time and again on this programme about chip shortage and they have attracted higher prices due to the reduction in capacity. the other part that you mention is the pandemic demand which has seen a tech boom with everybody being forced to work from home we are seeing huge demand for the likes of computers, data servers and mobiles and all of those require memory chips and samsung is the worlds largest producer of them and people staying at home means that they are buying up smart tvs and washing machines which also require the chips, but the bad news is that the part of the business that did not do as well was the smartphone and i feel this has been the issue for samsung for the last few quarters.
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we heard that with iphone sales up, that meant that we saw less demand for their smartphones as well as them being impacted like so many companies around the world have been from supply chain problems, so as we've seen covid outbreaks in vietnam and china, that seen a disruption in their factories and going forward they say they are optimistic in the chip demand is likely to continue and many chip makers have been saying this and they are also hopeful that the demand for mobile phones will recover to pre—pandemic levels, back to the level we saw in 2019. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: surf's up! why record numbers of brits will be taking to their boards this summer. members of the public are being invited to share their views on a new online safety bill which has been drafted by the government. a newjoint "super committee" of mps and peers has been created to scrutinise the bill —
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which proposed that social media sites could be punished for failing to protect users from harmful content. the committee will report its findings by december. it's another step forward towards a safer internet and it will take time, but it's important that the legislation is as complete and proper as possible, so the scrutinising committee have quite a lot of work in front of them because it is a big bill which is dense and complicated and may have to go through it and make sure it is fit for purpose and particularly that it keeps the young and vulnerable people safe as possible. british summers are likely to regularly see temperatures of above 40c even if humanity manages to limit global warming to 1.5c, according to scientists. a report from the met office says the uk is already undergoing disruptive climate change with increased rainfall, sunshine and temperatures. last year was the third warmest, fifth wettest and eighth sunniest on record.
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no other year is in the top ten on all three criteria. scientists warn of worse extreme weather if global temperatures rise and carbon emissions are not reduced. this is bbc news, the latest headlines. president biden prepares a nationwide vaccination push — as us covid cases continue to soar. federal employeee could be told, getjabbed or face daily testing. british climate scientists have proved the past two decades were warmer, wetter and sunnier than the average for the entire 20th century. the online broker robinhood markets has become something of a household name — thanks to its role in the retail investment frenzy in �*meme
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stocks' such as gamestop. its trading app has been a way into the stock market for many first time private investors. but today the company makes its own debut on the nasdaq stock market. will its own shares prove as popular? samira hussain has more. robinhood's pitch is simple. it wants to democratise finance for us all and it does so through a phone app all and it does so through a phone app which some complain makes buying and selling shares much like playing and selling shares much like playing a video game. certainly the app has proved increasingly popular. at the end of march, it had 18 million active users, 6 million of whom had joined injust the active users, 6 million of whom had joined in just the last three months. but if robinhood's mission to bring the financial markets to everyone is working, it's also causing some chaos. witness gamestop, the chain of video game stores was the scene of one of the great stock market battles of recent
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years with big investors who bet gamestop shares would fall found themselves outgunned by retail investors, many of whom had robinhood accounts. and many of whom then found themselves unable to trade when the app stopped taking their orders, much to their fury. all of which got robinhood's ceo and angry audience at congress. he continues to attract government scrutiny. just a day before robinhood's debut it was revealed that he is being investigated by one of the main market regulators. but unlike many tech companies when they come to market, robinhood can actually point to the fact that they made a profit last year. its popularity as an investment tool might just translate popularity as an investment tool mightjust translate into popularity with investors. finally — if the olympics' first ever surfing event at the weekend inspired you to give it a go — you could be in good company. uk governing body surf england is expecting record numbers
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of people taking to surf boards this summer. the �*surfing surge�* began during lockdown last year, and is set to continue with more people holidaying in the uk because of travel restrictions. roger moon, co—founder of boardshop.co.uk — europe�*s largest online surf hardware retailer, says lockdown has boosted interest in the sport. i think lockdown has been a major effect from june, july last year, we saw a huge uptake in the amount of people surfing and the business we were doing and it was really one of the only things people can do when they had disposable income and it is a healthy, outdoorfun pursued to do. do a healthy, outdoor fun pursued to do. , ., , . , , a healthy, outdoor fun pursued to do. ,. , _.,., do. do you expect the industry boom will continue — do. do you expect the industry boom will continue and _ do. do you expect the industry boom will continue and i _ do. do you expect the industry boom will continue and i will _ do. do you expect the industry boom will continue and i will show - do. do you expect the industry boom will continue and i will show my - will continue and i will show my ignorance here, once you have a board and a wet suit, what else do you need to buy? you board and a wet suit, what else do you need to buy?— board and a wet suit, what else do you need to buy? you need, luckily, ou need you need to buy? you need, luckily, you need a — you need to buy? you need, luckily, you need a beginners— you need to buy? you need, luckily, you need a beginners board - you need to buy? you need, luckily, you need a beginners board and - you need to buy? you need, luckily, you need a beginners board and a i you need to buy? you need, luckily, i you need a beginners board and a wet suit and as you progress through the sport you might get more advanced
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boards or a quiver, as we call it, so several boards for different conditions and a wet suit, if you�*re serving in the uk you might need a summer wet suit, winter wet suit, hooded wet suit, so it�*s cheap to start with and it�*s really easy to get into than there are low barriers to entry, but the growth should continue, yes, but nothing goes up in a straight line forever. spot the man who sells _ in a straight line forever. spot the man who sells surf _ in a straight line forever. spot the man who sells surf boards - in a straight line forever. spot the man who sells surf boards a - in a straight line forever. spot the | man who sells surf boards a living. obviously this whole industry and the whole sport was traditionally quite male dominated but we see that change quite a bit and i know you are starting to develop women�*s boards. why have you decided to do that? why can�*t you get the best selling mail board and paint it pink and give it to a woman? why doesn�*t it work? because it doesn�*t, does it. it work? because it doesn't, does it. ., , ., ., .,, it work? because it doesn't, does it. that is traditionally what the industry was — it. that is traditionally what the industry was doing _ it. that is traditionally what the industry was doing and - it. that is traditionally what the industry was doing and being i it. that is traditionally what the industry was doing and being a | it. that is traditionally what the - industry was doing and being a male dominated industry, like you say, thatis dominated industry, like you say, that is what we were doing but we took on ahead of ladies surf and she
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has educated at that people don�*t want that. it comes down to a body dynamic. if there were lady specific road bikes for ages, then they should be surfboards. you can often end up with a surfboard that doesn�*t fit under your arm or a surfboard that doesn�*t turn very well, so we think it is a big growth area and we should give the audience what they want. . . should give the audience what they want. ., ., , , �* �* ~ ., want. hear, hear. this is bbc world news. i want. hear, hear. this is bbc world news- i am — want. hear, hear. this is bbc world news. i am victoria _ want. hear, hear. this is bbc world news. i am victoria fritz. _ the home secretary has visited birmingham, to meet families of the victims of the 1974 ira pub bombings. priti patel held a virtual meeting with them in march, but had promised to pay a visit in person. in talks described as "passionate but dignified", the families urged her to call an inquiry into the bombings, which killed 21 people and injured hundreds more. giles latcham reports. this was a moment many months in the
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making. a face to face meeting with the home secretary, hosted by the west midlands mayor and a chance for the relatives of the victims to press their case for a wide ranging public enquiry. the government recently announced plans to end all prosecutions for offences relating to the troubles in northern ireland. plans that the families have described as obscene and apparent. they were raised at this meeting but they did not form part of the main discussion. 21 people were killed by the bombs planted by the ira into city centre pubs, among them the sister ofjulie hamilton, who emerged from the meeting convinced that as a result we are now a step closer to an enquiry. taste that as a result we are now a step closer to an enquiry.— that as a result we are now a step closer to an enquiry. we are closer than we have _ closer to an enquiry. we are closer than we have been, _ closer to an enquiry. we are closer than we have been, it _ closer to an enquiry. we are closer than we have been, it like - than we have been, it like that. we�*ve had to wait nearly 47 years to get this far and she says that she works and acts on integrity and we
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will keep to that word. 1 works and acts on integrity and we will keep to that word.— works and acts on integrity and we will keep to that word. i hope there will keep to that word. i hope there will be a public _ will keep to that word. i hope there will be a public enquiry. _ will keep to that word. i hope there will be a public enquiry. the - will keep to that word. i hope there will be a public enquiry. the homel will be a public enquiry. the home secretary— will be a public enquiry. the home secretary said very clearly that there — secretary said very clearly that there are — secretary said very clearly that there are all sorts of standards to be there are all sorts of standards to he met— there are all sorts of standards to he met to — there are all sorts of standards to be met to get to that position, but there _ be met to get to that position, but there would be a very clear process by which _ there would be a very clear process by which the evidence was examined so she _ by which the evidence was examined so she could make an appropriate judgment — so she could make an appropriate judgment. the so she could make an appropriate 'udrment. ., , , judgment. the meeting lasted 'ust over an hour. the i judgment. the meeting lasted 'ust over an hour. the home �* judgment. the meeting lastedjust over an hour. the home secretary| over an hour. the home secretary agreed that the government lawyers would liaise with lawyers for the families to explore what a public enquiry might entail. daily coronavirus cases have risen for the first time in a week. more than 27,000 new cases were reported yesterday, though that number is less than this time last week. health secretary, sajid javid, said despite the "encouraging" figures, he is remaining cautious. former chief scientific advisor, sir mark walport, warns that we�*ve not yet seen the impact of restrictions easing.
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what do the great barrier reef, the canals in venice, and the galapagos islands have in common with the slate landscapes of north west wales? the answer is unesco world heritage site status. the area, including six sites in snowdonia, is now one of 32 uk sites on the prestigious list. our wales correspondent tomos morgan reports. 20 years in the making, and recognition is finally here. the slate landscape that dominates parts of snowdonia is now on a prestigious world heritage list that includes the great wall of china and machu picchu. the pioneerfor this bid was doctor david nguyen. i picchu. the pioneerfor this bid was doctor david nguyen. melt picchu. the pioneer for this bid was doctor david nguyen.— doctor david nguyen. i felt it was somethin: doctor david nguyen. i felt it was something very — doctor david nguyen. i felt it was something very wonderful - something very wonderful here, almost magical and i�*m naturally delighted to hear now that after 20 years, ourambitions delighted to hear now that after 20 years, our ambitions have been realised. ., , , , realised. few of us can resist the si . ht of realised. few of us can resist the sight of men _ realised. few of us can resist the sight of men digging _ realised. few of us can resist the sight of men digging a _ realised. few of us can resist the sight of men digging a hole. - realised. few of us can resist the sight of men digging a hole. it i realised. few of us can resist the sight of men digging a hole. it is| sight of men digging a hole. it is said that wales _ sight of men digging a hole. it 3 said that wales made the roof or the
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world in the 19th century and in its heyday the industry employed close to 20,000. 50 heyday the industry employed close to 20,000. , heyday the industry employed close to 20,000. y ., , . , , ., to 20,000. so why does welsh slate have such a — to 20,000. so why does welsh slate have such a good _ to 20,000. so why does welsh slate have such a good name _ to 20,000. so why does welsh slate have such a good name worldwide? | have such a good name worldwide? firstly, it�*s the best slate in the world. it is one of the more dense slates and has been proven on the roofs for well over 200 or 300 years. roofs for well over 200 or 300 ears. ., ., ., , ., years. for former quarryman, fred hu~hes, years. for former quarryman, fred hughes. this _ years. for former quarryman, fred hughes, this area _ years. for former quarryman, fred hughes, this area has _ years. for former quarryman, fred hughes, this area has always - years. for former quarryman, fred hughes, this area has always been j hughes, this area has always been special. hughes, this area has always been secial. , , ., special. this place could have gone to rack and — special. this place could have gone to rack and ruin, _ special. this place could have gone to rack and ruin, forgotten - to rack and ruin, forgotten about, more decay than there already is, so maybe this is a pathway to get it back up on its feet and have the recognition. it isjust back up on its feet and have the recognition. it is just fantastic news. recognition. it is 'ust fantastic news. , ., ., news. just as the ta' mahal has for india and the h news. just as the taj mahal has for india and the pyramids _ news. just as the taj mahal has for india and the pyramids for - india and the pyramids for egypt, the hope is that the recognition for the hope is that the recognition for the slate mines here in north wales will also bring an economic boost to the area. for the locals, it is tourism, a key employer here, that
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will hopefully benefit from the announcement today. in will hopefully benefit from the announcement today.- will hopefully benefit from the announcement today. in order to get the tories to — announcement today. in order to get the tories to stay _ announcement today. in order to get the tories to stay here _ announcement today. in order to get the tories to stay here we _ announcement today. in order to get the tories to stay here we need - announcement today. in order to get the tories to stay here we need the l the tories to stay here we need the investment putting in —— the tories to stay here the investment putting in to help businesses get up and running. in to help businesses get up and runninu. ., 'j~:: :: in to help businesses get up and runninl. ., 'j~:: 11, ., , ,, ., running. for1800 years, slate has been mined _ running. for1800 years, slate has been mined in _ running. for1800 years, slate has been mined in a _ running. for1800 years, slate has been mined in a silvery _ running. for1800 years, slate has been mined in a silvery and - running. for1800 years, slate has| been mined in a silvery and rugged landscape, and know the stone that has roofed buildings across the globe from westminster hall to melbourne and rio has brought an accolade sort world over. now here�*s the weather with sarah keith—lucas. wednesday brought us another day of some sunny spells but some really heavy downpours and frequent thunderstorms with lightning and hail and this was the picture in telford during wednesday afternoon. the outlook is for the unsettled theme to continue and i think thursday will bring another day of sunshine and showers and it will be cool and breezy but the showers won�*t be as heavy or frequent as they have been over recent days and that�*s due to the fact that the low pressure bringing the showery
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weather is drifting towards the north and north—east and we have another area of low pressure developing in the south—west which will be more of a player through thursday and friday. for much of northern ireland, scotland and northern england, cloudy start with showery rain but across england and wales, largely dry wood sunshine around and there will be more brightness developing in the north in the afternoon but down towards the south—west, expect rain to arrive and the breeze will be picking up and it will be a lustily day and not particularly warm for the time of year with temperatures between 18 or 22 degrees for most of us. not too bad in the south—east. a dry day. into thursday night, the showers in the north are going to gradually ease away but attention turns to the south—west of england where this area of heavy rain will move in and look at the gusts of wind, around 110 or 50 move in and look at the gusts of wind, around 110 or50 mph, unseasonably strong through the english channel and through the bristol channel so very blustery in
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the south on friday morning and a wet start to the day, whereas in the north it is looking mostly dry to start your friday and quite a bit of dry weather for friday across scotland, northern ireland and northern england with a few showers around and we have the initial heavy rain and brisk winds but it gradually clears through the east and then return to some sunshine and scattered showers. temperatures are cooler than recent days between 17 or 20 degrees on friday and heading towards the weekend, low pressure is not far away but it moves towards the east and we have a northerly air flow coming down and higher pressure out in the atlantic is trying to nudge its way in so between weather systems as we head through the course of the weekend and may one or two showers around but dry weather through saturday and sunday and some sunny spells and temperatures on the cool side for this time of year. goodbye.
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this is bbc world news. our top stories. president biden prepares to announce that federal workers in the us need to get vaccinated, or prepare for an increase in testing. it comes as us covid cases continue to soar. us champion pole vaulter sam kendricks tests positive at the tokyo olympics — the australian athletics team is isolating after close contact with him. the climate state we�*re in — british scientists prove the past two decades have been warmer, wetter and sunnier than the average for the entire 20th century. the exiled belarusian opposition leader meets the us president at the white house, and gets a strong show of support.
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a message to the whole world that the greatest country in the world is with us. and this meeting is like a success for belarusians that are fighting. unlawfully killed — 31 years after the hillsborough football stadium disaster, a supporter who suffered life—changing injuries becomes the 97th victim. hello and welcome to bbc world news. president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will soon be required to confirm they are vaccinated, orface more testing. the numbers of coronavirus cases are rising, with the director of the us national public health agency, the cdc, saying cases have increased over 300% nationally since mid—june.
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our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. there�*s a growing sense of urgency. about half the population is fully vaccinated, but infection rates are rising, the delta variant is spreading rapidly, and the number ofjabs in arms is still much lower thanjoe biden wants to see. the president is about to announce that all government workers and contractors be vaccinated against covid—19 or be required to submit to regular testing. we still have a lot of people not vaccinated. the pandemic we have now is a pandemic of the unvaccinated, so please — please, please, please — go vaccinate. protect yourself and your children out there. it is important. all americans are being advised to wear face masks again — indoors, in public spaces — in parts of the country with substantial or high transmission rates. that applies to 67% of counties —
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up in just 211 hours from 63%. some of the big tech companies like facebook and google have said their staff must be vaccinated before stepping back into the office. netflix has reportedly made jabs compulsory for all cast and crew members on us productions. the enforcement of vaccination policies is now a huge challenge facing much of corporate america. private companies have to make the decision whether they are going to mandate vaccination, or if they are not going to mandate it, they will allow people to come into work not vaccinated but insist on verification, but the private companies are the ones that will have to do the verification because the government hasn't stepped in to do that. so i think there is a role for government here that has not been filled adequately. with millions of americans onlyjust getting used to life again as it used to be, there�*s a growing unease that the pandemic is far from over. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles.
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day six of the olympic games is underway and there has been an upset in the athletics, with reigning world pole vault champion sam kendricks ruled out of the games after testing positive for covid—19. australia�*s entire track and field team are isolating as a precaution. meanwhile, more medals have been won in the pool and on the water. sarah mulkerrins is covering all the action for us in tokyo. it has been a very good thursday morning for the swimming sensation from the usa, caleb dressel. he won gold in the men�*s 100 metres freestyle. he has won olympic gold in three relays until this point but had never won an individual title. but he delivered this morning in tokyo. he went into this with so much pressure, the weight of the us media on him. he has been billed as
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michael phelps�*s heir apparent. he delivered. he got off to a fast start. we got to the wall in first and he hung on to win in an olympic record. gold for america and caleb dressel. and also, in the last few minutes, we have had a world record in the pool, because china�*s women have won the four by 200 metres freestyle relay. they were against the australians and the americans in that. australia finished with the bronze. there has also been plenty of action on the rowing. we have had a first gold medal in rowing for ireland. paul o�*donovan and fintan mccarthy won gold for ireland in the lightweight men�*s double sculls. paul won silver in rio with his brother, but they were able to upgrade that to gold today. another pairing of brothers of sorts, the sinkovic brothers from croatia,
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they won gold in 2016 in a different class of boat, the double sculls. here they won gold in the pairs. plenty of talent on offer. let�*s get some of the day�*s other news. the ever given container ship, which blocked the suez canal for nearly a week in march, will finally arrive in the dutch port of rotterdam today. the ship, which grounded at the end of march, sealing shut one of the world�*s busiest waterways and causing a backlog in global trade, spent more than three months impounded by the suez canal authority during a dispute over compensation with its owners. a woman has been jailed for five and a half years for stealing diamonds worth more than £4 million, or 5.5 million us dollars from a jeweller in london. the court heard that lulu lakatos, who is 60 and was born in romania, swapped the gems for pebbles. prosecutors said it was the highest value theft of its kind in the uk. dusty hill, the bass playerfor zz top has died at the age of 72.
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that�*s according to a statement from his bandmates. they say he passed away in his sleep at his home in houston texas. hill was one of the long—bearded musicians behind such hits as sharp dressed man. the band toured for nearly half a century, and was inducted to the rock and roll hall of fame in 20011. a report by the met office says the impact of climate change is already being felt across britain, with increased rainfall, sunshine and temperatures. last year was the third warmest, the fifth wettest and the eighth sunniest on record. it�*s the only year to score in the top ten, for all three categories. our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. dramatic changes in our skies. in 2020, the uk experienced
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a year of extremes. from storms in february, which caused chaos across the country, to a summer heatwave, when temperatures sweltered above 36 degrees for six consecutive degrees. and rain in october with the uk�*s wettest day on record. it is and rain in october with the uk's wettest day on record.— wettest day on record. it is all charted in _ wettest day on record. it is all charted in an _ wettest day on record. it is all charted in an annual— wettest day on record. it is all i charted in an annual assessment wettest day on record. it is all - charted in an annual assessment of the climate. the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our observation that the uk climate is already changing. so climate change isn�*t something that is just going to happen in 2050, or we need to worry about towards the end of the century. we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. the report compared the most recent three decades with the 30 years before, and found an average of the uk were 0.9 degrees hotter. for rainfall, the country was an average of 6% wetter. and 2020 was the eighth sunniest year recorded in the last 100 years.
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new defences are under construction, like this tidal barrier in lincolnshire, to cope with future storm surges. but the reality is flooding is having a devastating impact now, with some homes being flooded again and again. changes that seem small are having a very big effect on people�*s lives. what�*s interesting about this report is there is lots of data. so there are lots of temperature records and percentage changes. but what we are seeing are the impacts, the impacts to us as humans, to our businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of our eyes. come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united nations climate summit. we will find out if governments can rise to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effects of climate change. right now, the elements show no signs of letting up, with this week�*s flash floods taking london by surprise. scientists will continue to track
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and analyse these events, but they warn that extremes are becoming the new norm. rebecca morelle, bbc news. president biden says he was honoured to meet the exiled belarusian opposition leader, svetla na tikhanovskaya, at the white house. she said the visit would prove inspirational to her opposition movement, which is trying to oust president lukashenko from power, after what they claim was a rigged election last year. mark lobel has more and his report contains flashing images. this was the state�*s response to protesters disputing what they called a rigged election back in august. few here believe the country�*s long—time president alexander lukashenko when he claimed he had won re—election with 80% of the vote, and neither did governments in the eu, uk, canada and the us. and this is the woman who says she won that election, svetla na ti kha novs kaya.
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she met president biden at the white house on wednesday. this is a very significant meeting, a message to the whole world that the greatest country in the world is with us and this meeting is like success of all of the belarusians that are fighting at the moment. they include thousands of civilians taking to the streets for months, at risk of their own security. but the opposition is not being tolerated by the man dubbed europe�*s last dictator. keen to rally the beleaguered opposition, president biden tweeted he was honoured to meet the exiled opposition leader, adding that the united states stands with the people of belarus in their quest for democracy and universal human rights. it�*s like inspiration for our people to move forward, not to give up, although people are not giving up,
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for sure, but it�*s one more signal that we have strong allies beside us. but despite sanctions on his regime and internationalflight bans, president lukashenko has dug in with russian support. we talked about multiple points of pressure on the regime, for the regime to stop violence, release political prisoners and start dialogue with belarus, and you know, i�*m sure that belarus can be an example of non—violent transition of power. she told the president the us could be an invaluable future partner to an independent belarus, but for that to become a reality, the situation on the ground would have to look vastly different to this, with no immediate sign it will. mark lobel, bbc news.
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great britain have missed out on two more medals at the olympics. we speak to the chair of british rowing in a few minutes. an infrastructure bill worth about $1 trillion has cleared a major hurdle in the us senate, after passing a procedural vote. a formal debate can now begin on the programme, one of president biden�*s main priorities. earlier republican and democratic leaders announced they�*d agreed on key issues after months of negotiations. we just left the floor of the united states senate, where we had a strong and bipartisan showing to move forward on this historic legislation which will be the greatest investment in infrastructure in all of our lifetimes. each of us are deeply committed to demonstrating to the country and to the world that
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our government can work and it can work for the people of the united states of america. 50 work for the people of the united states of america.— states of america. so we come to . ether states of america. so we come together and — states of america. so we come together and work _ states of america. so we come together and work in _ states of america. so we come together and work in good - states of america. so we come | together and work in good faith states of america. so we come - together and work in good faith with our democrat colleagues, our republican leaders and members worked _ republican leaders and members worked out that the elements of this _ worked out that the elements of this we — worked out that the elements of this. we got something on a bipartisan basis. it is the way washington should work and the way america _ washington should work and the way america expects us to work. this is bbc world news. the latest headlines. president biden prepares a nationwide vaccination push, as us covid cases continue to soar. federal employees could be told, getjabbed or face daily testing. british climate scientists have proved the past two decades were warmer, wetter and sunnier than the average for the entire 20th century. a football supporter who suffered life—changing injuries at hillsborough has died at the age of 55. an inquest into andrew devine�*s death — held on wednesday — concluded he�*d been unlawfully killed, making him the 97th victim of the disaster.
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james reynolds reports: andrew devine was 22 when he was seriously injured at hillsborough. at first he was given no more than six months to live. but with 24—hour care, he survived for another 32 years. his family say he was the centre of their lives. our devastation over his death, they say, is overwhelming. 96 more liverpool fans died of their injuries at hillsborough. two years after the disaster, an inquest ruled their deaths were accidental. the families refused to accept this verdict. after years of campaigning, they succeeded in obtaining a new inquest. in 2016, this hearing recorded that the fans were unlawfully killed.
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in a later trial though, the police commander at the game was cleared of gross negligence manslaughter. the liverpool coroner�*s court has now ruled that andrew devine was, like the 96 others, unlawfully killed. and so more than three decades on, the total number of dead from hillsborough rises to 97. james reynolds, bbc news. later, official uk figures are expected to show another fall in the number of people still on furlough, as the british government continues to reduce the level of financial support it offers to businesses, and life begins to return to normal. from next month, employers will have to contribute more towards their wage bill, which many labour market experts warn could triggerjob cuts when companies can�*t make ends meet. our business correspondent colletta smith reports on getting back to work for over two million people still using the scheme.
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it had been such a long time coming. it had been such a long time coming. i was so excited to get ready, pick out of the outfit of coming back to work and just seeing my friends that i hadn�*t gotten to see at work. and just sit at my desk after a whole 15 months, it was quite exciting. teh months, it was quite exciting. ten da s aao, months, it was quite exciting. ten days ago. her— months, it was quite exciting. ten days ago, her life got busy again. after so long on furlough, she was over the moon getting the call asking her to come back. originally su osed asking her to come back. originally sopposed to _ asking her to come back. originally supposed to come _ asking her to come back. originally supposed to come back _ asking her to come back. originally supposed to come back before - asking her to come back. originally supposed to come back before the | supposed to come back before the december lockdown. when the country went into lockdown at that point i did feel a bit insecure to the point of the fact that, will i be able to come back because i had been anticipating that initial return to work? i did worry a little bit. as the weeks became months the best thing was to kind of build a routine and just keep a positive mental attitude. that is what helped me get
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up attitude. that is what helped me get up in the mornings. emit attitude. that is what helped me get up in the mornings.— up in the mornings. staff here have been brought _ up in the mornings. staff here have been brought back _ up in the mornings. staff here have been brought back gradually - up in the mornings. staff here have been brought back gradually as - been brought back gradually as business ike —— has increased. from next month companies will have to pay more, 20%, for each team member on furlough. that will mean tough decisions for many firms. brute on furlough. that will mean tough decisions for many firms.- decisions for many firms. we are seeinr a decisions for many firms. we are seeing a lot _ decisions for many firms. we are seeing a lot of— decisions for many firms. we are seeing a lot of clients _ decisions for many firms. we are seeing a lot of clients that - decisions for many firms. we are seeing a lot of clients that are i seeing a lot of clients that are trying — seeing a lot of clients that are trying to— seeing a lot of clients that are trying to bring in measures like part-time — trying to bring in measures like part—time working, reduced hours, temporary— part—time working, reduced hours, temporary pay cuts, as an alternative to people losing their jobs _ alternative to people losing their jobs but— alternative to people losing their jobs. but if those things can't be agreed, — jobs. but if those things can't be agreed, then the fallback will be that some people will be made redundant. that some people will be made redundant-— that some people will be made redundant. ., , ., , ., redundant. lots of companies have already faced _ redundant. lots of companies have already faced up _ redundant. lots of companies have already faced up to _ redundant. lots of companies have already faced up to the _ redundant. lots of companies have already faced up to the challenge l already faced up to the challenge and made some redundancies. simon says it couldn�*t be back to business as usual. brute says it couldn't be back to business as usual. ~ ., ., ., ., as usual. we have had to let a number of _ as usual. we have had to let a number of our _ as usual. we have had to let a number of our staff _ as usual. we have had to let a number of our staff go, - as usual. we have had to let a l number of our staff go, because as usual. we have had to let a i number of our staff go, because we were unsure of how long furlough was going to last. but over the past year as well we have seen a number of our employees leave the industry due to the uncertainties around
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hospitality. for due to the uncertainties around hospitality-— due to the uncertainties around hositali . ., ., ., , hospitality. for those who have been out of the workplace _ hospitality. for those who have been out of the workplace for _ hospitality. for those who have been out of the workplace for so _ hospitality. for those who have been out of the workplace for so long, i out of the workplace for so long, hoping to get back to life as normal, the prospect of redundancy is all the more daunting. colette at smith, bbc news. the availability of covid—19 vaccines varies widely from country to country. in recent months, the shortage in many parts of the world has sparked the a rise in vaccine tourism, with many people heading to the united states to getjabbed. our taipei correspondent, cindy sui returned to her home country, the us, to find out more. these tourists from many countries have come to the united states to get vaccinated against covid—19. notjust for brazil or for the us it is for the world. everyone wants the world to to normal. besides latin america, many travellers have come from asia including this 84—year—old grandmother who just got off a flight from vietnam. her granddaughter tells me that even at her age she cannot get vaccinated in her country. i tell you, in my country there are not enough vaccines.
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not enough for everybody. around 50% of us residents are fully vaccinated but rates are much lower elsewhere including around 20% in south america, 10% in asia and just 1.5% in africa. just the san francisco airport alone has vaccinated around 1000 passengers arriving from over 50 countries since may and the demand is growing. the shortage of vaccines and the slow vaccination rate in many places around the world including taiwan and other parts of asia have driven a trend in vaccine tourism. the united states is making it easy by offering free vaccines to anyone in its territory without requiring residency. we have a surplus supply and being able to make that available for others is a good thing and it really helps everyone. it helps other countries to vaccinate their population faster, it helps to reduce the barriers of international travel that currently exist and ultimately everybody wins when we offer a programme like this.
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taiwanese people like this woman who prefer the two shot vaccines have simply walked into us pharmacies and filled out a consent form to get the jabs. she has spent $18,000 just on plane tickets and hotel lodging for one month, but she says it is worth it. i have a seven—year—old daughter and my parents are over 70 years old. i need to protect myself then i can protect my family. i feel so happy right now. i feel like a super woman. great britain have just missed out on two more medals at the olympics. helen glover and polly swann were fourth in the women�*s pair — the same place that emily craig and imogen grant finished in the lightweight women�*s double sculls, though they were pipped by the narrowest of margins. mark davies is the chair
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of british rowing. mark, first of all, let�*s talk about helen glover. an amazing comeback for her, but not to be, sadly? weill. for her, but not to be, sadly? well, not to be depends _ for her, but not to be, sadly? well, not to be depends on _ for her, but not to be, sadly? well, not to be depends on how- for her, but not to be, sadly? well, not to be depends on how you i for her, but not to be, sadly? .11 not to be depends on how you define success. not to be in medal terms, of course. but hers is the most astonishing story of these games. even though she did come forth with polly. to make an olympic final, having had three children since being an olympic champion, is an absolutely amazing thing to have achieved. her interview afterwards, she said, look, in life, there is nothing wrong with failing, providing you try and then fail. and everybody on twitter in the rowing world said, you call that a failure? that is not how we define failure. so the advice she was handing out and what she achieved over the course of this period has been something for people to take forward
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and, as i say, it is not how you define success in the olympic games, but in life she certainly succeeded. absolutely. let�*s talk about rowing generally for great britain. we have huge pedigree in rowing. a huge history over the last 20 or so years. but it has to be said these olympics so far have been a little bit of a disappointment, giving the history that we have. the men�*s coxless four didn�*t make the medal two. there was a bit of a war of words afterwards. what is your reaction to what happened there? we�*ve been very close in a number of areas. we have had a finishes. that is the last thing you want. we are here to get on the podium. we have got a young squad. and they were as well—prepared, i think, got a young squad. and they were as well—prepared, ithink, as got a young squad. and they were as well—prepared, i think, as they could have been. the men�*s four have attracted all the headlines because of the pedigree we have had in the competition over the years. we have
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won it for the last six olympiads. they had a tremendous season. it didn�*t work on the day. they missed out by a tiny margin. they had steering problems, as people will have seen. they came forth. the war of words are not terribly concerned about. i am concerned about how the athletes will react to the fourth place, how we can support them through that disappointment. it is undoubtedly disappointing. and, again. being top of the medal table as we have been for many years, obviously that has not worked out this time, but we will go through to paris and we will be back. we have got a very strong team, a very good coaching team. and we will take the lessons from this olympic games and implement them going forward. the british rowing chief coach, juergen rob lowe, stepped down. do you think it was a mistake in hindsight to let him go at that point?—
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him go at that point? well, as everybody _ him go at that point? well, as everybody in _ him go at that point? well, as everybody in rowing _ him go at that point? well, as everybody in rowing will- him go at that point? well, as everybody in rowing will no, i| him go at that point? well, as i everybody in rowing will no, i did everything i could to make sure he would be here for the tokyo games. i don�*t think mistake is the word. there is a time when you have to part company with anybody. the to these games was extremely difficult. it was difficult for all countries, of course. decisions had to be made. and unfortunately, the one with was that he would step down at that point. we have got a very coaching team. it is not about one person. it is a that he went. but five forth micro places show we are there or thereabouts. it hasn�*t quite worked. we haven�*t quite got onto the podium. it is not likely have had a disaster. if you score the team in the way that world rowing scores for world cup two, we would be in the top three. it is a shame. it is world cup two, we would be in the top three. it is a shame.— top three. it is a shame. it is a shame. top three. it is a shame. it is a shame- mike _ top three. it is a shame. it is a shame. mike davies, - top three. it is a shame. it is a shame. mike davies, thank- top three. it is a shame. it is a | shame. mike davies, thank you top three. it is a shame. it is a i shame. mike davies, thank you for joining us. hot
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shame. mike davies, thank you for 'oinin: us. ., ., ., shame. mike davies, thank you for joining us._ that - shame. mike davies, thank you for joining us._ that is i shame. mike davies, thank you for joining us._ that is it i joining us. not at all. that is it from me- _ joining us. not at all. that is it from me. more _ joining us. not at all. that is it from me. more news- joining us. not at all. that is it from me. more news in - joining us. not at all. that is it from me. more news in a i joining us. not at all. that is it from me. more news in a fewl joining us. not at all. that is it - from me. more news in a few minutes. stay with us on bbc news. bye—bye. hello. wednesday brought us another day of some sunny spells but some really heavy downpours and frequent thunderstorms, with lightning and hail. this was the picture in telford on wednesday afternoon. the outlook is for the unsettled theme to continue. thursday will bring another day of sunshine and showers. it will be cool and breezy. the showers will not be as frequent or heavy as recent days. that is down to this area of low pressure bringing the showery weather. it is drifting off towards the north and north—east. we have got another area of low pressure developing in the west. that will be more of a player on thursday night into friday. for much of northern ireland, scotland and northern england, quite a cloudy start with some showery rain. across england and much of wales, largely dry with sunshine. more brightness in the north
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in the afternoon. down towards the south—west expect some rain to arrive later in the day. the breeze picking up. it will be a blustery filling day at a not particularly warm for this time of year. 18 to 22 degrees for most. not too bad towards the south—east. a drier day than recently. into thursday night, the showers in the north are going to gradually ease away. but our attention turns to the south—west of england where this area of heavy rain will move its way in. look at those wind gusts. 110 to 50 mph, unseasonably strong, through the english channel, the bristol channel as well. blustery in the south first thing on friday morning and a pretty wet start to the day. further north is looking mostly dry to start your friday. quite a bit of dry weather for friday it was of scotland, northern ireland and northern england. just a few showers. further south, rain and brisk winds, which is cleared through the day.
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then a return to sunshine and scattered showers. temperatures are cooler than recent days. 17 to 20 degrees on friday. heading towards the weekend, low pressure not far away. it is moving towards the east. we have got a northerly air flow coming down. higher pressure out in the atlantic is trying to nudge its way in. between weather systems as we head through the course of the weekend. perhaps one or two showers around. wait a bit of dry weather through saturday and sunday. temperatures in the cool side for this time of the year. cool side for this time of year.
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goodbye.
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this is bbc news, the headlines. president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will be required to prove they are vaccinated against covid or face frequent testing. infection rates across the us have increased by over 300% in under a month. us champion pole vaulter sam kendricks tests positive at the tokyo olympics — and has been ruled out of the games. members of the australian athletics team are now isolating after close contact with him. the exiled belarusian opposition leader has met the us president at the white house. joe biden offered his support and said the us stands with the people. last year�*s election in belarus faced allegtions that it was rigged. british climate scientists have proved the past two decades were warmer, wetter and sunnier than the average for the entire 20th century. their research says the impact of climate change is already being felt, with increased rainfall, sunshine and temperatures. earlier this month, organisers
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of the tokyo olympics announced that �*nursing children�* can accompany athletes to the games when necessary. the news has come as a major relief for some mothers who felt they were being forced to choose between "being a �*breastfeeding mum�* or an olympic athlete�* — to quote one of them. bbc sport africa�*s michelle katami has been speaking to medal winning mothers from kenya, to learn more about the juggling act that is required just to get to the start line? they know plenty about winning. both are former world champions and it�*s not the only thing they have in common. they also know how difficult it is to be an elite athlete and a mother. ~ ., , , ., ., mother. when i was young, i thought, don't aet mother. when i was young, i thought, don't get pregnant _ mother. when i was young, i thought, don't get pregnant because _ mother. when i was young, i thought, don't get pregnant because your- don�*t get pregnant because your career will end. don�*t get pregnant because your careerwill end. it don't get pregnant because your career will end.— career will end. it was a bit difficult to _ career will end. it was a bit difficult to train _ career will end. it was a bit difficult to train and - career will end. it was a bit difficult to train and bring l career will end. it was a bit i difficult to train and bring her to the track —
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difficult to train and bring her to the track. , ., the track. the kenyan middle-distance i the track. the kenyan i middle-distance runners the track. the kenyan - middle-distance runners have the track. the kenyan _ middle-distance runners have been middle—distance runners have been friends for over a decade and have come to rely on each other for child support. in come to rely on each other for child su ort. , , . , , support. in the olympics my child was hit with _ support. in the olympics my child was hit with her _ support. in the olympics my child was hit with her and _ support. in the olympics my child was hit with her and it _ support. in the olympics my child was hit with her and it was - support. in the olympics my child was hit with her and it was easier| was hit with her and it was easier for me to communicate through my daughter to janet because my mind was on the games.— daughter to janet because my mind was on the games. even so, they have alwa s was on the games. even so, they have always been — was on the games. even so, they have always been totally _ was on the games. even so, they have always been totally honest _ was on the games. even so, they have always been totally honest with - was on the games. even so, they have always been totally honest with each l always been totally honest with each other. ,, ., , , with always been totally honest with each other._ with such i always been totally honest with each other._ with such a | other. she told me yes. with such a hue rice other. she told me yes. with such a huge price to _ other. she told me yes. with such a huge price to pay — other. she told me yes. with such a huge price to pay for _ other. she told me yes. with such a huge price to pay for becoming i huge price to pay for becoming a mother, it�*s not a surprise that only two female athletes have successfully defended an olympic title after giving birth in between games. she is aiming to emulate retaining the 1500 metres title in tokyo. it retaining the 1500 metres title in to 0. . , retaining the 1500 metres title in to 0. ., , ., ., retaining the 1500 metres title in to 0. ., ., ., ., ., tokyo. it means a lot to me going to to 0 as tokyo. it means a lot to me going to tokyo as a — tokyo. it means a lot to me going to tokyo as a mother. _ tokyo. it means a lot to me going to tokyo as a mother. i _ tokyo. it means a lot to me going to tokyo as a mother. i am _ tokyo. it means a lot to me going to tokyo as a mother. i am going i tokyo. it means a lot to me going to tokyo as a mother. i am going there j tokyo as a mother. i am going there with a strong mind, carrying the flag of kenya and also carrying the flag of kenya and also carrying the flag of kenya and also carrying the flag of my daughter. she
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flag of kenya and also carrying the flag of my daughter.— flag of kenya and also carrying the flag of my daughter. she is drawing ins - iration flag of my daughter. she is drawing inspiration from _ flag of my daughter. she is drawing inspiration from the _ flag of my daughter. she is drawing inspiration from the 2019 _ flag of my daughter. she is drawing inspiration from the 2019 world i inspiration from the 2019 world championships where she watched the mothers, shelly—ann fraser—pryce of jamaica and allyson felix getting their way to the goal.— jamaica and allyson felix getting their way to the goal. shelley and had her son _ their way to the goal. shelley and had her son with _ their way to the goal. shelley and had her son with the _ their way to the goal. shelley and had her son with the track, - their way to the goal. shelley and had her son with the track, and i l had her son with the track, and i left my daughter at home and i always think of my babies, so it is better when i leave them at home. despite having the support of her family, the 27—year—old thinks that the idea of an informal mums club with athletes assisting each other is a good one. it is with athletes assisting each other is a good one-— is a good one. it is good for the mothers and — is a good one. it is good for the mothers and it _ is a good one. it is good for the mothers and it shows _ is a good one. it is good for the | mothers and it shows everything is a good one. it is good for the i mothers and it shows everything is possible. 1 mothers and it shows everything is ossible. ~ , ,., possible. i think it is something so nice to have _ possible. i think it is something so nice to have a _ possible. i think it is something so nice to have a club _ possible. i think it is something so nice to have a club for— possible. i think it is something so nice to have a club for mothers i possible. i think it is something so nice to have a club for mothers at| nice to have a club for mothers at the olympics because we can share our experience. 3515 the olympics because we can share our experience.— the olympics because we can share our experience. as she prepares for her third olympic _ our experience. as she prepares for her third olympic games, _ our experience. as she prepares for her third olympic games, she i our experience. as she prepares for her third olympic games, she will. her third olympic games, she will again be relying on herfriends for support. again be relying on her friends for su ort. ~ , ., again be relying on her friends for su--ort. ~ ., ., ., support. when you are a young mother there are so — support. when you are a young mother there are so many _ support. when you are a young mother there are so many things _ support. when you are a young mother there are so many things that - support. when you are a young mother there are so many things that you i there are so many things that you don�*t know. there are so many things that you don't know-— don't know. our friendship has grown be ond don't know. our friendship has grown beyond athletics. _
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don't know. our friendship has grown beyond athletics. she _ don't know. our friendship has grown beyond athletics. she is _ don't know. our friendship has grown beyond athletics. she is not - don't know. our friendship has grown beyond athletics. she is not even i beyond athletics. she is not even like a realfriend, _ beyond athletics. she is not even like a real friend, she _ beyond athletics. she is not even like a real friend, she is - beyond athletics. she is not even like a real friend, she is like i beyond athletics. she is not even like a real friend, she is like a i like a realfriend, she is like a mum. the father of a schoolboy whose remains were found in sussex woodland has made an impassioned plea for information on 110 years on. vishal mehrotra was last seen alive in london on the 29th ofjuly 1981, the day of the royal wedding. earlier this year sussex police contacted the family asking for their support to mark the anniversary with a national appealfor information. the offer has since been withdrawn, a decision vishal�*s father has described as disgusting. our correspondent colin campbell has the story. all eyes were on the balcony at buckingham palace. the all eyes were on the balcony at buckingham palace.— buckingham palace. the royalwedding of prince charles _ buckingham palace. the royalwedding of prince charles and _ buckingham palace. the royalwedding of prince charles and lady _ buckingham palace. the royalwedding of prince charles and lady diana i of prince charles and lady diana spencer, a day of national celebration, the day that vishal mehrotra valley. {ll} celebration, the day that vishal mehrotra valley.— celebration, the day that vishal mehrotra valley. 40 years is a very lona time mehrotra valley. 40 years is a very long time and _ mehrotra valley. 40 years is a very long time and vishal— mehrotra valley. 40 years is a very long time and vishal mehrotra - mehrotra valley. 40 years is a very l long time and vishal mehrotra would have been nearly 49 years of age and
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i would have probably been a grandfather, if he wanted kids, i don't know. it grandfather, if he wanted kids, i don't know— grandfather, if he wanted kids, i don't know. it is diversity. vishal was last seen — don't know. it is diversity. vishal was last seen walking _ don't know. it is diversity. vishal was last seen walking home - don't know. it is diversity. vishal was last seen walking home in i was last seen walking home in putney, south—west london and his partial remains were found in sussex woodlands seven months later. the lower half of his body has never been located. 40 years on, vishal�*s father is pleading with sussex police to recover his son's missing remains from the woods. sussex police do not believe it is a proportionate line of enquiry as they see a surge would cost in excess of £400,000. —— a search. one retired met detective retired —— worked on the case in 1981 and blue's clues could remain in the woods. g blue's clues could remain in the woods. �* , . . blue's clues could remain in the woods. �* , ., . , ., blue's clues could remain in the woods. �* , ,., , ., woods. a search should be made here, because of the — woods. a search should be made here, because of the possible _ because of the possible investigative opportunities, and whilst there are investigative opportunities, the investigation is incomplete.
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opportunities, the investigation is incomplete-— opportunities, the investigation is incomplete. vishal's father claims institutional _ incomplete. vishal's father claims institutional racism _ incomplete. vishal's father claims institutional racism has _ incomplete. vishal's father claims institutional racism has hindered i institutional racism has hindered the case, an allegation sussex police firmly reviewed. the force ditched plans for an anniversary appeal this month, citing a lack of viable lines of enquiry, leaving his father to make his own appeal. anyone who may have any evidence or information or any suspicion as to what happened 40 years ago in putney, near east putney station, what is it that they could recall that might help us? it is what is it that they could recall that might help us?— that might help us? it is help that could solve _ that might help us? it is help that could solve a _ that might help us? it is help that could solve a child _ that might help us? it is help that could solve a child murder, - could solve a child murder, providing overduejustice could solve a child murder, providing overdue justice for vishal and his family. mark ronson is the multi—award winning music producer behind some of pop's biggest hits. now he's taking centre stage with a new documentary series: 'watch the sound' on apple tv plus. he talked to my colleague, reeta chakrabarti, about his time working as an intern at rolling stone magazine — at the age of 12.
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my voice hadn't even broken yet, i had this high—pitched squeak and they let me answer the switchboard phones, in those days it was like the old—school buttons and i'd be like, "hi, rolling stone!" it's amazing what they let me do. but ijust wanted to be around music and i think because i wasn't some piano, guitar prodigy or something i thought, maybe i'll write about it, maybe i'll make it, i'm not sure. i just want to be around it all the time. so in this new series that you've made for apple tv+ you are charting the history of music production, tell us a little bit about what you look at? yeah, well, we all know what a great song is, but behind that in a great recording and our favourite classic recordings, whether it's eleanor rigby or skepta, it's the sounds and we don't even realise how much goes into that, so going to talk to people like paul mccartney or tame impala or the beastie boys about the revolutionary technologies that they use, even at the beginning the beatles were revolutionising technologies, so was t—pain, so was charli xcx, and they take these sounds that
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are very outside in the beginning and bringing them to the mainstream with their talents so i wanted to get behind that and talk to these people and i have always been so fascinated with sound. the first time i'm met amy winehouse the first thing she said is, "i want my album to sound like this" and she played me some 60s girl group pop, so sound has always been front and centre when i've been thinking about music. and you had so many big names when you were making this series including paul mccartney — was that intimidating talking to him, or not? you know, in this show i'm sort of more the interviewer so i'm just more thinking ok, i don't want to ask paul mccartney some question that his answered like 700 times, what can we talk about that i know he will get excited about too and maybe shed new light on something that he's
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still never talked about, so that's where my head was at. you know, in this show i'm sort of more the interviewer so i'm just more thinking ok, i don't want to ask paul mccartney i have so much respect forjournalism, music journalism, all of it. i thought, i'm not going tojust go in there and be some kind of unprepared idiot because that would be a wasted opportunity to sit with some of these brilliant people, so ijust over prepared like hell, just like i always do. farmers hit by a freak hail storm last week in essex are calling for emergency financial help from the government. 12 farms in the thaxted area were struck by hail stones the size of golf balls. it's estimated up to 90% of some crops have been lost. this from our environment reporter richard daniel. massive hailstones hammering down in the accident last week. i've never seen damage like this before. neither have i. first time. absolutely devastating. it neither have i. first time. absolutely devastating. it looks as if someone — absolutely devastating. it looks as if someone has _ absolutely devastating. it looks as if someone has come _ absolutely devastating. it looks as if someone has come through - absolutely devastating. it looks as| if someone has come through here with a flail mower. eight days on, robert cannot take it in. the scale
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of the damage on his 200 acre farm is immense. we of the damage on his 200 acre farm is immense-— of the damage on his 200 acre farm is immense. we hope it is a one-off. we are having _ is immense. we hope it is a one-off. we are having trouble _ is immense. we hope it is a one-off. we are having trouble getting - is immense. we hope it is a one-off. we are having trouble getting our. we are having trouble getting our head around it. we don't know what to do now. we've never seen this devastation. this is our year's work. to us, it's more than money, we look after them, we tend them all year. it's quite hurtful, yeah. this is what the _ year. it's quite hurtful, yeah. this is what the crop _ year. it's quite hurtful, yeah. this is what the crop should look like and is due for harvesting about three weeks but take look at this. battered, bruised, a pod split open. they reckon they have lost around 50% of the crop in this field. nearby, an estimated 90% loss in a field of oilseed rape, smashed from pods, the seed has now germinated creating a green carpet on the ground. and in a field of oats once destined for the breakfast table, similar story. destined for the breakfast table, similar story-—
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similar story. i've been walking cro -s as similar story. i've been walking crops as an _ similar story. i've been walking crops as an independent - similar story. i've been walking i crops as an independent grammar similar story. i've been walking - crops as an independent grammar list for 35 years in essex and i've never seen devastation like we saw this winter field seen devastation like we saw this winterfield here. we think seen devastation like we saw this winter field here. we think we seen devastation like we saw this winterfield here. we think we have lost around 90% of the oat crop that robert will harvest in two or three weeks' time. it is on the ground and weeks' time. it is on the ground and we do not have machines to hoover it up. 12 we do not have machines to hoover it u . _ ' ., , ., we do not have machines to hoover it u n ' ., , ., , . up. 12 farms in a ten mile stretch of land barely — up. 12 farms in a ten mile stretch of land barely half— up. 12 farms in a ten mile stretch of land barely half a _ up. 12 farms in a ten mile stretch of land barely half a mile - up. 12 farms in a ten mile stretch of land barely half a mile wide i up. 12 farms in a ten mile stretch i of land barely half a mile wide were hit by the storm just weeks before the harvest. the losses are estimated to run to hundreds of thousands of pounds. deaf have a disaster fund _ thousands of pounds. deaf have a disaster fund so _ thousands of pounds. deaf have a disaster fund so farms _ thousands of pounds. deaf have a disaster fund so farms that - thousands of pounds. deaf have a l disaster fund so farms that suffered severe flooding back in the winter have, i understand been supported by the fund and i think this is equally devastating. the the fund and i think this is equally devastating-— devastating. the hailstorm is the latest in a series _ devastating. the hailstorm is the latest in a series of— devastating. the hailstorm is the latest in a series of extreme - latest in a series of extreme weather events and for robert, in just a few minutes, it wiped out a year's work and through his business into a loss. stay with us on bbc news, coming up next world business report.
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a draft law in the scottish parliament has been amended to exempt the queen's land from measures to encourage green energy after her lawyers raised "concerns". the changes mean land owned by the royal household — such as the balmoral estate — could not be subject to compulsory purchase orders without the monarch's approval. the correspondence between buckingham palace and the scottish government was first reported in the guardian. the british home secretary has visited birmingham, to meet families of the victims of the 1974 ira pub bombings. priti patel held a virtual meeting with them in march, but had promised to pay a visit in person. in talks described as "passionate but dignified", the families urged her to call an inquiry into the bombings, which killed 21 people and injured hundreds more. giles latcham reports.
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this was a moment many months in the making. a face to face meeting with the home secretary, hosted by the west midlands mayor and a chance for the relatives of the victims to press their case for a wide ranging public enquiry. the government recently announced plans to end all prosecutions for offences relating to the troubles in northern ireland. plans that the families have described as obscene and apparent. they were raised at this meeting but they did not form part of the main discussion. 21 people were killed by the bombs planted by the ira into city centre pubs, among them the sister ofjulie hambleton, who emerged from the meeting convinced that as a result we are now a step closer to an enquiry. we are closer than we have been, put it like that. we've had to wait nearly 47 years
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to get this far and she says that she works and acts on integrity and we will keep to that word. i hope there will be a public enquiry. the home secretary said very clearly that there are all sorts of standards to be met to get to that position, but _ there would be a very clear process by which the evidence was examined so she could make an appropriate judgment. the meeting lasted just over an hour. the home secretary agreed that the government lawyers would liaise with lawyers for the families to explore what a public enquiry might entail. making progress. america's central bank says vaccinations have helped get the economy back on track. but it's not time to start removing support
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soaring screen time. facebook revenuejumps as we spend more of our life — and money — online. but could the boom soon be over? welcome to world business report. i'm victoria fritz. we start in the us — where the central bank says the economy is making progress towards recovery — thanks to widespread vaccinations. as expected, the federal reserve has kept interest rates on hold — near zero — after its two—day meeting. fed chairjerome powell says now�*s not the time to start thinking about raising borrowing costs, despite rising inflation. from new york, here's michelle fleury from this to this. new york is back. home sales are up, the reopening of offices and restaurants has the city sizzling again and americans, feeling
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flush, want to be here. with the vaccine out and everything it makes you more inclined to be outside. having some freedom back clearly helps stretch our legs, all of us, to see things we haven't seen in a while _ paid to go to the museum because it's open, go - to the restaurants you couldn't go to before _ yeah, spending money on that type of stuff. . we bought some art, some clothing, things like that. home improvement. big home improvement bills. with its newly remodelled 92,000 square—foot store, bed bath & beyond is more than ready to greet those able to splurge. the customer has changed, the world is changing, retail is changing. mark, who became the president and ceo of bed bath & beyond before the pandemic says people have switched from buying things they need to do things they want. in the early piece of the pandemic, cleaning, health, safety were number one. it then moved into "i've been looking at these walls for a long time
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and i don't think they look great and i want new towels, i'm experimenting with cooking. all of this helped power the american economic rebound and consumer shopping counts for two thirds of all economic activity but with stimulus money coming to an end and higher prices offsetting the wage gains, is the us in for a period of slower growth? and inside the american central bank, they are not looking just at that, but also the danger that the now rampant delta variant of covid might turn boom in to bust. with successive waves of covid over the past year and over some months, there has tended to be less in the way of economic implications from each wave and it's possible people might pull back from some activities because of the risk of infection, going out, travelling, and schools might not reopen. on financial markets, the dowjones tanked recently
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with investors worried that new covid variants could disrupt commerce but while financial markets fret about the future at bed bath and beyond, the ceo is more sanguine. i think the customers have learnt to be agile and so have we so people still have needs and wants and they may change slightly but i think we will be there for them and ready to service them in whatever way we see. there could be a further big boost to the us economy after the senate voted to move forward on a trillion dollar infrastructure plan being pushed by president biden. if it passes congress it would see huge federal investment in roads, bridges, transport and green energy. anna macdonald is a fund manager at amati global investors in edinburgh. she is here and let's see what she says. she is here and let's see what she sa s. y she is here and let's see what she sa 5, , . ., �* she is here and let's see what she sa s. y �* ., ., says. sorry, i couldn't hear what ou says. sorry, i couldn't hear what
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you said- — says. sorry, i couldn't hear what you said- oh. — says. sorry, i couldn't hear what you said. oh, she _ says. sorry, i couldn't hear what you said. oh, she is _ says. sorry, i couldn't hear what you said. oh, she is here, - says. sorry, i couldn't hear what you said. oh, she is here, i- you said. oh, she is here, i couldn't— you said. oh, she is here, i couldn't quite _ you said. oh, she is here, i couldn't quite work- you said. oh, she is here, i couldn't quite work out - you said. oh, she is here, i- couldn't quite work out whether we were going to be able to speak to you live. i'm pleased we can. nice to speak to again. what do you think about this? the president is picking it up, saying by american, this will be a huge boost to the economy and transform the economy, so he right? there are two big packages they are hoping to pass through the senate and congress and the first one is the massive infrastructure package which i think is what you must have been talking about beforehand and yes, this is going to be, should be pretty transformative for the roads, bridges, waterways and all the climate change projects putting forward and there is a second massive slice of $3.5 trillion that the democrats hope to get past which will really boost to education,
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social welfare and even more climate change action projects. the thing is that they want to boost what they are able to make in america and the pandemic really illustrated that there are some supply chain issues and they don't want to be vulnerable to those shortages again, whether thatis to those shortages again, whether that is semiconductors or building materials and things like that. what materials and things like that. what is interesting _ materials and things like that. what is interesting as _ materials and things like that. what is interesting as i _ materials and things like that. what is interesting as i was _ materials and things like that. what is interesting as i was listening to a clip of president biden speaking earlier and he was talking to truckers in pennsylvania and saying, buy american, buy american and a lot of the rhetoric coming from joe biden sound similar to donald trump. america first, america first. however, the social agenda is really the distinction here and it is that second aspect of this that will transform america and change it in quite a different direction, if it
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goes ahead. quite a different direction, if it goes ahead-— quite a different direction, if it aoes ahead. , , , ., , ., goes ahead. yes, it seems to be a lot more supportive _ goes ahead. yes, it seems to be a lot more supportive perhaps - goes ahead. yes, it seems to be a lot more supportive perhaps than | goes ahead. yes, it seems to be a i lot more supportive perhaps than we have been used to from republican run white houses. in terms of supporting childcare in terms of doing things to try and make the social aspect of people's lives a lot better. of course, this is really expensive to do and the republicans fear ever increasing debt levels and they fear tax rises but the democrats are keen to push this agenda through, and they are in control of the house of representatives and the should be something that can happen. thanks very much. — something that can happen. thanks very much. and _ something that can happen. thanks very much, and good _ something that can happen. thanks very much, and good to _ something that can happen. thanks very much, and good to see - something that can happen. thanks very much, and good to see you - very much, and good to see you again. let's stay in the us because facebook has become the latest of the big tech giants to report a surge in earnings — as we spend more time and money online. it says revenue jumped
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56% in the three months to the end ofjune— to just over £29 billion and most of that from advertising. 2.9 billion people now use one of facebook�*s services at least once a month. but the company has also warned revenue growth will 'decelerate significantly�* in the coming months — sending shares down sharply. so what's the problem? i asked doug astrop who is managing partner at exponential investment partners in atlanta, georgia. well, we don't think there is a problem, actually. we think the numbers they reported were pretty amazing and as you pointed out, 56% revenue growth and this is a company valued at over $1 trillion, that is incredible growth on the top line and i think facebook was just being a bit cautious on setting expectations for the next two quarters because the accounts
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are going to get more difficult year over year, so i think they were being a bit conservative but they're still looking at 20 or 30% growth which is fantastic. apple's new privacy policies do ban apps and advertisers from collecting data about iphone users without their consent, so what impact will those changes have on facebook revenues? probably not overly significant. they did warn that could be a little bit of a headwind but they seem to think it was not going to be any kind of a game changer. so prospects still look very good. they have two thirds of the world's internet users using facebook and billions of people checking in daily, so it's an incredible audience that they captured the users love the service.
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it's hard to find anyone in the ecosystem who is not really happy with facebook. there are lots of users who would consider it and some of its other services like a necessary evil, something they need to do in order to stay in touch and in some ways stay relevant in their own social circles and with their own work circles. and i wonder if data becomes harder and ad targeting becomes more difficult because of that and what other avenues are open to facebook to make money? they have that great ecosystem with all of those users, so they can broaden out into other services and they are getting them to payments and also some media activity with music and video.
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facebook shares not doing so well because of the concerns from the company itself. let's check at the asian markets, which were broadly higher today and we had some reassurance from the chinese authorities and also, of course, that ft is not going to happen anytime soon. you soon. —— see you soon. wednesday brought us another day of sunny spells but some really heavy downpours and frequent thunderstorms with lightning and hail and this was the picture in telford during wednesday afternoon. the outlook is for the unsettled theme to continue, so i think thursday will bring another day of sunshine and showers, cool and breezy but the showers won't be as heavy or as frequent as they have been in recent days and thatis they have been in recent days and that is down to the fact that the low pressure bringing the showers is drifting off towards the north and
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north—east. we have another area of low pressure developing in the south—west which will be more of a player through thursday to friday. for much of northern ireland, scotland and northern england, cloudy start with showery rain across the south of england and much of wales, largely dry wood sunshine and a bit more brightness developing in the north in the afternoon but down towards the south—west expect rain to arrive later in the day and the breezes picking up and it will be a day and not particularly warm but this time of year with temperatures between 18 or 22 degrees for most of us. not too bad in the south—east, a drier day than we've seen recently. into thursday night, the showers in the north are going to gradually ease away but our attention turns to the south—west of england where the area of heavy rain will move in and look at those wind gust, 40 or 50 will move in and look at those wind gust, 40 or50 mph, will move in and look at those wind gust, 40 or 50 mph, unseasonably strong through the english channel and bristol channel and very blustery in the south first thing on friday morning and a wet start to
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the day as well but in the north it's looking mostly dry to start friday and quite a bit of dry weather for friday across parts of scotland, northern ireland and northern england with a few showers and further south across england and wales, initial heavy rain and brisk winds which clear towards the east through the day and a return to sunshine and scattered showers around as well. temperature is cooler than recent days between 17 or 20 degrees on friday and heading towards the weekend, low pressure still not far away but starting to move towards the east and we have a northerly air coming down and higher pressure out in the atlantic is trying to nudge its way in, so between weather systems as we head through the weekend with maybe one or two showers around but quite a bit of dry weather through saturday and sunday. some sunny spells and temperatures on the cooler side for this time of year. goodbye.
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this is bbc news broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the globe. i'm maryam moshiri. our top stories. us champion pole vaulter sam kendricks tests positive at the tokyo olympics — he's been ruled out of the games. in the pool, us swimming star caleb dressel has blazed his way to victory in the men's 100 metre freestyle. president biden is to announce that all federal workers in the us must be vaccinated or submit to regular testing. it comes as us covid cases continue to rise. the impact of climate change is already being felt across britain, say scientists, as they show the past 20 years have been warmer,
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wetter and sunnier than average. unlawfully killed — 31 years after the hillsborough football stadium disaster, a supporter who suffered life—changing injuries becomes the 97th victim. hello and welcome. let's go to the olympics. it is day six of the games. there has been an upsetin six of the games. there has been an upset in the athletics, with the reigning world pole vault champion at sam kendricks ruled out of the games after testing positive for a covid. meanwhile, the australian track and field team breezily have to self isolated after coming into contact with him. they have resumed
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normal activities now. more medals have been won in the pool and on the water. let'sjoin mike bushell have been won in the pool and on the water. let's join mike bushell in the bbc sport centre. let's talk about the athletics issue. it is a big blow for the pole vaulting in particular, isn't it? what are the knock—on effects? particular, isn't it? what are the knock-on effects?— particular, isn't it? what are the knock-on effects? yes, absolutely. it is a really — knock-on effects? yes, absolutely. it is a really big _ knock-on effects? yes, absolutely. it is a really big blow. _ knock-on effects? yes, absolutely. it is a really big blow. the - knock-on effects? yes, absolutely. it is a really big blow. the timing i it is a really big blow. the timing couldn't be worse with the track and field athletics starting on friday. it is probably the sort of news at some point we were expecting to be reporting on. it isjust the some point we were expecting to be reporting on. it is just the timing thatis reporting on. it is just the timing that is rather unfortunate. sam kendricks, the big star of world pole vaulting, the reigning champion, now withdrawn from the games having tested positive for covid—19. he had been expected to contend for it medals here in tokyo. his father, scott, also his coach, has said on social media today that his son is not experiencing any symptoms, so that is a relief. we have also heard an argentinian pole
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vaulter has returned a positive test. he has tweeted that the games are over for him test. he has tweeted that the games are overfor him as test. he has tweeted that the games are over for him as well. with no symptoms for him either. that is a real problem for the pole vault competition. the better news, as you have been saying, earlier on we heard all 68 members of the australian track and field team had to self—isolate because they have beenin to self—isolate because they have been in contact, there pole vaulter had at least, with sam kendricks. the whole team went into isolation in line with protocols. but in the last few minutes the better news is that they are now out of isolation, the whole team, able to train again because it has been confirmed they tested negative thanks to those tests done straightaway. that is the better news. obviously it is a problem for the pole vault competition going forward. absolutely. some positive news. historic day for ireland?- absolutely. some positive news. historic day for ireland? well, this reall is historic day for ireland? well, this really is fantastic. _ historic day for ireland? well, this
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really is fantastic. it _ historic day for ireland? well, this really is fantastic. it follows - historic day for ireland? well, this really is fantastic. it follows on - really is fantastic. it follows on from the building blocks set in place in rio mag, when they won their first—ever place in rio mag, when they won theirfirst—ever rowing place in rio mag, when they won their first—ever rowing medal. place in rio mag, when they won theirfirst—ever rowing medal. now they have gone in —— and struck gold for the first time. what an olympics this is turning out to be for ireland. theirfirst—ever this is turning out to be for ireland. their first—ever rowing gold. fintan mccarthy and paul o'donovan celebrating being olympic champions in the men's schools doubles. it follows the nation's first—ever medal in the women's rowing as well. the team won bronze earlier today in the women's this force. shows what the knock—on effects from a medal can be. they won their first rowing medal at rio mac, which led to growth in the sport at home in ireland, more funding and now you can see the effects this can have. success breeds success. now they have got a first gold. you can only imagine the celebrations back home in ireland.
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fantastic for ireland. let's talk now about some record breaking news from the pool?— from the pool? yes, as you mentioned, _ from the pool? yes, as you mentioned, a _ from the pool? yes, as you mentioned, a star - from the pool? yes, as you mentioned, a star of - from the pool? yes, as you mentioned, a star of the i from the pool? yes, as you - mentioned, a star of the games so far, a second gold medalfor the american caleb dresser —— caleb dressel, as he looks to become the most successful swimmer and an individual olympic games. he won the 100 metres freestyle gold, winning in a time of 47.02. earlier, we also saw a world record. we have not seen too many of those. we saw china take the gold in a thrilling swim in the women's four by 200 metres freestyle, that world record time of seven minutes, 40.33 seconds. they had to hold off a late surge from the usa team as well. a record—breaking day in the pool. absolutely fantastic. mike, thank you. president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will soon be required to confirm they are vaccinated, orface more testing.
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the numbers of coronavirus cases are rising, with the director of the us national public health agency, the cdc, saying cases have increased over 300% nationally since mid—june. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. there's a growing sense of urgency. about half the population is fully vaccinated, but infection rates are rising, the delta variant is spreading rapidly, and the number ofjabs in arms is still much lower thanjoe biden wants to see. the president is about to announce that all government workers and contractors be vaccinated against covid—19 or be required to submit to regular testing. we still have a lot of people not vaccinated. the pandemic we have now is a pandemic of the unvaccinated, so please — please, please, please — get vaccinated. protect yourself and your children out there. it is important. all americans are being advised
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to wear face masks again — indoors, in public spaces — in parts of the country with substantial or high transmission rates. that applies to 67% of counties — up in just 24 hours from 63%. some of the big tech companies like facebook and google have said their staff must be vaccinated before stepping back into the office. netflix has reportedly made jabs compulsory for all cast and crew members on us productions. the enforcement of vaccination policies is now a huge challenge facing much of corporate america. private companies have to make the decision whether they are going to mandate vaccination, or if they are not going to mandate it, they will allow people to come into work not vaccinated but insist on verification, but the private companies are the ones that will have to do the verification because the government hasn't stepped in to do that. so i think there is a role for government here that has not been filled adequately.
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with millions of americans onlyjust getting used to life again as it used to be, there's a growing unease that the pandemic is far from over. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. president biden says he was honoured to meet the exiled belarusian opposition leader, svetla na tikhanovskaya, at the white house. she said the visit would prove inspirational to her opposition movement, which is trying to oust president lukashenko from power, after what they claim was a rigged election last year. mark lobel has more — and his report contains flashing images. this was the state's response to protesters disputing what they called a rigged election back in august. few here believe the country's long—time president alexander lukashenko when he claimed he had won re—election with 80% of the vote, and neither did governments in the eu, uk, canada and the us. and this is the woman who says
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she won that election, svetla na ti kha novs kaya. she met president biden at the white house on wednesday. this is a very significant meeting, a message to the whole world that the greatest country in the world is with us and this meeting is like success of all of the belarusians that are fighting at the moment. they include thousands of civilians taking to the streets for months, at risk of their own security. but the opposition is not being tolerated by the man dubbed europe's last dictator. keen to rally the beleaguered opposition, president biden tweeted he was honoured to meet the exiled opposition leader, adding that the united states stands with the people of belarus in their quest for democracy and universal human rights. it's like inspiration for our people
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to move forward, not to give up, although people are not giving up, for sure, but it's one more signal that we have strong allies beside us. but despite sanctions on his regime and internationalflight bans, president lukashenko has dug in with russian support. we talked about multiple points of pressure on the regime, for the regime to stop violence, release political prisoners and start dialogue with belarus, and you know, i'm sure that belarus can be an example of non—violent transition of power. she told the president the us could be an invaluable future partner to an independent belarus, but for that to become a reality, the situation on the ground would have to look vastly different to this, with no immediate sign it will. mark lobel, bbc news.
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let's get some of the day's other news. the ever given container ship, which blocked the suez canal for nearly a week in march, will finally arrive in the dutch port of rotterdam today. the ship, which grounded at the end of march, sealing shut one of the world's busiest waterways and causing a backlog in global trade, spent more than three months impounded by the suez canal authority during a dispute over compensation with its owners. a woman has been jailed for five and a half years for stealing diamonds worth more than £4 million, or 5.5 million us dollars, from a jeweller in london. the court heard that lulu lakatos, who is 60 and was born in romania, swapped the gems for pebbles. prosecutors said it was the highest value theft of its kind in the uk. dusty hill, the bass playerfor zz top has died at the age of 72. that's according to a statement from his bandmates. they say he passed away in his sleep at his home in houston texas. hill was one of the long—bearded musicians behind such hits
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as sharp dressed man. the band toured for nearly half a century, and was inducted to the rock and roll hall of fame in 2004. a football supporter who suffered life—changing injuries at hillsborough, has died at the age of 55. an inquest into andrew devine's death — held on wednesday — concluded he'd been unlawfully killed, making him the 97th victim of the disaster. james reynolds reports. andrew devine was 22 when he was seriously injured at hillsborough. at first he was given no more than six months to live. but with 24—hour care, he survived for another 32 years. his family say he was the centre of their lives. our devastation over his death, they say, is overwhelming.
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96 more liverpool fans died of their injuries at hillsborough. two years after the disaster, an inquest ruled their deaths were accidental. the families refused to accept this verdict. after years of campaigning, they succeeded in obtaining a new inquest. in 2016, this hearing recorded that the fans were unlawfully killed. in a later trial though, the police commander at the game was cleared of gross negligence manslaughter. the liverpool coroner's court has now ruled that andrew devine was, like the 96 others, unlawfully killed. and so more than three decades on, the total number of dead from hillsborough rises to 97. james reynolds, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: the australian state of new south wales has recorded 239 new coronavirus infections —
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the highest daily rise since the start of the pandemic. we'll get more from sydney. an infrastructure bill worth about one trillion dollars has cleared a major hurdle in the us senate, after passing a procedural vote. a formal debate can now begin on the programme, one of president biden's main priorities. earlier, republican and democratic leaders announced they'd agreed on key issues after months of negotiations. we just left the floor of the united states senate, where we had a strong and bipartisan showing to move forward on this historic legislation which will be the greatest investment in infrastructure in all of our lifetimes. each of us are deeply committed to demonstrating to the country and to the world that our government can work, and it can work for the people
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of the united states of america. so we've come together and worked in -ood so we've come together and worked in good faith_ so we've come together and worked in good faith with our democrat colleagues and worked out the elements of this. we have got something on a bipartisan basis. it is the _ something on a bipartisan basis. it is the way— something on a bipartisan basis. it is the way washington should work. it is the _ is the way washington should work. it is the way america expects us to work _ this is bbc news. the latest headlines. american pole vaulter sam kendricks has tested positive for a coronavirus. memories of australia's athletics team, who had trained with him, avoid isolating after testing negative. british climate scientists have proved the past two decades were warmer, wetter and sunnier than the average for the entire 20th century. that is what we are talking about now. a report by the uk met office says the impact of climate change is already being felt across britain, with increased rainfall, sunshine and temperatures.
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last year was the third warmest, the fifth wettest and the eighth sunniest on record. it's the only year to score in the top ten, for all three categories. our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. dramatic changes in our skies. in 2020, the uk experienced a year of extremes. from storms in february, which caused chaos across the country, to a summer heatwave, when temperatures sweltered above 34 degrees for six consecutive days. and rain in october with the uk's wettest day on record. it is all charted in an annual assessment of the climate. the uk is getting wetter, warmer and sunnier. we can see very clearly from our observation that the uk climate is already changing. so climate change isn't something that is just going to happen in 2050, or we need to worry about towards
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the end of the century. we are seeing this very clearly in our observations now. the report compared the most recent three decades with the 30 years before, and found an average of the uk were 0.9 degrees hotter. for rainfall, the country was an average of 6% wetter. and 2020 was the eighth sunniest year recorded in the last 100 years. new defences are under construction, like this tidal barrier in lincolnshire, to cope with future storm surges. but the reality is flooding is having a devastating impact now, with some homes being flooded again and again. changes that seem small are having a very big effect on people's lives. what's interesting about this report is there is lots of data. so there are lots of temperature records and percentage changes. but what we are seeing are the impacts, the impacts to us as humans, to our businesses, to ecology across the uk. it really is being played out in front of our eyes.
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come rain or shine, the world will be heading to glasgow later this year for the united nations climate summit. we will find out if governments can rise to the challenge of cutting emissions to stop the worst effects of climate change. right now, the elements show no signs of letting up, with this week's flash floods taking london by surprise. scientists will continue to track and analyse these events, but they warn that extremes are becoming the new norm. rebecca morelle, bbc news. turkish authorities have launched an investigation into a massive forest fire that spread to a town in southern turkey. it comes as a bee keeper in greece has been charged with negligence over a similar fire there on tuesday, as extreme weather conditions continue to sweep across europe, as richard forrest reports. another day of devastating weather events in europe. hundreds evacuated here near turkey's mediterranean
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coast as a forest fire spread to towns following days of flooding and landslides in the north—east. the cause of this is under investigation as the fire was started at four separate points. translation: ~ ., ., translation: we heard that we will ut out this translation: we heard that we will put out this far _ translation: we heard that we will put out this far without _ translation: we heard that we will put out this far without any _ put out this far without any casualties. we hope to put out the fire. all aspects of the incident will be investigated. in greece, stronu will be investigated. in greece, strong winds — will be investigated. in greece, strong winds are _ will be investigated. in greece, strong winds are hampering - will be investigated. in greece, - strong winds are hampering efforts to extinguish another fire burning out of control, a day after a forest fire damaged homes in the northern suburb of athens. a64—year—old beekeeper has been charged with negligence. in northern lebanon, wildfires burning across the mountainous region where the army has been dispatched and help has been requested from cyprus. with more extreme weather expected across parts of europe later this week. richard forrest, bbc news.
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a draft law in the scottish parliament has been amended to exempt the queen's land from measures to encourage green energy after her lawyers raised concerns. the changes mean land owned by the royal household — such as the balmoral estate — could not be subject to compulsory purchase orders without the monarch's approval. the correspondence between buckingham palace and the scottish government was first reported in the guardian. monarchies give insight of legislation which affects her interest. the australian state of new south wales has recorded 239 new coronavirus infections — the highest daily rise since the start of the pandemic. people living in eight hotspots in the biggest city, sydney, are being ordered to wear masks outdoors and must stay within five kilometres of their homes. our correspondent shymaa khalil in sydney explains if the lockdown will work given the lag
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in the roll—out of vaccination programme and how infection is fast increasing in new south wales. there was an announcement of an extension yesterday. experts are saying this may go well beyond the end of august. because new south wales has recorded 239 new locally acquired cases, the highest number notjust since acquired cases, the highest number not just since the acquired cases, the highest number notjust since the beginning of this outbreak but since the beginning of the pandemic for the state, which shows you how challenging and difficult the situation here is a new south wales, especially in greater sydney with the delta variant and how transmissible it is. more than 65 of those cases have beenin more than 65 of those cases have been in the community in the entire time of the illness. that is why the new south wales government has announced new restrictions to aid areas in sydney that are considered the hotspots. people in those areas will have to wear masks, even when
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they go outdoors, only for essential reasons, and they cannot travel further than five kilometres from their homes. we also heard from the police commissioner, police will be given powers from tomorrow, from friday, to close down businesses who breach these stay—at—home orders. who breach the lockdown orders. but also he said, expect to see much more police presence on the street, especially in those areas. we also heard from the state premier, who does give a daily update on the covid cases, she refused, she rejected the criticism that her government failed in containing the virus, failed to go early enough and hard enough and that the lockdown did come gradually, which many a tribute to the rise in the case numbers, but she did acknowledge that because of the number of people in the community who are infectious, cases will get worse, the numbers will get worse before they get better. and yes, experts are saying
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that even though the lockdown has been extended until the end of august, the 28th of august, given how things are right now and the trajectory of these cases, it will go beyond that, maybe. 5h? go beyond that, maybe. shy mccallion- — the availability of covid—19 vaccines varies widely from country to country. in recent months, the shortage in many parts of the world has sparked the a rise in vaccine tourism, with many people heading to the united states to getjabbed. our taipei correspondent, cindy sui, returned to her home country, the us, to find out more. these tourists from many countries have come to the united states to get vaccinated against covid—19. notjust for brazil or for the us it is for the world. everyone wants the world to to normal. besides latin america, many travellers have come from asia including this 84—year—old grandmother who just got off a flight from vietnam. her granddaughter tells me that even at her age she cannot get
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vaccinated in her country. i tell you, in my country there are not enough vaccines. not enough for everybody. around 50% of us residents are fully vaccinated but rates are much lower elsewhere including around 20% in south america, 10% in asia and just 1.5% in africa. just the san francisco airport alone has vaccinated around 1000 passengers arriving from over 50 countries since may and the demand is growing. the shortage of vaccines and the slow vaccination rate in many places around the world including taiwan and other parts of asia have driven a trend in vaccine tourism. the united states is making it easy by offering free vaccines to anyone in its territory without requiring residency. we have a surplus supply and being able to make that available for others is a good thing and it really helps everyone. it helps other countries to vaccinate their population faster, it helps to reduce the barriers of international travel that currently exist and ultimately
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everybody wins when we offer a programme like this. taiwanese people like this woman who prefer the two shot vaccines have simply walked into us pharmacies and filled out a consent form to get the jabs. she has spent $18,000 just on plane tickets and hotel lodging for one month, but she says it is worth it. i have a seven—year—old daughter and my parents are over 70 years old. i need to protect myself then i can protect my family. i feel so happy right now. i feel like a super woman. you can get more on our website. you can also reach me and a lot of our team on twitter. i will be back in a few minutes with more news. bye—bye.
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hello. wednesday brought us another day of some sunny spells but some really heavy downpours and frequent thunderstorms, with lightning and hail. this was the picture in telford on wednesday afternoon. the outlook is for the unsettled theme to continue. thursday will bring another day of sunshine and showers. it will be cool and breezy. the showers will not be as frequent or heavy as recent days. that is down to this area of low pressure bringing the showery weather. it is drifting off towards the north and north—east. we have got another area of low pressure developing in the south—west. that will be more of a player on thursday night into friday. for much of northern ireland, scotland and northern england, quite a cloudy start with some showery rain. across england and much of wales, largely dry with sunshine. more brightness in the north
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in the afternoon. down towards the south—west expect some rain to arrive later in the day. the breeze picking up. it will be a blustery feeling day at a not particularly warm for this time of year. 18 to 22 degrees for most. not too bad towards the south—east. a drier day than recently. into thursday night, the showers in the north are going to gradually ease away. but our attention turns to the south—west of england where this area of heavy rain will move its way in. look at those wind gusts. 40 to 50 mph, unseasonably strong, through the english channel, the bristol channel as well. blustery in the south first thing on friday morning and a pretty wet start to the day. further north is looking mostly dry to start your friday. quite a bit of dry weather for friday it was of scotland, northern ireland and northern england. just a few showers. further south, rain and brisk winds, which is cleared through the day. then a return to sunshine
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and scattered showers. temperatures are cooler than recent days. 17 to 20 degrees on friday. heading towards the weekend, low pressure not far away. it is moving towards the east. we have got a northerly air flow coming down. higher pressure out in the atlantic is trying to nudge its way in. between weather systems as we head through the course of the weekend. perhaps one or two showers around. wait a bit of dry weather through saturday and sunday. temperatures in the cool side for this time of the year.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. us champion pole vaulter sam kendricks tests positive at the tokyo olympics, and has been ruled out of the games. members of the australian athletics team had to isolate briefly after close contact with him. president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will be required to prove they are vaccinated against covid or submit to frequent testing. infection rates across the us have increased by over 300% in under a month. the exiled belarusian opposition leader has met the us president at the white house. joe biden offered his support and said the us stands with the people. last year's election in belarus faced allegtions that it was rigged. british climate scientists have proved the past two decades were warmer, wetter and sunnier than the average for the entire 20th century. their research says the impact of climate change is already being felt, with increased rainfall, sunshine and temperatures.
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you're watching bbc news. now for all the sport, here's mike bushell. mallory franklin has been in gold medal position in the canoeing and i'm just looking down and hearing that she has in fact guaranteed a silver medal and we are just waiting to see if there's any update on that but it's certainly looking a lot brighter now for team gb thanks to mallory franklin, really a legacy of london 2012 when the lee valley canoe park course was set up for the olympics and that has been her home training ground and it's really paying off and it looks like a silver in the women's canoeing. earlier today a bronze medalfor matthew coward—holley in the men's trap shooting. earlier, helen glover came so close, to an incredible podium finish, on her return to an olympic rowing final. joe lynskey reports.
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just reaching the start line was remarkable enough. helen glover had planned to watch these games at home but she got back in a boat during lockdown while her babies were asleep and now she was back in an olympic final, the women's pair defending champion and alongside her was polly swann, who trained for the last year while working as a doctor. the two were only here as the games were delayed but a fairy tale medal was just out of reach. hind were delayed but a fairy tale medal wasjust out of reach.— wasjust out of reach. and great britain iust _ wasjust out of reach. and great britain just over _ wasjust out of reach. and great britain just over the _ wasjust out of reach. and great britain just over the line - wasjust out of reach. and great britain just over the line now . britain just over the line now in fourth place, and regardless of the position here, you have to put, take your hat off to helen glover and polly swann. your hat off to helen glover and polly swann-_ your hat off to helen glover and poll swann. ._ ., ., . ~ polly swann. the way we have tackled the ro'ect polly swann. the way we have tackled the project has _ polly swann. the way we have tackled the project has been _ polly swann. the way we have tackled the project has been really _ the project has been really exceptional and i couldn't be prouder— exceptional and i couldn't be prouder of her and what we've done togethen _ prouder of her and what we've done togethen it — prouder of her and what we've done together. it has been a special ride _ together. it has been a special ride i — together. it has been a special ride. ., ., .,
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ride. i want to say, i love you so much, ride. i want to say, i love you so much. you've — ride. i want to say, i love you so much, you've been _ ride. i want to say, i love you so much, you've been my- ride. i want to say, i love you so i much, you've been my inspiration. ride. i want to say, i love you so - much, you've been my inspiration. i never— much, you've been my inspiration. i never saw— much, you've been my inspiration. i never saw myself— much, you've been my inspiration. i never saw myself getting _ much, you've been my inspiration. i never saw myself getting back - much, you've been my inspiration. i never saw myself getting back in . never saw myself getting back in a rowing _ never saw myself getting back in a rowing boat — never saw myself getting back in a rowing boat until _ never saw myself getting back in a rowing boat until you _ never saw myself getting back in a rowing boat until you guys - never saw myself getting back in a rowing boat until you guys came i rowing boat until you guys came along, _ rowing boat until you guys came along, especially— rowing boat until you guys came along, especially in _ rowing boat until you guys came along, especially in the - rowing boat until you guys camel along, especially in the lockdown and i_ along, especially in the lockdown and ijust— along, especially in the lockdown and liust want— along, especially in the lockdown and ijust want to _ along, especially in the lockdown and ijust want to say _ along, especially in the lockdown and ijust want to say that - along, especially in the lockdown and ijust want to say that you i along, especially in the lockdownl and ijust want to say that you can do anything — and ijust want to say that you can do anything you _ and ijust want to say that you can do anything you want _ and ijust want to say that you can do anything you want to _ and ijust want to say that you can do anything you want to do. i and ijust want to say that you can| do anything you want to do. trying and failing — do anything you want to do. trying and failing is— do anything you want to do. trying and failing is no— do anything you want to do. trying and failing is no problem - do anything you want to do. trying and failing is no problem as - do anything you want to do. trying and failing is no problem as long i do anything you want to do. tryingl and failing is no problem as long as you try— and failing is no problem as long as you try and — and failing is no problem as long as you try and that _ and failing is no problem as long as you try and that goes _ and failing is no problem as long as you try and that goes out _ and failing is no problem as long as you try and that goes out to - and failing is no problem as long as you try and that goes out to not i you try and that goes out to not 'ust you try and that goes out to not just nry— you try and that goes out to not just my children _ you try and that goes out to not just my children but _ you try and that goes out to not just my children but everyone i you try and that goes out to not i just my children but everyone else out there — just my children but everyone else out there. .,, ._ just my children but everyone else out there. , ._ , out there. those may be helen glover's parting _ out there. those may be helen glover's parting words - out there. those may be helen glover's parting words to i out there. those may be helen glover's parting words to a i out there. those may be helen l glover's parting words to a sport she has loved and left her mark on. great britain into the record books and such fabulously well done there. olympic champion in this race in london and rio. one more medal was just a fraction away. and for british rowing, tokyo has been a case of getting so close. emily craig and imogen grant were in a thrilling race. this lightweight double sculls would go to the line. you can count them in. right through- _ you can count them in. right through. and _ you can count them in. right through. and great - you can count them in. right through. and great britain i you can count them in. right i through. and great britain and the netherlands _ through. and great britain and the netherlands for _ through. and great britain and the netherlands for a _ through. and great britain and the netherlands for a photo _ netherlands for a photo finish there. . . , ., ., .,
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there. craig and grant were half a second from _ there. craig and grant were half a second from gold _ there. craig and grant were half a second from gold but _ there. craig and grant were half a second from gold but they - there. craig and grant were half a second from gold but they had i there. craig and grant were half a i second from gold but they had come forth —— fourth, missing bronze by 100th of a second. for italy, the winners, the tiny margin meant so month. gb rows have now come forth five times, and more medal sad, in the water than on it but james will be missed out in the 200 metre breaststroke, six in a final, but the race of the night was in freestyle as the world watched the black cab of the usa's k s ul, labelled the next michael phelps. it is his first individual gold and at 24 he is quickly learning but at the olympics, years of training can come down to the touch of a wall. just to confirm the women's canoe final
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result with australia taking the gold in the end and well done to team gb�*s mallory franklin who has won a silver medal. elsewhere today the olympics have been dominated by covid—19. just a day before the start of the track and field events starting, sam kendricks, the world pole vault champion, has withdrawn from the games, having tested postive for covid. he won olympic bronze in rio five years ago and had been expected to contend for a medal in tokyo. kendricks' father scott, who is also his coach, said on social media his son is not experiencing symptoms and we are now already seeing a knock on effect. we have also now heard that the argentinian pole vaulter, german chiaraviglio, has now returned a postive test and has tweeted that the games are overfor him, and the 68 members of the australian track and field squad are isolating and being tested, as their pole vaulter, curtis marshall, was in close contact with kendricks.
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but they have now returned negative tests, so the whole team will resume training as normal. this is a huge relief for the australian olympic committee. two of the big stars in pole vaulting, including sam kendricks, out of the games, but australia can carry on as normal. so thatis australia can carry on as normal. so that is the good news. thank you, mike. later, official uk figures are expected to show another fall in the number of people still on furlough, as the british government continues to reduce the level of financial support it offers to businesses, and life begins to return to normal. from next month, employers will have to contribute more towards their wage bill, which many labour market experts warn could triggerjob cuts when companies can't make ends meet. our business correspondent colletta smith reports on getting back to work for over 2 million people still using the scheme. it had been such a long time coming.
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i was so excited to get ready, pick out the outfit of coming back to work and just seeing my friends that i hadn't gotten to see at work. and just sit at my desk after a whole 15 months, it was quite exciting. ten days ago, her life got busy again. after so long on furlough, she was over the moon getting the call asking her to come back. originally supposed to come back before the december lockdown. when the country went into lockdown at that point, i did feel a bit insecure to the point of the fact that, will i be able to come back because i had been anticipating that initial return to work? i did worry a little bit. as the weeks became months the best thing was to kind of build a routine and just keep a positive mental attitude. that is what helped me get up in the mornings. staff here have been
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brought back gradually as business has increased. from next month companies will have to pay more, 20%, for each team member on furlough. that will mean tough decisions for many firms. we are seeing a lot of clients that are trying to bring in measures like part—time working, reduced hours, temporary pay cuts, as an alternative to people losing theirjobs. but if those things can't be agreed, then the fallback will be that some people will be made redundant. lots of companies have already faced up to the challenge and made some redundancies. simon says it couldn't be back to business as usual. we have had to let a number of our staff go, because we were unsure of how long furlough was going to last. but over the past year as well we have seen a number of our employees leave the industry due to the uncertainties around hospitality. for those who have been out of the workplace for so long, hoping to get back to life as
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normal, the prospect of redundancy is all the more daunting. coletta smith, bbc news. team gb�*s mallory franklin has won a silver medal in the women's c1 slalom canoe final. it's a sport she took up in 2010, just two years before the london olympic games where she attended merely as a spectator. since then, she's made a meteoric rise through the sport. let's cross live now to laura scott at the lee valley water sports centre in east london. iam here i am here with mallory franklin's nearest and dearest who were watching on the big screen as she what —— got the silver medal a few moments ago and i'm joined by her fiance, ciaran, some of how you feel about the silver medal. so delighted that mallory could _ about the silver medal. so delighted that mallory could go _ about the silver medal. so delighted that mallory could go out _ about the silver medal. so delighted that mallory could go out and i that mallory could go out and deliver what she is capable of doing. we saw it in the heats and it's been a big journey to get to the games, jumping through all the
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covid protocols that they need 2am just delighted she was able to put it out there. find just delighted she was able to put it out there-— it out there. and it was pretty tense because _ it out there. and it was pretty tense because there - it out there. and it was pretty tense because there were i it out there. and it was pretty | tense because there were still it out there. and it was pretty i tense because there were still some paddlers to go and you needed to work out if she would win the medal and when you knew she had a medal, regardless of the colour, how proud were you? just regardless of the colour, how proud were ou? , �* regardless of the colour, how proud were ou? , ~ ., , were you? just delighted. a nervous wait, but were you? just delighted. a nervous wait. but it's — were you? just delighted. a nervous wait, but it's something _ were you? just delighted. a nervous wait, but it's something we - were you? just delighted. a nervous wait, but it's something we talked i wait, but it's something we talked about and she wanted to be off early in the final to put the pressure on the other girls, and she did exactly that to plan. a nervy wait, butjust thrilled, and i know she will be so pleased, herand thrilled, and i know she will be so pleased, her and her coach, they can celebrate together.— celebrate together. beaten by one of her fiercest rivals _ celebrate together. beaten by one of her fiercest rivals as _ celebrate together. beaten by one of her fiercest rivals as well. _ celebrate together. beaten by one of her fiercest rivals as well. it - celebrate together. beaten by one of her fiercest rivals as well. it is i her fiercest rivals as well. it is fittin: it her fiercest rivals as well. it is fitting it came _ her fiercest rivals as well. it is fitting it came down _ her fiercest rivals as well. it is fitting it came down to - her fiercest rivals as well. it 3 fitting it came down to franklin and fox, number one and two in the world for many years now and exchanging wins at all the international competitions, so for their first olympic games final to come down to franklin and fox is a perfect ending. franklin and fox is a perfect endinu. �* , ., franklin and fox is a perfect
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endinu. franklin and fox is a perfect endinr.�* ., ending. beyond mallory's silver medal, ending. beyond mallory's silver medal. she _ ending. beyond mallory's silver medal, she is _ ending. beyond mallory's silver medal, she is a _ ending. beyond mallory's silver medal, she is a pioneer- ending. beyond mallory's silver medal, she is a pioneer in i ending. beyond mallory's silver medal, she is a pioneer in the i medal, she is a pioneer in the sport. how proud are you of that role as well? i sport. how proud are you of that role as well?— role as well? i remember mallory competing _ role as well? i remember mallory competing when _ role as well? i remember mallory competing when the _ role as well? i remember mallory competing when the women i role as well? i remember mallory competing when the women were role as well? i remember mallory i competing when the women were in the same category as the men, so for her to come through and make her debut in the first world championships for ci in the first world championships for c1 and come through today, she has been a role model in pushing it forward. i been a role model in pushing it forward. . , i. been a role model in pushing it forward. . , ., been a role model in pushing it forward. . , . , ., forward. i am sure you are dying to see her. forward. i am sure you are dying to see her- i — forward. i am sure you are dying to see her. i can't _ forward. i am sure you are dying to see her. i can't wait _ forward. i am sure you are dying to see her. i can't wait to _ forward. i am sure you are dying to see her. i can't wait to see - forward. i am sure you are dying to see her. i can't wait to see her i forward. i am sure you are dying to see her. i can't wait to see her and | see her. i can't wait to see her and i believe she _ see her. i can't wait to see her and i believe she gets _ see her. i can't wait to see her and i believe she gets home _ i believe she gets home saturday afternoon and i will be waiting at the airport. afternoon and i will be waiting at the airport-— afternoon and i will be waiting at the airort. �* the airport. and then the wedding lans the airport. and then the wedding plans begin _ the airport. and then the wedding plans begin in _ the airport. and then the wedding plans begin in earnest, _ the airport. and then the wedding plans begin in earnest, don't i plans begin in earnest, don't they? indeed. she's got a busy year and plans for the world championship later in the year which is really different to a normal year but we will be full steam ahead with the wedding planning for december. her family will need to wait a few more days to be able to celebrate with her in person but it's been a really special morning at the white water centre as they've seen her clinch the all—important silver medal. fantastic stuff, laura. thank you very much indeed.
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the british home secretary has visited birmingham, to meet families of the victims of the 1974 ira pub bombings. priti patel held a virtual meeting with them in march, but had promised to pay a visit in person. in talks described as "passionate but dignified", the families urged her to call an inquiry into the bombings, which killed 21 people and injured hundreds more. giles latcham reports. this was a moment many months in the making. a face to face meeting with the home secretary, hosted by the west midlands mayor and a chance for the relatives of the victims to press their case for a wide ranging public enquiry. the government recently announced plans to end all prosecutions for offences relating to the troubles in northern ireland. plans that the families have described as obscene and apparent. they were raised at this meeting but they did not form part of the main discussion. they were raised at this meeting but they did not form part of the main discussion.
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21 people were killed by the bombs planted by the ira into city centre pubs, among them the sister ofjulie hambleton, who emerged from the meeting convinced that as a result we are now a step closer to an enquiry. we are closer than we have been, put it like that. we've had to wait nearly 47 years to get this far and she says that she works and acts on integrity and we will keep her to that word. i hope there will be a public inquiry. the home secretary said very clearly that there are all sorts of standards to be met to get to that position, but _ there would be a very clear process by which the evidence was examined so she could make an appropriate judgment. the meeting lasted just over an hour. the home secretary agreed that the government lawyers would liaise with lawyers for the families to explore what a public enquiry might entail.
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more on that story on our website as with all the stories. people who have been fully vaccinated in the eu or us will not need to isolate when coming to england from an amber list country. currently, only people who received theirjabs in the uk can avoid quarantine when arriving from amber list countries, except france. the uk foreign secretary dominic raabjoins us now from our westminster studio. thank you forjoining us, and let me ask you first of all, lots of speculation about spain going onto the amber watchlist soon. if you are booking your summer holiday or you had one booked, would you go to spain or hold off for a while? we have a spain or hold off for a while? , have a review system so we can update based on the evidence in relation to all countries and that will take place next week and the joint bio—security centre will give their appraisal of the latest evidence on the virus, the variance and ministers can make their decisions. we have these regular
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review point so i won't get ahead of the decision that will be next week but we always have these reviews on these are the natural way to make sure we can monitor carefully each destination. sure we can monitor carefully each destination-— sure we can monitor carefully each destination. these new travel rules cominu destination. these new travel rules coming into — destination. these new travel rules coming into force _ destination. these new travel rules coming into force on _ destination. these new travel rules coming into force on monday i destination. these new travel rules coming into force on monday meanj coming into force on monday mean travel is fully vaccinated in the eu and us countries do not need to self—isolate when coming into england. the question is, why are we opening up borders in this way when there are, for example, countries in there are, for example, countries in the eu which are using substandard vaccinations and in the us there is no real official way of proving you are double jabbed and it's on a piece of paper which is eminently affordable. aren't you worried we are going to increase the number of new variants by opening borders in this way? hat new variants by opening borders in this wa ? ., ., this way? not quite right on either oint, but this way? not quite right on either point. but let _ this way? not quite right on either point, but let me _ this way? not quite right on either point, but let me clarify. - this way? not quite right on either point, but let me clarify. in i point, but let me clarify. in relation to the eu and the same for the us, the official regulator, the ema in the case of the eu and the fda in the us, will have to have a
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licence to specific vaccines so it will only be vaccines that have been licensed and authorised by the eu regulator or the uk regulator or in the case of the us, the fda or the uk that could be used so it wouldn't include substandard vaccines. in relation to the eu the proof will be digital and relation to the eu the proof will be digitaland in relation to the eu the proof will be digital and in relation to the us and this reflects the fact that they had a state —based approach to certification, you are right, it will be a card —based approach but it will be not right to say is easy to defraud, but to give us an additional level of reassurance, those us double vaccinated travellers will also have to provide proof of residency which allows us to make sure we are checking very carefully, so i think the answer to the question, why are we taking the step, opening up the same way as we are domestically in the sure—footed careful way with safeguards in place to make sure we can do it in a sustainable way. d0 to make sure we can do it in a sustainable way.— to make sure we can do it in a sustainable way. to make sure we can do it in a sustainable wa . , ., ~ ,, sustainable way. do you think the us will reciprocate _ sustainable way. do you think the us will reciprocate and _ sustainable way. do you think the us will reciprocate and lift _ sustainable way. do you think the us
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will reciprocate and lift its _ sustainable way. do you think the us will reciprocate and lift its ban - sustainable way. do you think the us will reciprocate and lift its ban on - will reciprocate and lift its ban on uk travellers?— will reciprocate and lift its ban on uk travellers? ultimately it will be their decision _ uk travellers? ultimately it will be their decision and _ uk travellers? ultimately it will be their decision and they _ uk travellers? ultimately it will be their decision and they are - uk travellers? ultimately it will be their decision and they are taking i uk travellers? ultimately it will be | their decision and they are taking a very careful approach, notjust for the uk but across the board and we've had conversations and the president has raised it with the prime minister so clearly they would like to proceed and we will work out how we can do that as soon as possible but ultimately they have got to take that decision for themselves in a way that many others will and have, but what i can tell you is by taking the approach we are taking, a lot of countries will approach ours and say, can we get on the uk list of double vaccinated countries, citizens from countries that can come in and that allows us to have more of a conversation about our nationals as well, so i think it will create a cycle and some momentum allow people to build confidence in the system. we are doing this with high trust partners and i've had messages overnight saying, can we work on something similar with the saying, can we work on something similarwith the uk, saying, can we work on something similar with the uk, the high trust partners, so i think this is the right way forward i will be good for the uk, both for business and travel
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as both ways. the uk, both for business and travel as both ways— the uk, both for business and travel as both ways. michael gove described those who refused _ as both ways. michael gove described those who refused to _ as both ways. michael gove described those who refused to vaccinate - those who refused to vaccinate themselves as selfish. do you agree with that? we themselves as selfish. do you agree with that? ~ ., themselves as selfish. do you agree with that? ~ . :: , ., with that? we have 70% of the pepulation _ with that? we have 70% of the population double _ with that? we have 70% of the population double vaccinated l population double vaccinated and people can feel confident in it if they were nervous before and the way i would frame it to anyone who has not yet had the vaccine, is look, it's in your own self interest to get the jab and it's in the interest of your family get the jab and it's in the interest of yourfamily and get the jab and it's in the interest of your family and friends and your work colleagues, and of course it's in the interest of the country because the sooner we get from 70% closer to 100%, because the sooner we get from 70% closerto100%, or80 because the sooner we get from 70% closer to 100%, or 80 or 90%, the better it will be. what i would say is that those that were nervous can now look at the track record and have confidence that the double jab is good for them and their community and for the country. let’s is good for them and their community and for the country.— and for the country. let's turn to vaccines being _ and for the country. let's turn to vaccines being sent _ and for the country. let's turn to vaccines being sent abroad, - and for the country. let's turn to vaccines being sent abroad, in i vaccines being sent abroad, in particular the 9 million doses of vaccine that the uk is sending.
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there have been reports that the amount of vaccines the uk sending have a shelf line that means they won't last beyond september and there are worries that have been expressed by some people, particularly on the african continent that poorer countries receiving those vaccines will not have time to administer them. what do you say to that? i have time to administer them. what do you say to that?— do you say to that? i can tell you it is categorically _ do you say to that? i can tell you it is categorically not _ do you say to that? i can tell you it is categorically not right. - do you say to that? i can tell you it is categorically not right. all. it is categorically not right. all vaccines have a shelf life and this is why we ship them out in august and this is why the distribution is in place and we do that with charities and other distributors with governments, the most effective partnership and whether it is vulnerable countries, lay—offs, cambodia, two of the recipients in indonesia struggling with the virus through to commonwealth countries like jamaica and kenya, we make sure we do our bit and with the certainty of the domestic roll—out and the supply of vaccines we need for that, we are doing our bit to get everyone
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vaccinated. we know in the uk we won't be safe until everyone is safe and we feel the moral interest of getting other countries vaccinated but we also see the national interest in being part of the international roll—out of the vaccine to allow people to go on holiday and allow international travel and international trade, so there is a moral dimension to this but also a strong british interest and again it shows global britain is and again it shows global britain is a life—saving force for good in the world and we should be proud of it. so the vaccines don't have a shelf life of september? all vaccines have a shelf life which is why we are shipping them in august so they can get into the arms of people before the expiry date. get into the arms of people before the exniry date-— the expiry date. let's talk about the expiry date. let's talk about the 9 million. _ the expiry date. let's talk about the 9 million. 100 _ the expiry date. let's talk about the 9 million. 100 million - the expiry date. let's talk about the 9 million. 100 million his. the 9 million. 100 million his pledge, but will 9 million even make a dent in it? we pledge, but will 9 million even make a dent in it?— a dent in it? we made the pledge in june and the — a dent in it? we made the pledge in june and the hundred _ a dent in it? we made the pledge in june and the hundred million - a dent in it? we made the pledge in june and the hundred million was i a dent in it? we made the pledge in| june and the hundred million was for the middle of next year, so we are doing it in tranches. the point is that when we made the commitment of 100 million vaccine doses to support
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the international initiative, we secured at the g seven i billion doses from all of the other partners towards the same cause and it shows you what our leadership has delivered and the aim is to get the point at which the world is adequately vaccinated to see off this pandemic. the current trajectory is the end of 2024 and if we can make it happen by next year we can make it happen by next year we will have achieved a massive gain for the people around the world, particularly the most vulnerable countries and it's something we will benefit from as well.— countries and it's something we will benefit from as well. have you been watchin: benefit from as well. have you been watching the — benefit from as well. have you been watching the olympic— benefit from as well. have you been watching the olympic games? - benefit from as well. have you been watching the olympic games? i - benefit from as well. have you beenj watching the olympic games? i love it. i've watching the olympic games? i love it- i've been — watching the olympic games? i love it. i've been watching _ watching the olympic games? i love it. i've been watching cal— watching the olympic games? i love it. i've been watching cal orion - watching the olympic games? i be it. i've been watching cal 0rion du bois and the swimmers. karate was my
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sport as a youngster and the japanese have introduced it and that will be next week and i am loving the success we have had and i am wishing the team to do even better in the days to come. the wishing the team to do even better in the days to come.— in the days to come. the winter ol mics in the days to come. the winter olympics are — in the days to come. the winter olympics are being _ in the days to come. the winter olympics are being held - in the days to come. the winter olympics are being held in - in the days to come. the winter| olympics are being held in china in the days to come. the winter- olympics are being held in china and you said this morning you will not be attending the olympics. why? we be attending the olympics. why? - always say about whether we would boycott because of human rights concerns, that is the ultimate background to the question, and first of all for the athletes concerned, the olympic committee take the decisions and that is a matter of law and those are independent and the reason we do thatis independent and the reason we do that is we don't want to politicise sport but in terms of diplomatic representation we apply, we will think carefully about it. we have those concerns and i think it was unlikely that i would go, but we haven't taken a firm decision on it yet. haven't taken a firm decision on it et. . ., ., , haven't taken a firm decision on it et. . ., haven't taken a firm decision on it et. . , ., ., ~ haven't taken a firm decision on it et. . ., ., ~ ., yet. dominic raab, good to talk to ou. yet. dominic raab, good to talk to yom thank — yet. dominic raab, good to talk to yom thank you — yet. dominic raab, good to talk to you. thank you very _ yet. dominic raab, good to talk to you. thank you very much. - the father of a schoolboy whose remains were found in sussex woodland has made an impassioned plea for information on forty years on. vishal mehrotra was last seen alive in london on the 29th ofjuly 1981, the day of the royal wedding. earlier this year sussex police
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contacted the family asking for their support to mark the anniversary with a national appealfor information. the offer has since been withdrawn, a decision vishal's father has described as disgusting. our correspondent colin campbell has the story. all eyes were on the balcony at buckingham palace. the royal wedding of prince charles and lady diana spencer, a day of national celebration, the day that vishal mehrotra vanished. 40 years is a very long time and vishal would have been nearly 49 years of age and i would have probably been a grandfather, if he wanted kids, i don't know. it is devastating. vishal was last seen walking home in putney, south—west london and his partial remains were found in sussex woodlands seven months later. the lower half of his body has never been located. 40 years on, vishal's father is pleading with sussex police to recover his son's missing remains from the woods. sussex police do not believe it is a proportionate line of enquiry as they say a search would cost
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in excess of £400,000. believes clues could remain in the woods. a search should be made here, because of the possible investigative opportunities, and whilst there are investigative opportunities, the investigation is incomplete. vishal's father claims institutional racism has hindered the case, an allegation sussex police firmly reviewed. the force ditched plans for an anniversary appeal this month, citing a lack of viable lines a lack of viable lines of enquiry, leaving his father to make his own appeal. anyone who may have any evidence or information or any suspicion as to what happened 40 years ago in putney, near east putney station, what is it that they could recall that might help us? it is help that could solve a child murder, providing overduejustice
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for vishal and his family. more on that story on the website. before we go, a slice of prince charles and princess diana's wedding cake has been put up for sale more than 40 years after the
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unusually windy weather for the time of year across south—western parts of year across south—western parts of the uk but during today it will still be breezy out there for many areas and the shower is not as widespread or heavy the winds coming in from the west or south—west. but with the best of the sunshine likely to be across the midlands and the south of england,
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we could see 23 degrees. still some heavy showers for the first part of the night, scotland and perhaps northern ireland. we focus on the south—west, that area of low pressure continuing to deepen and bringing in the rain and strengthening winds. unusually windy across devon and cornwall for this time of the year. 50 to 60 mph across coastal areas. strong winds in the english channel as well. temperatures in double figures with the rain having gone as far north as northern and then. we have got some windy weather to start with on friday. winds gradually ease. showers or longer spells of rain for england and wales. sundry downpours threatening eastern england as the showers move further west. northern scotland looks quite cool and cloudy. generally speaking on friday temps will be a little bit lower than today. let's head into the weekend. we are looking for high pressure. the high pressure looks like it will remain here the atlantic over the azores. low
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pressure is still heading toward scandinavia but the influence our weather in a way that means we have more of a northerly breeze over the weekend. not particularly warm. we still have some sunshine around this weekend. still some showers. maybe some heavy once across england and wales. still around into sunday. top temperature is disappointing, 20 or 21 celsius.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. scientists warn that the uk is already undergoing disruptive climate change — with increased rainfall, sunshine and higher temperatures. are you worried about what's happening to the climate? what are you doing to cut carbon emissions? we'd love to hear from you. get in touch @annita—mcveigh #bbcyourquestions how many years has that been in the making? at the tokyo olympics a thrilling finish in the women's canoe slalom — australia'sjessica fox takes gold — with silver for team gb�*s mallory franklin. from monday travellers arriving in england,
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scotland and wales who've been fully—vaccinated in the eu or us

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