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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 28, 2021 11:00pm-11:30pm BST

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�*welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. as covid cases rise in the us, the push to get the nation vaccinated — all federal workers could be required to have the jab, or face more testing. in great britian the covid rules are eased for fully vaccinated travellers from the us and the european union. from monday they'll no longer have to isolate on arrival. day 6 of the tokyo olympics — how will the us gymnastics team fare without their star performer simone biles? and france says it owes a debt to the people of french polynesia over the damage caused by nearly two hundred nuclear tests.
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it's six in the morning in singapore, and six in the evening in washington where president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will soon be required to confirm they are vaccinated — orface more testing. the numbers of coronavirus cases are rising with the director of the us national public health agency. the cdc, saying cases have increased over 300% nationally since mid—june. president biden has renewed his call for people to get vaccinated. so many people all over 630,000 americans have lost their lives
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because of covid—19 will stop and the press keeps wanting me to talk about covid—19 but i'm going to mention this one thing, we still have a lot of people not vaccinated. in the pandemic we have now is a pandemic of the unvaccinated. so, please, please, please, if you are not vaccinated, protect yourself and the children out there. it is important. meanwhile the problem for many countries in asia which are experiencing a surge in coronavirus cases, is that many people just don'have access to vaccines. indonesia has fully vaccinated less than 7 percent of its population, thailand 5.2 percent and myanmar a mere 2.8 percent. in great britain though cases are on the decline and the government is feeling confident enough to relax covid border controls. people who have been fully vaccinated in either the united states or the european union will be allowed in without having to quarantine. i'm joined now by dr saskia popescu, epidemiologist
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and infection prevention specialist. shejoins us live from phoenix, arizona. good to have you on the programme. president biden calling on his people to get vaccinated — what is the picture there now with levels of vaccination? it is very concerning. the united states is under 50% of us population is fully vaccinated or strained see it steep incline of cases and a lot of them are, i should say, mostly unvaccinated areas. areas we just do not have the vaccination rates that we want. so, the concern is it's very transmissible with hospitalisations and increased cases of surgery and areas these are vulnerable populations. and try to vaccinate as many people and also encouraging masks. the delta variant is now thought to be behind most of the infections in the us — spreading fast —
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here in asia it's dominant too — and yet vaccination rates in this part of the world are still pretty low — how concerned are you about teh virus mutating — before we can vaccinate everyone? i'm really concerned with was in front of us right now. delta is a very transmissible, more than anything we've seen and it does take anything we've seen and it does take a partially vaccinated population and we are very fortunate in the united states to have to send a 50% vaccinated, but in the world where there are a lot of vaccine in equities, that's a vulnerable population because viruses, they mutate where they can spread. the more the virus spreads, the more likely it is to mutate and that something we need to see as a public health issue. i just want to ask you about the uk: this experiment to open up — the world is watching — what do you make of the uk's decision?
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very similar to how i felt about the united states. i think it was a bit premature, especially with the search that the uk was experiencing. 0f search that the uk was experiencing. of these wonderful vaccines and they are very advantageous but not perfect and does a lot we have to do to vaccinate everybody. if you're going to open up, it needs to be slowly and on the situation were having these really high case and hospitalisations and instead in a way were we can slowly control and that's the way the united states is put up a recommendation that if you are not vaccinated, you should be wearing a mask and doors if you are in a place of high transmission because we are seeing dot to take advantage of notjust vaccinated people in terms of infections which are still rare, but unvaccinated or partially vaccinated. it's a very precarious situation and i worry deeply about it. what is your prognosis for the winter months — will we start to see infections rise in the us/uk and europe —
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and will we sadly see deaths rise as well? it is very likely because we know cases increased over the weekend in 2020 and in 2021. it's about human behaviour. what we do? we travel, we go to holidays we go with other people. this is a rep environment for transmission ever going to be really mindful of this, notjust because of covid—i9 but because of concerns sparked by it. i'm very concerned that if we do not make leaps and bounds to vaccinate everybody and get a true global vaccine equity, we're going to see other surges in those winter months. and you can find much more about this story on our website. we have a special section dedicated to all things coronavirus, with everything you need to know about latest figures and vaccines. just go to bbc.com/news. let's take a look at some of the stories in the headlines in the uk. bbc news has learned that more thani million face masks which were sent to nhs hospitals
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in england during the pandemic have failed safety tests. the department of health said it had advised hospitals not to use the high grade face coverings which are often worn by doctors and nurses working in intensive care units. a woman has been jailed for 5.5 years for stealing diamonds worth more than £4 million or $5.5 us from a jeweller in london. the court heard that lulu lakatos, who is 60 and was born in romania, swapped the gems for pebbles. prosecutors said it was the highest value theft of its kind in the uk. still to come a bit later in the programme, the slate landscapes of gwynedd in north wales are awarded unesco world heritage status. we'll take you on a virtual tour. but first, let's head to tokyo, now where its day six of the olympic games.
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and japan is starting the day still on top of the medal tally with 13 gold medals, one more than china, with the united states sitting in third place. we'll have an update on the day's events in a minute, but first, as we were just talking about, coronavirus cases are on the rise in asia and japan is not immune. tokyo is suffering its worst outbreak of coronavirus since the pandemic began. wednesday saw a record of more than 3000 cases in tokyo alone. i'm joined now by mariko 0i, who is in the vibrant shimbashi district in tokyo. japan's daily total of covid cases topped 9000 for the first time yesterday, putting hospitals under increasing strain. how is this affecting the games? it is not affecting the games, but
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we heard from the countries prime minister as well as other officials that the games would continue. but it is definitely concerning to see the number of cases rising here in tokyo, but also surrounding prefectures nationwide as well. and it was probably inevitable because we were in the area last night which was a popular district for office workers to drink after work and when it hit eight p:m., which is when bars and restaurants were asked to close, many of them remained open and partly because of money, because even though the government promised financial support, even though the government promised financialsupport, it even though the government promised financial support, it is taking way too long and up to six months of this business is to receive the money which is way too slow, especially for smaller ones to stay afloat and can probably see some commuters behind me as well and of course, this is the first state of emergency —— fourth. it is just become the norm. in the number of people out and about hasn't exactly
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gone down and against people on the street, they would say until it strictly to stay at home. when they decided to go ahead with the olympics despite the strong public 0lympics despite the strong public opposition. olympics despite the strong public 0- osition. . ., olympics despite the strong public o- osition. . ., .,, olympics despite the strong public ouosition. . ., , ., , opposition. thanks and as promised, let's look ahead _ opposition. thanks and as promised, let's look ahead to _ opposition. thanks and as promised, let's look ahead to what _ opposition. thanks and as promised, let's look ahead to what is _ opposition. thanks and as promised, let's look ahead to what is coming i let's look ahead to what is coming up let's look ahead to what is coming up in day six. all eyes will be on the women's gymnastics and the individual all—around final after four—time gold medallist simone biles pulled out for mental health reasons. biles had already withdrawn from the team final on tuesday, saying she felt like she had the weight of the world on her shoulders. i'm joined from tokyo by our sports presenter sarah mulkerrins. it would have been simone biles' big day, but she's not there. who else is in the running today? there talking about covid—i9 cases have clouded the sentiment injapan but it's something that people have been living with for a very long time now. today, it will been some
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biles big day but she is not there. who else is in the running today? it is really interesting, this removal from simone biles. removing herself from simone biles. removing herself from this title and remember, she was being tipped to go back to back with goals in the all—around event and that hasn't been done since 1968 and that hasn't been done since 1968 and it is wide open now because simone biles is so far ahead of the other competitors and you do have to look at brazil's rebecca, she finished second highest in qualifying for this. she is a really interesting story. she has ruptured her acl three times, she has had desperate look with injuries. she competed in her home games and she is here on her own because her team is here on her own because her team is not qualified, surreal opportunity for her to potentially get an olympic gold medal and they'll be a great story for her herself would also be a great story for brazil. they never won this
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event and they've never got a gold medal in this event and so they'll be a historic moment. if you look at the americans was of a strong members and the team. 0ne the americans was of a strong members and the team. one of the members and the team. one of the members of that team who won silver when simone biles pulled out and she really pulled herself together and was one of the members support the team through. she qualified in third for this all around. so, team through. she qualified in third forthis allaround. so, she team through. she qualified in third for this all around. so, she is going to be named to look out for. and really interesting as well because you're going of the twins from great britain, jessica and jennifer werejust i6 from great britain, jessica and jennifer were just 16 years old and they are part of the team that when that surprise and historic bronze medal in the team event.- that surprise and historic bronze medal in the team event. thank you. draw the latest _ medal in the team event. thank you. draw the latest on _ medal in the team event. thank you. draw the latest on what _ medal in the team event. thank you. draw the latest on what is _ draw the latest on what is happening. if you want to get in touch with me, i'm on twitter, @bbckarishma. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme,
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president macron says has his country owes a "debt" to french polynesia over nuclear tests held there, but he stops short of apologising. we'll take a look at why this matters. the us space agency, nasa, has ordered an investigation after confirmation today that astronauts are cleared to fly while drunk. the last flood control here, once in every part of the soldier's lot, the last foot patrol here, once in every part of the soldier's lot, drudgery and danger, now no more after almost four decades.
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in your own private house not doing any harm to anyone come i don't see why all these people should wander in and say you are doing something wrong. six rare white lion clubs - on the prowl in worcester park, and already, they have been met with a roar of approval _ from visitors. they are lovely and sweet, yeah, they were cute. they are lovely and sweet, yeah, they're cute. this is newsday on the bbc. i'm karishma vaswani in singapore. 0ur headlines — as covid cases rise in the us, president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will soon be required to confirm they are vaccinated or face more testing. in great britain, the covid rules are eased for fully vaccinated travellers from the us and the european union. from monday, they'll no longer have to isolate on arrival.
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president macron of france has said his country owes a "debt" to french polynesia for nearly 200 nuclear tests it carried out there over three decades. in a speech during his first official visit to the territory, mr macron said victims of those tests should be better compensated. translation: | think it's true - that we would not have done the same tests in cruz or in brittany. we did the tests here because it was far away, it's true. i want to tell you here that the nation owes a debt to french polynesia. applause. only 63 polynesians have received compensation for radiation exposure since the tests ended in 1996. estimates say around 100,000 people were affected, many of them suffering from cancers. i'm joined now by
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professor anais maurer. she was born and raised in french polynesia and now teaches french literature at rutgers university. she has written extensively about issues affecting french polynesia because of the nuclear tests. how significant is this acknowledgement by president macron that he owes a debt to the people of french polynesia? will it change the situation on the ground? i want to start by emphasising that he is not the first french president to acknowledge the debt to the people of polynesia. the salary been done and how this will affect the situation on the ground, judging by what happens in 2016, i would remain cautious. recognising that france
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had responsibilities in developing these diseases in french occupied polynesia, the number of rejections in the community to compensate victims from nuclear tests went from 98% in 2016, two 96% in 2018. and one remains cautious. 9896 in 2016, two 96% in 2018. and one remains cautious.— one remains cautious. what we're seeinu one remains cautious. what we're seeing from _ one remains cautious. what we're seeing from what _ one remains cautious. what we're seeing from what the _ one remains cautious. what we're seeing from what the french - seeing from what the french president has said is a significant acknowledgement of the mistakes that were made by france during that time. one that goes somewhere towards alleviating the grief and the pain that is being felt by people in french polynesia. fine the pain that is being felt by people in french polynesia. one of the main issues _ people in french polynesia. one of the main issues put _ people in french polynesia. one of the main issues put forward - people in french polynesia. one of the main issues put forward and i people in french polynesia. one of. the main issues put forward and that is the way that nuclear tests
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radiation and youth diseases are currently compensated. and victims of french chico tests that put forward a demand for compensation will only receive compensation if the commission for compensating nuclear victims decides independently that the victims, the individual victims have been exposed to more than one bit of radiation. however, the data on which the committee relies is very opaque and has not been verified by independent atomic scientists. recognising france's responsibility. fin atomic scientists. recognising france's responsibility. on the toic france's responsibility. on the to - ic of france's responsibility. on the topic of compensation. - france's responsibility. on the topic of compensation. the . france's responsibility. on the | topic of compensation. the fact france's responsibility. on the - topic of compensation. the fact that he is there and there's this high—profile event in high—profile visit, is it a sign that more people might get compensation? figs
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visit, is it a sign that more people might get compensation?- visit, is it a sign that more people might get compensation? as long as he does not — might get compensation? as long as he does not address _ might get compensation? as long as he does not address the _ might get compensation? as long as he does not address the current - he does not address the current system for compensation, this limit were very little will change from the people on the ground. so far he is going to forward suggestions on how to better accompany victims and the administrative process, but not to re—evaluate the data according to which radiation is currently calculated and this is important because a recent study from them after recent declassified archives showed that according to these alternate ways of measuring radioactive fallout, over hundred thousand people, which is more than 90% of the population at the time would have received more than one bit of radiation.— bit of radiation. thank you so much for our bit of radiation. thank you so much for your thoughts _ bit of radiation. thank you so much for your thoughts this _ bit of radiation. thank you so much
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for your thoughts this morning. - what do the canals in venice in the galapagos islands have with the slate areas of northwest wells. the unesco world heritage site status. six sites and it's now one of 32 uk sites on the prestigious list. 0ur wells correspondent reports. 20 years in the making and recognition is finally here. the slate landscape the damaged parts of snow dona includes the great wall the slate landscape that dominates part of snowdonia is now on a prestigious unesco world heritage list that includes the great wall of china and machu picchu. and the pioneerfor this bid was dr david quinn. i felt there was something very wonderful here, almost magical. naturally delighted to hear now that after 20 years our ambitions have been realised.
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it is said wales rule the world in the 19th century and in its heyday the industry employed close to 20,000. so why does welsh slate have such a good name worldwide? firstly, it is the best slate in the world. it is one of the more dense slates, it has been proven on reeves for over 200, 300 years. for fred hughes, this area has been special. this place could have gone to rack and ruin, they could have been more decay than they already is. maybe this is a pathway to get it back up on its feet, have the recognition. it is just fantastic news. just as the taj mahal has for india and the pyramids have for egypt, the hope is the recognition for the slate mines in north wales will also bring an economic boost to the area. for the locals, it is tourism, a key employer, he will hopefully benefit from this announcements.
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in order to get the tourists, we need the investment to get businesses that help businesses get up and running. for 1800 years, slate has been mined in the silva, striking and rugged landscape. and now this stone which has approved houses across the globe has got an accolade sought the world over. let's return to the olympics now. the games are usually marked by people from all over the world coming together to celebrate athletes competing at the peak of their ability. but with no fans allowed in the stands and people watching from their homes in tokyo and around the world instead, social media is more important than ever to help keep people engaged and up to date with all the gold medal drama. well, one of the people behind the social media accounts is daum kim, digital media manager for the tokyo games.
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what an olympics to be part of. typically there's a lot more fanfare, far more spectators obviously. how has it been so far? well, we are more relaxed than we were in the last week. even to the last minutes, we have challenges and concerns but because the cauldron was lit on the 23rd, the operation has been going smoothly and it will bring excitement to people. how different has it been in comparison to what you might have expected? the games have been plagued with problems — covid cases, an impending tropical storm, lots of anti—0lympic sentiment amongst people injapan. how has that affected you? yeah, i mentioned this briefly last week. but we are under very many uncertainties can even now we have uncertainties. but i feel that we
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have been pushing through, which is also the essence of the olympic spirit to really show how resilient we are and how truly show how the world can come together even digitally on social media on her website, to show that we are truly living in a connected world. what's been your best moment so far? it is only been a week but in terms of the excitement, what would you see it is? i’ll of the excitement, what would you see it is? �* , see it is? i'll say the unforgettable - see it is? i'll say the i unforgettable moment see it is? i'll say the - unforgettable moment was see it is? i'll say the _ unforgettable moment was when i went to the olympics venue with spectators for the first time. last week for volleyball, i was surprised to see that the venue is just fully ready for the spectators. music, lights, the displays, the cheers. everything is live and we had spectators and the atmosphere truly gave me goose bumps. however, there was something missing in the venue,
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even though we had the audience cheering sounds and fans displayed on screen. and as a digital media person, i have to ask whether our hearts can be shared and found online in the absence of physical presence will stop at just online in the absence of physical presence will stop atjust as how our skin is a vehicle, to feel the heart. i thought that not having the stimuli meant that we are missing the warmth of people, which is key to any sporting event like this. but on the other side, the essence of the olympics... sorry.— the olympics... sorry. really briefl , the olympics... sorry. really briefly. i— the olympics... sorry. really briefly, i want _ the olympics... sorry. really briefly, i want to _ the olympics... sorry. really briefly, i want to ask - the olympics... sorry. really briefly, i want to ask if - the olympics... sorry. really briefly, i want to ask if you . the olympics... sorry. really- briefly, i want to ask if you would do it again?— do it again? definitely. even without spectators, - do it again? definitely. even without spectators, doing i do it again? definitely. even without spectators, doing it| do it again? definitely. even i without spectators, doing it on social media, we are doing it again. you can really since the enthusiasm you have for the games shining through. that's all for now. stay with bbc world news.
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hello. wednesday brought us another day of some sunny spells but some really heavy downpours and frequent thunderstorms with lightning and hail too. this was the picture in telford during wednesday afternoon. now, the outlook is for the unsettled theme to continue and i think thursday will bring another day of sunshine and showers, it will be quite cool and breezy. but the showers will not be as heavy or as frequent as they have been over recent days. that's due to the fact that this area of low pressure that is bringing all of this showery weather is just drifting its way off towards the north and northeast. we have got another area of low pressure developing in the southwest and that'll be more of a player through thursday night into friday. so, for much of northern ireland, scotland and northern england, quite a cloudy start to the day with some showery rain. further south across england and much of wales, largely dry with some sunshine around
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and there will be some brightness developing in the north during the afternoon but down towards the southwest, expects some rain to arrive later in the day. the breeze picking up here too. it will be quite a blustery feeling sort of day and not particularly warm for this time of year. but temperatures generally somewhere between 18 to 22 degrees for most of us. not too bad down towards the southeast, a drier day here than we have seen recently. now, into thursday night, the showers in the north will gradually ease away but our tension turns to the southwest of england where this area of really heavy rain will move its way in and look at those wind gusts around about a0 to 50 mph unseasonably strong gusts of wind through the english channel, through the bristol channel as well. so, it's going to be very blustery in the south first thing friday morning and a pretty wet start to the day too. whereas further north, it's looking mostly dry to start your friday and quite a bit of dry weather for friday across parts of scotland, northern ireland and northern england just a few showers around. further south across england and wales, we've got that initially heavy rain and brisk winds which gradually clears towards the east through the day, and then a return to some sunshine
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and scattered showers around too. temperatures cooler in recent days around 17 to 20 degrees on friday. and then heading towards the weekend, low pressure still not far away, but it is starting to move towards the east. we've got a northerly air flow coming down and higher pressure out in the atlantic is trying to nudge its way in. so, between weather systems as we head through the course of the weekend. perhaps one or two showers around but quite a bit of dry weather through saturday and sunday too. some sunny spells and temperatures on the cool side for this time of year. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news.
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the headlines — president biden is expected to announce that federal workers will soon be required to confirm they are vaccinated orface more testing. the move comes as the numbers of coronavirus cases are rising sharply. relaxing the rules — from monday, fully vaccinated travellers from the united states and eu will no longer have to quarantine when they arrive in england, scotland or wales. they will still have to present negative covid tests. president macron of france has said his country owes a "debt" to french polynesia over nuclear tests held there. it's estimated over 100,000 were affected by radioactive fallout from nearly 200 nuclear tests over three decades. peru's new president, pedro castillo, has been sworn in after a long and tense election process. the former schoolteacher has promised to reduce poverty and boost the public health system to tackle the pandemic.

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