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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 28, 2021 9:00pm-10:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. starting monday, double—jabbed tourists from the eu and the united states won't have to quarantine on arrival in britain. four—time olympic gold medallist simone biles pulls out of another olympic event over concerns about her mental health. the us secretary of state warns afghanistan it will become a "pariah state" if the taliban does not respect the rights of its people. and start your engines — we speak to the grand tour's richard hammond about the team's new adventure in scotland.
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hello, and welcome to the programme. from monday, england and wales�* covid border controls will be significantly relaxed as people who have been fully vaccinated in the eu or us will not need to isolate when coming to england from an amber list country. officials say the move will reunite friends and family who live abroad. the uk transport secretary grant shapps said the new rules will apply to all travellers from the united states, the european union, as well as norway and switzerland. but france for now is not included, after being classed as amber—plus. passengers will need to have been fully vaccinated in america or the eu travellers will still need a test before setting off and another test two days after arrival. northern ireland has yet to decide whether to follow suit. meanwhile the government says it will review again england's traffic light system for countries around the world — including france — at the end of next week.
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our transport correspondent, caroline davies, reports. few come for the weather. the uk's international tourists have mostly kept away with quarantine rules, but perhaps — after months — there's some sunshine behind the clouds. here we are in the middle of westminster... kate has led tours for over a0 years, but her last was at the end of february 2020. i've had no work at all, in common with pretty much all of my colleagues, especially the language guides from europe. it's just collapsed. it's certainly a step in the right direction. i doubt whether it will make much difference now for this year. pre—pandemic, 40% of the guests were american, but city hotels aren't the only businesses is dependent on international visitors. why is it necessary to have international travel, notjust do things online? the truth is that in business, as in life, the personal connections that we make around the meetings
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that we have are absolutely crucial at building goodwill, understanding, empathy, and all of these things are part of what makes businesses successful. there was news for cruising, too. ships will be able to set sail for international trips since the first time since march 2020. england and scotland will follow this policy. wales and northern ireland are yet to say whether they'll follow too. labour has said that it's worried that there's a robust system in place to be able to verify vaccine passports. we've got real concerns because there doesn't seem to be a system in place yet for an international vaccine passport, which the government said that they were going to bring forward. each individual us state does things differently. they don't have an national health service that has a vaccine programme like we do, with the certifications. if the hope was to help tourism and trade, with much of europe already open to international travel, has the government acted too late? other countries have had to catch up with the speed of our vaccination programmes to make this a meaningful
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approach, so partly, it'sjust waiting for other countries. and partly, we wanted to check that our own approach to allowing people who have been vaccinated in the uk to go away and then come back again, that that was all working. we'll always put the security of the country first. but for many separated from family and friends, today's news makes a big difference. janet lives in switzerland but hasn't been back to the uk for 18 months. now, it's like, "yay!" we can all go and see the people that we have only been talking to on zoom. we're so close here in zurich, but it's so far when you know you have to quarantine. the government say they're still looking at what happens for those jabbed in the rest of the world. the travel industry hope today's announcement is clearing a path forward. caroline davies, bbc news. we know all too well that the pandemic led to dramatic losses in the aviation industry. in 2019, the global airline sector
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generated $838 billion in revenue. compare that to 2020, where earnings dropped to $372 billion. and to talk more about the impact this has had on the travel industry, i'm joined now by the president of the us travel association, roger dow. hello there, good to have you on the programme. a, hello there, good to have you on the programme-— hello there, good to have you on the l programme-— 50 programme. a pleasure, thank you. so it seems that — programme. a pleasure, thank you. so it seems that the _ programme. a pleasure, thank you. so it seems that the uk _ programme. a pleasure, thank you. so it seems that the uk is _ programme. a pleasure, thank you. so it seems that the uk is relaxing - programme. a pleasure, thank you. so it seems that the uk is relaxing its - it seems that the uk is relaxing its travel restrictions, but there's no reciprocal arrangement from the us. that must be disappointing for you? it is very frustrating. i applaud the uk for taking the lead. some country has to take the lead, and they have because we know that others will follow. we are putting a lot of pressure on the white house and the administration to be reciprocal. a vaccine is a vaccine, whether you're a british citizen or us citizen, and the science shows
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that it's safe to travel. 50 us citizen, and the science shows that it's safe to travel.— that it's safe to travel. so what is the hesitation, _ that it's safe to travel. so what is the hesitation, do _ that it's safe to travel. so what is the hesitation, do you _ that it's safe to travel. so what is the hesitation, do you think? - that it's safe to travel. so what is the hesitation, do you think? i. the hesitation, do you think? i think the hesitation is politicians want to be perfect. risk—based is very rare in their world, and you have to treat this with a risk—based approach. i can stop car accidents tomorrow and no one can drive. but we don't do that. we must do the same thing, we have to learn to live with this thing. there's still a bowl, stars, and leprosy in the world. but we've learned it to contain them and the medical science is way ahead of where it was a year and a half ago dashes sars. i was listin: to and a half ago dashes sars. i was listing to our _ and a half ago dashes sars. i was listing to our correspondent - and a half ago dashes sars. i was listing to our correspondent in washington a little earlier who is saying in a sense, the us government has made it very clear that the uk is not about to be put onto the travel list anytime soon — in fact, it's been brought up to level four, meaning there is a high risk from the uk. is this all about the delta variant? �* ,
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the uk. is this all about the delta variant? �*, ., the uk. is this all about the delta variant? �* , ., , ., variant? it's about the delta variant, our— variant? it's about the delta variant, our white _ variant? it's about the delta variant, our white house . variant? it's about the delta variant, our white house is| variant? it's about the delta - variant, our white house is nervous about the delta variant. but you have to follow the science and the cases. that's with the uk has done, they've and the cases, and they are opening with a risk—based approach. the uk will be the first country, uk and canada, to open. i believe they'll pull back and opened the uk, it makes the most sense to open the uk because we both have similar vaccination and case rates. once that opens, the rest of the world will follow. that opens, the rest of the world will follow— that opens, the rest of the world will follow-— will follow. roger, i'd like to brina in will follow. roger, i'd like to bring in what _ will follow. roger, i'd like to bring in what the _ will follow. roger, i'd like to bring in what the us - will follow. roger, i'd like to bring in what the us state i bring in what the us state department has had to say. it says, "we appreciate the transparency and concerted efforts of our european partners and allies to combat this pandemic." so it is a generally positive statement, but one that makes no commitments whatsoever? discussions are auoin on
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commitments whatsoever? discussions are going on right _ commitments whatsoever? discussions are going on right now, _ commitments whatsoever? discussions are going on right now, i'm _ commitments whatsoever? discussions are going on right now, i'm glad - are going on right now, i'm glad that that statement is as positive as it is. i'm hopeful we will see something in the next week or two. the problem is it's notjust the economic issue — your piece before me talked about the olympian who dropped out, the mental health issue, the economics, health, and mental health — we have to address all, notjust look at health only. do you think the digital vaccine certificate that's being introduced in some countries might be a way forward? i in some countries might be a way forward? ~ , ., ._ forward? i think it is a way forward- — forward? i think it is a way forward- i _ forward? i think it is a way forward. i think— forward? i think it is a way forward. i think it's - forward? i think it is a way forward. i think it's a goodi forward. i think it's a good beginning, i think long term there must be multiple ways of entering where there's a vaccine, whether it's testing or you've already had covid and have antibodies. but it's a good start and where we should begin, and again i applaud the brits for doing this. every week we don't open the uk and eu, and canada i've beenin open the uk and eu, and canada i've been in the us it's $1.5 billion and
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10,000 jobs every week. we been in the us it's $1.5 billion and 10,000 jobs every week. 10,000 “obs every week. we have to leave it 10,000 jobs every week. we have to leave it there. _ 10,000 jobs every week. we have to leave it there, thank _ 10,000 jobs every week. we have to leave it there, thank you _ 10,000 jobs every week. we have to leave it there, thank you very - 10,000 jobs every week. we have to leave it there, thank you very much, | leave it there, thank you very much, roger. leave it there, thank you very much, rouer. ., ~' ,, it's been another action packed day at the tokyo olympics, with medals won in rowing and swimming. but all eyes have been on the gymnastics, where team usa has said, it fully supports simone biles in her decision to pull out of tomorrow's all—around individual contest. they said, she needed to focus on her mental health. meanwhile, tokyo has recorded its largest number of new covid infections in a single day, since the pandemic began. lucy hockings has more from tokyo. it's been announced that the american gymnast simone biles has pulled out of another gymnastics event. these are the first pictures we've seen of her since that announcement. she has withdrawn from the all—around competition, in which she's defending the champion. you can see simone here at her hotel. but you remember on tuesday, she pulled out of the team event, saying she needed to focus on her mental health.
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she has yet to decide whether she will compete in other individual events in tokyo. this is the biggest talking point here in tokyo at the moment at these olympics games. simone biles very much the of these olympics, social media around the world, team usa, commentators in the us talking about this, as well. —— the face of these olympics. it's really put the mental health of elite athletes in the spotlight. so let's speak now to someone who knows the situation well. amy tinkler is a gymnast who won bronze in rio and stopped competing because of some of the mental pressures, and shejoins us now from durham, in northeast england. amy, thank for taking the time. what were your first thoughts when you heard simone saying, "look, i won't compete anymore because of my mental health"? i think it was a shock, like it was to everyone. but it was also... it was nice to hear an athlete put her mental health first.
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that doesn't really happen, and i never got the chance to do that in my gymnastics. i think it's really important that that becomes normal, and that it is ok for people to speak out about their mental health. amy, do you think gymnastics has a particular problem with mental health stresses? i do, i think gymnastics — especially on the girls side, we turn senior when we're 16 years old, so we have to mature very, very quickly, we have to grow up. and we're put under such pressure at such a young age. and i do think that takes a toll on your mental health. i do think gymnastics is also moving in the right direction, but i still think there's a lot of change that needs to be made. thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us, thank you. thank you. if you look at the headlines here injapan, on the one side, of course, there's the olympics, but there's also the pandemic.
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japan has avoided the devastated covid outbreak suffered by other nations on the continent, but this fifth wave that's being fuelled by the delta variant is putting real pressure now on hospitals here in tokyo. they've been told to prepare more beds, they are expecting more hospitalisations. mariko oi is in a district here in tokyo, she gave us the latest on those covid numbers. we have to remember that this is the fourth state of emergency that tokyo is under. and, with the latest declaration, the number of people out and about hasn't exactly gone down. it's not a strict lockdown, there's no penalty — though the first state of emergency back in last april, people actually obliged. but by the fourth time, people are rather fed up. and if you ask people on the streets, they'll say, "you can't exactly tell us to stay at home when the government forged ahead with the olympics despite the strong public opposition." well, back to the olympics, let's take a look at some of the action that's been happening here on day five.
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japan's gold rush continues — in the last hour, we've seen teenager daiki hashimoto win the coveted men's all—around gymnastics title. it's his second medal of the tokyo games after helping japan to silver in the team event. more glory in the swimming pool for team gb, they took gold in the men's 4x200m freestyle relay. the quartet, made of the 200—metre champion tom dean, silver medallist duncan scott, james guy and matthew richards came within 0.03 seconds of the world record. it was really a great race and a stunning performance from them. also stunning is this young woman from australia, ariarne titmus picking up a second gold medal and setting a games record in her latest battle with american katie ledecki. titmus beat her in the freestyle final on monday, touched home in one minute, 53.50 seconds. the toast of australia right now. let's take a look at where things
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stand on the medals table. it's been up and down a little bit today, but as the host country, japan, back in the lead with 13 gold medals after that gold in the past hour or so in gymnastics. china close behind them, as well, with 12, and because of some of the golds in the pool for australia, also the women's four rowing events, that's lifted their overall olympics tally, you can see they are sixth and have moved up the table as you can see to fifth. lucy reporting there from tokyo. the us secretary of state has warned that afghanistan would become a "pariah state" if the taliban failed to respect the rights of its people and committed atrocities. speaking in india, anthony blinken said that if the rebels wanted international recognition, they needed to resume negotiations and resolve the conflict peacefully. and getting that recognition is something the taliban are very much hoping to achieve through increased diplomatic engagement. these pictures are from a meeting earlier today between senior taliban officials and members of the chinese government. here's the bbc�*s afghanistan
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correspondent, secunder kermani. they've now captured large amounts of territory bordering neighbouring countries, like china. the key message they are trying to push out to china and central asian states is that they will not allow transnational jihadist organisations like is, die ash to operate from their territory and be a threat to neighbouring countries. the taliban are trying to portray themselves as actually the best place to offer stability to the region — and in exchange, they want some kind of international legitimacy and acceptance. interestingly the us secretary of state today saying if the taliban do want the international acceptance, they need to ensure that they are treating people and territories under their control in line with international human rights standards, and the need to come back to the negotiating table to make a real effort to reach and negotiate a settlement of this
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conflict. let's look at some of the day's other news... president macron of france has said his country owes a "debt" to french polynesia for nearly 200 nuclear tests it carried out there over three decades. so far, just 63 polynesian civilians have received compensation, despite a study estimating that over a 100,000 were affected by radioactive fallout. an armed robber has stolen jewellery worth more than $2 million from one of the oldest jewellery houses in paris. the man entered the chaumet store — close to the champs—elysees — late on tuesday, brandishing a handgun. no shots were fired. he then escaped on a scooter. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: as the world races to achieve net zero, we take a look at what's being described as the most powerful tidal turbine in the world.
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the number of daily coronavirus cases in the uk has risen again for the first time in a week. the latest government figures show there were just over 27,731; new cases in the latest 24—hour period — though that number is still down on the same time last week. and 91 deaths were recorded in the last 2a hours. stephen reicher, a professor of social psychology at the university of st andrews, explains why people's behaviour at this point in time is important. if we were to all relax, if we were to believe it's all over and that infections don't matter and increase our contacts back to the level they were pre—pandemic, then it's pretty clear and pretty obvious that actually, we would be in deep trouble. so we need to be positive, we need to be optimistic, we need to
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enjoy the outdoors in the summer — but at the same time, we mustn't be complacent and pretend that this pandemic has gone away. because it hasn't. renewable energy could play a crucial role in the uk's attempt to reach net zero. wind is providing more and more of our electricity, but what about energy from our waters? experts say that we need to use all forms of electricity generation if that target is to be reached and are calling for government support to help the tidal industry develop commercially. it comes as what's being described as the most powerful tidal turbine device in the world has connected to the grid in orkney, an archipelago off the northeastern coast of scotland. lorna gordon has been to take a look. in the fast—flowing waters of orkney, a new tidal device is being connected to the grid. lying low on the surface of the water. we are in spring tide which is when the water moves at its fastest rate.
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we were given rare access on board. we think this is a game changer for the tidal sector. we have these two turbines on each of these legs, each one megawatt rated. it is the most powerful turbine in the world. we can recover that to surface to get access to maintenance. we can raise them, repair them and lower them all within a tide. the tides here are among some of the most powerful in the world. water flowing so fast around the 02, it gives the illusion the devices moving, cutting through the water, even though it is tethered to anchors on the sea bed. the attraction of tidal power is that it is a completely predictable form of renewable energy, and this powerful current is turning the blades on two turbines on this device, generating enough electricity to power up to 2,000 homes. in the year of cop 26, endorsing and supporting a pioneering,
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innovative technology space like tidal stream, is kind of standing for what needs to happen. tidal stream is able to complement the uk's transition to net—zero. tidal is still expensive compared to other renewables like wind. experts say government support would help to bring costs down and enable the industry to develop commercially. i think all of these industries in the early phases need government support in one form or another. the industry finance needs to know there are guaranteed prices as it commercialises. when you look at wind, that is the path that was followed with wind. we need the same path followed with tide to make it work. and, yes, we need all of these different energy sources going forward. the uk government says it has a long history of supporting the development of wave and tidal stream technologies.
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the tidal industry would like more. driving further change in these islands and beyond. lorna gordon, bbc news, orkney. for almost 20 years, richard hammond has been one third of the hugely succesful driving trio that includes james may and, of course, jeremy clarkson. coming to fame here on the bbc�*s top gear, they can now be found on amazon prime, where their series the grand tour constantly ranks as the one the streaming service's now the team are back with a brand—new special, and a little earlier, richard hammond told me all about swapping the tropical locations of previous programmes, and instead exploring their own backyard, scotland. it made for a more — i dare say, a slightly more relaxed feel. it's almost as though some of the burden of the huge, big adventures has been lifted, and it's kind of matey and charming, and relaxed. andy willman, the editor, the inspiration behind the show, really — he certainly said when he came out of the edit blinking in the sunlight, it has a gentle charm to it. which i think people will enjoy, it's a good time for it.
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so was the decision to film in scotland it taken before the pandemic, or afterwards? oh, it was taken post, it was taken... we had a plan, i think we are heading to russia, we got some way down planning that. but when we couldn't actually really in stoneham say we are going ahead — it's very difficult, a lot of people are freelance you can't be booking them, it's very expensive if it then falls down — and then we thought, "well, where can we be pretty guaranteed to be able to go? let's go close to home." that's when, in discussion, we said, "hang on a minute. the scottish highlands is some of the most beautiful scenery in the world, let's go there." and then we had, as always, the daft question that we wanted to answer in the course of this show, which in this instance was — if you're of a certain age, you'll remember looking out of the window of your family home, and on the drive in the family car, which is always some drab—coloured, drab—shaped, dreary little, i don't know, vauxhall viva, something unambitious, willfully so, and modest.
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whereas we then turn around and watch the television, and we would watch kojak or starsky & hutch, or the dukes of hazard, and they'd all be flashing around an enormous, noisy, beautiful, flamboyant cars. and we asked, "why didn't they sell those in the uk? why didn't we have those?" so we got a hold of some and set about finding out. and how did that go down, seeing these cars in scotland? laughter well, we got to edinburgh and we realised that that was a city not built to accommodate a full—sized 1980s american sedan. it was built to accommodate and allow for the free and easy passage of a horse. so that was a problem. actually, once we got out onto those beautiful, sweeping roads around the northern coast of scotland, they worked a treat. and we enjoyed them so much so thatjeremy and i brought our car home, in fact.
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although mine is broken and hasn't turned the wheel since, but i'll fix it eventually. —— turned a wheel since. that's good to know, that certainly is a seal of appreciation. so did you discover a new found appreciation for the scenery and nature in, well, i was going to say your own backyard, but in scotland? yeah, i mean, you forget how far scotland is from everywhere else in the uk. it's a big country! we did, to be honest, i've filmed there a few times over the years and it is always epic and beautiful, it always is. and like i say, we appeal to a global audience, and scotland enjoys global status will it's admired across the world. i mean, all of america claims to be scottish anyway. so it was an absolute pleasure — and also to go and explore, and know we have with us our crew who are such a talented bunch. they can do itjustice, visually and in audio terms. so they brought to life, and it's almost another character in the film. there's this beautiful, sometimes misty, sometimes rainy, sometimes it's a startlingly beautiful, sunny landscape.
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and we learn thatjeremy clarkson is extending his skills to become a farmer, as well, now? i know! well, you say extending his skills — he's as good at farming as he is most of the things we try and do in the grand tour — if we're honest about it. but it is a genuine passion of his, and you see that in the show, which i love. he really does care about it, and that shines through. and i think that's important, isn't it, in any television programme that the people at the centre of it — if they are genuinely enthusiastic about a subject, if they are really knowledgeable and passionate about it, that is compelling. and whether they are baking cakes, grooming dogs, talking about cars or farming, that passion and enthusiasm is compelling. we are drawn to watch it. we look forward to the programme. richard hammond, many thanks. thank you, reeta, an absolute pleasure, nice to talk to you.
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richard hammond talking to me a little bit earlier, looking like he was having an absolute blast on the streets in scotland. good evening. summer warmth and sunshine may be in short supply at the moment, but one thing we haven't been short of today is rain. drenching downpours and thunderstorms have affected many places. and in northern scotland, the rain has been heavy and persistent and we still have this met office amber warning in force, with that wet weather continuing on through the evening and into the night and then sinking its way a little further southwards as well, getting in across northern ireland through the early hours of thursday. for england and wales, showers taking a while to fade, but most places should be dry by the end of the night. compared with some we've had recently, it's going to be a relatively cool and fresh night as well. so low pressure will still be close by during tomorrow, this low drifting slowly eastwards. this next little area of low—pressure racing in from the southwest will start
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to influence the weather as we head towards the end of the day. but across northern ireland, scotland and northern england, we can expect a lot of cloud, some outbreaks of rain at times. wales, the midlands, east anglia and the southeast should be largely dry with some sunshine, just one or two showers, and then our area of low pressure approaching from the southwest to bring cloud and rain here by the end of the afternoon. it is going to be quite a windy day and quite a cool one for the time of year as well, top temperatures between 16—21 celsius. but as this little area of low pressure approaches on the southwest, we're going to see some really heavy rain for a time across southwest england, getting up into south wales and running eastwards as we go through the night. and for a time, some very strong and gusty winds. we could see gusts of 40—50 mph or more in some exposed spots. quite unusual for this time of year, could cause some disruption. the wet and fairly blustery weather will push eastwards across the midlands, east anglia, the southeast, so summer rain here for a time on friday.
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that will tend to clear away. drier conditions behind, with some sunny spells. still the potential for 1—2 showers and temperatures between 17—20 celsius. now, as we head into the weekend, we have low pressure up to the northeast, higher pressure to the southwest, but neither really taking control of our weather. we're kind of trapped between the two, so that means there will still be some showers but not as many as we've had over recent days, a decent amount of dry weather. and it will feel cool, especially in the north.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a boost for the uk's tourist industry as double jabbed eu and us citizens won't have to self—isolate when arriving in britain from monday. catching a predator — we meet the reporter who worked tirelessly to reveal jeffrey epstein�*s sex trafficking operation. how iranian—linked hackers tried to lure defence contractors to reveal sensitive information by pretending to be an attractive fitness instructor from liverpool. and from behind the decks to centre stage, the world's most famous music producer, mark ronson, joins us to talk about his new documentary series.
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if there is one person who could be credited with bringing down jeffrey epstein, it might just bejulie k brown. after years of studying court documents and pulling together evidence, the miami herald reporter published a series of explosive revelations on the billionaire financier, featuring the stories of dozens of women who claimed epstein had abused them. her reporting also uncovered the way epstein was able to use his power and money to flout the us justice system. what happened next is well—documented. he was arrested a few months later on federal charges for sex trafficking, and by august 2019, epstein was found dead in jail. julie joins us now as she releases her new book, perversion ofjustice: thejeffrey epstein story.
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welcome to the programme, julie, very good to have you. just put this into a sort of timetable for us, because by the time you started researching this story, jeffrey epstein had already served 13 months for sex related offences, hadn't he? yes, in fact he had been released at least eight years earlier, so this was a case that was sort of like a cold case that i wanted to re—examine, because of the lenient sentence that he had received. find sentence that he had received. and did ou sentence that he had received. and did you start _ sentence that he had received. and did you start out to research jeffrey epstein? i did you start out to research jeffrey epstein?— did you start out to research jeffre e stein? ., ., jeffrey epstein? i thought i would do a story about _ jeffrey epstein? i thought i would do a story about sex _ jeffrey epstein? i thought i would do a story about sex trafficking i jeffrey epstein? i thought i would i do a story about sex trafficking and every time i began to do research on it, his case kept coming up, and every time i looked at his story about it, ijust kept thinking to myself, how did this happen? how did a man like this commit such a horrendous crime and pretty much get away with it? 50
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horrendous crime and pretty much get away with it?— away with it? so your “ournalism our away with it? so your “ournalism your investigation, _ away with it? so yourjournalism your investigation, was - away with it? so yourjournalism your investigation, was about i your investigation, was about cracking —— tracking down the women who made allegations against him. how did you do that and how difficult was it? well, remember, this had happened a decade before. these were 13, 1a, 15—year—olds, so now they were in their late 20s for the most part, and what happened was donald trump nominated a new labour secretary named alex acosta, and acosta was the former miami prosecutor who gave or signed off onjeffrey epstein�*s deal, so i wondered what the victims thought about this, because of course the labour department here oversees human trafficking and child labour laws, so here was a man who had basically let the predator off the hook who was now overseeing a large agency with oversight over
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this kinds of cases. find large agency with oversight over this kinds of cases.— large agency with oversight over this kinds of cases. and how much did the victims _ this kinds of cases. and how much did the victims know _ this kinds of cases. and how much did the victims know about - this kinds of cases. and how much did the victims know about what . this kinds of cases. and how much l did the victims know about what had been going on in the criminal justice system?— been going on in the criminal 'ustice s stem? ~ ., ., ., justice system? well, not a whole lot, justice system? well, not a whole lot. because _ justice system? well, not a whole lot, because the _ justice system? well, not a whole lot, because the real— justice system? well, not a whole lot, because the real overarching | lot, because the real overarching issue with this whole case was how much the federal government hid from the victims. i mean, they did a lot of this negotiation in secret, they made sure that the documents stayed sealed, even after he went to jail, they would not tell the victims exactly what he went to jail for, so the victims had to sue the government in order to get the information about exactly what happened here, so it was startling to them once i started explaining to them exactly what had happened and how this very wealthy politically connected man had manipulated the criminaljustice connected man had manipulated the
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criminal justice system. connected man had manipulated the criminaljustice system. so connected man had manipulated the criminaljustice system.— criminal 'ustice system. so you say that criminaljustice system. so you say that he was — criminaljustice system. so you say that he was protected, _ criminaljustice system. so you say that he was protected, he - criminaljustice system. so you say that he was protected, he was - that he was protected, he was helped? that he was protected, he was heled? , ., , , helped? yes, he was definitely heled. helped? yes, he was definitely helped- he _ helped? yes, he was definitely helped. he hired _ helped? yes, he was definitely helped. he hired lawyers- helped? yes, he was definitely helped. he hired lawyers in - helped? yes, he was definitely helped. he hired lawyers in a l helped. he hired lawyers in a strategic way, so that he had the right lawyers in place to try to influence the prosecutors on the case and ultimately the department ofjustice in washington. that case and ultimately the department ofjustice in washington.— ofjustice in washington. at what oint did ofjustice in washington. at what point did you _ ofjustice in washington. at what point did you realise _ ofjustice in washington. at what point did you realise that - ofjustice in washington. at what point did you realise that you - ofjustice in washington. at what | point did you realise that you had ofjustice in washington. at what l point did you realise that you had a huge story here? i point did you realise that you had a huge story here?— huge story here? i think when i interviewed _ huge story here? i think when i interviewed the _ huge story here? i think when i interviewed the first _ huge story here? i think when i interviewed the first victim - huge story here? i think when i interviewed the first victim and | interviewed the first victim and she told me her story. remember, they never spoken before, and this was just coming, their voices had never been heard, and hearing what they had gone through, itjust was tragic, and i think itjust moved me so much that i realised that we had to get this story out there from the victims perspective. d0 to get this story out there from the victims perspective.—
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victims perspective. do you think ou have victims perspective. do you think you have succeeded _ victims perspective. do you think you have succeeded in _ victims perspective. do you think you have succeeded in doing - victims perspective. do you think. you have succeeded in doing that? victims perspective. do you think- you have succeeded in doing that? to your satisfaction?— your satisfaction? well, if you're askin: your satisfaction? well, if you're asking me _ your satisfaction? well, if you're asking me whether _ your satisfaction? well, if you're asking me whether there - your satisfaction? well, if you're asking me whether there is - your satisfaction? well, if you're i asking me whether there isjustice served, certainly, withjeffrey epstein's arrest, that was i think one starting point forjustice, but of course he committed or allegedly committed suicide in jail. of course he committed or allegedly committed suicide injail. d0 of course he committed or allegedly committed suicide in jail.— committed suicide in 'ail. do you not believe * committed suicide in 'ail. do you not believe he h committed suicide in jail. do you not believe he committed - committed suicide in jail. do you l not believe he committed suicide? committed suicide in jail. do you i not believe he committed suicide? i think that there are too many questions, and until authorities reveal exactly how they came to that conclusion, i think... reveal exactly how they came to that conclusion, ithink... his brother does not think he committed suicide, his lawyers do not believe, and their forensic pathologist to think he was... there are two men problems with the story, and it was to early... jeffrey epstein felt he was above the law. he had already beat this wrap one before. in my view it
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seems too early for him to throw in the towel. ., ., ., the towel. 0k, we will have to leave it there. thank _ the towel. 0k, we will have to leave it there. thank you _ the towel. 0k, we will have to leave it there. thank you so _ the towel. 0k, we will have to leave it there. thank you so much, julie i the towel. 0k, we will have to leave it there. thank you so much, julie k| it there. thank you so much, julie k brown, the award—winning investigative journalist with the miami herald. thank you. it's a honey—trap fit for a james bond film. a hacking group aligned with the iranian government spent years pretending to be aerobics instructorfrom liverpool, to try and dupe a worker at an american defence contractor firm, according to a new report out today. the cyber security firm proofpoint say a so—called marcella flores connected with an employee online and sent flirtatious messages that contained malware. sherrod degrippo is the senior director of threat research and detection at the firm and joins us now from atlanta, georgia. hello there. it is an old tale with a very modern twist, i suppose. how
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did you detect that this was going on? ., ., did you detect that this was going on? . ., ., . , ., 4' did you detect that this was going on? ., ., ., ._ ., on? part of our daily work is watching — on? part of our daily work is watching to _ on? part of our daily work is watching to make _ on? part of our daily work is watching to make sure - on? part of our daily work is watching to make sure that| on? part of our daily work is - watching to make sure that people are protected from threats like malware, credentialfishing and malwa re, credential fishing and ransomware, malware, credentialfishing and ransomware, things like this, and this was caught up in one of those searches. �* ., this was caught up in one of those searches. �* . ., , this was caught up in one of those searches. �* . . , ., . ~ �* , searches. and what was the hacker's strate: searches. and what was the hacker's strategy and — searches. and what was the hacker's strategy and using _ searches. and what was the hacker's strategy and using this _ searches. and what was the hacker's strategy and using this character - searches. and what was the hacker's strategy and using this character of i strategy and using this character of marcella flores? it is strategy and using this character of marcella flores?— marcella flores? it is somewhat a throwback to _ marcella flores? it is somewhat a throwback to the _ marcella flores? it is somewhat a throwback to the old _ marcella flores? it is somewhat a throwback to the old tactics - marcella flores? it is somewhat a throwback to the old tactics of - throwback to the old tactics of espionage, where state intelligence agencies will create attractive profiles and try to gather information on potential defence information on potential defence information which in this case they did, and they created facebook profiles and, as you said in your intro, specifically around liverpool and attending the university of liverpool was part of the facebook profile of this particular actor. you suspect that this comes from iran. why do you think that? in
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analysing the information, as well as the piece of malware that was used by this particular actor, and we did that in conjunction with data released by facebook directly, and we were able to correlate that the tactics and procedures used in this particular attack line up perfectly with those that we have seen out of iran in the past, specifically social engineering, which is one of their specialties they use very frequently. their specialties they use very frequently-— frequently. and by social engineering, _ frequently. and by social engineering, you - frequently. and by social engineering, you mean i frequently. and by social - engineering, you mean assuming frequently. and by social _ engineering, you mean assuming the identity of somebody else? yes. engineering, you mean assuming the identity of somebody else?— identity of somebody else? yes, and b sendin: identity of somebody else? yes, and by sending messages _ identity of somebody else? yes, and by sending messages of— identity of somebody else? yes, and by sending messages of emotional i by sending messages of emotional appeal that might cause their target to speak —— take specific action, such as being an instructor and cooking on diet software, to make sure their weight was down during the pandemic. clicking that allowed a back door to the install. fiend clicking that allowed a back door to the install. �* ., . ., , the install. and what could this hackin: the install. and what could this hacking group _ the install. and what could this hacking group do _ the install. and what could this hacking group do with - the install. and what could this hacking group do with the - hacking group do with the information it acquired? typically we see these _ information it acquired? typically we see these type _ information it acquired? typically we see these type of _ information it acquired? typically we see these type of actors - we see these type of actors attending to obtain information that
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is relevant to defence, as well as continuing to spy on the traffic and movement of that particular user that target that they are going after, because they might have special to defence information that could potentially be embargoed or sanctioned and unable for iran to access. ., ,. ., sanctioned and unable for iran to access. . ,. ., ., ~ , ., access. 0k, fascinating. thank you so much. access. 0k, fascinating. thank you so much- that _ access. 0k, fascinating. thank you so much. that is _ access. 0k, fascinating. thank you so much. that is sherrod _ access. 0k, fascinating. thank you so much. that is sherrod degrippoj so much. that is sherrod degrippo speaking to us from the company proofpoint. thank you. south africa's vaccination rate has increased significantly in recent weeks and has been largely driven by younger people who are keen to show others that vaccines work and are safe. but with just under ir% of the population vaccinated, the country still has a long way to go before it reaches its target of 67% by february of next year. the bbc�*s vumani mkhize has more. right through this door, please. they are coming in their numbers. these are the more than 6 million south africans who have received at least one shot of a covid—19 vaccine.
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i'll be vaccinating you today. teams of nurses are stationed at various booths inside this johannesburg vaccination site. people are relieved to finally get their jabs. i just want to live my life and enjoy life, hence i came for vaccination. really much relief to have got my shot. south africa's vaccination roll—out is finally gaining momentum after a slow start. sites like this are administering shots to around 250,000 people a day. the government plans to inoculate 67% of the population by february of next year. the increase in vaccinations has been helped by greater collaboration between the public and private health care sectors and plans are in place to ramp up inoculations. the uk at its peak was vaccinating at about 400,000 vaccinations a day. so when you compare south africa to the uk, we can get to similar trajectories to what the uk
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was vaccinating at. south africans between the ages of 18 and 3a will be allowed to get vaccinated for covid—19 from 1st september. the current uptake is largely driven by younger people, who are eager to get inoculated. one of those is this newsreader, who cannot wait to get his jab once his age group is allowed to be vaccinated. all my friends who are in their late 20s, 30s and 40s, want to get vaccinated, they have signed up. when you speak to the older people here at work, one lady said to me, "i am not going to get vaccinated because i do not know anyone who has been vaccinated and lived to tell the tale." hopefully when they see us younger ones coming back from being vaccinated and being healthy, that will encourage more of them to line up. health experts caution although there is momentum, it does come a little too late. just because vaccination numbers are high right now doesn't mean it will stay like that forever. what we are experiencing right now,
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hopefully i am wrong, is a honeymoon period, in that there is a group in society which is keen to be vaccinated and those are the ones that are rushing forward to be vaccinated. there is a large percentage of other people that should be vaccinated that are not coming forward. but for many young people, they are just relieved there is a honeymoon stage at all. the government hopes the current uptake will continue to gain momentum and for people to spread the word about the benefits of being inoculated. vumani mkhize, bbc news, johannesburg. do stay with us on bbc news. still to come: music producer mark ronson joins me to talk about his new series delving into the history of the topic he knows best — music producing. a permanent monument in tribute to fallen police officers and staff has been unveiled at the national memorial arboretum. the prince of wales and the prime minister were among
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those attending a dedication ceremony at the site in staffordshire. phil mackie reports. the new monument overlooks a place of national remembrance. the giant doorway, which is slightly ajar, represents the threshold through which officers walk towards danger. the more than 4,000 who have died were remembered at today's dedication ceremony. i would particularly like to express my profound gratitude for the valour and sacrifice of those who have laid down their lives. this is an event for the wider police family, the people who haven't got uniforms on, the children, the parents and the partners of personnel who have lost their lives. among those taking place was gillian wombwell, who was widowed aged 21 when her husband david was shot alongside two colleagues in london in 1966. archive: here, for the congregation of police and relatives, was held - the funeral service of the three men
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who were shot dead. "do not think of me as gone, i'm with you still in each new dawn." proud. proud, and i hope he's looking down and saying, "about time, this is a nice place to be." was it an emotional day? i tell you what, i sobbed my socks off last night and i will probably sob my socks off tonight. yes, it was an emotional day. every rank was represented, from cadet to chief constable. this memorial, i think, will tell those who have passed away in the line of duty, but also those who want to join the service in the future, to realise that policing is very much valued. it's somewhere people can come to reflect on the courage of those who have made the ultimate sacrifice. phil mackie, bbc news, staffordshire. they were praised around the world
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for their handling of the first wave of the pandemic, but now many asian countries that had been at the vanguard of apparent best practice are seeing a surge of new covid cases — with many reporting a record number of daily positives, including thailand, south korea, malaysia and japan. hospitals in malaysia are said to be overwhelmed and turning away patients, and the south korean prime minister has warned that the latest spike in covid infections there shows no sign of abating. there are also grave concerns in countries like indonesia and myanmar, which are also reporting high number of positive cases and shortages of oxygen. our south east asia correspondent jonathan head gave us his analysis, saying three factors are at play. one is simply the new variants. the delta variant has spread much faster than what they were dealing with last year. last year, these countries managed to deal with covid through basically very efficient contact tracing. when you only have got maybe 40, 50,
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or 100 cases at most a day, you can use that method. but when you are getting thousands, it is simply doesn't work, there are too many contacts to trace. another is that their health systems are far more limited in their capacity to deal with very seriously ill people than you get in europe and the united states. the numbers of icu beds are much, much smaller. even in a country like thailand, with what is regarded as generally a very good health system, you reach the limits much sooner with the number of cases than you did, for example, in britain. and the third is the lack of vaccines. to be honest, many of these countries, it is fair to say, were complacent. they thought they had beaten covid and so they did not order vaccines early enough. malaysia did and because of that, although malaysia is suffering very badly at the moment, and the government has made blunders, it is on track to vaccinate most of its population by the end of the year, but other countries in this region are nowhere near that. indonesia, about 6%.
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thailand, 5% for all vaccines. vietnam, the poster child of controlling covid last year, less than 1% of the population vaccinated. they are all rushing to buy vaccines now, but the only ones they can get in any quantities are the less effective chinese ones like sinovac. they are putting in orders for vaccines that will only arrive probably towards the end of the year. so their attempt to vaccinate their way out of this simply is not moving fast enough to deal with the speed of the delta variant. the problem is, and we are seeing this in indonesia now, you can impose lockdowns, but you cannot do what we saw in wuhan last year or perhaps in some parts of italy, a total lockdown. because these are low—income countries where huge numbers of people depend on being able to go out and making a living. there is not a social security net. already in indonesia, for example, you are seeing the government, at least in the capital, jakarta, talking about lifting restrictions, even as their death rates reach an absolute peak, because people cannot survive. it is the same here in thailand. it is a very desperate situation. we are seeing, on the one hand, people being found having died
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at home, sometimes several members of a family dying at home, because they couldn't get medical treatment. on the other hand, people crying out to be able to go back to the kind of street activities they need to keep themselves together. jonathan head reporting. now, mark ronson is the oscar, grammy and brit—award winning music producer behind some of pop's biggest hits. from the wildly infectious nothing breaks like a heart with miley cyrus, to his iconic work with amy winehouse, to his wedding reception classic uptown funk, mark ronson's music is pretty much the soundtrack to all of our lives. usually spotted near the back at concerts and gigs behind the decks or as part of the band, the multi—talented producer is taking centre stage with a new documentary series watch the sound on apple+. he dropped by earlier to talk music, motown and paul mccartney, and we started by discussing his time interning at music bible rolling stone at the age of 12.
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i mean, my voice hadn't even broken yet — i had this little high—pitched squeak — and they let me answer the switchboard phones. in those days, it was like the old—school buttons, and i'd be like, "hi, rolling stone!" you know, it's amazing what they let me do, but ijust wanted to be around music. and i think because i wasn't some piano/guitar prodigy orsomething, iwas like, "ok, well, maybe i'll write about it, maybe i'll make it, i'm not sure. i just want to be around it all the time." so in this new series that you've made for apple+, you are charting the history of music production. tell us a little bit about what you look at. yeah. well, we all know what a great song is, but behind that, in a great recording and our favourite classic recordings — whether it's eleanor rigby or spectre — it's the sounds. and we don't even realise how much goes into that. so going to talk to people like paul mccartney or tame impala or the beastie boys about the revolutionary technologies that they used. like, even at the beginning, the beatles were revolutionising technology.
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so was t—pain, so was charli xcx, and they'd take these sounds that are very, like, outside in the beginning and then bring them to the mainstream with their talents, so i wanted to get behind that and talk to these people. and i've always been so fascinated with sound. the first time i met amy winehouse, the first thing she said is, "i want my album to sound like this," and she played me some '60s girl group pop. so sound has always been at the forefront of when i'm thinking about music. and you had so many big names when you were making this series, including, for example, paul mccartney. was that intimidating, talking to him, or not? you know, in this show, i'm sort of more the interviewer, so i'm just more thinking like, "ok, i don't want to ask paul mccartney some question he's answered, like, 700 times. what can we talk about that i know he'll get excited about and maybe shed new light on something that he's still never talked about?" so that's where my head was at. i have so much respect forjournalists and musicjournalism, all of it. i was like, "i'm notjust
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going to go in there and be some unprepared idiot," because that would be a wasted opportunity to sit with some of these brilliant people, so ijust overprepared like hell, just like i always do. we will take that respect, mark, thank you! and that's good advice as well for any budding journalist. i wonder if i can talk to you a little bit about your emotional connection with music. what is the best state of mind for producing really quality music? does it come from pain or does it come from happiness? i think it can come from either, as long as it's authentic, you know? so some days, you can go to the studio and genuinely be feeling super happy, and on a day like that, actually, it makes me think of when we did uptown funk. we were just in the mostjoyous mood and we were just jamming on instruments, and that's how that song was sort of birthed. and there's other
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times where pain... i think there's more brilliant classic sad songs than there are happy songs, if you really had to look at it, because it's hard to make a happy song kind of cool, in a way, but as long as it's from a genuine, authentic emotion and not trying to copy anybody else or whatever, you always have a chance of making something interesting. you were very close to amy winehouse, and i wonder how you're feeling now that we've just marked the tenth anniversary of her death? yeah. i mean, i don't really think about it in milestones or years, you know? it is strange to think it's been ten years. she's the person — she kind of put me on the map. you know, the work we did together is why i have a career, why i'm talking to you. i think the lessons that i learned working with her, really, about authenticity — she just rode for that harder than anyone. so whenever i start to do anything that sounds a bit fake or not true, i can feel amy's voice just
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being like, "hey, really?" — with her arms crossed — and i just think that that's some kind of... that's this thing, like she's always around. and she was a great friend. i miss her humour, i miss her energy, but that's what it is. mark ronson there, remembering amy winehouse. and before we go, how about this? a french dad and robotics engineer has built a robotic suit for his teenage son that allows him to walk. 16—year—old son oscar, who is a wheelchair user, activates the suit by saying "robot, stand up", and it then walks for him. his dad jean—louis constanza co—founded the company that builds the suit, which can allow users to move upright for a few hours a day. it's used in hospitals in several countries, but it isn't yet available for everyday use and has a price tag of around $170,000 us. up next for viewers in the uk is the bbc news at ten
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with huw edwards, and for those watching on bbc world news, laura trevelyan has today's edition of world news america. thanks for watching. hello, welcome along to our longer—range weather forecast, which takes us out ofjuly and into the first part of august. now, i think summer warmth and sunshine will be in short supply. wednesday brought plenty of heavy, thundery downpours with an area of low pressure drifting across the uk. this low, drifting a little further eastwards as we head through thursday. at the same time, a new low will be approaching from the south—west. across the northern half of the uk, scotland, northern ireland, northern england, we will have a lot of cloud with outbreaks of rain at times. wales, the midlands, east anglia and the south east should be largely dry with sunny spells and just the odd shower, and then our new area of low pressure will bring cloud and rain into the far south west later. generally speaking, it will be quite
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a windy day and a relatively cool one for the time of year as well. top temperatures of around 16 degrees for aberdeen, 21 for birmingham, norwich and london. through thursday evening, all eyes turn to the south west. this area of low pressure is going to bring some very heavy rain to south—west england, parts of south wales, other southern counties of england as well, and, for a time, close to the south coast, the potentialfor some really strong and gusty winds, gusts of 40—50 mph, maybe even a little stronger than that. the weather system responsible will continue its journey eastwards, as we head through friday, so we will see some rain for a time across parts of the midlands, east anglia, down towards the south east, and then tending to pivot away, leaving some slightly drier weather behind, some sunny spells, still the potential for one or two showers, and those temperatures still a bit below par, really, for this time of year. as we move into the weekend, low pressure will be quite a long way away up to the north east. still close enough to have an influence on our weather
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and this area of high pressure not quite close enough to dry things out completely, so there will still be some showers around as we head through the weekend, but they shouldn't be quite as widespread or quite as heavy as the showers we have seen over recent days. some sunny spells on saturday — those temperatures still only between 15 and 21 degrees, and a similar sort of day on sunday, large areas of cloud some showers, especially down towards the south, drier weather further north and west. and temperatures between 15 and 22. as we head into the start of next week, high pressure will try, very weakly, to build in across the north west. at the same time, low pressure will still be close to the south, so it is closest to the area of low pressure where we have the greatest potential for showers on monday, across southern counties of england, into the midlands and parts of wales. the further north you are, with that area of high pressure weakly building its way in, there will be more dry weather and some spells of sunshine. but, certainly, no summer heatwave. 14 to 20 degrees at best.
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so, relatively speaking, a fairly dry start to next week, but, as we head deeper into the week, the jet stream, the winds high up in the atmosphere raking back across the atlantic and bringing an area of low pressure in our direction. now, this could be quite a deep low, as we head towards the end of next week. it will bring some outbreaks of heavy and possibly thundery rain again, but also the potential for some strong winds. so, relatively speaking, a fairly dry start to next week, but then it will turn wetter and windier and is likely to feel rather cool, as well. summer warmth and sunshine in very short supply. bye for now.
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tonight at ten... the covid rules are eased for fully vaccinated travellers from the us and the european union. those coming to england, scotland and wales will no longer have to isolate on arrival. the news was greeted with relief by travellers. looking forward to it, you know, just a few short trips to the uk. we are so close here in zurich but it's so far when you know you have to quarantine. the change from next monday is seen as a major boost to british travel firms and tourism. but tougher rules will still apply to france. travellers from there will still need to quarantine in the uk. also tonight... this is wonderful, duncan scott, can
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you get the world this is wonderful, duncan scott, can you get the world record?

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