Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 28, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

5:00 pm
good afternoon, this is bbc news with me ben brown — our headlines at 5pm. relaxing the rules. from monday, fully vaccinated travellers from the united states and eu will no longer have to quarantine when they arrive in england. labour says it's reckless but the government says the time is right. we always said we would need to move in line with what is going on in the real world and people being vaccinated in europe and america means we can move to the next stage which means i live people to come here and if they are double
5:01 pm
vaccinated avoiding to have to quarantine. bronze for team gb�*s charlotte dujardin — who has riden into the record books, as britain's most decorated female olympian of all time — with six medals. this is wonderful. gold to great britain in the men's 4x200 metres freestyle relay! and britain's swimmers strike gold again at the tokyo olympics with victory in the men's 200 metre freestyle relay. the american gymnast, simone biles, pulls out of another final — saying she wants to focus on her mental health. nearly 28,000 new covid—i9 cases have been reported in the last 2a hours across britain — that's an increase of over 4,000 and the first rise in the daily total after seven days of falling cases. prince charles unveils a national memorial in honour of all the british police officers who've died in the line of duty. and after liverpool lost its world heritage status, it's given instead
5:02 pm
to the slate landscapes of north—west wales. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the government has decided that people travelling to england from the united states and the eu will no longer have to quarantine — as long as they are fully vaccinated. the change comes into force next monday, the 2nd of august. it's been welcomed as a big boost to both the aviation and tourism industries. labour, however, says the "last thing" the country needs is to "be exposed to yet more dangerous variants�*. more dangerous variants". and in the last hour the government has published the latest coronavirus figures for the uk.
5:03 pm
they show that there were a further 27,731; confirmed cases of covid—i9 in the last 2a hours. a further 91 people have died within 28 days of a positive test, taking the total number of deaths in the uk to 129,430. 0ur political correspondent alex forsythjoins me now. let's talk first of all about those rule changes on travelling to england announced by the government. labour pretty angry about it. it is a fairl labour pretty angry about it. it 3 a fairly significant shift labour pretty angry about it. it 1 a fairly significant shift from the government because they have said people in the us and most of the eu though not france at this stage if they have had both doses of the vaccine they will be able to travel to england and they will not have to quarantine so that is quite a change. they will still have to take a test before they leave and a test when they arrive in england but that need for quarantine for a ten day period has now gone away. the
5:04 pm
government has been under pressure for some time from the travel and tourism industry to relax the rules because that sector has been suffering crippling losses through the pandemic and their argument is now is a safe and proportionate time to do so. this was the transport secretary grant shapps explaining the government's thinking. we've already enabled people who have been double—vaccinated here, and we can prove that quite easily with the nhs app, to travel and come back and not need to quarantine, even if they're coming from an amber list country. today, we're expanding that to all of europe, including countries like norway for example, and switzerland outside of the eu, and also the united states of america, which does of course cover a very large number of people who come to this country, and we'll then look at what to do with people who are vaccinated outside of those areas, once we've got this pilot successfully up and running. asi as i say that won't get up part of france which is still on the amber
5:05 pm
plus was so even if you had had a double vaccination you will have to quarantine if coming from france and that will be reviewed next week but this has more broadly been welcomed by the travel and tourism sector and the labour have expressed some concerns. they say the government should have waited until there was an internationally recognised vaccine passport, a way of proving it was accepted across the board that people have had both jabs before this was introduced. it is also worth a sink we have not heard yet whether scotland and northern ireland will accept this and in wales, the first minister mark drakeford expressed some dra keford expressed some reservations. drakeford expressed some reservations. this is what he had to say earlier. given that they are making decisions that we probably wouldn't _ have made for ourselves, - it's very important that the uk government is able to offer us assurances that the risks thatl will be run, and there are risks whenever people visit - from other parts of the world i where the virus is in circulation, and where new variants - of the disease may be emerging, that proper precautions are in place. _
5:06 pm
the government is a saying if you don't do this now when people are double vaccinated and they are being tested when would you get the system up tested when would you get the system up and running? but it is worth noting that it is not being reciprocated across the board. there are slightly different arrangements depending on what country in the eu you go to and not being reciprocated by the us where they are still not wanting people from the uk to travel at there and they are advising against travel to the uk as well despite the fact there has been some hope remember back at the g7 summit when the world leaders got to get that there was talking about some sort of uk us travel corridor which has not come to pass it by the government hopes there will be some reciprocity down the line but at this stage they are going it on their own. it is worth noting the wider context. we have seen again the number of covid cases fall in the number of covid cases fall in the united kingdom and there is growing confidence in the vaccination programme. while the government is still saying they are being cautious and the us where they are still not wanting people from the uk to travel it there and they
5:07 pm
are advising against travel to the uk as well despite the fact there has been some hope remember back at the g7 summit when the world leaders got to get that there was talking about some sort of uk us travel corridor which has not come to pass it by the government hopes there will be some reciprocity down the line but at this stage they are going it on their own. it is worth noting the wider context. we have seen again the number of covid cases fall in the united kingdom and there is growing confidence in the vaccination programme. while the government is the direction of travel right now.— government is the direction of travel right now. alex, thank you very much _ travel right now. alex, thank you very much indeed. _ travel right now. alex, thank you very much indeed. they - travel right now. alex, thank you very much indeed. they have - very much indeed. they have announced that cruise lines can once again operate international sailings. let's get some reaction to that. with me is andy harmer — managing director of the cruise lines international association, which is the world's largest cruise industry trade association. good to have you with us. what is your reaction to that? i assume you articulated. it your reaction to that? i assume you articulated-— articulated. it is great for the cruise industry. _ articulated. it is great for the cruise industry. we _ articulated. it is great for the cruise industry. we have - articulated. it is great for the | cruise industry. we have been working very collaboratively with government for the last 18 months to build a set of protocols to return that safe cruising. we have had domestic cruises in the uk since the middle of may so this is a very exciting time for our industry and also for our guests who have missed the opportunity to travel and stay on one of our cruises. i'm sure they
5:08 pm
have missed the opportunity but are you worried they will be anxious about going back onto a cruise ship for quite a long period of time with a lot of people on board? cruising has resumed in other parts of the world even towards the end of last year so i think the latest figure is about 800,000 people globally have taken a cruise holiday and that has been a safe return to surface weather in europe or asia or more recently in north america. our customers and our guests can rely upon the fact we have built a multilayered approach to our safety and wellness on board our cruise ships and that we put the well—being of our guests at the centre of what we do... 1, of our guests at the centre of what we do... ., , of our guests at the centre of what wedo... ., , ~ , of our guests at the centre of what wedo... ., , ~ i, we do... that sounds fine andy but tell us in a — we do. .. that sounds fine andy but tell us in a bit— we do... that sounds fine andy but tell us in a bit more _ we do... that sounds fine andy but tell us in a bit more detail - we do... that sounds fine andy but tell us in a bit more detail what - tell us in a bit more detail what that means, what is that multilayered approach to safety? it starts with hundred percent mandatory testing of all our guests before embarkation and includes health screening on board as well as
5:09 pm
surveillance testing throughout. it includes those things we have become use to in modern life such as face coverings and social distancing, all of our ships have medicalfacilities on board and testing facilities on board. and for all of our itineraries we have worked very closely with local porch health and public health so we can again work closely with those authorities for our safe return to service.- our safe return to service. given those protocols, _ our safe return to service. given those protocols, to _ our safe return to service. given those protocols, to what - our safe return to service. given those protocols, to what extent| our safe return to service. given i those protocols, to what extent is it still a pleasurable experience to go on an international cruise? you are absolutely _ go on an international cruise? ym. are absolutely right, our guests are looking for a break and many of them have not had one for some time. 2 million people who normally take a cruise from the uk each year are delighted and very excited to be getting back on board our ships. of course it is a balance but our priority right now is that safe resumption of service, it means ever cruise ships will slowly over time start to resume international cruises in line with the latest
5:10 pm
government announcement. the andemic government announcement. the pandemic has — government announcement. the pandemic has been devastating for all sorts of industries especially at the travel industry. it must have been absolutely devastating for the cruise line industry. it been absolutely devastating for the cruise line industry.— cruise line industry. it has been a very challenging _ cruise line industry. it has been a very challenging period. - cruise line industry. it has been a very challenging period. we - very challenging period. we voluntarily suspended our operations just over 12 months ago. but also its devastating for the it's devastating for the destinations we visit as well, those coastal communities that rely upon the tourism. and also our longer supply chains that includes hotel years and travel agents and airlines and airports in all of those things that rip —— that rely upon a successful cruise industry andy thank you for talking to us. the manauuin thank you for talking to us. the managing director of cruise lines international association. we can talk to karen d. chief executive of the airport 0perators association, which represents uk airports. we have had this other announcement today karen that the government is allowing people to come in from the
5:11 pm
united states and the european union if they are double vaccinated from monday without quarantining. how much of a that going to be for the aviation industry? == much of a that going to be for the aviation industry?— much of a that going to be for the aviation industry? -- karen dee. it is a small— aviation industry? -- karen dee. it is a small step _ aviation industry? -- karen dee. it is a small step forward _ aviation industry? -- karen dee. it is a small step forward but - aviation industry? -- karen dee. it is a small step forward but it - aviation industry? -- karen dee. it is a small step forward but it is - aviation industry? -- karen dee. it is a small step forward but it is a i is a small step forward but it is a really important one. and we are very pleased that the government has decided to go ahead with this. the and the early 0r us are very important markets for uk airports and uk aviation. like of the sectors we have been struggling and in effect close for sometime now. it will be an important for us. which we are very welcome. this will be an important for us. which we are very welcome.— we are very welcome. this is something — we are very welcome. this is something the _ we are very welcome. this is something the aviation - we are very welcome. this is i something the aviation industry we are very welcome. this is - something the aviation industry and airlines have really been pushing for. �* , ,., , ., , airlines have really been pushing for. absolutely. certainly as other sectors are _ for. absolutely. certainly as other sectors are beginning _ for. absolutely. certainly as other sectors are beginning to - for. absolutely. certainly as other sectors are beginning to open - for. absolutely. certainly as other sectors are beginning to open up| for. absolutely. certainly as other. sectors are beginning to open up and as we see the vaccines rolled out within the uk, we have always felt that risk became less and much more manageable for us. really important for us to begin to restart the aviation sector in the uk in a safe
5:12 pm
way. and let us not forget passengers will still be required to significant tests before they travel to the uk. ., ., ., ., to the uk. labour are worried about this sa in: to the uk. labour are worried about this saying it _ to the uk. labour are worried about this saying it is _ to the uk. labour are worried about this saying it is reckless _ to the uk. labour are worried about this saying it is reckless and - to the uk. labour are worried about this saying it is reckless and seen i this saying it is reckless and seen the last thing the country needs is to be exposed to get more dangerous variants. do you have any concerns about this?— about this? public health has to be first but i about this? public health has to be first but | think — about this? public health has to be first but i think we _ about this? public health has to be first but i think we believe - about this? public health has to be first but i think we believe that - about this? public health has to be first but i think we believe that we | first but i think we believe that we are in a place where with the testing framework we have and the monitoring and the level of vaccinations we have in the uk that risk is something we can manage properly within that testing framework. we are pleased that the government has reflected that and has made this change. 1loathed government has reflected that and has made this change.— government has reflected that and has made this change. what about the traffic li . ht has made this change. what about the traffic light system? _ has made this change. what about the traffic light system? we _ has made this change. what about the traffic light system? we know- has made this change. what about the traffic light system? we know there i traffic light system? we know there is going to be another review of that in a few days' time. are you hoping for it for the relaxation on that, more countries going onto the green list for example?— that, more countries going onto the green list for example? clearly, you will appreciate _ green list for example? clearly, you will appreciate that _ green list for example? clearly, you will appreciate that there _ green list for example? clearly, you will appreciate that there is - green list for example? clearly, you will appreciate that there is only - green list for example? clearly, you will appreciate that there is only a i will appreciate that there is only a few countries that are on the greenness at the moment. for uk
5:13 pm
airports we are still seeing passenger numbers only really about 20, 20 5% of normal levels. if we are going to see our way through, we are going to see our way through, we are going to be able to provide the services we need to the uk economy, we need to see that aviation restart safely and as i say we have seen other parts of the economy opening up other parts of the economy opening up and as we see the vaccine roll—out, we think that is something we can do with a sensible and managed risk.— we can do with a sensible and managed risk. we can do with a sensible and manaied risk. . ., ., ., . ~' we can do with a sensible and manaied risk. . ., ., ~ ., managed risk. karen, good to talk to ou. karen managed risk. karen, good to talk to you- karen dee. _ managed risk. karen, good to talk to you. karen dee, chief— managed risk. karen, good to talk to you. karen dee, chief executive - managed risk. karen, good to talk to you. karen dee, chief executive of. you. karen dee, chief executive of the airport operations association. and just to let you know that tomorrow at 1.30, we'll be joined by professorjonathan van tam — england's deputy chief medical officer — to answer your questions about vaccine take—up amongst young people. get in touch with the hashtag #bbcyourquestions —
5:14 pm
or you can text 61124 — or you email yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. there's been more medal success at the olympics for team gb. earlier this afternoon, charlotte dujardin became the most decorated female british 0lympian of all time. she took bronze in the individual dressage with her horse gio who's competing at his first 0lympics, bringing her total number of medals across three olympics to six which includes three gold medals. earlier, there was a fifth tokyo gold in the men's 200 metre freestyle relay. tom dean and duncan scott — who won gold and silver yesterday — were part of the victorious team who just missed out on a world record. elsewhere britain's rowers won their first medal of the games — a silver in the men's quadruple sculls. for a full round—up of the action at the olympics this morning — let's cross to jane dougall at the bbc sport centre. hijane. as we have been hearing
5:15 pm
fantastic success for charlotte's with dujardin with six altogether metals and in the pool as the 4x200 relay team one. andy swiss has this report. another day of triumph and tears of joy- another day of triumph and tears of joy. for britain's swimmers, itjust does not get better than this. they had begun with high hopes in the man's free relay with the individual gold medallist tom dean leading them off and graduate they ground it down their opponents. firstjames guy and then you print a swing from matthew richards took them into the lead, do a second and a half clear as dunk and scott dived in for the final leg and scott dived in for the final leg and what followed was almost a victory procession. indeed the only real race was against the clock. great britain right on the world record, right on the line. this is wonderful. duncan scott, can you get
5:16 pm
the world record, it is go to great britain. , , , ., ., britain. just three hundredths of a second outside _ britain. just three hundredths of a second outside the _ britain. just three hundredths of a second outside the world - britain. just three hundredths of a second outside the world record . britain. just three hundredths of a i second outside the world record but what a victory. forjames guy in particular, the emotions overflowed. as they did 6000 miles away in maidenhead as tom dean's family and friends enjoyed another early morning party. and who could blame them? britain have now won three swimming goals for the first time in 113 years and the history boys could hardly believe it. $5 a 113 years and the history boys could hardly believe it.— hardly believe it. as a kid, getting ended u- hardly believe it. as a kid, getting ended up at _ hardly believe it. as a kid, getting ended up at gold _ hardly believe it. as a kid, getting ended up at gold medal _ hardly believe it. as a kid, getting ended up at gold medal is - hardly believe it. as a kid, getting ended up at gold medal is my - ended up at gold medal is my absolute dream and to do it after 25 years it is pretty emotional. these four lads are the best freestyle race in the world. so four lads are the best freestyle race in the world.— four lads are the best freestyle race in the world. so close to the world record _ race in the world. so close to the world record in _ race in the world. so close to the world record in the _ race in the world. so close to the world record in the end, - race in the world. so close to the world record in the end, but - race in the world. so close to the world record in the end, but of. race in the world. so close to the l world record in the end, but of the pickled _ world record in the end, but of the pickled in — world record in the end, but of the ickled. , ., , . , pickled. in the gymnastics meanwhile, _ pickled. in the gymnastics meanwhile, american - pickled. in the gymnastics - meanwhile, american superstar pickled. in the gymnastics _ meanwhile, american superstar simone biles has a nose she is withdrawing from her next event, she withdrew from her next event, she withdrew from the team final yesterday after one fault and she needed to focus on
5:17 pm
her mental health. usa gymnastics estate she would be assessed daily to see if she can compete and her other offence next week adding... —— other offence next week adding... —— other events. elsewhere, there was british disappointment in the tennis. andy murray and joe salisbury knocked out by croatia. at 3a, murray prospect glittering in the peh career may not be over. the room and brought some success. in the main quadruple schools. the bridge crew at the top of the screen clinging onto silver but it was a rare highlight in a largely frustrating day. the man's four had won gold at the previous five games but this time their hopes veered wildly off course. look five games but this time their hopes veered wildly off course.— veered wildly off course. look at the steering _ veered wildly off course. look at the steering problems _ veered wildly off course. look at the steering problems of- veered wildly off course. look at the steering problems of the - the steering problems of the british. there is going to be a clash between great britain and the italians. �* . ., , clash between great britain and the italians. ~ . ., , ., italians. after that remarkable near miss, they could _ italians. after that remarkable near miss, they could only _
5:18 pm
italians. after that remarkable near miss, they could only finish - italians. after that remarkable near miss, they could only finish fourth l miss, they could only finish fourth and you could feel every ounce of their pain. i and you could feel every ounce of their pain-— their pain. i forgot the steering a little bit. and — their pain. i forgot the steering a little bit. and that _ their pain. i forgot the steering a little bit. and that is _ their pain. i forgot the steering a little bit. and that is what - their pain. i forgot the steering a little bit. and that is what costs | little bit. and that is what costs us. little bit. and that is what costs us i_ little bit. and that is what costs us i am — little bit. and that is what costs us. i am sorry, little bit. and that is what costs us. lam sorry, i little bit. and that is what costs us. i am sorry, i didn't steer us the _ us. i am sorry, i didn't steer us the best— us. i am sorry, i didn't steer us the best at— us. i am sorry, i didn't steer us the best at the end there. at least the best at the end there. at least they finished- _ the best at the end there. at least they finished. not _ the best at the end there. at least they finished. not everyone - the best at the end there. at least they finished. not everyone did. i the best at the end there. at least| they finished. not everyone did. in they finished. not everyone did. in the double scoles, norway's race curtailed in the stockist of circumstances. help did eventually arrive at their hopes of gold have come to a less than graceful end. andy swiss, bbc news. the highs and those of sports. three gold medals, one silver into bronze makes six on the pic metals, that is how many charlotte dujardin has after coming third in the individual dressage meaning she has written's most decorated 0lympian of all time. her performance secured for the in the event earlier on and on her horse gio and she has overtaken
5:19 pm
catherine granger. despite her rain is coming to a champion consent, she was delighted with the bronze her horse gio relatively inexpensive and it was unexpected hence the celebrations the latest middle and end of the latest mental and analytic career which began for her backin analytic career which began for her back in london 2012. dujardin said it was an honour to be amongst the other female athletes who had won so so many incredible sports people, women that achieved so much. band so many incredible sports people, women that achieved so much. and now that i have women that achieved so much. and now that i have done — women that achieved so much. and now that i have done that _ women that achieved so much. and now that i have done that and _ women that achieved so much. and now that i have done that and more, - women that achieved so much. and now that i have done that and more, and - that i have done that and more, and i have typed it all, wes lesson i think i was or today i was level with katherine granger. and now i have beaten her, it is a little bit surreal, is in a? you only dream of these things happening and it has actually happened so i can't believe it. ~ ., ., , actually happened so i can't believe it. ., , ., , actually happened so i can't believe it. more details on this are on our website and _ it. more details on this are on our website and away _ it. more details on this are on our website and away from _ it. more details on this are on our website and away from the - it. more details on this are on our. website and away from the olympic system used to bring on the 100, manchester originals are scheduled to be plain and superchargers in a
5:20 pm
double—header at old trafford. they have confirmed the women's fixture is abandoned, the men's match is still scheduled to go ahead but keep up—to—date on the bbc sport website. ben. jane dougall. after seven days instead he falls in the number of coronavirus cases in the number of coronavirus cases in the uk they have gone in the opposite direction with a slight rise to almost 20,000 cases, about 4000 more than yesterday plus i figure. but the prime minister has described plans for fully vaccinated people to avoid isolation if they come into contact with a positive coronavirus case as "nailed on". the rule change will come into effect on august the 16th and will apply to all fully vaccinated people in england. in scotland, wales and northern, there are plans to ease the same rules at some point in august. how will the new changes to travel quarantines and the upcoming updates to isolation on august the 16th impact behaviour?
5:21 pm
how will this impact infections? joining me now is stephen reicher, a professor of social psychology at the university of st andrews. he sits on the government's behavioural advisory group, known as, spi—b, and joins us from fife in scotland. good to see you again. thank you for being with us. let's talk first of all about case numbers because we have seen the steady falls in the last few days which have slightly baffled quite few scientists as to the reason why but as i say the figures going in the other direction today. you worried that downward trend is going to creep back up? none of us know exactly what is going on with these figures. we don't know if they are a genuine dropping infections or change around testing. we don't know what that this is say the end of the effect of the year rows of people getting together for the euros, the effect of people being outdoors. the effects of schools closing for
5:22 pm
instance. 0ne effects of schools closing for instance. one thing that is for sure is the effect of the reopening on the 19th ofjuly are not showing through yet. they won't show through until the beginning of next month. the simple fact of the matter is that i and nobody else has got a crystal ball and i think the important thing to discuss at the moment is rather than speculating about things we can't know about. to do things that we do know will make a difference in terms of making it more likely that infections come down and therefore less likely that we need to re—any restrictions. behaviour is absolutely critical, there is no doubt about that. the simplest statistic of all is if you look at the number of contacts we are having in a week, it is about a third or so of what it was pre—pandemic. if we were to all relax and believe it is all over and to believe that infections don't matter and increase our contacts back to the level they were
5:23 pm
pre—pandemic, then it's pretty clear and pretty obvious that actually we would be in deep trouble. so, we need to be positive, we need to be optimistic, we need to enjoy the outdoors and enjoy the summer but at the same time, we mustn't be complacent and pretend that this pandemic has gone away because it hasn't. 50 pandemic has gone away because it hasn't. , ., �* , hasn't. so we shouldn't be complacent. _ hasn't. so we shouldn't be complacent. the _ hasn't. so we shouldn't be complacent. the daily - hasn't. so we shouldn't be | complacent. the daily mail hasn't. so we shouldn't be - complacent. the daily mail were quoting a senior government minister unnamed as saying it was all over bar the shouting today. i’m unnamed as saying it was all over bar the shouting today.— bar the shouting today. i'm glad there are people _ bar the shouting today. i'm glad there are people in _ bar the shouting today. i'm glad there are people in the - bar the shouting today. i'm glad - there are people in the government do have crystal balls ahead of the rest of us but it is impossible to tell right now. we really do not know. what is pretty clear and what we do know is that if people begin to think there is no risk, our research shows this from previous pandemics or this pandemic, if they think there is no danger, they will stop acting to stop infection. and that will include things like for instance not getting vaccinated. at
5:24 pm
the moment the government is very exercised about the fact that or young people are not getting vaccinated but if you send out a message to them which says infections no longer are a problem, then why should people get vaccinated? i think what we all agree on is that our best defence as many —— as for as many people as possible to get vaccinated. many -- as for as many people as possible to get vaccinated. michael gove was suggested _ possible to get vaccinated. michael gove was suggested people - possible to get vaccinated. michael gove was suggested people who i possible to get vaccinated. michael i gove was suggested people who don't get vaccinated are selfish. would you go that far? i get vaccinated are selfish. would you go that far?— you go that far? i think that is a completely _ you go that far? i think that is a completely counterproductive i completely counterproductive things to say. the thing that we know about vaccination and what works in getting people to be vaccinated is to engage with them and to explain things to them and make life easy for them. things to them and make life easy forthem. many things to them and make life easy for them. many people have a very genuine questions which need answering. and if you respect people and treat people positively and answer their questions, they are more likely to engage with you. if you push them away and say they are fools or call them selfish and so on, you alienate the very people you
5:25 pm
are trying to persuade. i think not only do i think it is not true and not fair, i think it's completely counterproductive and i note for instance that 10 downing street has distanced itself from mr gove's comments. distanced itself from mr gove's comments-— distanced itself from mr gove's comments. ., ., , comments. the government as i mentioned — comments. the government as i mentioned in — comments. the government as i mentioned in the _ comments. the government as i mentioned in the introduction i comments. the government as i mentioned in the introduction is| mentioned in the introduction is easing various restrictions, we have heard borisjohnson saying it is nailed on august the 16th when you do not have to isolate if you come into contact with the covid case if you have been double vaccinated, travel rules we have been reported today being east. does all of that, it may be good for opening up the economy and so on but does that sort of measure breed complacency? it is a difficult balance for the government, isn't it? it a difficult balance for the government, isn't it? it is a difficult balance _ government, isn't it? it is a difficult balance but - government, isn't it? it is a difficult balance but i i government, isn't it? it is a difficult balance but i think| government, isn't it? it is a i difficult balance but i think there are two issues here. the first is what is the direct impact of the measures in terms of increasing infection. and to think that concerns me here is that all the way through this pandemic, the problem hasn't been public motivation. by
5:26 pm
and watch the public have been motivated to do the right thing. it is supporting people to do the right thing, the government intervening to help us act responsibly by for instance making sure the public spaces are well ventilated so we are saved, by for instance providing the practical support so that people can self—isolate. let me use an analogy here just before this item we are talking about the olympics. 25 years ago in atlanta, you won one gold and over the last few days we have been celebrating the 100th gold since atlanta, a complete turn around. now what has changed is not the motivation of our athletes, it is lottery funding so that they can train, so that they can get all the right technology. that is what is leading to its being winners and in exactly the same way, the problem we have been this pandemic, the reason why we have been a fan is not because people lack motivation. it is because we haven't given people to support that they need and i think if the government continue to give that support, it would be the
5:27 pm
same winning formula that we see leading to all the reports almost every day of gold coming home from tokyo. we do need more support to people and as you say the second problem with these changes is its messaging. it is the way in which the first of all using the term freedom day suggests that, that is if we are free from the virus and thatis if we are free from the virus and that is a very dangerous thing. and also if the government messages that 100,000 infections a day that sacher javid argued we make it up to 100,000 infections a day but it doesn't matter, the implication is infections aren't a problem. —— sajid javid. infections do matter for a whole host of reasons. not least that although vaccines are very effective, still, a small proportion of people will be effected and still we have little more than half of the population as a whole which is actually vaccinated right now. infections matter. we
5:28 pm
have to bring infections down and we mustn't sent out the message that it doesn't matter so you don't have to bother because the irony is if you say to people it is all over, it will stay around for a lot longer. we got the message of stephen reicher, thank you so much from a professor of social psychology at the university of st andrew's. good to touch you as ever. the government has unveiled a £1.6 billion plan to improve the lives and opportunities of disabled people in the uk. the national disability strategy aims to tackle issues such as a lack of access to housing, education and employment. but campaigners say it doesn't go far enough and joining me now is kamran mallick who is the chief executive of disability rights uk. the government saying this is transformational. you the government saying this is transformational. ., ,., ., transformational. you disagree. good afternoon, transformational. you disagree. good afternoon. yes. _ transformational. you disagree. good afternoon, yes, thank _ transformational. you disagree. good afternoon, yes, thank you. _ transformational. you disagree. good afternoon, yes, thank you. we - transformational. you disagree. good afternoon, yes, thank you. we do i afternoon, yes, thank you. we do disagree. we don't think in its
5:29 pm
current form it is going to lead to the transformation that disabled people have been calling out for for a very long time. the root problem is that disabled people have not been part of the design of this strategy. there has been a lack of proper engagement with disabled people and our organisations. it is a lack of consultation and a lack of engagement. but the money if you just look at the money, there is a £1.6 billion which certainly sounds in these pretty desperate times like an awful lot of money. it in these pretty desperate times like an awful lot of money.— an awful lot of money. it sounds a lot of money _ an awful lot of money. it sounds a lot of money when _ an awful lot of money. it sounds a lot of money when you _ an awful lot of money. it sounds a lot of money when you take i an awful lot of money. it sounds a lot of money when you take it i an awful lot of money. it sounds a lot of money when you take it out | an awful lot of money. it sounds a i lot of money when you take it out of context. but some of that money is existing money that is kind of being repurposed potentially so this is not a level of new money that is coming in into making this strategy a reality but if you just think about that level of funding and think about even one of the things in the strategy that they talk
5:30 pm
about, the inaccessibility of train stations and the numbers that are still inaccessible to disabled people, that moneyjust to make those accessible would not go very far. so while it sounds like a big number, our concern is that some of it is existing money so there is not as much as we think.— as much as we think. that's an interesting _ as much as we think. that's an interesting example _ as much as we think. that's an interesting example about i as much as we think. that's an i interesting example about stations and access. give us more examples and access. give us more examples and tell us if you had been designing this strategy or put in charge of the whole thing, what would your plan be for transforming the rights and access of disabled people in this country? the starting oint is people in this country? the starting point is that — people in this country? the starting point is that engagement, - people in this country? the starting point is that engagement, so i people in this country? the starting point is that engagement, so it i people in this country? the starting point is that engagement, so it is i point is that engagement, so it is not about consulting with people, it is about ongoing engagement with us and our organisation. that means disabled people parts of lived experience drives the writing of this strategy and delivery of the strategy and backed up with a
5:31 pm
commitment of funding to happen over a number of years, we recognise this transformational change we talk about will not happen overnight. so it is over a number of years. you then have to look at some of the root causes of the inequality. the opening from the prime minister and the strategy very well paints this picture of this 14 million disabled people in our country and if we all lived in one location and we all said that these individuals have poor access to inclusive education, poor access to inclusive education, poor access to accessible housing, don't have full access to public transport and poor health inequalities and lack of social sufficient care, we would want to do something about it and there is some of the root problems we need to tackle. health and social care is not talked about in this and those kind of services are some of the key fundamental human rights basic of things that disabled people need to live, thrive, and get on in life and
5:32 pm
there is no mention of that at all. and why do you think the government didn't consult people like you and other disability rights campaigners? i think the government will say and they do say that they have consulted and they had a series of round tables that they talked about the online questionnaire that they did. but we already know there is a judicial review happening about the questionnaire and its legality and whether it was a legal way of engaging back in 2017, the un committee on conviction of rights and disabled people set the government very strongly that they needed to find mechanisms of engagement and they have not done that. why they have not done that, i think they need to answer for that as to why they haven't done it. we think they almost don't want to hear what the real requirements is to change our society.— what the real requirements is to change our society. kamran mallick, thank ou change our society. kamran mallick, thank you very _ change our society. kamran mallick, thank you very much, _ change our society. kamran mallick, thank you very much, chief - change our society. kamran mallick, | thank you very much, chief executive of the disability rights uk. thank
5:33 pm
you for your time. let's get more in the olympics and more support at the bbc sport centre, once again it is jane dugald. hello there, ben. she said she could not leave it but charlotte dujardin as britain —positive most decorated female athlete of all time. she won on geo also known as pumpkin norma into individual dressage advent. she was thrilled with her performance and the horse because he is going to be an experience but she did not have to wait for the other writers to finish so it was a bit nervy to see if she would say in the bronze position but she celebrated as confirmation came that she had one bronze. dujardin as to her double gold in 2012 and go than team silver in rio. she said she was delighted to have achieved so much. there was more gold—medal success for great britain pot segment in the olympic pool. this time in the final 0lympic pool. this time in the final of the four by 200 m freestyle relay. tom dean is now a double
5:34 pm
0lympic relay. tom dean is now a double olympic champion a day after he won his first goal. he along with duncan scott, james guy and rafe richards came within 300s of the second of the world record as they emphatically. finishing more than three seconds clear of the russian 0lympic three seconds clear of the russian olympic committee. it is their fifth gold medal at the games, a very emotional reaction of course and three of those have come in swimming. that hasn't happened for 113 years. the swimming. that hasn't happened for 113 ears. ., swimming. that hasn't happened for 113 ears. ._ ., , swimming. that hasn't happened for 113 ears. , ., 113 years. the way the last year has been and as — 113 years. the way the last year has been and as a _ 113 years. the way the last year has been and as a kid, _ 113 years. the way the last year has been and as a kid, dreaming - 113 years. the way the last year has been and as a kid, dreaming of i 113 years. the way the last year has been and as a kid, dreaming of an. been and as a kid, dreaming of an olympic gold medal is my absolute dream and to do it and finally after 25 years is pretty emotional. with these four webs here, we have the best resort in the run and 0dyssey my team—mate getting first and second is amazing and just the way how things have progressed, bracing, michael phelps, ryan rocky, and now we are the olympic champions. band we are the olympic champions. and that has come _ we are the olympic champions. and that has come true. another night to rememberfor that has come true. another night to remember for great britain pot segment in the pool and there has been success in the rowing as well for team won the first men's
5:35 pm
quadruple schools medal after taking silver. the four held off a late charge from austria and poland to secure second place behind the netherlands. since 1996, team gb have won gold in the men's fours but not today. with 500 metres to go they were very well—positioned but struggled to stay in lincoln if you watch at the bottom of the screen there was dramatic steering issues nearly leading to them crashing into the italian boat, they finished in fourth, australia the winners. lee brody has lost in four sets to jami. this comes as andy's brain's hopes were also ended. he and joe salisbury were out of the men's doubles after losing their quarterfinal match against croatia. they won the first set comfortably, taking it to six for postop that there'd step into a tie—break and
5:36 pm
10-7 to there'd step into a tie—break and 10—7 to marion. away from the olympics, and professional footballers in england are to be limited to ten higher fars headers a week in training. ——professional footballers in england are to be limited to 10 "higher force headers" a week in training under new guidelines for the upcoming season. recent "multiple studies" were conducted into concerns about the long—term dangers of heading. in 2019, a study found professional footballers were more likely to suffer from neuro—degenerative brain disease. guidance for amateurs is "10 headers per session and only one session a week where heading practice is included". has father died from a link to heading footballs. this has father died from a link to heading footballs. has father died from a link to headin: footballs. . , . , heading footballs. this message has to net heading footballs. this message has to get through _ heading footballs. this message has to get through because... _ heading footballs. this message has to get through because... players i to get through because... players are dying, and it's as simple as that. i think this is the start, i think as more and more evidence comes to light —— light, i don't
5:37 pm
think the bible have any option. i think the bible have any option. i think the bible have any option. i think the day will i don't know when, it's probably taken out of the game, you know, you can't put players at risk of something that can kill them later on in life. just before we _ can kill them later on in life. just before we go. — can kill them later on in life. just before we go, just to update you on some developing news on the hundred, umpires at old trafford have northern superchargers women's is abandoned because of the weather. it is a pitch inspection for the men's fixture at 6:15 p:m., seeking keep up—to—date on that on the bbc sport website, but that is it for now. jane, thank you. let's stay with the olympics. the american gymnast, and one of the faces of the tokyo games, simone biles has dropped out of tomorrow's individual all around final. she says she needs to "focus on her mental health." it means she won't defend the olympic title she won in rio five years ago. here she is speaking to reporters yesterday.
5:38 pm
no injury, thankfully. that's why i took a step back because i didn't want to do something silly out there and get injured. so i thought it was passed up the girls took over and did the rest of the job, which they absolutely did, and they should be really proud of themselves for how well they did last minutes, having to go and, and it's been very stressful, this olympic games. i thinkjust as a whole, not having an audience, there were a lot of different variables going into it. it has been a long week, a long olympic process, it has been a long year. so, just a lot of different variables and i think we are just a little bit too stressed out, but we should be out here having fun and sometimes that is not the case. ifelt like it would be better to take a back—seat, work on my mindfulness, i knew the girls would do a great job and i didn't want to risk a team medal because of my screw ups. they have worked too hard for that. but mental health first, because if you don't you will not
5:39 pm
i decided that those girls needed to go in and do the rest of the competition. but mental health first, because if you don't you will not enjoy your sport and succeed as much as you want to. it is ok sometimes to sit out of big competitions to focus on yourself because it shows how strong a competitor and person you really are. i'm joined now by callum skinner, a former team gb cyclist, who won gold at the 2016 olympics and has faced his own mental health troubles. thank you very much indeed for being with us. i think you relate to what she was saying there in that press conference, particularly when you are at the commonwealth games after you had all of that success in the olympics of 2016. bask you had all of that success in the olympics of 2016.— olympics of 2016. ask and i can definitely pull _ olympics of 2016. ask and i can definitely pull a _ olympics of 2016. ask and i can definitely pull a few— olympics of 2016. ask and i can definitely pull a few similarities | definitely pull a few similarities from simone's starley. i think she's been incredibly courageous to speak out and to be honest, basically heading into the 2018 commonwealth
5:40 pm
games, i was the champion and that comes with a lot of pressure. usually i can fly under the radar, but my mental health was deteriorating quite badly. i was suffering from depression at the time. i made it to the first day of competition and then chose to cool out —— pull out for the subsequent two days and then the final day i returned to win a medal, which in retrospect, i am delighted about. yes, i think she has done a lot of athletes i favour being so open about it. i wasn't on that occasion. my about it. i wasn't on that occasion. my coaches and my support staff covered for me and said i had a stomach issue. so all credit to her. i think she's done a lot to move the conversation forward. [30 i think she's done a lot to move the conversation forward.— conversation forward. do you think that conversation _ conversation forward. do you think that conversation is _ conversation forward. do you think that conversation is moving - conversation forward. do you think. that conversation is moving forward? to think they are seeing more ailing sports able to talk about that tall that's competing at the very highest level does take on their mental health? , , .. . , health? definitely in their capacity to talk about _ health? definitely in their capacity to talk about it. _ health? definitely in their capacity to talk about it. i _ health? definitely in their capacity to talk about it. i don't _ health? definitely in their capacity to talk about it. i don't think- to talk about it. i don't think this is a wave of athletes health
5:41 pm
suddenly facing mental health issues. i think they have always been there. they have been dismissed as a different physical injury which the fans and the media and coaches might accept far more easily than a mental health issue. there is still a good amount of stigma surrounding it in sports. i left sports a couple of years ago, and i have been employed ever since, and all of my employers have taken a very vested interest in making sure that my well—being is top—notch. that's not always the case and sport. it's a very cut—throat game, and to show any kind of weakness can be a threat to your career. any kind of weakness can be a threat to your career-— to your career. simone biles has had hue to your career. simone biles has had huge support — to your career. simone biles has had huge support and — to your career. simone biles has had huge support and sympathy - to your career. simone biles has had huge support and sympathy on i to your career. simone biles has had j huge support and sympathy on social media and so on and all around the world. there have been some comments, some negative comments, and some commentators have been saying to him about have let down your team and you have left on your country by pulling out of these events. what would you say to those sort of people? i
5:42 pm
events. what would you say to those sort of people?— sort of people? i think that it's their prerogative _ sort of people? i think that it's their prerogative to _ sort of people? i think that it's their prerogative to say - sort of people? i think that it's their prerogative to say but i sort of people? i think that it's. their prerogative to say but they wish. i think they need to try and understand the level of pressure that athletes can put themselves in and understand that this isn't an issue, it'sjust been and understand that this isn't an issue, it's just been swept under the rug before. ultimately, ithink we want to look after athletes better. we went to see it and have long careers and we want to follow them through that story. i really hope that simone comes back better and stronger on the back of this and we can all support or along the way. @ think we all help that. really good to talk to you. thank you so much for being with us, a former gb cyclist and a gold matter —— gold medal winnerfrom cyclist and a gold matter —— gold medal winner from 2016. cyclist and a gold matter —— gold medal winnerfrom 2016. thank cyclist and a gold matter —— gold medal winner from 2016. thank you. more now on the travel changes coming into place from next week — and the government has decided that people travelling to england —— the scottish who are fully vaccinated will be able to travel there without quarantining from monday. that follows a similar announcement we heard earlier on for
5:43 pm
england, that was announced and confirmed by ministers at westminster. so we can get some reaction to all of that from lisa, travel editor for the sun. you are in a rather sunny climb. where are you depressed about? i am in a rather sunny climb. where are you depressed about?— you depressed about? i am in the south of france, _ you depressed about? i am in the south of france, i _ you depressed about? i am in the south of france, i can _ you depressed about? i am in the south of france, i can cite - you depressed about? i am in the south of france, i can cite in i you depressed about? i am in the south of france, i can cite in the i south of france, i can cite in the south of france, i can cite in the south of france, and as he can see, the weather is glorious here tonight. the weather is glorious here toniiht. my the weather is glorious here toniiht. w ,. the weather is glorious here toniiht. �*, ., tonight. lucky you. it's raining here in london, _ tonight. lucky you. it's raining here in london, but— tonight. lucky you. it's raining here in london, but anyway, i tonight. lucky you. it's raining i here in london, but anyway, let's move on. you have disappeared for a moment, let's see if we can get you back... i'm not sure we can. and it was so sunny and beautiful there in the south of france. we will try and get lisa backjust in a couple of minutes. anyway, let's move on to some of the day's of the news, because the prince of wales has paid tribute to the valour and sacrifice of police officers and staff as a new police memorial was unveiled in staffordshire this afternoon. it commemorates over 1000 ——
5:44 pm
——was unveiled in staffordshire, this afternoon. it commemorates almost 5,000 police officers and staff who have died in the line of duty since modern policing began in the uk.(sot next) i would like to express my profound gratitude for the valour and sacrifice for those who had laid down their lives to keep us safe, to remember their families who mourn and to recognise those who continue to serve in order to safeguard our freedoms. those who continue to serve in order to safeguard ourfreedoms. whilst our expressions of appreciation will always be hopelessly inadequate and unfortunately make the anchorage note easier to bear, i do pray that this memorial will not only provide a hallowed place for us all to pay tribute to each of them, but also the reassurance that those who have given their lives so selflessly will
5:45 pm
leave a lasting legacy and will never be forgotten. a woman has beenjailed for five and a half years for stealing diamonds worth more than four million pounds from a jeweller in london. our correspondent sanchia berg is here. this is a real extraordinary story for anyone who has been following this case in the last few days. an incredible story, just talk us to read. incredible story, 'ust talk us to read. �* . .. incredible story, 'ust talk us to read. �* , ~ , ., incredible story, 'ust talk us to read. 3 ~ , ., ., ., read. it's like the plot of a hollywood _ read. it's like the plot of a hollywood movie - read. it's like the plot of a hollywood movie because| read. it's like the plot of a i hollywood movie because what happened was that this will mean we now know is said that she was actually a jam and value anna. she went to poodles in mayfair to assess some extremely valuable diamonds, and it's quite a bit of a slice —— sleight of hand, because she looked at, she took each diamond out and looked at it, put them back in the special paris which was then padlocked, and then she put that purse in her bag, and the staff from the jewellers were very concerned
5:46 pm
and said no, no, you can do that, there was a bit of a discussion from energy apparent they remove that paris and put it back. but what the julies didn't realise at the time was that she had swapped that purse for another one that she had in her bag and she had hidden the original person a secret compartment. and that only emerged much later when the jewellers had the stones x—rayed because they weren't allowed to open the paris, they couldn't open it initially, and they discover that instead of these beautiful diamonds, there were seven pebbles. so now we know that this is lulu, a woman of romanian origin who is living in france. she had a whole gang of people helping our. it is france. she had a whole gang of people helping our.— people helping our. it is like a con'urin: people helping our. it is like a conjuring trick, _ people helping our. it is like a conjuring trick, almost. i people helping our. it is like a conjuring trick, almost. a i people helping our. it is like a i conjuring trick, almost. a magic trick. so what the other gang members, do we know what has happened to them? do we know what has happened to the diamonds because? epic about the diamonds back? ~ . , ., ., back? while a number of the other members of _ back? while a number of the other members of the _ back? while a number of the other members of the gang _ back? while a number of the other members of the gang had - back? while a number of the other members of the gang had been i members of the gang had been pursued, identified by police, convicted, but they are still
5:47 pm
continuing their inquiries to find the whole group. and as for the diamonds, well, they haven't back in that they have disappeared completely. again were able to able to get to france within hours of completing the robbery and we don't know what's happened to the diamonds. know what's happened to the diamonds-— know what's happened to the diamonds. ~ . ., , ., diamonds. what a story, sandra, thank ou diamonds. what a story, sandra, thank you very — diamonds. what a story, sandra, thank you very much _ diamonds. what a story, sandra, thank you very much indeed. i diamonds. what a story, sandra, l thank you very much indeed. let's diamonds. what a story, sandra, i thank you very much indeed. let's go back now to those travel changes coming into effect in england and scotland for next week. we were talking to lisa, travel editorfor the son, who is in very sunny south france, and we lost her, we have her back, i'm pleased to say. are these rat —— relaxations welcome for the travel industry? rat -- relaxations welcome for the travel industry?— travel industry? yes, they are huael travel industry? yes, they are hugely welcome _ travel industry? yes, they are hugely welcome by _ travel industry? yes, they are hugely welcome by the - travel industry? yes, they are i hugely welcome by the inbound tourism industry because it has been paralysed for the better part of 18 months now. this is an industry that's worth about 28 billion to the uk economy in 2019. it employs over 500,000 people. it's a huge boost to this inbound tourism that people from the us and from the eu can now come in till, notjust england, but
5:48 pm
scotland as well, we have also confirmed this evening that from this monday, they will be allowing people to come into the country without having to quarantine an entry. without having to quarantine an ent . ., ,., without having to quarantine an ent . ., , without having to quarantine an ent . , ,, entry. labour says it is reckless and they are — entry. labour says it is reckless and they are buried _ entry. labour says it is reckless and they are buried by - entry. labour says it is reckless i and they are buried by dangerous variants coming in and so on. but you don't think that that is a real possibility. you are not worried about those sort of concerns? 14541431111. about those sort of concerns? well, i think what — about those sort of concerns? well, i think what we _ about those sort of concerns? well, i think what we have _ about those sort of concerns? well, i think what we have seen _ about those sort of concerns? well, i think what we have seen with - about those sort of concerns? well, i think what we have seen with a - i think what we have seen with a delta variant in the uk over the last month has shown that although we have had quite worryingly high numbers of cases, it hasn't translated into the same number of hospitalisations or debts as the first p waves we had. and depth of pain seems to be the one that is actually going through most of europe at the moment. there is some worries about spain, the numbers are very high, and their younger population who has not been vaccinated, but it's a good first start. it is quite hit the critical of us to say that we were allowing our own citizens to travel to eu countries, but we weren't reciprocated and allowing them to come into the uk. so this is long
5:49 pm
overdue. it's been six months since the eu has allowed us to travel into their countries.— their countries. also, we have got their countries. also, we have got the traffic light _ their countries. also, we have got the traffic light travel _ their countries. also, we have got the traffic light travel system - the traffic light travel system under review again. i think it's next thursday, is that, so what are you expecting to see there? expecting to see a few more countries added to the green list? if you are looking at the kind of data they said they would be looking at. the fact that they have got more countries at high rates of vaccination. there are many countries that have far lower case rates that we have, and there should definitely be a host of countries that should be added to that greenest. all he can hope is that is the case. i personally and i think of her videos here in france would like to see france removed from this amber plus list. at the moment, this is the only country where you currently have to self—isolate on return even if you have been double jab. in the real seem to be in place even though we are going to be letting eu citizens into the uk. so here i am at a campsite in the south of france. it's a fantastic campsite
5:50 pm
with many nations of your pair. i have italians, french, dutch german neighbours here, yet, it will be me having to self—isolate when i got home coming into my dutch and italian friends from next week will be allowed to go into the uk without self isolating, whereas i want. do ou self isolating, whereas i want. do you think that amber plus welfare france comment is that going to be changed next week?— france comment is that going to be changed next week? there had been indications that _ changed next week? there had been indications that it _ changed next week? there had been indications that it was _ changed next week? there had been indications that it was going - changed next week? there had been indications that it was going to - indications that it was going to change, but it seems strange they haven't done it today while they haven't done it today while they have announced this opening up of europe. uk2 europeans. it seems strange it wasn't on at the same time, but obviously the last announcement was done separate to the traffic light list, and that is generally where we care where countries move on our traffic light system. it could be that we could have behaved days, but british citizens want to be able to enter the uk without quarantining. hopefully that will all get sorted in the next update next week. shill in the next update next week. all right, lisa, you are making us very
5:51 pm
jealous there, but have a lovely, lovely time, what's left of it in the south of france by that speech. almost forgot what a beach looks like. thank you very much. thank ou. the bbc news has learned that over 1000 facemasks have failed safety tests, advise hospitals not to use the high—grade face coverings which are often worn by doctors and nurses working in intensive care units. the doctors units, the bna, said it was scandalous that staff had been put at rest. our correspondent has more details on this at rest. our correspondent has more details on thi— details on this lucy, what can you tell us? well. _ details on this lucy, what can you tell us? well, this _ details on this lucy, what can you tell us? well, this is _ details on this lucy, what can you tell us? well, this is all _ details on this lucy, what can you tell us? well, this is all about - tell us? well, this is all about facemasks. — tell us? well, this is all about facemasks, and _ tell us? well, this is all about facemasks, and at _ tell us? well, this is all about facemasks, and at some - tell us? well, this is all about facemasks, and at some of. tell us? well, this is all about| facemasks, and at some of the highest grade of facemasks. we reported in february that the department of health had said that certain amounts, more than 1 million facemasks should be withdrawn because there were concerns about the safety of men, and they would do
5:52 pm
independent testing of them. well, we have now discovered that the department of health wrote two hospitals last month to say that these masks had failed safety tests, and not only that, but the safety mark, the ce mark which is the emblem that shows that they meet the european standards, the british safety institution said that that mark on the mask was false. that has led the doctors union to say that this is scandalous, that they wanted questions answered. how did these masks, more than a million of them get into hospitals? how is it that doctors and nurses ended up using them? did anyone get ill or worse, they say, from using them?- they say, from using them? lucy, have we had _ they say, from using them? lucy, have we had any _ they say, from using them? lucy, have we had any word _ they say, from using them? lucy, have we had any word from - they say, from using them? lucy, have we had any word from the i have we had any word from the suppliers, what are they saying? well, the suppliers are held fine, and they provide hygiene and protection equipment. they believe that the masks did have a valid
5:53 pm
safety report. they say they passed on the safety information in good faith to the nhs, and they say that's on the recently when there where these new tests done did they just failed safety, and that's because the masks were small and they were tried on big people, and that was the explanation. there was a time at it was needed. they weren't hospitals not to use these masks and they have put a strategy in place to make sure there are replacements masks. you have to remember this is a catalogue of incidents. that the ppe can be used as intended. a select committee last week and said that £2 billion worth of ppe that the government had by couldn't be used. the government says that is a small fraction and it's always tried to get ppe to the
5:54 pm
front line, but here we have yet another million masks, more than a million masks that seem to have failed safety checks and had safety reports on them that the institution says was false. reports on them that the institution says was false-— says was false. lucy, many thanks for that. renewable energy could play a crucial role in the uk's attempt to reach net zero. wind is providing more and more of our electricity, but what about energy from our waters? experts say that we need to use all forms of electricity generation if that target is to be reached and are calling for government support to help the tidal industry develop commercially. it comes as what's being described as the most powerful tidal turbine device in the world has connected to the grid in orkney. lorna gordon has been to take a look. in the fast flowing waters of orkney, a new tidal device is being connected to the grid.
5:55 pm
lying low on the surface of the water. we are in spring tide which is when the water moves at its fastest rate. we were given rare access on board. we think this is a game changer for the tidal sector. we have these two turbines on each of these legs, each one megawatt rated. it is the most powerful turbine in the world. we can recover that to surface to get access to maintenance. we can raise them, repair them and lower them all within a tide. the tides here are among some of the most powerful in the world. water flowing so fast around the 02, it gives the illusion the devices moving, cutting through the water, even though it is tethered to anchors on the sea bed. the attraction of tidal power is that it is a completely predictable form of renewable energy, and this powerful current is turning the blades on two turbines on this device, generating enough electricity to power up to 2000 homes.
5:56 pm
in the year of cop 26, endorsing and supporting a pioneering, innovative technology space like tidal stream, is kind of standing for what needs to happen. tidal stream is able to complement the uk's transition to net—zero. tidal is still expensive compared to other renewables like wind. experts say government support would help to bring costs down and enable the industry to develop commercially. i think all of these industries in the early phases need government support in one form or another. the industry finance needs to know there are guaranteed prices as it commercialises. when you look at wind, that is the path that was followed with wind. we need the same path followed with tide to make it work. and, yes, we need all of these different energy sources going forward. the uk government says it has a long history of supporting the development of wave and tidal stream technologies.
5:57 pm
the tidal industry would like more. driving further change in these islands and beyond. lorna gordon, bbc news, orkney. sophie is here in a moment. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. it feels like summer is on hold at the moment, not least in parts of northern scotland, where we have a met office amber warning in force for heavy and persistent rain, which brings the risk of flooding and travel disruption. the rain continuing here as we head through the rest of the day. southern scotland, brighter, but with some heavy thundery for england and wales, shar is taking a while to fade, but most places should be dry by the end of the night. compared with some we have had recently, it's going to be relatively cool and fresh night as well. so low pressure will still be close by during tomorrow. this low
5:58 pm
drifting slowly east rates. this next little area of low pressure rating and from the southwest will start to influence the weather as we head towards the end of the day. across northern ireland, scotland and northern england, we can expect and northern england, we can expect a lot of cloud, some outbreaks of rain at times, wales, the midlands and east anglia and the southeast, should be largely dry but some sunshinejust one or two sunshine just one or two showers, then our area of the pressure pension from the southwest will bring cloudy and rainy here by the end of the afternoon. it is going to be quite a windy day, and quite a cool one for the time of year as well. top temperature is between 16-21 well. top temperature is between 16—21 celsius. as this little area of low pressure approach is from the southwest, we are going to see some really heavy rain for a time across southwest england getting into south wales, then running eastwards as the southwest, we are going to see some really heavy rain for @ across southwest england getting into south wales, then running east rates as we go through the year, could cause for @. go through the year, could cause for @, some very strong and gusty winds. he could see gusts of 140—50 mph or
5:59 pm
more in some exposed spots. quite unusualfor more in some exposed spots. quite unusual for this more in some exposed spots. quite unusualfor this time of more in some exposed spots. quite unusual for this time of year, could cause some disruption the wet and fairly blustery weather will play she spreads across the midlands, east anglia met the southeast, so some rain here for a time on friday. that will tend to clear away, drier conditions behind the some sunny spouse must of the potential for one or two showers, the temperature is between 17—20 celsius. now, as we head into the weekend, we have low pressure up to the northeast. higher pressure up to the northeast. higher pressure to the southwest, but neither the wet and fairly blustery weather will push eastwards across the midlands, east anglia, the southeast, so some rain here for a time on friday. that will tend to clear away, time on friday. that will tend to clearaway, drier time on friday. that will tend to clear away, drier conditions behind the some sunny spells, still the potential for one or two showers, the temperature is between 17—20 celsius. now, as we head into the weekend, we have low pressure up to the northeast. higher pressure to the northeast. higher pressure to the southwest, really taking control of our weather. we are kind of trapped between the two. so that means there still will be some showers, but not as many as we have had over recent days. a decent amount of dry weather, and it will feel cool, especially in the north.
6:00 pm
at six: relaxing england and scotland's borders — from next week double—jabbed tourists from the eu and the united states won't have to quarantine on arrival. the changes come into effect in the early hours of monday morning — it's hoped it'll give a much—needed boost to british tourism and allow friends and families to be reunited at last. looking forward to it. you know, just a few short trips to the uk. we are so close here in zurich but it is so far when you know you have to quarantine.
6:01 pm
but, after being classed as amber—plus, the changes will not apply to travellers arriving from france for now. also tonight: this is wonderful.

44 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on