Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 28, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines — bronze for team gb's charlotte dujardin, who has ridden into the record books, as britain's most decorated female olympian of all time, with six medals. commentator: this is wonderful, go to great britain! _ britain's swimmers strike gold again at the tokyo olympics, with victory in the men's 200 metre freestyle relay. the american gymnast, simone biles, pulls out of another final, saying she wants to focus on her mental health. the bbc understands fully vaccinated travellers from the us and eu will be allowed to enter england without the need for quarantine. a national memorial is unveiled for all the british police officers
2:01 pm
who've died in the line of duty. and the slate landscapes of north west wales, including six sites in snowdonia, have been awarded unesco world heritage site status. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. there's been more medal success at the olympics for team gb. charlotte dujardin has won bronze in the individual dressage, at the tokyo olympics, on her horse gio — to become great britain's most decorated female olympian of all time — with six medals. early this morning, there was a fifth tokyo gold, in the men's 200 metre freestyle relay. tom dean and duncan scott — who won gold and silver yesterday — were part of the victorious team who just missed out on a world record.
2:02 pm
and britain's rowers won their first medal of the games — a silver in the men's quadruple sculls. for a full round—up of the action at the olympics this morning, let's cross to jane dougall at the bbc sport centre. what a fantastic day. that is just so far. who knows what will happen next. charlotte dujardin has won a third successive individual olympic title, making her britain's most decorated female olympian of all—time, with six olympic medals. after performing on her horse, gio, it was a nerve—wracking moment for dujardin, who had to wait for the other riders to finish, to see if she would stay in the bronze position. a relatively inexperienced horse.
2:03 pm
cheering then, confirmation came that she had finished third, and added to her first bronze of the games in the team dressage event. dujardin now has six olympic medals, having won double gold at london 2012, and gold and team silver in rio on the now—retired valegro. well, dujardin wasn't the only success for team gb today. medals have been won elsewhere — most notably in the pool — as the men's 4 x 200 metre relay team stole the headlines. andy swiss reports. another day of triumph and tears ofjoy. for britain's swimmers, itjust doesn't get better than this. they began with high hopes in the men's freestyle relay, with individual gold medallist tom dean leading them off. and gradually, they ground down their opponents. firstjames guy, than a brilliant swim from matthew richards took them into the lead nearly a second and a half clear, as duncan scott dived in for the final leg.
2:04 pm
what followed was almost a victory procession. indeed, their only real race was against the clock. team great britain right on the world record line. this is wonderful. duncan scott, can you get the world record? it's gold to great britain. just three hundredths of a second outside the world record, but what a victory! forjames guy in particular, the emotions overflowed, as they did 6,000 miles away in maidenhead as tom dean's family and friends enjoyed another early morning party. cheering and who could blame them? britain have now won three swimming golds for the first time in 113 years, and the history boys could hardly believe it. as a kid, winning an olympic gold medal was my absolute dream. to do it finally, after 25 years, it's pretty emotional. with these four lads here, we've got the best freestylers in the world. so close to the world record in the end. i if anything, i'm a bit gutted.
2:05 pm
in the gymnastics, meanwhile, american superstar simone biles has announced she is withdrawing from her next event, thursday's all—around final. yesterday she withdrew from the team final after one vault, saying she needed to focus on her mental health. usa gymnastics say biles will be assessed daily to see if she can compete in her other events next week, adding, "we wholeheartedly support simone's decision and applaud her bravery in prioritising her well—being. her courage showed yet again why she is a role model for so many." elsewhere, there was british disappointment in the tennis. andy murray and joe salisbury knocked out by croatia's marin cilic and ivan dodig. at 3a, murray's glittering olympic career may now be over. the rowing brought some success in the men's quadruple sculls. the british crew at the top of the screen clinging on for silver, but it was a rare highlight in a largely frustrating day. the men's four had won gold at the previous five games,
2:06 pm
but this time, their hopes veered wildly off course. look at the steering problems of the british! there's going to be a crash between great britain and the italians! after that remarkable near miss, they could only finish fourth, and you could feel every ounce of their pain. i forgot the steering a little bit, and i think that's what cost us. lads, i'm sorry i didn't steer us the best line at the end there. at least they finished. not everyone did. in the double sculls, norway's race curtailed in the soggiest of circumstances. help did eventually arrive, but their hopes of gold have come to a less than graceful end. andy swiss, bbc news. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website.
2:07 pm
so, let's see where that puts team gb in the medals table. earlier we spoke tojudy harvey, chair of selectors for dressage for the games, about charlotte dujardin�*s olympic victory. it is extraordinary, and charlotte has worked so hard for this, and carl hester, her mentor and trainer, he deserves as much of this medal as she does, and in fact the whole team has been absolutely remarkable and fantastic. but to deal with what we have all had to deal with, with covid, with the difficulty of getting horses over to europe to compete, with brexit, and one thing or another, whether or not the olympics beyond, to then to be able to focus on gio, and to do that routine, and i think there is the first time it has ever been
2:08 pm
performed in public, that freestyle routine, it was just an expanding piece of professionalism and concentration in sport. she truly deserves this. it is fantastic. the german rider was outstanding, absolutely outstanding, and fully deserved to win. i think charlotte could have had a little squeak at silver, but to get bronze is phenomenal, on a horse who internationaljudges really don't know very well. he's the youngest horse in the middle and, basically, a lot of people laughed at charlotte when she chose that horse, because he's so small and little that they felt he didn't have the dynamic of the big stage. but he has highlighted all his strengths, and really trained him brilliantly, and itjust really trained him brilliantly, and it just goes to really trained him brilliantly, and itjust goes to show what really trained him brilliantly, and it just goes to show what you really trained him brilliantly, and itjust goes to show what you can do, and he has proved himself as a number one dressage horse for the future. so, let's see where that puts team
2:09 pm
gb in the medals table. they now have 16 medals in total — thanks to the additional 4, today. this puts them 6th on day five of the olympic games. the bbc understands that ministers have decided that fully vaccinated travellers from the us and eu will be allowed to enter england without the need for quarantine. the start date has not yet been announced. the aviation industry has been pushing the government for a relaxation of the rules. with more on that, i'm joined by our political correspondent iain watson from westminster. just take us through then exactly what has been agreed. there is a meeting of the covid oh committee, the covert operations committee, the covert operations committee, they were discussing this proposal that they could be a relaxation in travel rules. that if you can prove that you have both
2:10 pm
vaccinations, and these are approved vaccinations, and these are approved vaccinations, and these are approved vaccinations, and you're coming from the eu or the united states, then you can come into england, without the need to quarantine. in other words, if you are coming from an amber list country. there would be a proviso that you hadn't been in a red list country. most of south america, south africa and so on, in the preceding two weeks. but you would be able to escape quarantine if you are fully jabbed and would be able to escape quarantine if you are fullyjabbed and if would be able to escape quarantine if you are fully jabbed and if you are coming from a country on an amber list in either europe or north america. now this is something the travel industry have been pushing for some time, as you say. it is something the government said they would review by the end of this month and they have now taken the decision in principle to go ahead. what we are waiting for are the details of the decision that was taken. i think we will get those in the next hour or so and that would include obviously and crucially exactly when this would start, whether it would be aligned with auger i6 whether it would be aligned with auger 16 when domestic rules change, isolation changing by testing the
2:11 pm
people who are double jabbed, or whether to help boost the industry we get perhaps an earlier start date, sometime next week. again what is interesting here, the government have come into quite a lot of heavy criticism about not putting india on the red list quickly enough, as their critics and opponents would see it. so the fact that they are willing now to relax the travel rules a little bit further shows a quiet confidence at the very least in government that vaccination is getting the covid pandemic in check, and that they are now able to open up and that they are now able to open up even more sectors of the economy. but of course there is no detail yet as to whether there will be any reciprocity with the united states, because at the moment, with a few exceptions, if you want to travel to the united states, and certainly want to travel there on holiday, you simply can't get in. as far as america's concern, because of the prevalence of the delta variant here, we can't get in, and therefore if we are offering something to the american public that we do not get
2:12 pm
in return, then that aspect of this might be controversial. so again, when we see the detail, we will be looking out for whether the government is likely to say that sometime in the future, or the near future, the rules would also be relaxed for uk citizens. whatever labour had _ relaxed for uk citizens. whatever labour had to _ relaxed for uk citizens. whatever labour had to say _ relaxed for uk citizens. whatever labour had to say about - relaxed for uk citizens. whatever labour had to say about this? - relaxed for uk citizens. whatever labour had to say about this? we relaxed for uk citizens. whatever - labour had to say about this? we are still waitinu labour had to say about this? we are still waiting for— labour had to say about this? we are still waiting for responses, _ labour had to say about this? we are still waiting for responses, on - still waiting for responses, on whether they would go ahead on the same basis, but certainly labour have been far more cautious than the government. they say the government has been reckless with its borders policy. they wanted to see some internationally recognised system of covert passport in place before there was any moves to relax rules any further. in the shadow transport secretaryjim mcmahon said the government, at the moment, should be proceeding far more cautiously. it is quite clear that travel, tourism, _ it is quite clear that travel, tourism, aviation has been devastated by a year and a half of restrictions by a government that has been — restrictions by a government that has been all over the place, in terms — has been all over the place, in terms of— has been all over the place, in terms of its plan, and by a
2:13 pm
constantly changing landscape where consumers and travellers just don't have the _ consumers and travellers just don't have the confidence to book ahead, so what _ have the confidence to book ahead, so what we — have the confidence to book ahead, so what we have been calling for is an international vaccine passport, where _ an international vaccine passport, where we — an international vaccine passport, where we reach an agreement with our key destinations, like america, canada. — key destinations, like america, canada, like the eu, to make sure that when— canada, like the eu, to make sure that when it — canada, like the eu, to make sure that when it is safe to do so, and when _ that when it is safe to do so, and when the — that when it is safe to do so, and when the data allows that to be in place. _ when the data allows that to be in place. the — when the data allows that to be in place, the passengers have the confidence to travel again. also a call they are _ confidence to travel again. also a call they are from _ confidence to travel again. also a call they are from labour - confidence to travel again. also a call they are from labour to - confidence to travel again. also a call they are from labour to see i confidence to travel again. also a i call they are from labour to see the data on which the decisions have been based. the setting up not been transparent enough and they want to be convinced that the scientific evidence would allow this further relaxation to take place. but certainly there are concerns that other countries were opening up more quickly than we were, and concerns in government therefore that the uk could be at a disadvantage. thank you. the headlines on bbc news... bronze for team gb's charlotte dujardin — who has ridden into the record books, as britain's most decorated female
2:14 pm
equestrian olympian. the american gymnast, simone biles, pulls out of another final — saying she wants to focus on her mental health. the bbc understands fully vaccinated travellers from the us and eu will be allowed to enter england without the need for quarantine. the government has unveiled a £1.6 billion plan to improve the lives and opportunities of disabled people in the uk. the national disability strategy aims to tackle issues such as a lack of access to housing, education and employment. but campaigners say it doesn't go far enough as our disability news correspondent, nikki fox, reports for disabled children like florence, getting the right support and funding from government and local authority is crucial, especially when it comes to specialist education. this family had to spend £15,000
2:15 pm
fighting to get the right school for their daughter. ii—year—old florence is autistic, epileptic, and has global development delay. we looked at what would be best for florence, and we all came to the conclusion that a school with a specialist provision would be much better suited for her. the family weren't happy with the council's first choice of school because they didn't believe it catered for people with more complex needs, like their daughter. so we decided to take the council to tribunal to argue our case, and we had to fund all of our own private reports, and employ a solicitor to do that, which is a hugely expensive process. there are hundreds of families that are locked in battle with councils because it seems that the first port of call for a council is to say no, and make parents fight for it. as part of today's strategy, the government has admitted the special educational needs system is failing some disabled children, and it's spending £300 million trying to improve it. and the plans cross all
2:16 pm
departments, like housing. there's a commitment to increase the number of accessible homes. employment�*s mentioned. disabled people are far less likely to have a job, so the government are consulting on ways to make companies be more transparent when it comes to declaring how many disabled people they employ. access to health care. learning disabilities and autism training will be offered to all health and social care staff. but there are plans for more consultations and audits, including one around public transport, and campaigners are frustrated by the promise of more reports and less action. i'm really disappointed. this is a missed opportunity. the prime minister promised it would be the most ambitious and transformative disability plan in a generation. unfortunately, i think an awful lot of disabled people, 14 million of them, are going to see it as a broken promise. the government says their plan will be updated every year, and their progress
2:17 pm
will be scrutinised. florence's family were eventually successful in their battle, and she's now at a school which will enable her to be the best she can be. nikki fox, bbc news. i'm nowjoined by louise rubin, who is the head of policy and campaigns at scope. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. i mean, first off, what is your reaction to that strategy? i think there are some promising elements in the strategy, and there are things that we can welcome. so, for example, the focus on the extra costs that we know disabled people face in their everyday lives is to be welcomed, and some of the commitments around employment that were picked up a new report there. fantastic to see the government recognising that gap between employment rates between disabled people and non—disabled people needs
2:18 pm
to be closed. but overall, it is underwhelming, the strategy. that is not the transformational change we were promised by the prime minister. for us at scope, it looks more like a one year action plan, not the long—term vision we were expecting today. long-term vision we were expecting toda . ~ ., long-term vision we were expecting toda . ~ . , ., , . ., today. what were you expecting, what would ou today. what were you expecting, what would you have _ today. what were you expecting, what would you have liked _ today. what were you expecting, what would you have liked to _ today. what were you expecting, what would you have liked to have - today. what were you expecting, what would you have liked to have seen? i would you have liked to have seen? what could it have achieved? brute would you have liked to have seen? what could it have achieved? we were exectin: what could it have achieved? we were expecting something _ what could it have achieved? we were expecting something that _ what could it have achieved? we were expecting something that will - what could it have achieved? we were expecting something that will tell- expecting something that will tell us how life would be significantly different for disabled people in five years or ten years or the next generation, when it doesn't do that. it really rounds up a lot of changes and policy recommendations that have already been announced. now, that's not to say they don't have merit in them, they certainly do, but we thought this would be something bigger, and there are particular things that have been missed and overlooked. so for example on children, your piece commented on what the strategy is doing around education. there is lots and there that we welcome and we know that parents and carers battle with the education system, as you pointed out. but for children, and for their parents and carers, it is not all
2:19 pm
about education. the strategy tells us very little about what the government will do about their health and their social care needs, about getting a diagnosis, and we know these are the things that disabled families really struggle with, alongside the education system. with, alongside the education s stem. ., , , ., ., ., system. louise, i understand that a 'udicial system. louise, i understand that a judicial review _ system. louise, i understand that a judicial review has _ system. louise, i understand that a judicial review has been _ system. louise, i understand that a judicial review has been approved i system. louise, i understand that a| judicial review has been approved of the survey, the actual survey, because there were so many people unhappy with that starting point. do you believe that that is where it failed disabled people? we you believe that that is where it failed disabled people? we know that the consultation _ failed disabled people? we know that the consultation process _ failed disabled people? we know that the consultation process was - failed disabled people? we know that the consultation process was beset i the consultation process was beset with problems around accessibility in particular, so certain people with disabilities were not able to answer the questions because of the accessibility problems, and some of the questions disabled people told us they didn't feel they could express themselves and give the answer is that they wanted to give. so yes, right from the outset, they have been problems. the government did try to engage with disabled people but it certainly hasn't been a smooth or flawless process. so how do ou a smooth or flawless process. so how do you think — a smooth or flawless process. so how do you think this _ a smooth or flawless process. so how
2:20 pm
do you think this is _ a smooth or flawless process. so how do you think this is going _ a smooth or flawless process. so how do you think this is going to _ a smooth or flawless process. so how do you think this is going to move - do you think this is going to move forward? i mean, it has been described as a broken promise, unfair, inappropriate. what next? it comes off the back of a year and a half of disabled people struggling, feeling forgotten, feeling overlooked by the government, so tensions are high. i think what we need to see next is government committing to more funding. we have a spending review coming up later in the year, we want to know what they are going to do in the long to significantly improve disabled people's lives. just significantly improve disabled people's lives.— significantly improve disabled people's lives. just very quickly, do ou people's lives. just very quickly, do you know _ people's lives. just very quickly, do you know how— people's lives. just very quickly, do you know how much - people's lives. just very quickly, do you know how much of- people's lives. just very quickly, do you know how much of this i people's lives. just very quickly, - do you know how much of this money that has been earmarked is new money? i that has been earmarked is new mone ? ., �* ~' that has been earmarked is new mone ? ., �* ~ .,, ., money? i wouldn't like to put an actual figure _ money? i wouldn't like to put an actual figure on _ money? i wouldn't like to put an actual figure on it _ money? i wouldn't like to put an actual figure on it but _ money? i wouldn't like to put an actual figure on it but we - money? i wouldn't like to put an actual figure on it but we know l money? i wouldn't like to put an i actual figure on it but we know that lots of things announced in the strategy today are in fact things that have been announced previously. so it is not quite as generous as it first appears, i'm afraid.— first appears, i'm afraid. thank ou. a study of british adults in their late 40s has found that more than a thirds have multiple
2:21 pm
chronic health issues. the conditions commonly experienced include recurrent back problems, mental ill—health, high blood pressure, and risky drinking. the study was published in the journal bmc public health. researchers say they're "surprised and worried" to see how many people experience such issues in their late 40s. let's speak now to dr nighat arif. she is a nhs gp with a specialist interest in women's health. thank you forjoining us. i can certainly relate to the back pain. were you surprised by the results? i'm not surprised at all. as a doctor, i see a lot of chronic illnesses that actually come about around the midline. i still feel 40s, 50s and 60s is relatively young. the reason that this data has come about is because they did a longitudinal study, they look to people's backgrounds, their upbringing, and most importantly
2:22 pm
they included a mental health aspect. we realise as doctors that the brain and body, we cannot disconnect that, that comes as a package. so now what you feel and he is going to physically affect you down here. is going to physically affect you down here-— is going to physically affect you down here. . ., , , , down here. yeah, those mental issues and pressures — down here. yeah, those mental issues and pressures do _ down here. yeah, those mental issues and pressures do tend _ down here. yeah, those mental issues and pressures do tend to _ down here. yeah, those mental issues and pressures do tend to build - down here. yeah, those mental issues and pressures do tend to build as - and pressures do tend to build as you head towards that critical age, isn't it, that midlife age. why don't we talk about, or do we talk enough about these issues? i mean, for women, for example, it is menopause. for men, it is prostate cancer. do we talk about these issues enough? i cancer. do we talk about these issues enough?— cancer. do we talk about these issues enough? cancer. do we talk about these issues enouuh? ., �* ~ ., issues enough? i don't think we do. what has happened _ issues enough? i don't think we do. what has happened with _ issues enough? i don't think we do. what has happened with generation issues enough? i don't think we do. i what has happened with generation 2, what has happened with generation z, people born around the 1970s, we have social media, so platforms that allow people to talk about taboos and talk about midlife more so. unfortunately, it has a ways been packaged in such a negative way. it is a waste bin midlife crisis, the gentleman goes off and buys a the women a handbag. but actually what we are realising is that these are
2:23 pm
great to transitional periods, women are coming into their own, for the first time women are earning more in their 40s than they ever did in their 40s than they ever did in their 30s, which is amazing. women are becoming more empowered, we are getting more knowledge about how the menopause affects us. however what we are finding is we are missing, we are not preparing for the chronic health conditions that can occur, like back pain, high blood pressure, and also we are missing diagnoses of cancer that can come about. our body is a machinery, and as it gets older, these things come about, so we should be educating people around what are the signs and symptoms of diabetes, high blood pressure, how to look after your back, how to look after those joints much better. to look after your back, how to look after thosejoints much better. the education is coming. it is getting better. 50 education is coming. it is getting better, ., , education is coming. it is getting better. ., , ., , , education is coming. it is getting better. ., , ., , better. so does the onus rely on the medical community? _ better. so does the onus rely on the medical community? a _ better. so does the onus rely on the medical community? a lot _ better. so does the onus rely on the medical community? a lot of - better. so does the onus rely on the medical community? a lot of us - better. so does the onus rely on the | medical community? a lot of us look on envy at some the health service providers, for example, in the eu, in the states, if you have insurance of course, where there are many
2:24 pm
checks, and, you know, women have extensive medical checks annually. where does the responsibility lie, then? it where does the responsibility lie, then? ., , ., where does the responsibility lie, then? ., , where does the responsibility lie, then? ., then? it has to be both, it has to be with the _ then? it has to be both, it has to be with the individuals _ then? it has to be both, it has to i be with the individuals themselves, so exercise, look after your weight, make sure you are stopping smoking, make sure you are stopping smoking, make sure you are stopping smoking, make sure you are keeping a tab on the amount you are drinking as well, and having an awareness of mental health and reaching out for support. and then also what health care sector can provide. i work for the nhs, it is a phenomenal service, we just know how much it has had to cope with under the pandemic. the most important thing is there are things. we have offered national health checks for people, so from the age of 40, men and women are offered a cheque for diabetes, which is a blood test, a cheque for cholesterol, which is a blood test, we do their height and weight, body mass index, and give them lifestyle tips, and then vital screening programme, breast screening programme, breast screening programme, we also offer men and
2:25 pm
women bowel cancer screening programmes. unfortunately the pick—up rate is where we fall down on. for example bowel cancer pick—ups, only 40% of the population returned their kits back. but if picked up early we can prevent cancers such as that. i think the nhs, we've got to remember, it was set up as an emergency service to provide free point of access care at the point when someone needs it. what has happened is it has grown into this phenomenal health care infrastructure, which provides care for everybody, but there are limitations, and we as individuals have to play our part in order to pf°p up have to play our part in order to prop up this phenomenal, phenomenal service. idr prop up this phenomenal, phenomenal service. , . ~ ., ~ prop up this phenomenal, phenomenal service. , . ~ ., ,, , ., in the last hour, the slate landscapes of north west wales — including six sites in snowdonia — have been awarded unesco world heritage site status. it's the 32nd uk site on the list, and joins sites like the taj mahal and the grand canyon.
2:26 pm
let's talk to our correspondent tomos morgan, who's in llanberis. just update us on how significance this is. i just update us on how significance this is. ~ ., , ., this is. i think really for the --eole this is. i think really for the people that _ this is. i think really for the people that worked - this is. i think really for the people that worked in - this is. i think really for the people that worked in the l this is. i think really for the - people that worked in the industry, the people that lived in this area, what hope is this will provide another economic boost. this area was at once the worldwide industrial hotbed really for slate export across the world really. slate from north wales has been used to remove places like copan city —— cogan haguein places like copan city —— cogan hague in hall, places in melbourne and rio dejaneiro as well so there was a real interest in getting wales and the slate mines onto that list and the slate mines onto that list and today they have got that recognition that so many people here think they deserve, and they've got it. they were on a list, competing against people like korea's tidal —— korea's tidal flats. against people like korea's tidal —— korea's tidalflats. nice in france and the wine regions of italy. there
2:27 pm
was a delay because they were heavily debating a bid from poland but nevertheless as soon as they got into this bid from wales, there is very little consideration and that was given straightaway. you look at some of the shots here, on the drone you might be able to see as well, this is a stunning, rugged, jaggery landscape, that silvery glint in the sunshine, often, not always sunshine, often, not always sunshine, rainy and wales, so can a blending in with a cloud sometimes, it is striking when you drive through snowdonia, really. i asked annex quarrymen yesterday what makes the slate of way also impressive, why was it so widely regarded across the world, and i am told that it is actually the maturity of the slate compared to slate from other areas of the world. it is in the ground forfar of the world. it is in the ground for far longer, thousands of years, which is why it is so durable and has to the test of time across these famous buildings across the world. at one stage the industry here
2:28 pm
employed, at one stage almost half a million tonnes was mind annually. huge recognition for the area, hopefully a big boost economically and for people involved here, going forward into the future. i was and for people involved here, going forward into the future.— forward into the future. i was 'ust auoin to forward into the future. i was 'ust going to ask fl forward into the future. i was 'ust going to ask you i forward into the future. i was 'ust going to ask you what i forward into the future. i was 'ust going to ask you what it i forward into the future. i wasjust going to ask you what it means i forward into the future. i wasjust| going to ask you what it means for the local community. and the state of the quarrying sector at the moment in wales.— of the quarrying sector at the moment in wales. there are still minin: moment in wales. there are still mining going _ moment in wales. there are still mining going on _ moment in wales. there are still mining going on here, _ moment in wales. there are still mining going on here, certainly. moment in wales. there are still. mining going on here, certainly not the level it once was, a number of reasons why it has diminished slightly over the years, the use of man—made slate as well, which has got durability in a different way, importing the slate, which is cheaper than from other areas of the world as well but also machinery as well really. undoubtedly within the industry there is still a recognition for this particular slate, and why it was so important, why it was part of a huge industrial revolution in the 18th and 19th century, this was the hotbed for it.
2:29 pm
it was taken down from several hundred mines in this area, small minds in this area, taken down on the steam train, on the train is pulled by horses. and then shipped out across the world to where it is needed. so there is a huge this historical significance is as to how the slate was mind and taken across the slate was mind and taken across the world and as i say today the recognition in the hope is that the area can build on that. this area is now actually an adventure tourism hotspot with zip wires, mountain biking, things like that, but they concern from some people was keeping the tourists in the area for long periods of time and keeping that economic input, and the hope is that something like this can do what the taj mahal has done for areas of india, orthe taj mahal has done for areas of india, or the great wall of china has done, what the grand canyon has done for that area of america, that it can bring even more tourism to the area and boost everything around it as well. ., ., , the area and boost everything around it as well. ., .,, a, ., , ., it as well. thomas morgan, beautiful view of yourself _
2:30 pm
it as well. thomas morgan, beautiful view of yourself is _ it as well. thomas morgan, beautiful view of yourself is welcome - it as well. thomas morgan, beautiful view of yourself is welcome you - it as well. thomas morgan, beautiful view of yourself is welcome you have just come into vision as i said that! thank you very much indeed! thank you. the weather now with ben rich. hello. it feels like summer is on hold at the moment, not least in parts of northern scotland, where we have a met office amber warning in force for heavy and persistent rain, which brings the risk of flooding and travel disruption. the rain continuing here as we head through the rest of the day. southern scotland, brighter, but with some heavy thundery showers, and for northern ireland, england and wales, a story of sunny spells and some of those really intense downpours, with thunder and lightning, some hail and gusty winds, generally quite a windy day, particularly down towards the south, and top temperatures of 16 to 20 degrees. that is a bit disappointing for this time of year. through this evening and tonight, the showers continue for a time across england and wales, only slowly fading. northern ireland and scotland will continue to see cloud and some outbreaks of rain it will be a relatively cool night, compared with some we have had recently. as we head through the next couple of
2:31 pm
days, more showers or longer spells of rain in the forecast, especially in the north during thursday, and in the south during friday, where it could be windy for a time as well. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... team gb's charlotte dujardin rides into the record books as britain's most decorated female equestrian olympian. this is wonderful, gold to great britain's men. britain's swimmers strike gold again at the tokyo olympics with victory in the men's 200 metre freestyle relay. the american gymnast, simone biles, pulls out of another final, saying she wants to focus on her mental health. the bbc understands fully—vaccinated travellers from the us and eu will be allowed to enter england without the need for quarantine.
2:32 pm
a national memorial is unveiled for all the british police officers who've died in the line of duty. and the slate landscapes of north—west wales — including six sites in snowdonia — have been awarded unesco world heritage site status. let's go back to jane dougall now in the bbc sport centre for a round—up of all the olympic action. good afternoon. charlotte dujardin has won a third successive individual olympic title, making her britain's most decorated female olympian of all time with six olympic medals. after performing on her horse gio, it was a nerve—wracking moment for dujardin, who had to wait for the other riders to finish to see if she would stay in the bronze position.
2:33 pm
then confirmation came that she had finished third and added to her first bronze of the games in the team dressage event. dujardin now has six olympic medals, having won double gold at london 2012 and gold and team silver in rio on the now—retired valegro. there on the now—retired valegro. are so many incredible on the now—retired valegro. sportspeople come 0l women incredible sportspeople come out women that have achieved so much, and now that i have done that and i have topped it all, last night i think i was, or today, i was level with katherine grainger, now i have beaten her, it is a little bit surreal, so you only dream of these things happening and it is actually happening, so i can't believe it. there was more gold medal success for great britain's men in the olympic pool, this time in the final of the 4x200 metre freestyle relay. tom dean is now a double olympic champion, a day after he won his first gold. he, along with duncan scott, james guy and matthew richards came
2:34 pm
within three hundredths of a second of the world record as they won emphatically. finishing more than three seconds clear of the russian olympic committee. it's team gb's fifth gold medal of the games. three have come in swimming — and that's not happened for 113 years. the way year has been and as a kid, dreaming of olympic gold medals, my absolute dream, finally after 25 years, it is so emotional, these 4 lads here have the best freestyle in the world, my teammate getting 1st and 2nd, just the way things have progressed, raising michael phelps, the olympic champions, it is a dream come true. —— racing. so another night to rememberfor great britain's men in the pool — and there's been success in the rowing as well. the team have won their first men's quadruple sculls medal after taking silver.
2:35 pm
harry leask, angus groom, tom barras and jack beaumont held off a late charge from australia and poland to secure second place behind the netherlands. since 1996, team gb have won gold in the men's fours — not today though. with 500 metres to go, they were very well positioned but then struggled to stay in lane, some dramatic steering issues which nearly led to them crashing into the italian boat at the bottom of your screen. they avoided that to finish fourth, australia the winners. the only remaining british player in the men's singles — liam broady — has gone out in the third round, losing in three sets to jeremy chardy. this comes as andy murray's hopes of a third olympic gold medal were ended. he and joe salisbury are out of the men's doubles after losing their quarterfinal match against croatia. they won the first set fairly confortably, taking it 6—4, but lost the second — and then the third set went to a tie break 10—7 against marin cilic and ivan dodig.
2:36 pm
american gymnast and four—time olympic gold medallist simone biles has withdrawn from tomorrow's individual all—around final in tokyo for her mental health. she withdrew from the team final yesterday — during the competition — but remained at the side of her teammates as they went on to win silver. usa gymnastics has said in a statement... they go on to say... it has been really stressful not having an audience, lots of different variables, it has been a long week, along olympic process, along year, sojust long week, along olympic process,
2:37 pm
along year, so just a long week, along olympic process, along year, sojust a lot long week, along olympic process, along year, so just a lot of different variables and i think we're just different variables and i think we'rejust a different variables and i think we're just a little bit too stressed out. but we should be out here having fun, and sometimes that is not the case. just a quick update on the men's all around — gb's james hall finished eighth and joe fraser ninth in the final. great to finish in the top ten. that's all the sport for now. the prince of wales has paid tribute to the "valour and sacrifice" of police officers and staff as a new police memorial was unveiled in staffordshire this afternoon. prince charles unveiled a plaque at the monument, which commemorates almost 5,000 police officers and staff who have died on duty. i would particularly like to express my profound gratitude for the valour and sacrifice of those who have laid down their lives to keep us safe.
2:38 pm
to remember theirfamilies who mourn and to recognise those who continue to serve in order to safeguard our freedoms. whilst our expressions of appreciation will always be hopelessly inadequate, and unfortunately make the anguish no easier to bear, i do pray that this memorial will not only provide a hallowed place for us all to pay tribute to each of them, but also the reassurance that those who have given their lives so selflessly will leave a lasting legacy and will never be forgotten. our correspondent phil mackie gave us the latest.
2:39 pm
this would have been a bigger event originally but because of covid restrictions they have reduced the numbers of people here. there is a second part a little along millennium way to the national arboretum. the sun came out eventually and this is really the kind of image people would like to see of that memorial, which represents, i think you can probably see, a giant doorway slightly ajar, a threshold through which police personnel step towards danger. that is the idea. those little apertures in laidwith gold leaf which reflect the sun there representing courage and sacrifice as well. up to 5000 police personnel have lost their lives since the first recognisable force was founded several hundred years ago, around 1,500 in the line of duty, came to some kind of violent end. others, notjust police officers but police staff as well, represented
2:40 pm
here today, as was the whole police family. children, spouses, parents of those who have lost their lives were part of the service, as well as uniformed and retired officers too. very striking and clever design, phil. there is a police memorial in london, but it was felt that this was required as well, why? the national memorial arboretum is where people come to remember, a national place of remembrance. it was felt there needed to be something that would represent the police here as well as all the other memorials. a vast park filled with memorials. a great place to come if you get a chance to visit in staffordshire. you might remember the money was raised following a campaign by sir michael winner in central london. this is more centrally located as well. when there are not so many people
2:41 pm
around and the music is not playing it will be a place for quiet reflection. it was felt this needed to happen, it took seven years to raise the money, £4.5 million, lots of it raised by different police forces, the police family i talked about, not just police officers but their relatives. it is not quite complete, this is pretty much how it will end, but finishing touches to be put in place over the next coming months and years/ but i really think it is a fitting memorial to all of those people. i haven't met a single person who has lost somebody who has been here today who doesn't think that this is a really fitting tribute, a wonderful memorial to their lost loved ones. the head of the rnli is warning that more lives will be
2:42 pm
lost in the channel if migrants continue to cross in packed dinghies. mark dowie has been speaking to this programme as the number of people making the perilous journey is rising, with this year's total already exceeding the whole of 2020. charlie rose reports. watch your hands. children 1st. cold. _ watch your hands. children 1st. cold. tired _ watch your hands. children 1st. cold, tired and desperate. i! cold, tired and desperate. 11 migrants, including 2 children, are rescued by lifeboat crews in the english channel. this footage is the 1st of its kind released by the rnli. , , , . ., 1st of its kind released by the rnli. . _ rnli. this is becoming incredibly dangerous- _ rnli. this is becoming incredibly dangerous. live _ rnli. this is becoming incredibly dangerous. live site _ rnli. this is becoming incredibly dangerous. live site given - rnli. this is becoming incredibly dangerous. live site given to i rnli. this is becoming incredibly dangerous. live site given to be| dangerous. live site given to be lost on either side of the channel if these crosses continue in the way that they are. our work is becoming more and more important in bringing people to safety. that is the reason why we are talking about it. the charity has _ why we are talking about it. the charity has released testimonies from light blue crews showing the
2:43 pm
challenges they face do not stop once the rescued migrants are brought ashore. the once the rescued migrants are brought ashore.— once the rescued migrants are brought ashore. once the rescued migrants are brouaht ashore. . , , . brought ashore. the abuse that were thrown at the — brought ashore. the abuse that were thrown at the people _ brought ashore. the abuse that were thrown at the people walking - brought ashore. the abuse that were thrown at the people walking up - brought ashore. the abuse that were thrown at the people walking up the | thrown at the people walking up the beach, _ thrown at the people walking up the beach, the — thrown at the people walking up the beach, the women and children, there was some _ beach, the women and children, there was some drunken yob throwing a beer can. to then return home and faced a backlash from people in the community and on social media makes it all 100% harder. but it is dh deemed danger of crossing the channel in small dinghies which the rnli is especially keen to highlight. i was1 rnli is especially keen to highlight. i was 1 of a handful of journalists invited to take part in ac survival exercise at their training pool. the idea is to replicate the conditions migrants find themselves in when crossing the channel. bags of belongings, sick bags, very basic, and in the conditions and getting really rough.
2:44 pm
my conditions and getting really rough. my crews are seeing incredibly harrowing scenes when they come across both like the 1 you are in this morning, in the middle of the channel, out of sight of land, been passed by huge ships going in both directions, it is incredibly frightening.— directions, it is incredibly frightening. directions, it is incredibly frioohtenin. �* , frightening. and the rnli is forecasting _ frightening. and the rnli is forecasting a _ frightening. and the rnli is forecasting a busy - frightening. and the rnli is forecasting a busy few - frightening. and the rnli is l forecasting a busy few weeks frightening. and the rnli is - forecasting a busy few weeks ahead. the headlines on bbc news... team gb's charlotte dujardin rides into the record books as britain's most decorated female equestrian olympian. the american gymnast, simone biles, pulls out of another final — saying she wants to focus on her mental health. the bbc understands fully—vaccinated travellers from the us and eu will be allowed to enter england without the need for quarantine. let's return to news that the slate landscapes of north west wales —
2:45 pm
including six sites in snowdonia — have been awarded unesco world heritage site status. it's the 32nd uk location on the list and joins places like the taj mahal and the grand canyon. mark drakeford joins me now. thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news. congratulations. weill. on bbc news. congratulations. well, thank ou, on bbc news. congratulations. well, thank you. this _ on bbc news. congratulations. well, thank you, this is _ on bbc news. congratulations. well, thank you, this is the _ on bbc news. congratulations. well, thank you, this is the 4th _ on bbc news. congratulations. -ii thank you, this is the 4th world heritage site in wales, and for a small country, that se pretty proud record, add today has been a day of genuine celebration here in north—west wales. genuine celebration here in north-west wales.- genuine celebration here in north-west wales. , ., , ., north-west wales. they actually, a beautiful sight, _ north-west wales. they actually, a beautiful sight, a _ north-west wales. they actually, a beautiful sight, a beautiful - beautiful sight, a beautiful landscape, but why do they matter? they matter because it combines the drama of the natural landscape here
2:46 pm
and snowdonia with the enormous impact that human beings have had on it as well, particularly during the slate quarrying era of the 19th and early 20th centuries. that impact is very visible all around you here in north—west wales, that is what convinced unesco to grant world heritage status to this part of north wales, that you see the combination of the natural world and the human world and the way that they have interacted with 1 another. obviously the impact of that site behind you, i think there are 6 in all, have a global significance, going beyond the welsh borders. i had been reading that the area also exported technologies in its heyday, what were those? slate exported technologies in its heyday, what were those?— what were those? slate -based technologies, _ what were those? slate -based technologies, this _ what were those? slate -based technologies, this part - what were those? slate -based technologies, this part of- what were those? slate -based| technologies, this part of wales moved the world with buildings of
2:47 pm
huge significance and absolutely ordinary buildings as well. it was slate from wales that created the roofs of those buildings across the world and a technology that went alongside it in quarrying and mining of slate, also in the way that slate is used, those things were exported from this part of wales to the rest of the world. igrgte from this part of wales to the rest of the world-— from this part of wales to the rest of the world. ~ ,. . , of the world. we saw recently in the news what happened _ of the world. we saw recently in the news what happened to _ of the world. we saw recently in the news what happened to liverpool. of the world. we saw recently in the | news what happened to liverpool and its docklands. how does wales or the slate site guarantee that it does not lose its status? igrgi’ith slate site guarantee that it does not lose its status? with unesco's decision today _ not lose its status? with unesco's decision today comes _ not lose its status? with unesco's decision today comes a _ not lose its status? with unesco's decision today comes a set - not lose its status? with unesco's decision today comes a set of- decision today comes a set of recommendations that the fantastic group of people who have worked on this locally will now have to put
2:48 pm
into practice, and we understand this is the start of our relationship unit unesco, not the end, and unless you are able to go on investing and go on preserving the character of the area, the things that make it so special, including the railway you can hear behind me, unless you can preserve all of that, then you will not be able to go on sustaining the conditions that make this part of the world so special, so we are absolutely committed to making sure that we have a sustainable plan for this part of wales, that the things that will attract people from around the world to come here must operate in a way that goes on making this place special for generations that will come beyond us as well. there has been reaction _ will come beyond us as well. there has been reaction to _ will come beyond us as well. there has been reaction to this, - will come beyond us as well. there has been reaction to this, as - will come beyond us as well. there has been reaction to this, as well. has been reaction to this, as well as a lot ofjubilation, some locals, residents and wells further afield, are concerned at the influx of tourists into the area. what are your thoughts on that?-
2:49 pm
tourists into the area. what are your thoughts on that? well, the works us here — your thoughts on that? well, the works us here is _ your thoughts on that? well, the works us here is to _ your thoughts on that? well, the works us here is to create - your thoughts on that? well, the works us here is to create a - works us here is to create a sustainable tourism industry. when we attract people from the rest of the world to come here to wales, that they come here in a way that celebrates everything we have to offer but respects it as well. that leaves it in a condition that other people would wish to visit after them. there is a challenge when you have a part of the world where many visitors wish to come, we have to make sure that the infrastructure is here, but also in an approach to tourism is here that emphasises the need for raw numbers and also a sustainable industry that doesn't end up destroying the very things that make it a success. igrgte end up destroying the very things that make it a success.— end up destroying the very things that make it a success. we have now had, ifi that make it a success. we have now had, if i could _ that make it a success. we have now had, if i could just _ that make it a success. we have now had, if i could just turn _ that make it a success. we have now had, if i could just turn you -
2:50 pm
that make it a success. we have now had, if i could just turn you the - had, if i could just turn you the latest travel regulations that have been confirmed by westminster, confirmation that the government is waving quarantine for arrivals of fully vaccinated people from europe and the united states. what are your thoughts on that and how likely is it that wales will be following suit? and if you do, when? titer? it that wales will be following suit? and if you do, when? very hard for us not suit? and if you do, when? very hard for us rrot to — suit? and if you do, when? very hard for us not to follow _ suit? and if you do, when? very hard for us not to follow suit _ suit? and if you do, when? very hard for us not to follow suit in _ suit? and if you do, when? very hard for us not to follow suit in the - for us not to follow suit in the sense that most of those visitors are arriving in the united kingdom will not be arriving through welsh ports or our cardiff airport, they will be arriving at destinations in england or scotland, and once they are in the united kingdom they will be able to travel wherever they choose. so the real thing for us as the welsh government is to understand more of how uk government and will be able to give us confidence that if people say they had been doubly vaccinated when they arrive in the uk, that we assure
2:51 pm
that has taken place, that it has taken place at the sort of standards and we would expect in our own health service, that the vaccines that have been used as those that have recognised by our regulatory authorities here in the uk, so there is just quite authorities here in the uk, so there isjust quite a authorities here in the uk, so there is just quite a lot of practical detail that we do not yet have available to us and we will need to see to make sure we are confident that the people who will be allowed in without quarantine, because they have been doubly vaccinated, that we are confident there has been done properly and reliably and to the sort of standards we would expect. just reading the latest on theirs, one of the details coming out of this is that passengers who are fully vaccinated with vaccines authorised by the ema and fta in europe and us will be able to travel to england from amber countries without having to quarantine on arrival from the 2nd of august, does
2:52 pm
that give you enough time to get those reassurances that you have listed? well, i listened carefully to what you said there, i am reassured— to what you said there, i am reassured . ,., , reassured that the uk government is sa in: that reassured that the uk government is saying that the _ reassured that the uk government is saying that the vaccines _ reassured that the uk government is saying that the vaccines would - reassured that the uk government is saying that the vaccines would have l saying that the vaccines would have to be those recognised by our own regulatory authorities, i will still want to know the level of assurance that they would be in the united states for example, there are no vaccine certificates, as i understand it, so how will the uk government no that somebody travelling from the us has been doubly vaccinated and that it has been done to the same sort of protocols and standards that we would expect in this country? provided those things are in place, i think we will have the reassurances we need, we need to understand a little better than we do at the moment as to how that evidence will be collected and how
2:53 pm
that evidence can be provided in a way that we can all rely on. would it be fair to _ way that we can all rely on. would it be fair to say _ way that we can all rely on. would it be fair to say that _ way that we can all rely on. would it be fair to say that you _ way that we can all rely on. would it be fair to say that you are - it be fair to say that you are resigned to the fact that you are going to have to go along with this decision or you are broadly in favour of it? labour in england are saying it is reckless. igrgte favour of it? labour in england are saying it is reckless.— saying it is reckless. we have said all alon: saying it is reckless. we have said all along as _ saying it is reckless. we have said all along as a _ saying it is reckless. we have said all along as a welsh _ saying it is reckless. we have said all along as a welsh government. saying it is reckless. we have said i all along as a welsh government and we would have taken a different approach to international travel, i still think this is the year when international travel is best avoided. we do not want to see in wales a situation which we faced in september last year when the virus was reimported into wales by people who had visited other parts of the world, at the same considerations apply to people from other parts of the world that are coming to the united kingdom. we would have rather a more precautionary approach by the uk and have done our best to persuade them of that throughout.
2:54 pm
given that they are making decisions that we probably wouldn't have made for ourselves, it is very important that the uk government is able to offer us assurances that the risks that will be run, and there are risks people visit, from other parts of the world where the virus is in circulation and where new varied cue of the disease may be emerging, the proper precautions are in place to continue to defend the population of the united kingdom against those risk —— variant two. those at the assurances we will be seeking from the uk government following these announcements.— the uk government following these announcements. thank you very much time, congratulations _ announcements. thank you very much time, congratulations again _ announcements. thank you very much time, congratulations again on - announcements. thank you very much time, congratulations again on your i time, congratulations again on your unesco status that you gained today, thank you. unesco status that you gained today, thank ou. ., ~ unesco status that you gained today, thank ou. ., ,, i. now, the weather with ben rich it feels as if summer is on hold at the moment, not least in northern scotland where as you can see the
2:55 pm
rain was coming down earlier. we had this weather warning extending across this swathe of the highlands. potential for disruption, travel disruption as heavy rain continues. southern scotland brighter but with a scattering of heavy thundery downpours, some affecting parts of northern ireland, england and wales, infrequent downpours with lightning, hail stones and gusty winds. —— frequent. the wind is strong, especially towards the south, brewing the rain through quickly. —— blowing the rain. as we head through this evening and overnight, rain continues to affect parts of northern scotland, only slowly pivoting southwards. rain also getting into northern ireland, much of england and wales dry by the end of the night. some showers taking a while to fade and cooler than it has been in recent nights.
2:56 pm
low pressure still close by, sitting to the north—east of the uk and another little area of low pressure running in from the south—west, becoming a feature particularly as we head into the latter part of the day. for scotland and northern ireland, cloud, outbreaks of rain, some into northern england, wales, midlands, east anglia and south wales largely dry. the cloud and rain gathers to the far south—west plate in the afternoon. —— later. top temperatures 20—21 in the best of the sunshine, quite breezy. overnight, the pulse of rain, some uncertainty about the exact track. maybe parts of southern england and wales seeing heavy rain and strong wind at times. we will keep a close eye on that. friday, the worst of the wet weather will clear, sunshine, one or two showers, temperatures in the high teens or low 20s. weeekend, high pressure not too far
2:57 pm
away, adding up to still some showers but not as many as in recent days. more dry weather, some spells of sunshine, feeling cool, particularly in northern scotland.
2:58 pm
2:59 pm
3:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines — fully vaccinated travellers from the us and the eu will be able to fly to and from england without the need for quarantine. but the wales government remains concerned. we have said all along as the welsh government that we would have taken a different approach to international travel. a different approach to internationaltravel. i a different approach to international travel. i still think this is the year when international travel is best avoided. bronze for team gb's charlotte dujardin, who has ridden into the record books, as britain's most decorated female olympian of all time, with six medals. britain's swimmers strike gold again at the tokyo olympics, with victory in the men's 200 metre freestyle relay. this is wonderful, gold to great britain! the american gymnast, simone biles, pulls out of another final, saying she wants to focus
3:01 pm
on her mental health. a national memorial is unveiled for all the british police officers who've died in the line of duty. and the slate landscapes of north west wales, including six sites in snowdonia, have been awarded unesco 'world heritage site' status. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. in the last few minutes, the government's confirmed people travelling from the eu and the us to england will not have to quarantine, if they are fully vaccinated.
3:02 pm
the change will come into force next monday, the 2nd august. the plans will be a major boost to the aviation and tourism sectors. but scientists are warning that the move could come with risks attached, and labour says the "last thing" the country needed is to "be exposed to yet more dangerous variants'. our political correspondent iain watson has more. so we have confirmation, just take us through the detail. yes. so we have confirmation, 'ust take us through the detail._ so we have confirmation, 'ust take us through the detail. yes, we now have the detail, _ us through the detail. yes, we now have the detail, and _ us through the detail. yes, we now have the detail, and this _ us through the detail. yes, we now have the detail, and this is - have the detail, and this is where we were expecting the government to go but we have more details now, so first of all, just to be very clear, people coming from the united states and the eu who are doubly vaccinated, and who have proof of vaccination, this is going to be a digital scheme for the eu, a paper—based scheme for us citizens, but they have proof of vaccination and these have been approved by the
3:03 pm
american or european authorities that they will be allowed to come into the uk without the need to quarantine. so effectively anybody from the so—called amber list countries that can provide that kind of proof from europe and america will be allowed into the uk, no longer having to do ten days quarantine. this will come in from 4am on monday morning. so coming on pretty quickly at the beginning of next week, and that of course has been seen as a boost to the travel industry. they were keen to get this done as quickly as possible, not to wait until domestic rules here change on august 16, but i should stress of course, at this stage these are travellers coming into england, not to the whole of the uk. we are still waiting to find out whether scotland and northern ireland will follow suit, but we heard from the first minister of wales, mark drakeford, the labour first minister of wales, and his attitude could be best summed up by the phrase he doesn't like it but he's going to have to go along with it, because he said most international arrivals coming to english or scottish airports, and then people would be able to travel
3:04 pm
to wales, but he had been urging the government to take a more cautionary approach to this at this stage and he now wants evidence that people will have to prove their vaccination status accurately, that that will be robustly done if they are coming into any part of the united kingdom. that is something ministers say they will do and there has been a pilot scheme on this as well. but i think what this show that, although the gunmen say they have been cautious publicly, privately i think ministers are more confident that the vaccination programme is beginning to keep the virus in check, and therefore we can begin to open up more of our economy, and certainly a clamour notjust open up more of our economy, and certainly a clamour not just from the travel industry but many conservative mps too for the government to do something for the aviation industry and to begin to ease restrictions on international travel. ., ~' , ., ease restrictions on international travel. . ,, ., ., a travel. thank you for that. as we aet more travel. thank you for that. as we get more reaction _ travel. thank you for that. as we get more reaction to _ travel. thank you for that. as we get more reaction to this, - travel. thank you for that. as we get more reaction to this, we i travel. thank you for that. as we | get more reaction to this, we will speak to you.
3:05 pm
the transport secretary grant shapps explained the changes. we have already enabled people who have been— we have already enabled people who have been double vaccinated here, and we _ have been double vaccinated here, and we can— have been double vaccinated here, and we can prove that quite easily with the _ and we can prove that quite easily with the nhs app, to travel and come back and _ with the nhs app, to travel and come back and not need to quarantine, even _ back and not need to quarantine, even if— back and not need to quarantine, even if they are coming from an amber— even if they are coming from an amber list — even if they are coming from an amber list country. today, we are expanding — amber list country. today, we are expanding that to all of europe, including — expanding that to all of europe, including countries like norway for example. — including countries like norway for example, and switzerland outside of the eu, _ example, and switzerland outside of the eu, and also the united states of america, which does of course cover— of america, which does of course cover a _ of america, which does of course cover a very— of america, which does of course cover a very large of america, which does of course covera very large number of of america, which does of course cover a very large number of people who come _ cover a very large number of people who come to this country and will then— who come to this country and will then look— who come to this country and will then look at what to do with people who are _ then look at what to do with people who are vaccinated outside of those areas _ who are vaccinated outside of those areas once — who are vaccinated outside of those areas once we have the pilot successfully up and running. that was the transport secretary, grant shapps, explaining those changes. our correspondent in washington is barbara plett usher. barbara, so we havejust barbara, so we have just had confirmation then of an easing of these travel restrictions. what will it mean from the us side of things,
3:06 pm
because there isn't a corridor that has been set up yet, is there, a travel corridor?— has been set up yet, is there, a travel corridor? no, there isn't. i ex - ect travel corridor? no, there isn't. i expect americans _ travel corridor? no, there isn't. i expect americans who _ travel corridor? no, there isn't. i expect americans who travel i travel corridor? no, there isn't. i expect americans who travel to l travel corridor? no, there isn't. i i expect americans who travel to the uk and who want to travel to the uk will welcome this, but the government won't, because they have advised against travel to britain. just last week, the centre for disease control and the state department put britain back on to a level four tier advisory status. now thatis level four tier advisory status. now that is the ranking for places where the rates of covert infections are very high. so they are warning against travel. also here in the us this week the white house announced it was planning to keep its travel bans in place for the foreseeable future, and you know that is largely due to the delta variant, its high infectious rate and the fact that it is spreading in the uk, that was the concern about britain, but also it is spreading here in the united states. and so it doesn't look as if
3:07 pm
that air corridor, which had been under discussion, in a working group sincejune, is likely to be agreed anytime soon, maybe not the summer, maybe not september.— maybe not september. barbara, how is this levelfor— maybe not september. barbara, how is this level for advisory _ maybe not september. barbara, how is this level for advisory decision - maybe not september. barbara, how is this level for advisory decision by - this level for advisory decision by the us government being greeted by american travellers —— macro level four. have they found it restrictive, because a lot of families are now saying, we want to visit our relatives?— visit our relatives? well, it is not a ban, it doesn't _ visit our relatives? well, it is not a ban, it doesn't say _ visit our relatives? well, it is not a ban, it doesn't say that - visit our relatives? well, it is not a ban, it doesn't say that you i visit our relatives? well, it is not. a ban, it doesn't say that you can't visit, it is a sort of description about which countries have, are higher risk for covert infections, so the government has put the uk in a category of high risk for infection, and then travellers can make up their own minds. i think many americans will want to travel to the uk, especially as you were saying people with family members and maybe others too, and if they are fully vaccinated they might not feel there is very much of a risk.
3:08 pm
so on the ground, in practical terms, in terms of how many americans travel to the uk, this may mean that many more do, but in terms of how the government here feels about travel, i think that level four advisory is quite a strong indication. igrgte four advisory is quite a strong indication-— indication. we have 'ust had reaction from i indication. we have just had reaction from british - indication. we have just had l reaction from british airways. indication. we have just had i reaction from british airways. of course the aviation industry is very happy with this decision, they had been calling for removal such as this. british airways have said, our own trials have proved it is quick and easy to check travellers are fully vaccinated and can safely enter the uk, and this step will allow us to reunite loved ones and get global britain back in business, giving the economy is a vital boost it so badly needs. can you just explain to us, for american travellers, all those coming in and out of america, which spoke to the first minister of wales mark drakeford, and he raised the question about the double vaccination passport or certificate.
3:09 pm
is that something that is needed or is used in the united states? igrgte is that something that is needed or is used in the united states? we do aet is used in the united states? we do get certificates _ is used in the united states? we do get certificates here _ is used in the united states? we do get certificates here when _ is used in the united states? we do get certificates here when we - is used in the united states? we do get certificates here when we get i get certificates here when we get vaccinated, but we don't need to show them when we travel. in some places, it is decided on a state—by—state level, for businesses orfor state—by—state level, for businesses or for entertainment venues, they can decide whether you need to show a vaccination certificate. the federal government may start to require it, that is something we will hear about later this week. as far as travel goes, as far as i'm aware, no, we don't have to show a vaccination certificate. what you normally have to do is get a covid test three days before you travel, showing a negative test, and certainly as you were saying, you were quoting british airways, the travel industry here also as you can imagine has been lobbying for a relaxation in the travel ban for those who are vaccinated, talking about setting up a corridor with other countries that have similar
3:10 pm
vaccination rates. but the biden administration hasjust vaccination rates. but the biden administration has just indicated vaccination rates. but the biden administration hasjust indicated it is not going to move quickly on this. there were a number of other considerations actually beside the delta variant spread that was slowing down the working group to get this corridor established. one was the oxford astrazeneca vaccine. now, that is not authorised in the us, so does that mean that british people who have been vaccinated with it, will they still be eligible? there was that question. also there is a bureaucratic level, there are several levels of government that have to sign off on kobe travel decision so you have that slowing things down as well, at least four. the focus in particular last week and this week on a domestic politics level has been the rise in cases because of the delta variant, and because of the delta variant, and because of the level of unvaccinated people here and i think that is what is really focusing attention here, and to open travel under these circumstances, just politically, is not really on the agenda. fiiq circumstances, just politically, is not really on the agenda. 0k. thank ou ve not really on the agenda. 0k. thank you very much _ not really on the agenda. 0k. thank you very much for — not really on the agenda. 0k. thank you very much for that _ not really on the agenda. 0k. thank you very much for that round-up i not really on the agenda. 0k. thank. you very much for that round-up from
3:11 pm
you very much for that round—up from the united states. the travel considerations, now that we have had this decision confirmed by westminster, that us and eu travellers will not have to quarantine from the 2nd of august. so let's get the likely reaction from europe. our europe correspondent nick beake joins me now. so yes, the likely reaction to this decision, what it will mean for many of the eu countries? i this decision, what it will mean for many of the eu countries?- many of the eu countries? i think there are two _ many of the eu countries? i think there are two groups, _ many of the eu countries? i think there are two groups, broadly, i many of the eu countries? i think l there are two groups, broadly, who would have been pretty pleased with this. first of all, people living in the eu who have been double jab, who were hoping to get to the uk for a holiday, from next monday they can do that without having to quarantine. so if they had a plan to go to london, the lake district, wherever, they will be able to do that without having to go into isolation when they arrive. and the second group would be british citizens, who live within the eu, countries including belgium, all the
3:12 pm
rest of it, who have got their two jabs, but it hasn't been approved by the uk government. so what ministers are saying today is that they are enabling people to be reunited with loved ones, brits who live abroad, they can get back to the uk, they won't need to quarantine and in effect it is putting the eu's level of vaccination on the same sort of path or giving at the same weight as the nhs system, so that's what they've done today. so i think people will broadly welcome this. and in terms of travel corridors, does that now mean there will be no use for those, come monday? this is b no use for those, come monday? this is by no means — use for those, come monday? this is by no means simple, _ use for those, come monday? this is by no means simple, and _ use for those, come monday? this is by no means simple, and people i use for those, come monday? this is| by no means simple, and people who may have tried to have had a trip around europe this summer will have found that, as well as the forms and the tests, it is not straightforward. i can think of three countries of that off my head where things become a bit difficult, so at the moment if you're going from the uk to italy, there is a five day quarantine, if you're going in that direction. where i'm talking
3:13 pm
you from in brussels, obviously in belgium, you can only come to the country if you are resident here or you have an essential reason to travel, so the idea of a quick trip on the eurostar to bruges, you know, that simply isn't an option at the moment. and also if you look at france. france is on the uk's amber plus list so even if you are double jabbed, coming from france to the uk, you would still have to quarantine and it seems from what ministers have said today, that particular element affecting france and people coming from france, that hasn't changed. so although broadly, this is a big move, when it comes to people arriving in the uk from europe, there are these individual circumstances, different rules for different countries, and as barbara was saying, ian before, with the delta variant, there are concerns that things could change, as we've seen throughout the summer, at quite short notice. just seen throughout the summer, at quite short notice-— short notice. just very quickly before we _ short notice. just very quickly before we let _ short notice. just very quickly before we let you _ short notice. just very quickly before we let you go, - short notice. just very quickly before we let you go, in - short notice. just very quickly| before we let you go, in terms short notice. just very quickly i before we let you go, in terms of the vaccination programmes, i know we are talking about a number of countries here, but how's that
3:14 pm
going, how are the numbers looking on the continent? bitter going, how are the numbers looking on the continent?— on the continent? after a slow start at the start — on the continent? after a slow start at the start of _ on the continent? after a slow start at the start of the _ on the continent? after a slow start at the start of the year, _ on the continent? after a slow start at the start of the year, the - at the start of the year, the vaccination progress has really improved and just this week the european commission president announced they have reached their target of vaccinating 70% of the eu's population, so they feel things are going in the right direction but all the time they say they are mindful of new variants and the way that could affect things.— that could affect things. thank you very much- — earlier the first minister of wales, mark drakeford, said it would be difficult not to follow the uk government's decision — but that the welsh government would need further information to be reassured that arrivals had been properly vaccinated. so the real thing for us, as the welsh government, is to understand more of how the uk government will be able to give us confidence that if people say they have been doubly vaccinated when they arrive in the united kingdom, and we are sure that
3:15 pm
that has taken place, that it has taken place to the sort of standards we would expect in our own health service, that the vaccines that have been used are vaccines that are recognised by our regulatory authorities here in the uk, so there is just quite authorities here in the uk, so there isjust quite a authorities here in the uk, so there is just quite a lot of practical detail that we don't yet have available to us.— detail that we don't yet have available to us. that was mark drakeford. _ available to us. that was mark drakeford, speaking _ available to us. that was mark drakeford, speaking to - available to us. that was mark drakeford, speaking to me i available to us. that was mark drakeford, speaking to me a l available to us. that was mark i drakeford, speaking to me a short time ago. joss croft is the chief executive of ukinbound, a trade association representing tourism in the uk. thank you for speaking to us here at bbc news. so your reaction to the confirmation of this news coming from westminster today?- confirmation of this news coming from westminster today? well, this can only be — from westminster today? well, this can only be good — from westminster today? well, this can only be good news, _ from westminster today? well, this can only be good news, and - from westminster today? well, this can only be good news, and in - from westminster today? well, this can only be good news, and in fact i can only be good news, and in fact it is probably the first bit of positive news that the inbound tourism industry and the 500,000 people that work in it have had for about 18 months, so we absolutely welcome this news today. i about 18 months, so we absolutely welcome this news today.— welcome this news today. i don't know if you _ welcome this news today. i don't know if you caught _ welcome this news today. i don't know if you caught what - welcome this news today. i don't know if you caught what mark i know if you caught what mark drakeford had to say there, he still
3:16 pm
has a number of questions, in particular talking about the practicalities of putting this new policy in place. do you understand and agree with his questions? weill. and agree with his questions? well, i think it's, — and agree with his questions? well, i think it's, you _ and agree with his questions? well, i think it's, you know, _ and agree with his questions? well, i think it's, you know, we've - and agree with his questions? -ii ithink it's, you know, we've had and agree with his questions? -ii i think it's, you know, we've had a system whereby british residents returning from amber list countries, as long as they are fully vaccinated, don't have to isolate. all we are doing is applying the same rating to europeans who have been fully vaccinated, so we think this is a wise thing to do. it will provide a lot of money for the uk economy, inbound tourism into the uk is the fifth largest export sector that we have. we are missing out on about £78 million a day being spent by foreign tourists in the uk, so as long as we can do it safely then this seems a very good idea. when ou sa , this seems a very good idea. when you say. we _ this seems a very good idea. when you say. we can — this seems a very good idea. when you say. we can do _ this seems a very good idea. when you say, we can do it— this seems a very good idea. when you say, we can do it safely, i this seems a very good idea. when you say, we can do it safely, whatl you say, we can do it safely, what will that mean, practically? this i will that mean, practically? as i sa , will that mean, practically? as i say. being _ will that mean, practically? as i say. being able _ will that mean, practically? as i say, being able to _ will that mean, practically? " i say, being able to demonstrate from the european union, they have a green travel passport that records their vaccination status, so again i
3:17 pm
would suggest it is no different from brits returning from their holidays from amber list countries but all we are doing is we are rolling out that same system for europeans who have had the same vaccinations as we have had. fiifi europeans who have had the same vaccinations as we have had. ok, so come monday _ vaccinations as we have had. ok, so come monday when _ vaccinations as we have had. ok, so come monday when this _ vaccinations as we have had. ok, so come monday when this is - vaccinations as we have had. ok, so come monday when this is set i vaccinations as we have had. ok, so come monday when this is set to i come monday when this is set to begin, 4am on the 2nd of august, what guidance will you be sending out your association members? this i out your association members? as i sa , we out your association members? as i say. we are — out your association members? is i say, we are absolutely delighted with the news today, but again there is a big but behind that. we have, as an inbound tourism industry, we have lost most of the summer. we have lost most of the summer. we have had no business since february, march of last year, so this would potentially start to bring in some money for the 500,000 people employed in inbound tourism in the uk, but it is going to be a slow recovery for them. a! uk, but it is going to be a slow recovery for them.— uk, but it is going to be a slow recovery for them. a slow recovery, i mean, recovery for them. a slow recovery, i mean. it — recovery for them. a slow recovery, i mean. it will— recovery for them. a slow recovery, i mean, it will be _ recovery for them. a slow recovery, i mean, it will be fair— recovery for them. a slow recovery, i mean, it will be fair to _ recovery for them. a slow recovery, i mean, it will be fair to say - recovery for them. a slow recovery, i mean, it will be fair to say we're i i mean, it will be fair to say we're halfway through the season, aren't
3:18 pm
we? ., �* , halfway through the season, aren't we? . �* , , ., halfway through the season, aren't we? . �*, ., we? that's right. if you look at the us for example, _ we? that's right. if you look at the us for example, it _ we? that's right. if you look at the us for example, it is _ we? that's right. if you look at the us for example, it is quite - us for example, it is quite seasonal, as is the european business, the us is our largest market, in terms of volume, or value into the uk, about £4.2 billion spent by the american tear each year. only 22% of those travel between september and december, so it is going to be an uphill struggle but we are proposing to the government they should be introducing some sector specific support, given how long it will take our industry to recover.— our industry to recover. which sectors? _ our industry to recover. which sectors? when _ our industry to recover. which sectors? when you _ our industry to recover. which sectors? when you say - our industry to recover. which sectors? when you say sector| sectors? when you say sector specific support, you talking about sectors within the tourism sector itself? , ., �* , sectors within the tourism sector itself? , ., �*, ., , , itself? yes, that's absolutely ri . ht. itself? yes, that's absolutely right- we _ itself? yes, that's absolutely right. we did _ itself? yes, that's absolutely right. we did a _ itself? yes, that's absolutely right. we did a survey - itself? yes, that's absolutely right. we did a survey last i itself? yes, that's absolutely i right. we did a survey last week that showed that 95% of all the inbound tourism this year has now been lost to our competitors, and that only 53% of our members are only expected to make 10% of their 2019 revenues before the end of the
3:19 pm
year. these are businesses that are viable businesses that will play a huge part in the uk's future economic prosperity, and we need to make sure that they are supported and until things recover properly in 2022. �* , ., ., ., 2022. budgets are rather tight at the moment _ 2022. budgets are rather tight at the moment from _ 2022. budgets are rather tight at the moment from the _ 2022. budgets are rather tight at i the moment from the government. a lot of pressures coming from different areas. do you really have confidence that you will get that support, that financial support? we have support, that financial support? - have seen the government supporting many, many industries, furlough has been a huge success for my industry, andindeed been a huge success for my industry, and indeed 77% of my members still have staff on furlough. they are now having to contribute to the furlough scheme, and the furlough scheme winds down as we head towards october. we won't get on our feet by october, and again tourism economics is recovering a full recovery by 2024, so the government needs to step in and again, apart from the furlough, many parts of my industry had not been supported in the way that other industries have, so we feel that it is only right that
3:20 pm
government does support these businesses through until next year when they will be able to stop the trade properly. when they will be able to stop the trade properly-— when they will be able to stop the trade n-roerl . ., ~ ,, , . iamjoined by i am joined by adam finn, iam joined by adam finn, professor of paediatrics at the university of bristol, and a friend of the programme really. thank you very much forjoining us, professor. does the science back up this decision? well, i think the science back up this decision? well, ithink it the science back up this decision? well, i think it does. yes, it does. this has been coming for some time and we now do have fairly solid evidence that these vaccines don't just stop people getting sick, they actually do reduce their risk of getting infected and passing the infection onto others. they are not by any means perfect in that regard, but it kind of makes logical sense that people who have been fully immunised pose a much lower risk
3:21 pm
than those that haven't, in terms of carrying the virus around. so i think this was inevitably going to happen sooner or later. it has perhaps happened a little bit sooner than some of us would have liked, just in the sense that there are of course still quite a lot of people who are not in a position to have received two doses of vaccines, so it's a bit hard on them, but nevertheless i think it was going to be hard to hold this back, and it is good news that the various governments are now beginning to talk to each other and reach agreement on this.- talk to each other and reach agreement on this. talk to each other and reach aareement on this. ., ._ agreement on this. through the day, i've been hearing _ agreement on this. through the day, i've been hearing a _ agreement on this. through the day, i've been hearing a lot _ agreement on this. through the day, i've been hearing a lot of— agreement on this. through the day, i've been hearing a lot of viewers i i've been hearing a lot of viewers and listeners to bbc programmes saying that we are still hearing stories of people who have been double vaccinated contracting covid—19. double vaccinated contracting covid-19. ~ , . h covid-19. absolutely right, that's true, and covid-19. absolutely right, that's true. and a _ covid-19. absolutely right, that's true, and a proportion _ covid-19. absolutely right, that's true, and a proportion of- covid-19. absolutely right, that's true, and a proportion of the i true, and a proportion of the inpatients we have in the hospital inpatients we have in the hospital in bristol are in fact people who have been fully immunised. that's entirely expected. the vaccine does massively reduce your risk of
3:22 pm
getting seriously ill, and it does very substantially reduce your risk of getting infection and symptoms, but it doesn't eliminate them entirely, and once you get up to the point of a very large proportion of the population have received a vaccine, you will begin to see significant numbers of vaccinated people getting infected. so as i said, although vaccination predicts a much lower risk of infection and transmission, it doesn't eliminate it entirely. transmission, it doesn't eliminate it entirel . ., , transmission, it doesn't eliminate it entirel . ., , it entirely. there has also been talk that the _ it entirely. there has also been talk that the young _ it entirely. there has also been talk that the young and - it entirely. there has also been talk that the young and those . it entirely. there has also been i talk that the young and those who are refusing to be vaccinated are effectively petri dishes for variants to develop and mutate. where are we? i remember you saying this about three weeks ago, where are we on the delta plus variant? so are we on the delta plus variant? ’sr the delta are we on the delta plus variant? 5r the delta plus are we on the delta plus variant? 5f the delta plus variant is one of a whole panoply of new versions of the virus we are seeing cropping up around the world. it has not at this point emerged as a major problem,
3:23 pm
but we are going to go on seeing evolution of this virus, particularly as it comes under more and more selection pressure from the immunity being induced by vaccine programmes, so we are going to keep a close eye on things, and i suspect that the whole travel industry and the moving around is still going to go on being quite bumpy and complicated as a consequence. so looking at the current figures, the cases, the hospitalisation is of course really key, and sadly those deaths, how would you read towards hopefully herd immunity and that key period in the autumn and winter? well, we are one of the most highly vaccinated populations in the world in the united kingdom, and of course we have had very big waves. we are in the middle of a third one of those, so a lot of people have been infected as well. so we are probably closer to population immunity than most. i think the drops in numbers
3:24 pm
we have seen over the last few days, though, are more to do with people's behaviour at the moment. people still being cautious, despite the relaxation of restrictions, and not entirely because of rising immunity. it is quite a rapid drop, and we do need more evidence before we can be really convinced that we are on a downward phase of the wave. fiifi downward phase of the wave. 0k, professor adam _ downward phase of the wave. 0k, professor adam finn, who sits on the joint committee on back unionisation —— vaccination and immunisation and also head of the academic unit of child health at bristol university, thank you very much as ever for your time. ., ~' ,, , . thank you very much as ever for your time. ., ~ ,, , . just thank you very much as ever for your time—just to l time. thank you very much. just to remind you — time. thank you very much. just to remind you if— time. thank you very much. just to remind you if you _ time. thank you very much. just to remind you if you are _ time. thank you very much. just to remind you if you are joining i time. thank you very much. just to remind you if you are joining us - time. thank you very much. just to remind you if you are joining us on | remind you if you arejoining us on bbc news, the big news announced and confirmed by the government is that people travelling from the eu and the united states towards england will now not have to quarantine from the 2nd of august, that is monday coming —— to england.
3:25 pm
there's been more medal success at the olympics for team gb. earlier this afternoon, charlotte dujardin has become the most decorated female british olympian of all time. she took bronze in the individual dressage with her horse gio who's competing at his first olympics, bringing her total number of medals across three olympics to six which includes three gold medals across three olympics to six which includes three gold medals. earlier, there was a fifth tokyo gold in the men's 200 metre freestyle relay. tom dean and duncan scott — who won gold and silver yesterday — were part of the victorious team who just missed out on a world record. elsewhere, britain's rowers won their first medal of the games — a silver in the men's quadruple sculls. meanwhile, the american gymnast, and one of the faces of the tokyo games, simone biles, has dropped out of tomorrow's individual all around final. it means she won't defend the olympic title she won in rio, five years ago. here she is, speaking
3:26 pm
to reporters yesterday. no, they're no injury, thankfully, that's why i took a step back. because i didn't want to do something silly and get injured out there. they are olympic silver medallists now, the girls, and they should be proud of how they did last minute, well having to go in. it has been really stressful, this olympic games. just as a whole. not having an audience, there are a lot of different variables going into it. it has been a long week, a long olympic process, it has been a long year. so, just a lot of different variables, and i think we arejust a little bit too stressed out, but we should be out here having fun and sometimes that is not the case. ijust felt like it would be better to take a back—seat, work on my mindfulness, and i knew the girls would do a great
3:27 pm
job, and i didn't want to risk a team medal because of my screw—ups. because they have worked too hard for that. ijust decided i just decided those ijust decided those girls should go into the competition. we put mental health first, because if you don't you will not enjoy your sport and succeed as much as you want to. it is ok sometimes to sit out of big competitions to focus on yourself because it shows how strong a competitor and person you really are. rather than just battle through it. joining me now is chris mears, who is an olympic gold medallist, who retired from competing professionally in 2019. chris, thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. we chris, thank you for 'oining us here on sac newah chris, thank you for 'oining us here on bbc newsfi one - chris, thank you for 'oining us here | on bbc newsfi one went on bbc news. no worries. one went throuuh on bbc news. no worries. one went through your — on bbc news. no worries. one went through your mind _ on bbc news. no worries. one went through your mind as _ on bbc news. no worries. one went through your mind as you _ on bbc news. no worries. one went through your mind as you saw- on bbc news. no worries. one went through your mind as you saw the i through your mind as you saw the news unfolding, and also hearing what simone had to say? i news unfolding, and also hearing what simone had to say? i related to it very heavily- _ what simone had to say? i related to it very heavily. it _ what simone had to say? i related to it very heavily. it really _ what simone had to say? i related to it very heavily. it really resonated . it very heavily. it really resonated with me. and i think, for me, i can't say that i know what it feels
3:28 pm
like to be that in the public eye, but i can tell you what it feels like after winning at an olympic games and not knowing exactly how to feel, and come you know, there is no book that tells you how you are supposed to process these emotions, and mental health was really bad for me after that, and i didn't know how to process it. i was still competing at a really high level. i was expected to do a job, and i really struggled through two years of doing that before i decided to call it a day. that before i decided to call it a da . , , ., ., ., , that before i decided to call it a day. chris, did you have any support or did ou day. chris, did you have any support or did you feel _ day. chris, did you have any support or did you feel like _ day. chris, did you have any support or did you feel like you _ day. chris, did you have any support or did you feel like you could - day. chris, did you have any support or did you feel like you could speak| or did you feel like you could speak about it back then? i or did you feel like you could speak about it back then?— about it back then? i think that came later- _ about it back then? i think that came later- i— about it back then? i think that came later. i did _ about it back then? i think that came later. i did get _ about it back then? i think that came later. i did get support, i about it back then? i think that i came later. i did get support, and about it back then? i think that - came later. i did get support, and i wasn't really maybe, i wasn't open to the support at that stage. i don't think i was ready to understand what i was going through. just think i was trying to go through the motions, and i had a
3:29 pm
bunch of people that were there for me but i couldn't quite get through to me. that to me came later after retirement, and anyone in that position, in all walks of life, not just in sport are not or someone like simone biles, if you are in sport, not in sport, having trouble, i took my girlfriend really regularly about these things and she's really good at handling that. it could be a friend, it could be a family member or it could be a therapist. i don't think it really matters. i think talking about stuff is really important.— is really important. what you've 'ust said is really important. what you've just said is _ is really important. what you've just said is less _ is really important. what you've just said is less of— is really important. what you've just said is less of the _ is really important. what you've just said is less of the stigma i is really important. what you've just said is less of the stigma of mental health, from what i'm hearing, correct me if i'm wrong, is the awareness that that is what the issue was, and many people have picked up on the fact that simone was very in tune. that is where something was wrong, and she was strong enough to recognise that and speak up about it. many people are saying the british
3:30 pm
are ahead in terms of this, is that what you are hearing? i are ahead in terms of this, is that what you are hearing?— are ahead in terms of this, is that what you are hearing? i think it can be es what you are hearing? i think it can be yes and — what you are hearing? i think it can be yes and it _ what you are hearing? i think it can be yes and it can _ what you are hearing? i think it can be yes and it can be _ what you are hearing? i think it can be yes and it can be no, _ what you are hearing? i think it can be yes and it can be no, i _ what you are hearing? i think it can be yes and it can be no, i am - what you are hearing? i think it can be yes and it can be no, i am sure l be yes and it can be no, i am sure that there are, i know a lot of friends who have left sport and have struggled, what support do they have? other than having to accept that there was something and now they have no qualifications and now they have no qualifications and now they had to make their way in the world. this porting system that we have a set up really well, i will say, adlai k said, i had access to support —— like i said, maybe i wasn't ready to take that support with both hands at that stage, but i think we have a really good setup. it can be better but i think the problem does start here, and we cannot ignore theirs, i am not the only one who felt the way i did, thatis only one who felt the way i did, that is why i decided to talk about it, this was an opportunity for me to share my story.— it, this was an opportunity for me to share my story. what do you make of some people? _
3:31 pm
to share my story. what do you make of some people? there _ to share my story. what do you make of some people? there has _ to share my story. what do you make of some people? there has been - of some people? there has been overwhelming support for simon myles, but what do you make of those who have been criticising her? we have all been hearing about sport psychology and mind over matter, many people saying at her level she should have been able to overcome her failure and continue should have been able to overcome herfailure and continue —— simone biles. what is your response? without coming across better or angry, i think we cannot put ourselves in that position. she is basically the face of sexual assault, her whole story has been a netflix documentary, everybody knows all these little details about her life, so i think some beset at home, keyboard warrior, —— somebody sat, you can say what you want at the comfort of your own home, but wait until you are on a world stage and it might be weird this say, but you
3:32 pm
feel very naked in front of all those people, and she went out there and she didn't feel comfortable, she has a backbone of steel for saying something, i don't think it was very valiant of her to dress up in her tracksuit and come out and support the other girls, that was absolutely amazing, a testament to her mental strength to do that.— strength to do that. perfect note to end our chat. _ strength to do that. perfect note to end our chat, chris, _ strength to do that. perfect note to end our chat, chris, thank- strength to do that. perfect note to end our chat, chris, thank you. - whether time. it feels like summer is on hold at the moment, not least in parts of northern scotland won't have a met office amber warning in force for heavy and persistent rain. a risk of flooding and travel disruption, rain continuing as we head through the rest of the day, southern scotland brighter, heavy thundery showers. northern ireland must any spells, some intense downpours with a dad lately,
3:33 pm
generally quite a windy day, particularly down to the south, top temperatures of 16—20 c. disappointing for this time of year. this evening, showers continue across england and wales, slowly fading, northern ireland and scotland cloudy with outbreaks of rain, a relatively cool night compared with some we have had recently. the next couple of days, more showers and longer spells of rain, especially in the north during thursday, and in the south during friday where it could be windy for a time as well.
3:34 pm
hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... fully—vaccinated travellers from the us and the eu will be able to fly to and from england without the need for quarantine. but the welsh government remains concerned. we have said all along as he welsh government that we would have taken
3:35 pm
a different approach to international travel. a different approach to internationaltravel. i a different approach to international travel. i still think this is the year when international travel is best avoided. bronze for team gb's charlotte dujardin, who has riden into the record books, as britain's most decorated female olympian of all time — with six medals. this is wonderful, gold to great britain's men. britain's swimmers strike gold again at the tokyo olympics with victory in the men's 200 metre freestyle relay. the american gymnast, simone biles, pulls out of another final — saying she wants to focus on her mental health. eight national memorial is unveiled for all the british police officers who have died on the line of duty. —— a national. and the slate landscapes of north west wales, including six sites in snowdonia, have been awarded unesco world heritage site status.
3:36 pm
let's go back to jane dougall now in the bbc sport centre for a round—up of all the olympic action. good afternoon. she said she couldn't believe it, but charlotte dujardin has overtaken rower catherine grainger as britain's most decorated female olympian of all time. she won her sixth olympic medal earlier on her horse gio — also known as pumpklin — in the individual dressage. she was thrilled with her performance and also the horse's, because he is reletively inexperienced. she had to wait for the other riders to finish to see if she would stay in the bronze position. but she celebrated as confirmation came that she had won the bronze. she adds to her double gold in 2012 and gold and team silver in rio. she said she was delighted to have achieved so much. there are so many incredible sportspeople, women that have achieved so much, and now that i have
3:37 pm
done that and i have topped it all, last night i think i was, or today, i was level with katherine grainger, now i have beaten her, it is a little bit surreal, so you only dream of these things happening and it is actually happening, so i can't believe it. well, as we've been hearing, there was great success for team gb in the pool again today as the men's [i by 200 metre relay team stole the headlines. andy swiss reports. another day of triumph and tears ofjoy. for britain's swimmers, itjust doesn't get better than this. they began with high hopes in the men's freestyle relay, with individual gold medallist tom dean leading them off. and gradually, they ground down their opponents. firstjames guy, than a brilliant swim from matthew richards took them into the lead nearly a second and a half clear, as duncan scott dived in for the final leg.
3:38 pm
what followed was almost a victory procession. indeed, their only real race was against the clock. team great britain right on the world record line. this is wonderful. duncan scott, can you get the world record? it's gold to great britain. just three hundredths of a second outside the world record, but what a victory! forjames guy in particular, the emotions overflowed, as they did 6,000 miles away in maidenhead as tom dean's family and friends enjoyed another early morning party. cheering and who could blame them? britain have now won three swimming golds for the first time in 113 years, and the history boys could hardly believe it. as a kid, winning an olympic gold medal was my absolute dream. to do it finally, after 25 years, it's pretty emotional. with these four lads here, we've got the best freestylers in the world. so close to the world record in the end. i if anything, i'm a bit gutted. in the gymnastics, meanwhile,
3:39 pm
american superstar simone biles has announced she is withdrawing from her next event, thursday's all—around final. yesterday, she withdrew from the team final after one vault, saying she needed to focus on her mental health. usa gymnastics say biles will be assessed daily to see if she can compete in her other events next week, adding, "we wholeheartedly support simone's decision and applaud her bravery in prioritising her well—being. her courage showed yet again why she is a role model for so many." elsewhere, there was british disappointment in the tennis. andy murray and joe salisbury knocked out by croatia's marin cilic and ivan dodig. at 3a, murray's glittering olympic career may now be over. the rowing brought some success in the men's quadruple sculls. the british crew at the top of the screen clinging on for silver, but it was a rare highlight in a largely frustrating day. the men's four had won gold at the previous five games, but this time, their hopes
3:40 pm
veered wildly off course. look at the steering problems of the british! there's going to be a crash between great britain and the italians! after that remarkable near miss, they could only finish fourth, and you could feel every ounce of their pain. i forgot the steering a little bit, and i think that's what cost us. lads, i'm sorry i didn't steer us the best line at the end there. at least they finished. not everyone did. in the double sculls, norway's race curtailed in the soggiest of circumstances. help did eventually arrive, but their hopes of gold have come to a less than graceful end. andy swiss, bbc news. breaking news on the 100,
3:41 pm
the 100, manchester orignials are scheduled to be playing northern superchasers in a double header at old trafford. the umpires have confirmed the women's fixture has now been abandoned, both teams will take a point. the men's match is scheduled for 18:30 later today. that's all the sport for now. more on charlotte dujardin's medal in dressage on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. dozens of british former senior military commanders — including four former chiefs of the defence staff — have written to borisjohnson, calling on the government to allow more afghan interpreters to settle in the uk.they say too many of those who worked with british forces have had their applications rejected and that if any are murdered by the taliban, "the dishonour would lie squarely at our nation's feet". the ministry of defence says it's already helped more than 2,000 afghan staff to come to the uk. this translator, whose identity we're not disclosing, has been turned down for relocation four times and fears retribution from the taliban.
3:42 pm
the taliban do not care for dismiss, for termination, they don't care anything. theyjust know who worked with the british and who not. anybody who worked with the british, they will kill them, sir. now i am worried about my family and myself in future about what will happen when the nato leave afghanistan. i know i will see my wife and daughter get shot, and myself too. with me is sara dejong who is a senior lecturer in politics at the university of york, and one of the founders of an organisation that campaigns for the rights of afghan interpreters. tell us about the concerns you have that afghan interpreters and i'm joined by nazir ayeen, aformer afghan interpreter. he has given his full consent to the bbc for this interview.
3:43 pm
i don't know if you heard the clip of an interpreter expressing his concern, not only for himself but his family, do you recognise that? thank you, yes, it is a trait which is completely understandable in the context of afghanistan and its political and military circumstances. i think afghanistan as a whole is suffering from quite a chaotic situation and the war in afghanistan, which britain was also involved in, has left the entire place in danger of —— left interpreters in danger of being killed by the telephone. can you confirm for _ killed by the telephone. can you confirm for us _ killed by the telephone. can you confirm for us how— killed by the telephone. can you confirm for us how it _ killed by the telephone. can you confirm for us how it is - killed by the telephone. can you confirm for us how it is that - killed by the telephone. can you confirm for us how it is that you | confirm for us how it is that you have gained at the right to settle in the uk, is that right? yes. have gained at the right to settle in the uk, is that right?- in the uk, is that right? yes, i made my _
3:44 pm
in the uk, is that right? yes, i made my way _ in the uk, is that right? yes, i made my way and _ in the uk, is that right? yes, i made my way and i _ in the uk, is that right? yes, i made my way and i sought - in the uk, is that right? yes, i- made my way and i sought asylum here to allow me to stay, and those left in afghanistan have nothing but wait for the government to wait for a decision. ~ , , ., ., ., , ~ decision. why did you had to seek as lum? decision. why did you had to seek asylum? what _ decision. why did you had to seek asylum? what is _ decision. why did you had to seek asylum? what is your _ decision. why did you had to seek asylum? what is your direct - asylum? what is your direct application turned down? ila. asylum? what is your direct application turned down? no, but it took uuite application turned down? no, but it took quite a — application turned down? no, but it took quite a long — application turned down? no, but it took quite a long time _ application turned down? no, but it took quite a long time until - application turned down? no, but it took quite a long time until they i took quite a long time until they recognised my service and they allowed me to stay.— recognised my service and they allowed me to stay. turning to you, this must be — allowed me to stay. turning to you, this must be a _ allowed me to stay. turning to you, this must be a story _ allowed me to stay. turning to you, this must be a story you're - allowed me to stay. turning to you, this must be a story you're hearing | this must be a story you're hearing time and again.— time and again. correct, unfortunately _ time and again. correct, unfortunately that - time and again. correct, unfortunately that is - time and again. correct, unfortunately that is the i time and again. correct, - unfortunately that is the case. we have seen— unfortunately that is the case. we have seen this extremely powerful and compelling letter by senior mililary— and compelling letter by senior military staff with emphasising these — military staff with emphasising these people who are mission essenlial— these people who are mission essential and are feeling for these people's— essential and are feeling for these people's lives, given the policy unfortunately still excludes more people _ unfortunately still excludes more people it — unfortunately still excludes more people it includes, so it is inundated with e—mails of people who are under— inundated with e—mails of people who are under serious threat, who are
3:45 pm
receiving — are under serious threat, who are receiving projections. why are under serious threat, who are receiving projections.— are under serious threat, who are receiving projections. receiving pro'ections. why are they receivin: receiving projections. why are they receiving those _ receiving projections. why are they receiving those rejections? - receiving projections. why are they receiving those rejections? they i receiving projections. why are they| receiving those rejections? they are receiving those re'ections? they are three different — receiving those rejections? they are three different reasons, _ receiving those rejections? they are three different reasons, firstly - three different reasons, firstly some — three different reasons, firstly some of— three different reasons, firstly some of them were contracted by third _ some of them were contracted by third parties, which is one way in which _ third parties, which is one way in which the — third parties, which is one way in which the british government tried to abdicate their responsibility, and supplies to british embassy in kaboul— and supplies to british embassy in kaboul interpreters who are working there _ kaboul interpreters who are working there and _ kaboul interpreters who are working there and some of them since 18 years— there and some of them since 18 years who — there and some of them since 18 years who have been refused, even though _ years who have been refused, even though they are aged dimly visible on the _ though they are aged dimly visible on the embassy compound. we also have people being dismissed for disciplinary reasons. unfortunately, 35% of _ disciplinary reasons. unfortunately, 35% of the — disciplinary reasons. unfortunately, 35% of the total workforce of interpreters face a disciplinary dismissal for very small reasons, and what — dismissal for very small reasons, and what we're seeing is that unless people _ and what we're seeing is that unless people are _ and what we're seeing is that unless people are causing a national security— people are causing a national security threat to the uk, because these _ security threat to the uk, because these people should still be protected, if they have one spoken back and _ protected, if they have one spoken back and come back late from leave, that shouldn't be a reason to give them _ that shouldn't be a reason to give them a _ that shouldn't be a reason to give them a death sentence. thirdly, there _ them a death sentence. thirdly, there are — them a death sentence. thirdly,
3:46 pm
there are people who have worked in roles that _ there are people who have worked in roles that the mod considers as not exposed, _ roles that the mod considers as not exposed, people who work as labourers, advisers, again unfortunately we have seen in the past few _ unfortunately we have seen in the past few months and years that also people _ past few months and years that also people who have worked as cooks, labourers — people who have worked as cooks, labourers are subject to attacks from _ labourers are subject to attacks from the — labourers are subject to attacks from the taliban and some of them have been— from the taliban and some of them have been killed. the taliban doesn't — have been killed. the taliban doesn't make distinctions as the government does, that is why as though— government does, that is why as though senior military officers have said, _ though senior military officers have said. we _ though senior military officers have said, we need to be much more generous— said, we need to be much more generous and inclusive in our protection. generous and inclusive in our protection-— generous and inclusive in our protection. how long were you workin: protection. how long were you working as _ protection. how long were you working as an _ protection. how long were you working as an interpreter? - protection. how long were you working as an interpreter? i i protection. how long were you i working as an interpreter? i was working as an interpreter? i was working for two years for the british army a day also worked for the british embassy in afghanistan in kaboul, so six years in total. how long were you waiting for a decision to be made about your right to settle in the uk? i decision to be made about your right to settle in the uk?— to settle in the uk? i arrived in the uk in _ to settle in the uk? i arrived in the uk in 2013, _ to settle in the uk? i arrived in the uk in 2013, and _ to settle in the uk? i arrived in the uk in 2013, and i— to settle in the uk? i arrived in the uk in 2013, and | waited i to settle in the uk? i arrived in - the uk in 2013, and i waited almost
3:47 pm
a year and a half for a decision to be made by the home office. i would like to ask you. _ be made by the home office. i would like to ask you, one _ be made by the home office. i would like to ask you, one of _ be made by the home office. i would like to ask you, one of the _ be made by the home office. i would like to ask you, one of the reasons, l like to ask you, one of the reasons, it has just been touched on, one of the reasons that the uk government put forward these refusals is that they claimed that some of the interpreters had not working in exposed roles, so the teller ban, they are not at risk from retribution from the taliban —— taliban. did you feel exposed? from the beginning _ taliban. did you feel exposed? from the beginning when _ taliban. did you feel exposed? from the beginning when i _ taliban. did you feel exposed? f'f7�*fli the beginning when ijoined a british army, my hope was to work towards a shared goal of civilising afghanistan, i didn't have that future scenario picture in my head that the circumstances 20 years of that, but it is right that anyone in any role for the british government orany any role for the british government or any otherforeign any role for the british government or any other foreign country in afghanistan is at risk. there taliban will not make any decision between those who are exposed or not
3:48 pm
exposed, and according to the local intelligence and local connections they have, if they find that any afghan who has had any support or connection with british or any other foreign force, they will target them without mercy. you foreign force, they will target them without mercy-— foreign force, they will target them without mer . ., ., , ., without mercy. you were nodding your head, without mercy. you were nodding your head. listening- _ without mercy. you were nodding your head, listening. i— without mercy. you were nodding your head, listening. i assume— without mercy. you were nodding your head, listening. i assume the - without mercy. you were nodding your head, listening. i assume the clock i head, listening. i assume the clock is ticking, how quickly do these decisions need to be made? $5 decisions need to be made? as quickly as possible. absolutely right, — quickly as possible. absolutely right, this new scheme was introduced in the 1st of april, then the next _ introduced in the 1st of april, then the next thing that happened was we had to— the next thing that happened was we had to -- _ the next thing that happened was we had to -- we — the next thing that happened was we had to —— we had the withdrawal announcement, and indeed a number of people _ announcement, and indeed a number of people have _ announcement, and indeed a number of people have arrived and we are actually — people have arrived and we are actually grateful for that. but there — actually grateful for that. but there are so many, the majority are still left _ there are so many, the majority are still left behind, the numbers reported before, 2000, is including families, _ reported before, 2000, is including families, so— reported before, 2000, is including families, so the estimate under the new afghan relocation scheme has been _ new afghan relocation scheme has been at _ new afghan relocation scheme has been at only 800 interpreters and
3:49 pm
their families, been at only 800 interpreters and theirfamilies, but been at only 800 interpreters and their families, but that is not enough — their families, but that is not enough for the number of people that britain _ enough for the number of people that britain actually employed. we have seen from — britain actually employed. we have seen from senior military staff they response _ seen from senior military staff they response from other political experts — response from other political experts the situation in afghanistan is escalating quicker than anybody had anticipated. so we see already a lot of— had anticipated. so we see already a lot of internal displacement, people being _ lot of internal displacement, people being scared, in the provinces where they are. _ being scared, in the provinces where they are, moving to kaboul, and everybody — they are, moving to kaboul, and everybody is fearing for their lives and needs— everybody is fearing for their lives and needs to get out. | everybody is fearing for their lives and needs to get out.— everybody is fearing for their lives and needs to get out. i wonder if i could end with _ and needs to get out. i wonder if i could end with you, _ and needs to get out. i wonder if i could end with you, having - and needs to get out. i wonder if i | could end with you, having worked your service with the british government, how did it make you feel when you were made to wait a long time? what do other interpreters say to you? how does that make them feel when they are told no? disappointment is the word i would use. ., �* ,
3:50 pm
disappointment is the word i would use. . �*, ., . disappointment is the word i would use. . h . , ., ., disappointment is the word i would use. . h ., ., ., use. that's a shame, we have lost ou, but use. that's a shame, we have lost you. but i — use. that's a shame, we have lost you. but i am _ use. that's a shame, we have lost you, but i am going _ use. that's a shame, we have lost you, but i am going to... - use. that's a shame, we have lost you, but i am going to... i - use. that's a shame, we have lost you, but i am going to... i don't i you, but i am going to... i don't want to lose that answer, so what do these interpreters say to you? how does it make them feel? i these interpreters say to you? how does it make them feel?— does it make them feel? i think he is riaht, does it make them feel? i think he is right, disappointed, _ does it make them feel? i think he is right, disappointed, especially i is right, disappointed, especially because— is right, disappointed, especially because british soldiers would confirm — because british soldiers would confirm this, they have looked out for the _ confirm this, they have looked out for the lives of our british soldiers. _ for the lives of our british soldiers, they expect that the british— soldiers, they expect that the british government is looking out for their— british government is looking out for their lives. gk, british government is looking out for their lives.— british government is looking out for their lives. ok, thank you very much, for their lives. ok, thank you very much. both. _ for their lives. ok, thank you very much. both. i— for their lives. ok, thank you very much, both, i don't— for their lives. ok, thank you very much, both, i don't know- for their lives. ok, thank you very much, both, i don't know if- for their lives. ok, thank you very much, both, i don't know if you i for their lives. ok, thank you very i much, both, i don't know if you can hear me, we had a few problems with your line, but if you can, thank you for telling us your story.— for telling us your story. thank you so much. the headlines on bbc news... fully—vaccinated travellers from the us and the eu will be able to fly to and from england without the need for quarantine. but the welsh government remains concerned. team gb's charlotte dujardin rides into the record books as britain's most decorated female equestrian olympian.
3:51 pm
the american gymnast, simone biles, pulls out of another final — saying she wants to focus on her mental health. the prince of wales has paid tribute to the "valour and sacrifice" of police officers and staff, as a new police memorial was unveiled in staffordshire, this afternoon. prince charles revealed a plaque at the monument, which commemorates almost 5,000 police officers and staff who have died in the line of duty. i would particularly like to express my profound gratitude for the valour and sacrifice of those who have laid down their lives to keep us safe. to remember theirfamilies who mourn and to recognise those who continue to serve in order to safeguard our freedoms.
3:52 pm
whilst our expressions of appreciation will always be hopelessly inadequate, and unfortunately make the anguish no easier to bear, i do pray that this memorial will not only provide a hallowed place for us all to pay tribute to each of them, but also the reassurance that those who have given their lives so selflessly will leave a lasting legacy and will never be forgotten. the slate landscapes of north west wales — including six sites in snowdonia — have been awarded unesco world heritage site status. it's the 32nd uk location on the list and joins places like the taj mahal and the grand canyon.
3:53 pm
earlier i spoke to the first minister of wales, mark drakeford, who was delighted by the news. this is the fourth world heritage site in wales, and for a small country, that is a pretty proud record, and today has been a day of genuine celebration here in north—west wales. they're actually a beautiful sight, a beautiful landscape, but why do they matter? they matter because it combines the drama of the natural landscape here in snowdonia with the enormous impact that human beings have had on it as well, particularly during the slate quarrying era of the 19th and early 20th centuries. that impact is very visible all around you here in north—west wales, that is what convinced unesco to grant world heritage status to this part of north wales, that you see the combination of the natural world and the human
3:54 pm
world and the way that they have interacted with one another. obviously the impact of that site behind you, i think there are six in all, have a global significance, going beyond the welsh borders. i had been reading that the area also exported technologies in its heyday, what were those? slate—based technologies, this part of wales roofed the world with buildings of huge significance and absolutely ordinary buildings as well. it was slate from wales that created the roofs of those buildings across the world and the technology that went alongside it in quarrying and mining of slate, also in the way that slate is used, those things were exported from this part of wales to the rest of the world. we saw recently in the news
3:55 pm
what happened to liverpool and its docklands. how does wales or the slate site guarantee that it does not lose its status? with unesco's decision today comes a set of recommendations that the fantastic group of people who have worked on this locally will now have to put into practice, and we understand this is the start of our relationship with unesco, not the end, and unless you are able to go on investing and go on preserving the character of the area, the things that make it so special, including the railway you can hear behind me, unless you can preserve all of that, then you will not be able to go on sustaining the conditions that make this part of the world so special, so we are absolutely committed to making sure
3:56 pm
that we have a sustainable plan for this part of wales, that the things that will attract people from around the world to come here must operate in a way that goes on making this place special for generations that will come beyond us as well. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich, it feels as if summer is on hold at the moment, not least in northern scotland where as you can see the rain was coming down earlier. we had this weather warning extending across this swathe of the highlands. potential for flooding, travel disruption as heavy rain continues. southern scotland brighter but with a scattering of heavy thundery downpours, some affecting parts of northern ireland, england and wales, frequent downpours with lightning, hail stones and gusty winds.
3:57 pm
the wind is brisk, especially towards the south, brewing the rain through quickly. as we head through this evening and overnight, rain continues to affect parts of northern scotland, only slowly pivoting southwards. rain also getting into northern ireland, much of england and wales dry by the end of the night. some showers taking a while to fade, and cooler than it has been in recent nights. low pressure still close by, sitting to the north—east of the uk and another little area of low pressure running in from the south—west, becoming a feature particularly as we head into the latter part of the day. for scotland and northern ireland, cloud, outbreaks of rain, some into northern england, wales, midlands, east anglia and south wales largely dry. the cloud and rain gathers to the far south—west later in the afternoon. top temperatures 20—21 in the best of the sunshine, quite breezy.
3:58 pm
overnight, the pulse of rain, some uncertainty about the exact track. maybe parts of southern england and wales seeing heavy rain and strong wind at times. we will keep a close eye on that. friday, the worst of the wet weather will clear, sunshine, one or two showers, temperatures in the high teens or low 20s. weeekend, high pressure not too far away, adding up to still some showers but not as many as in recent days. more dry weather, some spells of sunshine, feeling cool, particularly in northern scotland.
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 4pm — fully vaccinated travellers from the us and the eu will be able to fly to and from england without the need for quarantine. but the welsh government remains concerned. we have said all along is a welsh government that we would have taken a different approach to international travel. a different approach to internationaltravel. i a different approach to international travel. i still think this is the year when international travel is best avoided. bronze for team gb's charlotte dujardin, who has ridden into the record books, as britain's most decorated female olympian of all time — with six medals. commentator: this is wonderful, gold to great britain — commentator: this is wonderful, gold to great britain in _ commentator: this is wonderful, gold to great britain in the _ commentator: this is wonderful, gold to great britain in the men's _ commentator: this is wonderful, gold to great britain in the men's 4x200 - to great britain in the men's 4x200 metres freestyle relay.
4:01 pm
britain's swimmers strike gold again at the tokyo olympics with victory in the men's 200 metre freestyle relay. the american gymnast, simone biles, pulls out of another final — saying she wants to focus on her mental health. a warning that more lives risk being lost by migrants making the perillous crossing of the english channel, and the abuse rnli crews face for rescuing them. and the slate landscapes of north west wales — including six sites in snowdonia — have been awarded unesco 'world heritage site' status. a national memorial is unveiled for all the british police officers who've died in the line of duty. good afternoon, and
4:02 pm
welcome to bbc news. the government has confirmed people travelling from the eu and the us to england will not have to quarantine if they are fully vaccinated. the change will come into force next monday, the 2nd august. the plans will be a major boost to the aviation and tourism sectors. but scientists are warning that the move could come with risks attached, and labour says the "last thing" the country needed is to "be exposed to yet more dangerous variants'. the transport secretary grant shapps explained the changes. we have already enabled people who have been double vaccinated here, and we can prove that quite easily with the nhs app, to travel and come back and not need to quarantine, even if they are coming from an amber list country. today, we are expanding that to all of europe, including countries like norway for example, and switzerland outside of the eu, and also the united states of america, which does of course cover a very large number of people who come
4:03 pm
to this country, and we'll then look at what to do with people who are vaccinated outside of those areas, once we have the pilot successfully up and running. these changes only apply to england — the other uk nations have yet to make any similar move. earlier, i spoke to the first minister of wales mark drakeford. given that they are making decisions that we probably wouldn't have made for ourselves, it's very important that the uk government is able to offer us assurances that the risks that will be run, and there are risks whenever people visit from other parts of the world, where the virus is in circulation, and where new variants of the disease may be
4:04 pm
emerging, that proper precautions are in place. our political correspondent iain watson has more. we were just listening to mark drakeford there, and sounding cautious. he drakeford there, and sounding cautious. . , ., , drakeford there, and sounding cautious. ., , ., cautious. he was cautious, and i think the interesting _ cautious. he was cautious, and i think the interesting fare - cautious. he was cautious, and i think the interesting fare from i cautious. he was cautious, and i i think the interesting fare from the labour first minister of wales is that he was trying to urge the government to be cautious at westminster as well, because basically his attitude is he doesn't like this but he's going to have to go along with it, because most of these international arrivals who are no longer having to quarantine, will come in through english or scottish airports. very few come through cardiff for example. so they can then travel freely to wales in any case, so he will feel compelled to go along with this decision but he is uncomfortable with this decision. he thinks this is not the year to resume international travel, and indeed the uk wide labour party if you like is also being cautious, saying they should have waited until there was an internationally agreed
4:05 pm
system of covert passports, and they also want to see the data on which the decisions were taken by the government. but i have to say that borisjohnson was under huge pressure, notjust from the travel industry but for many of his own mps to start open up more of the economy, the travel industry, the aviation industry, which has had a hard time, and i think this also reflects inside government, i think while they are publicly saying they are being cautious, privately they are being cautious, privately they are confident the vaccination progress —— programme is keeping covid in check, so they'll be able to do things like relax the travel rules for travellers who are double vaccinated coming from the us and the eu. while we are talking about the eu. while we are talking about the eu. while we are talking about the eu and some other european countries that grant shapps mentioned, the one exception is still france. if you are travelling from france into the uk, you will still have to quarantine for ten days and the reason for that is that france is on the amber plus list, there are concerns about the prevalence of the beta variants in france, and decisions about which
4:06 pm
countries in which parts of the traffic light system, we will have to wait until next thursday. this is only about people coming in from the uk and the us. one of the concern they had in government that seems to have been overcome is that there is as yet no reciprocity from america, so us double jab citizens could come over here from next monday at 4am. the presidential ban on most uk citizens travelling into the united states remains.— citizens travelling into the united states remains. ., ~ , ., , . states remains. thank you very much indeed. airlines have broadly welcomed the government's announcement but british airways also called for help in securing the re—opening of the crucial uk—us travel corridor. today's announcement does nothing to help uk travellers who are still almost all banned from entering the us. our correspondent barbara plett usher has this update from washington.
4:07 pm
well, it is not a ban, it doesn't say that you can't visit, it is a sort of description about which countries have, are higher risk for covid infections, so the government has put the uk in a category of high risk for infection, and then travellers can make up their own minds. i think many americans will want to travel to the uk, especially, as you were saying, people with family and maybe otherwise, too, and if they are fully vaccinated they might not feel there is very much of a risk. so, on the ground, in practical terms, in terms of how many americans travel to the uk, this may mean that many more do, but in terms of how the government here feels about travel, i think that level four advisory is quite a strong indication.
4:08 pm
the travel industry here also as you can imagine has been lobbying for a relaxation in the travel ban for those who are vaccinated, talking about setting up a corridor with other countries that have similar vaccination rates. but the biden administration has just indicated it is not going to move quickly on this. there were a number of other considerations actually beside the delta variant spread that was slowing down the working group to get this corridor established. one was the oxford astrazeneca vaccine. now, that is not authorised in the us, so does that mean that british people who have been vaccinated with it, will they still be eligible? there was that question. also, there is a bureaucratic level, there are several levels of government that have to sign off on covid travel decisions so you have that slowing things down as well, at least four. the focus in particular last week and this week on a domestic politics level has been the rise in cases because of the delta variant, and because of the level of unvaccinated people here, and i think that is what is really focusing attention here, and to open travel under these circumstances, just politically, is not really on the agenda. that was barbara plett usher with analysis from the united states.
4:09 pm
nick beake described the reaction to the news from brussels. i think there are two groups, broadly, who would have been pretty pleased with this. first of all, people living in the eu, who have been double jabbed, who were hoping to get to the uk for a holiday, from next monday, they can do that without having to quarantine. so if they had a plan to go to london, the lake district, wherever, they will be able to do that without having to go into isolation when they arrive. and the second group would be british citizens, who live within the eu, countries including belgium, all the rest of it, who have got their two jabs, but it hasn't been approved by the uk government. so what ministers are saying today is that they are enabling people to be reunited with loved ones, brits who live abroad, they can get back to the uk, they won't need to quarantine and in effect it is putting the eu's level of vaccination on the same sort of path or giving at the same weight as the nhs system, so that's what they've done today.
4:10 pm
let's update you on the latest covid figures from the uk government. they have just been released. 27,7311 more cases — and 91 further deaths.
4:11 pm
with me now is dr shaun fitzgerald of cambridge university, who is a member of the sage environmental modelling group. he's speaking in his own capacity. this latest development, in terms of the easing of travel restrictions, do the stats and the figures bear that up? do the stats and the figures bear that u? ., do the stats and the figures bear that u? . ., ., that up? so, i mean, what we all have to take _ that up? so, i mean, what we all have to take on _ that up? so, i mean, what we all have to take on board _ that up? so, i mean, what we all have to take on board is - that up? so, i mean, what we all have to take on board is that, i have to take on board is that, whatever the restrictions are at any given moment of time, effectively it just means that there is a balance between personal responsibility and the restrictions that the government is imposing, and i think it's really important that we think of it in the round, that it's notjust a case of what we are allowed to do, what we are not allowed to do, it's actually what we should be doing. so it's very important that we still maintain the old message, and it is old now, because we are 18 months into this come about what we can do
4:12 pm
for ourselves. the hands, face, space, ventilate, making sure we get vaccinated and making sure that we still do our bit trying to get tested on a regular basis, whether you have symptoms, whether you haven't, try to look after oneself and others. other thanjust focusing —— rather than focusing on the figures and whether it make sense or not, i think the better way of framing this as it has always been a balance between the government restrictions on our own behaviours and responsibilities. i restrictions on our own behaviours and responsibilities.— restrictions on our own behaviours and responsibilities. i was going to sa that. and responsibilities. i was going to say that- we _ and responsibilities. i was going to say that. we know _ and responsibilities. i was going to say that. we know human - and responsibilities. i was going to i say that. we know human behaviour, as things are opening up, people are going to start forgetting those precautions that you've just mentioned there. do you think this is too much too soon, perhaps? yes, the numbers are dropping, in terms of the cases, but is it too soon, because we have the autumn winter flu period, the autumn winter booster period coming up, we've also got the schools returning? i booster period coming up, we've also got the schools returning?— got the schools returning? i think it's extremely _ got the schools returning? i think it's extremely difficult _ got the schools returning? i think it's extremely difficult to - got the schools returning? i think it's extremely difficult to take - got the schools returning? i think it's extremely difficult to take a i it's extremely difficult to take a view on whether it is too much or
4:13 pm
too little. as i said, i really think it is important that, whatever restrictions are in place, imposed by the government, that is taking on board the scientific advisers, informed by but not dictated by, it is really important that we then also do our bit, and the reason why for example cases might be coming down and yet restrictions might be relaxing, that is a result of many factors, which include for example, the rate at which the people are getting vaccinated. so that proportion of the population increasing and therefore that being able to suppress the transmission rates, but also the fact that we are spending more and more time outside at the moment, and admittedly the last few days have been a bit inclement but overall the summer has been rather good, so as a result of some of our behaviours as well and i think we should all take heed do our bit. so for example if you are inside, just making sure you through the windows open, notjust because it is wonderful to have as much fresh air when it's warm outside,
4:14 pm
because it actually helps dilute the air of any virus particles that might be present. i air of any virus particles that might be present.— air of any virus particles that might be present. air of any virus particles that miaht be resent. . , ., ., might be present. i am 'ust going to clarify something, _ might be present. i am just going to clarify something, because - might be present. i am just going to clarify something, because i - might be present. i am just going to clarify something, because i was - clarify something, because i was generalising when i said that cases have been slowly dropping. as of the figures we have received today, we are actually seeing an uptick on those that we saw the figures yesterday, sojust those that we saw the figures yesterday, so just to let viewers know, and yourself, so yesterday we had confirmed cases of 23,511. today's reported cases are 27,734. so let's just clarify that. let's go back to the modelling, dr fitzgerald. how do international variables affect your modelling? well, it is not my modelling, but i would say that the concern about, eh, the overall prevalence in any country will be taken on board, but then also, a, the presence of any variance with any geography will clearly be of great interest in
4:15 pm
figuring out what the risks are therefore for travel, but then also as results of the overall prevalence in any given country, the more virus there is just circulating within a given country, the greater chances for mutations to arise. overall it is these factors that need to be borne in mind. i is these factors that need to be borne in mind.— is these factors that need to be borne in mind. ., . i. .,, ., borne in mind. i introduced you as a member of— borne in mind. i introduced you as a member of the _ borne in mind. i introduced you as a member of the sage _ borne in mind. i introduced you as a member of the sage environmental| member of the sage environmental modelling group, just give us an insight as to what those models are looking like. the insight as to what those models are looking like-— looking like. the group that i'm involved in _ looking like. the group that i'm involved in actually _ looking like. the group that i'm involved in actually looks - looking like. the group that i'm involved in actually looks at - looking like. the group that i'm involved in actually looks at the transmission routes, rather than modelling, and looking at the population scale modelling. i}i(. modelling, and looking at the population scale modelling. ok, so the transmission _ population scale modelling. ok, so the transmission routes, _ population scale modelling. ok, so the transmission routes, what - population scale modelling. ok, so the transmission routes, what are i the transmission routes, what are those? ~ , ., ., ., the transmission routes, what are those? . , . ., ., ., those? well, they are not to do with the airborne — those? well, they are not to do with the airborne route, _ those? well, they are not to do with the airborne route, in _ those? well, they are not to do with the airborne route, in terms - those? well, they are not to do with the airborne route, in terms of - the airborne route, in terms of virus particles in the air, they are to do with droplet transmission from one person to another and then the indirect droplet route, which is
4:16 pm
when you might have droplets depositing on a surface and then somebody touching that surface and touching their mucous membranes. so fair to conclude then that masks are key, moving forward?— key, moving forward? again, it is a ersonal key, moving forward? again, it is a personal decision, _ key, moving forward? again, it is a personal decision, not _ key, moving forward? again, it is a personal decision, not just - key, moving forward? again, it is a personal decision, notjust one - key, moving forward? again, it is ai personal decision, notjust one that has been mandated by government, it is actually what you do with a mask. so even if you're going into a retail environment where it says it is now optional, we then all have to think about, what is the right thing to do? i personally, i do, when i go into a shop, i am still wearing a face covering, mainly, obviously, to protect others, in case i happen to be infectious and don't know it. i}i(. be infectious and don't know it. ok, dr sean fitzgerald, i did push you, i apologise, but thank you very much indeed. ok the time is 16 minutes possible. the headlines on bbc news... fully vaccinated travellers from the us and the eu will be able to fly to and from england without the need for quarantine.
4:17 pm
but the welsh government remains concerned. team gb's charlotte dujardin rides into the record books as britain's most decorated female equestrian olympian. the american gymnast, simone biles, pulls out of another final — saying she wants to focus on her mental health. there's been more medal success at the olympics for team gb. in the last few minutes, charlotte dujardin has become the most decorated female british olympian of all time. not the last few minutes, actually. it was in the last few hours. but the good news, that aside... she took bronze in the individual dressage with her horse gio who's competing at his first olympics, bringing her total number of medals across three olympics to six, which includes three gold medals earlier, there was a fifth tokyo gold in the men's 200 metre freestyle relay. tom dean and duncan scott — who won gold and silver yesterday — were part of the victorious team who just missed out on a world record. elsewhere, britain's rowers won their first medal of the games — a silver in the men's
4:18 pm
quadruple sculls. earlier, we spoke tojudy harvey, chair of the selectors for dressage for the games, about charlotte dujardin's olympic victory. it is extraordinary, and charlotte has worked so hard for this, and carl hester, her mentor and trainer, he deserves as much of this medal as she does, and in fact the whole team has been absolutely remarkable and fantastic. but to deal with what we have all had to deal with, with covid, with the difficulty of getting horses over to europe to compete, with brexit, and one thing or another, whether or not the olympics
4:19 pm
will be on or not, to then have to focus on gio, and to do that routine, and i think there is the first time it has ever been performed in public, that freestyle routine, it was just an expanding piece of professionalism and concentration in sport. she truly deserves this. it is fantastic. the german rider was outstanding, absolutely outstanding, and fully deserved to win. i think charlotte could have had a little squeak at silver, but to get bronze is phenomenal, on a horse who internationaljudges really don't know very well. he's the youngest horse in the medal group, and, basically, a lot of people laughed at charlotte when she chose that horse, because he's so small and little that they felt he didn't have the dynamic for the big stage. but she has highlighted all his strengths, and really trained him brilliantly, and itjust goes to show what you can do, and he has proved himself as a number one dressage horse for the future. that was judy harvey. well, plenty of other
4:20 pm
stories at the games — let's cross to tokyo and join lucy hockings. it has been a great day, hasn't it? it has been a great day, hasn't it? it has been a great day, hasn't it? it has indeed. the big story here in japan is about the japanese teenage gymnast who has just won the men's all round gold. but the other big story here if you look at all the local media is what is happening with the pandemic and japan is watching as other nations and southeast asia are really suffering with high infection rates at the moment. this country has avoided some of those devastating outbreaks but there is a fifth wave being fuelled by the delta variant and it is really putting pressure now on hospitals here in tokyo, with the governor morning he may need some more belts and some of the local hospitals. we have to remember this is the
4:21 pm
fourth _ we have to remember this is the fourth state of emergency tokyo is under, _ fourth state of emergency tokyo is under, and — fourth state of emergency tokyo is under, and with the latest declaration, the number of people out and _ declaration, the number of people out and about hasn't exactly gone down _ out and about hasn't exactly gone down it— out and about hasn't exactly gone down it is— out and about hasn't exactly gone down. it is not a strict lockdown, there _ down. it is not a strict lockdown, there is— down. it is not a strict lockdown, there is no— down. it is not a strict lockdown, there is no penalty, though the first state — there is no penalty, though the first state of emergency, back in last april. — first state of emergency, back in last april, people actually obliged, but by— last april, people actually obliged, but by the fourth time people are rather— but by the fourth time people are rather fed — but by the fourth time people are rather fed up, but by the fourth time people are ratherfed up, and if but by the fourth time people are rather fed up, and if you asked people — rather fed up, and if you asked people on— rather fed up, and if you asked people on the street, they say you can't _ people on the street, they say you can't exactly tell us to stay at home — can't exactly tell us to stay at home when the government forged for the olympics, despite strong public opposition, so this search is probably— opposition, so this search is probably inevitable. it has passed 8pm now. — probably inevitable. it has passed 8pm now, which is when bars and restaurants — 8pm now, which is when bars and restaurants have been asked to close but you _ restaurants have been asked to close but you can _ restaurants have been asked to close but you can probably see behind me that some _ but you can probably see behind me that some of them remain open. we have actually seen staff members out and about, _ have actually seen staff members out and about, telling people that we are open— and about, telling people that we are open after 8pm, and that is partly— are open after 8pm, and that is partly because the government has promised _ partly because the government has promised to offer them financial support, — promised to offer them financial support, but it is taking way too long. _ support, but it is taking way too long, according to some reports, more _ long, according to some reports, more than — long, according to some reports, more than six months, which is honestly— more than six months, which is honestly way too slow for smaller businesses. and it is notjust
4:22 pm
tokyo — businesses. and it is notjust tokyo the _ businesses. and it is notjust tokyo. the three surrounding prefectures are also seeing a spike in new— prefectures are also seeing a spike in new covid cases, so they are now asking _ in new covid cases, so they are now asking the _ in new covid cases, so they are now asking the national government to declare _ asking the national government to declare a — asking the national government to declare a state of emergency as welt _ declare a state of emergency as well. other big story everyone following around the world, notjust here in japan, is the fact that the american superstar gymnast simone biles has announced she is pulling out of another gymnastics event. we have some pictures that have just come into us actually. we haven't seen much of simone biles since that announcement, but here she is at her hotel. she has withdrawn from the all—round competition where she is the defending champion. on tuesday, she pulled out of the team event, saying she needed to focus on a mental health. we don't know yet is whether simone will compete in other individual events in tokyo. that announcement hasn't been made yet. but you can see her there at her hotel. so it has really brought this
4:23 pm
issue of mental health and the pressure athletes are under into the spotlight. let's speak to amy tinkler, a gymnast who won a medal in rio, and she has stopped competing because of mental health pressure. she is the face of these oration —— these olympic games, simone biles, under a oration —— these olympic games, simone biles, undera huge oration —— these olympic games, simone biles, under a huge amount of pressure, coming forward, taking a stand, saying i need to think about my mental health, rather than my physical abilities right now. when you first heard that, what was your reaction? i you first heard that, what was your reaction? ~ ., , you first heard that, what was your reaction? ~ . , ., , reaction? i think i was with -- as with everyone. — reaction? i think i was with -- as with everyone, it _ reaction? i think i was with -- as with everyone, it was _ reaction? i think i was with -- as with everyone, it was a - reaction? i think i was with -- as with everyone, it was a shock, i reaction? i think i was with -- as. with everyone, it was a shock, but i think— with everyone, it was a shock, but i think it _ with everyone, it was a shock, but i think it just — with everyone, it was a shock, but i think itjust shows how much of with everyone, it was a shock, but i think it just shows how much of a strong _ think it just shows how much of a strong person she is, and such an inspiration — strong person she is, and such an inspiration as well, to be the first gymnast — inspiration as well, to be the first gymnast to publicly on the biggest stage _ gymnast to publicly on the biggest stage in— gymnast to publicly on the biggest stage in an olympics games saying i'm struggling, i need help and i need _ i'm struggling, i need help and i need to— i'm struggling, i need help and i need to take a step back from this,
4:24 pm
and in _ need to take a step back from this, and in gymnastics mental health has kind of— and in gymnastics mental health has kind of always been looked over, and i hope _ kind of always been looked over, and i hope that— kind of always been looked over, and i hope that simone now can be the driving _ i hope that simone now can be the driving force to really put mental health _ driving force to really put mental health first. so driving force to really put mental health first-— health first. so what needs to chan . e health first. so what needs to change in _ health first. so what needs to change in the _ health first. so what needs to change in the sport _ health first. so what needs to change in the sport then? - health first. so what needs to change in the sport then? i i health first. so what needs to - change in the sport then? i think, eseciall change in the sport then? i think, especially for _ change in the sport then? i think, especially for the _ change in the sport then? i think, especially for the girls, _ change in the sport then? i think, especially for the girls, we - change in the sport then? i think, especially for the girls, we turned senior— especially for the girls, we turned senior at— especially for the girls, we turned senior at 16 years old, so from a young _ senior at 16 years old, so from a young age — senior at 16 years old, so from a young age we have to be very mature. we have _ young age we have to be very mature. we have a _ young age we have to be very mature. we have a lot — young age we have to be very mature. we have a lot of pressure, we are still competing around six, seven—year—old, so even from six years _ seven—year—old, so even from six years old. — seven—year—old, so even from six years old, you have that pressure of competitions already. and i do think as well, _ competitions already. and i do think as well, obviously simone biles is known _ as well, obviously simone biles is known in — as well, obviously simone biles is known in every household all over the world, — known in every household all over the world, and i can't imagine what pressure _ the world, and i can't imagine what pressure she has notjust from herself— pressure she has notjust from herself but from the whole world. it was a _ herself but from the whole world. it was a was _ herself but from the whole world. it was a was going to happen. she is such— was a was going to happen. she is such an _ was a was going to happen. she is such an incredible gymnast, and i think— such an incredible gymnast, and i think it _ such an incredible gymnast, and i think it is — such an incredible gymnast, and i think it is really impressive that she has— think it is really impressive that she hasjust said, look, i need to take _ she hasjust said, look, i need to take a _ she hasjust said, look, i need to take a step — she hasjust said, look, i need to take a step back from this right now _ take a step back from this right now. �* , , take a step back from this right now. ~ , , ., ., , now. amy, she did do that first rotation with _ now. amy, she did do that first rotation with the _ now. amy, she did do that first rotation with the volt _ now. amy, she did do that first rotation with the volt and - now. amy, she did do that firsti rotation with the volt and made now. amy, she did do that first i rotation with the volt and made an
4:25 pm
error. it was a low score from her. what do you think happened, can you tell? ,, ., , what do you think happened, can you tell? ,, , ., what do you think happened, can you tell? ,, , ., tell? she was supposed to complete a two and half — tell? she was supposed to complete a two and half twist _ tell? she was supposed to complete a two and half twist and _ tell? she was supposed to complete a two and half twist and she _ tell? she was supposed to complete a two and half twist and she ended - tell? she was supposed to complete a two and half twist and she ended up i two and half twist and she ended up only during — two and half twist and she ended up only during a one and a half. from the statement she put out, and from what i've _ the statement she put out, and from what i've heard, she has a thing that gymnast called the twisties, which _ that gymnast called the twisties, which is — that gymnast called the twisties, which is basically when you are in the air, _ which is basically when you are in the air, you — which is basically when you are in the air, you have no idea where your body— the air, you have no idea where your body is. _ the air, you have no idea where your body is. and — the air, you have no idea where your body is, and your spatial awareness has completely gone. so i've heard gymnast _ has completely gone. so i've heard gymnast say, evenjust doing has completely gone. so i've heard gymnast say, even just doing the simplest— gymnast say, even just doing the simplest skill, like a backward roll, _ simplest skill, like a backward roll, when they have the twisties, they can't— roll, when they have the twisties, they can't even do a backward roll without _ they can't even do a backward roll without wanting to twist. it's the most _ without wanting to twist. it's the most terrifying block that you can never _ most terrifying block that you can never really get in gymnastics. and when _ never really get in gymnastics. and when she _ never really get in gymnastics. and when she is— never really get in gymnastics. and when she is doing skills like a two and a _ when she is doing skills like a two and a half— when she is doing skills like a two and a half an volt, to have that, she could — and a half an volt, to have that, she could get seriously injured and it could _ she could get seriously injured and it could be — she could get seriously injured and it could be life—threatening, and i think— it could be life—threatening, and i think her— it could be life—threatening, and i think her and it could be life—threatening, and i think herand her it could be life—threatening, and i think her and her coach had such a sensible _ think her and her coach had such a sensible decision to say, you know what, _ sensible decision to say, you know what. if— sensible decision to say, you know what. if i _ sensible decision to say, you know what, if i carry on competing today, i could _ what, if i carry on competing today, i could seriously injure myself. i
4:26 pm
think— i could seriously injure myself. i think it — i could seriously injure myself. i think it was _ i could seriously injure myself. i think it was really brave of her to step back — think it was really brave of her to ste back. ., , , think it was really brave of her to step back-— think it was really brave of her to ste back. ., , , ., , ., , step back. the moves she does has been so complicated, _ step back. the moves she does has been so complicated, she - step back. the moves she does has been so complicated, she has - step back. the moves she does has been so complicated, she has been i been so complicated, she has been hard tojudge over the been so complicated, she has been hard to judge over the years because she is so advanced in what she does, what mental state do you think simone has to be in to be able to perform in the way that she does? yeah, notjust simone, but any gymnast — yeah, notjust simone, but any gymnast has got to be fully focused. gymnastics is a very dangerous sport. — gymnastics is a very dangerous sport. and _ gymnastics is a very dangerous sport, and if your mind is not 100% there. _ sport, and if your mind is not 100% there. the — sport, and if your mind is not 100% there, the worst injuries can happen _ there, the worst injuries can happen. and, yes, ithink, i can't even _ happen. and, yes, ithink, i can't even imagine what is going on in her head right _ even imagine what is going on in her head right now. i honestly send all my love _ head right now. i honestly send all my love to— head right now. i honestly send all my love to her. ijust really hope that she — my love to her. ijust really hope that she is — my love to her. ijust really hope that she is doing ok because i know how hard _ that she is doing ok because i know how hard it — that she is doing ok because i know how hard it can be. you that she is doing ok because i know how hard it can be.— how hard it can be. you are not the only one. — how hard it can be. you are not the only one. amy. _ how hard it can be. you are not the only one, amy, many _ how hard it can be. you are not the only one, amy, many people - how hard it can be. you are not the. only one, amy, many people around the world are thinking about her. she has received a lot of praise for what she has done. a lot of people
4:27 pm
have reflected on the fact it has taken a lot of strength to her to taken a lot of strength to her to take the stand and talk about her mental health. it is not a weakness at all. thank you for this, a great perspective you have brought to this. let's look at what else is happening on day five in tokyo. asi as i mentioned earlier, japan's gold rush continues, we havejust as i mentioned earlier, japan's gold rush continues, we have just had the teen esher daiki hashimoto winning the coveted men's all—round gymnastics title. —— teenager daiki hashimoto. another teenage hero for japan. there has been glorious bell in the swimming pool for team gb. it has been mentioned already they took the gold in the men's 4x200 metre relay. this is the core test and you will know —— this is the quartet. the quartet, made up of of 200 metre champion tom dean, silver medallist duncan scott, james guy and matthew richards came within 0.03secs of the world record. it was a stunning performance. and australia's ariarne titmus
4:28 pm
picked up a second gold medal and set a games record in her latest battle with american katie ledecky. titmus, who beat ledecky in the 400m freestyle final on monday, touched home in one minute and 53.50 seconds. and finally — let's take a look at where things stand on the medals table. japan is in the lead with 13 gold medals, with china close behind them with 12. australia also won gold medals in the men's four and women's four rowing events to lift their overall olympic tally to six, moving them up to fifth in the table. team gb is currently in sixth place.
4:29 pm
that is how the medals table is shaping up here in tokyo, as the night comes to an end. it is back to you in london. night comes to an end. it is back to you in london-— night comes to an end. it is back to you in london. thank you very much indeed. the prince of wales has paid tribute to the "valour and sacrifice" of police officers and staff, as a new police memorial was unveiled in staffordshire, this afternoon. prince charles revealed a plaque at the monument, which commemorates almost 5,000 police officers and staff who have died in the line of duty. i would particularly - like to express my profound gratitude for the valour _ and sacrifice of those who have laid down their lives to keep us safe. to remember their families who mourn and to recognise those _ who continue to serve in order to safeguard our freedoms. i whilst our expressions- of appreciation will always be
4:30 pm
hopelessly inadequate, | and unfortunately make the anguish no easier to bear, i do pray that this memorial. will not only provide a hallowed place for us all to pay— tribute to each of them, _ but also the reassurance that those who have given their lives - so selflessly will leave a lasting legacy and will never be forgotten. that was prince charles speaking earlier in staffordshire. now the weather with ben rich. hello. it feels like summer is on hold at the moment, not least in parts of northern scotland, where we have a met office amber warning in force for heavy and persistent rain, which brings the risk of flooding and travel disruption. the rain continuing here as we head through the rest of the day. southern scotland, brighter,
4:31 pm
but with some heavy thundery showers, and for northern ireland, england and wales, a story of sunny spells and some of those really intense downpours, with thunder and lightning, some hail and gusty winds, generally quite a windy day, particularly down towards the south, and top temperatures of 16 to 20 degrees. that is a bit disappointing for this time of year. through this evening and tonight, the showers continue for a time across england and wales, only slowly fading. northern ireland and scotland will continue to see cloud and some outbreaks of rain it will be a relatively cool night, compared with some we have had recently. as we head through the next couple of days, more showers or longer spells of rain in the forecast, especially in the north during thursday, and in the south during friday, where it could be windy for a time as well. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... fully—vaccinated travellers from the us and the eu will be able to fly to and from england
4:32 pm
without the need for quarantine. nearly 28,000 new covic—19 cases have been reported in the last 24 hours across britain — that's an increase of over 4,000 and the first rise in the daily total after seven days of lower cases. bronze for team gb's charlotte dujardin — who has ridden into the record books, as britain's most decorated female olympian of all time — with six medals. and the slate landscapes of north—west wales — including six sites in snowdonia — have been awarded unesco 'world heritage site' status. a national memorial is unveiled for all the british police officers who've died in the line of duty. sport, and time for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon.
4:33 pm
she said she couldn't believe it, but charlotte dujardin has overtaken rower catherine grainger as britain's most decorated female olympian of all time. —— katherine. she won her sixth olympic medal earlier on her horse gio — also known as pumpkin — in the individual dressage. she was thrilled with her performance and also the horse's, because he is reletively inexperienced. she had to wait for the other riders to finish to see if she would stay in the bronze position. but she celebrated as confirmation came that she had won the bronze. she adds to her double gold in 2012 and gold and team silver in rio. she said she was delighted to have achieved so much. there are so many incredible sportspeople, women that have achieved so much, and now that i have done that and i have topped it all, last night i think i was, or today, i was level with katherine grainger, now i have beaten her, it is a little bit surreal, so you only dream of these things happening and it is actually happening, so i can't believe it.
4:34 pm
there was more gold medal success for great britain's men in the olympic pool, this time in the final of the 4x 200metre freestyle relay. tom dean is now a double olympic champion, a day after he won his first gold. he, along with duncan scott, james guy and matthew richards, came within three hundredths of a second of the world record as they won emphatically. finishing more than three seconds clear of the russian olympic committee. it's team gb's fifth gold medal of the games. three have come in swimming — and that's not happened for 113 years. so another night to rememberfor great britain's men in the pool — and there's been success in the rowing as well. the team have won their first men's quadruple sculls medal after taking silver. harry leask, angus groom, tom barras and jack beaumont held off a late charge from australia and poland to secure second place behind the netherlands.
4:35 pm
since 1996, team gb have won gold in the men's fours — not today though. with 500 metres to go they were very well positioned but then struggled to stay in lane, some dramatic steering issues which nearly led to them crashing into the italian boat at the bottom of your screen. they avoided that to finish fourth, australia the winners. the only remaining british player in the men's tennis singles — liam broady — has gone out in the third round, losing in three sets to jeremy chardy. this comes as andy murray's hopes of a third olympic gold medal were ended. he and joe salisbury are out of the men's doubles after losing their quarterfinal match against croatia. they won the first set fairly confortably, taking it 6—4, but lost the second — and then the third set went to a tie break 10—7 against marin cilic and ivan dodig.
4:36 pm
arguably the story dominating the games at the moment, the american gymnast and four—time olympic gold medallist simone biles has withdrawn from tomorrow's individual all—around final in tokyo to protect her mental health. she stepped back from the team final yesterday, during the competition, but watched on as her teammates went on to win silver. us swimmer erica sullivan also suffered with mental health issues. she says it's very hard to comprehend what biles has gone through. i totally understand what she is going through, and honestly all the support i laughed her way, because at the end of the day so many little people understand the concerns of a top athlete, like simone biles who is at the top of her range, she is the curve, her own bar, and i do not think people... people fail to
4:37 pm
recognise she is also a human being, so so much heart, love, good vibes her way. professional footballers in england are to be limited to ten "higher force headers" a week in training under new guidelines for the upcoming season. recent "multiple studies" were conducted into concerns about the long—term dangers of heading. in 2019, a study found professional footballers were more likely to suffer from neuro—degenerative brain disease. guidance for amateurs is "ten headers per session and only one session a week where heading practice is included". manchester originals are scheduled to be playing the super chases at old trafford, the umpires have confirmed that the women's picture has been abandoned, both teams taking a point, the men's matches still scheduled but we will have updates. that's all the sport for now. more now on our top
4:38 pm
story this afternoon — and the government's scrapping quarantine rules for fully—vaccinated travellers arriving in england from the european union and the us from next monday. the decision was made at a meeting of senior ministers. well, let's speak to the chief executive of heathrow, john holland—kaye. thank you forjoining us. first off, your reaction to this announcement. this is fantastic news, for any byes who have family overseas, this gives us a chance to meet up with them, for businesses who need to be able to go and come and visit their subsidiaries and partners, it makes it easier. it is usually important for trade, it easier. it is usually important fortrade, because it easier. it is usually important for trade, because the same planes that carry business people and people visiting also carry the uk's exports —— hugely important.
4:39 pm
fantastic news and real congratulations to gran chaps for getting this to government. does it to far getting this to government. does it go far enough? _ getting this to government. does it go far enough? i— getting this to government. does it go far enough? i think _ getting this to government. does it go far enough? i think this - getting this to government. does it go far enough? i think this is - getting this to government. does it go far enough? i think this is the i go far enough? i think this is the riaht thin go far enough? i think this is the right thing to _ go far enough? i think this is the right thing to do, _ go far enough? i think this is the right thing to do, the _ go far enough? i think this is the i right thing to do, the government needs to show confidence in the vaccination programme to allow people vaccinated to travel freely. there is more that can be done to make it easierfor there is more that can be done to make it easier for people to travel, in particular getting rid of the pcr test as the first check that it carried out after you come back to the uk, why not replace that with a much cheaper lateral flow test? as we have our normal lives and only take a test if you test positive, so that the government can do its genomic sequencing. that would be much more practical and cheaperfor people to make sure that travel doesn't just people to make sure that travel doesn'tjust become something for wealthy people but all of us can enjoy it. wealthy people but all of us can en'o it. �* �* , , , wealthy people but all of us can en'o it. �* �* ,, ,., enjoy it. aren't there issues of accuracy? _ enjoy it. aren't there issues of accuracy? lateral— enjoy it. aren't there issues of accuracy? lateral flow - enjoy it. aren't there issues of accuracy? lateral flow test - enjoy it. aren't there issues ofi accuracy? lateral flow test are enjoy it. aren't there issues of - accuracy? lateral flow test are very accurate, that's _ accuracy? lateral flow test are very accurate, that's why _ accuracy? lateral flow test are very accurate, that's why we _ accuracy? lateral flow test are very accurate, that's why we use - accuracy? lateral flow test are very accurate, that's why we use them, | accurate, that's why we use them, told that government wants pcr tests so they can genomic sequencing, but
4:40 pm
the reality is they only do that sequencing on a few percent of the total test done, so most of them, on people who do not have covid, are wasted, so it is a big expense of the passenger. if you are a family of four who had to ticket pcr test, and caused £100 each, a huge burden. —— it might cost. why not move to lateral flow test as the first check and make it easierfor all of lateral flow test as the first check and make it easier for all of us? many would argue that in particular, with an important key travel hub like heathrow airport, sequencing is very important because this is where varieds would enter the country. i would agree if the government was doing the sequencing, the reality is the only sequence a couple of percent, so why make all of us take these tests when they are not using them for their intended purpose? they are getting much more accurate,
4:41 pm
pcr, much —— lateralflow, let's do that and only sequence those that proved positive.— that and only sequence those that proved positive. there you are with our mask proved positive. there you are with your mask on. _ proved positive. there you are with your mask on. i— proved positive. there you are with your mask on, i can _ proved positive. there you are with your mask on, i can see _ proved positive. there you are with your mask on, i can see travellers l your mask on, i can see travellers behind you walking up and down the corridor, what a you going to be asking travellers to do when they transit or arrive through heathrow airport moving forward? we transit or arrive through heathrow airport moving forward?— airport moving forward? we are askin: airport moving forward? we are asking everyone _ airport moving forward? we are asking everyone to _ airport moving forward? we are asking everyone to keep - airport moving forward? we are asking everyone to keep their i airport moving forward? we are i asking everyone to keep their mask on, as are the airlines, it is something that a lot of our colleagues and passengers expect as a way of giving them reassurance, and it is one of the few protections that work against the virus. everyone who is travelling here has already been tested, otherwise they wouldn't be allowed onto a plane, so it is a very safe environment, but we still want to make sure that everyone continues to where they face coverings, including those meeting and greeting, waiting for their loved ones.— meeting and greeting, waiting for their loved ones. what conversations are ou their loved ones. what conversations are you having _ their loved ones. what conversations are you having with _ their loved ones. what conversations are you having with the _ their loved ones. what conversations are you having with the airlines? - are you having with the airlines? you need precautions on board before
4:42 pm
they step onto land.— they step onto land. absently right, this is the standard _ they step onto land. absently right, this is the standard adopted - they step onto land. absently right, this is the standard adopted by - they step onto land. absently right, i this is the standard adopted by some of our biggest halides, and what we are trying to do is have an end—to—end journey that makes people feel safe —— biggest airlines. the same standards in new york as on the plane and after they arrive here. having common standards for health in travel and also for checking whether people are safe to travel is the way forward, so we can make it easierfor the way forward, so we can make it easier for people to go about their normal business but also stay safe. the us has got an advisory at the moment for americans travelling to the uk, despite what the english, what westminster has announced, do you think this latest announcement will be able to save the rest of summer, or is it too late? what sort of numbers are you expecting to
4:43 pm
travel? ., ., . ., ._ ., travel? the announcement today move the markets that _ travel? the announcement today move the markets that we _ travel? the announcement today move the markets that we conserved - travel? the announcement today move the markets that we conserved to - the markets that we conserved to about 20% of our normal customer base to about six to 5%, so that represents a lot of people who were not able to travel before but wanted to desperately can now travel. this is a really significant change coming just after schools have broken up for holidays, the eu is fully opened up to uk travellers, and in the uk is open to them as well, the us is a challenge, i am delighted the government has not waited for the us to open up to us, they have gone on ahead and opened up they have gone on ahead and opened up unilaterally, that is a good step forward because a lot of people in the states have family here who they haven't been able to see, this is a chance to get together, but it also means the uk will not for behind our competitors in europe who have been open to the us for several weeks. they have seen a massive increase in the number of people coming from the us into europe on the back of that, they have also seen a big growth in
4:44 pm
their trade with the us at that time. that is what the uk has been missing out on and it is important the uk has taken this step to reconnect us with the united states, our biggest single trading partner, so that we can help to protectjobs here in the uk. so that we can help to protect 'obs here in the uk.�* so that we can help to protect 'obs here in the uk. quickly, heathrow is a har for here in the uk. quickly, heathrow is a harp for smaller _ here in the uk. quickly, heathrow is a harp for smaller businesses, - here in the uk. quickly, heathrow is a harp for smaller businesses, how i a harp for smaller businesses, how much has this pandemic cost you so far? it much has this pandemic cost you so far? . , . ., , , much has this pandemic cost you so far? , ._ much has this pandemic cost you so far? , . , g: far? it has cost us nearly £3 million iust _ far? it has cost us nearly £3 million just as _ far? it has cost us nearly £3 million just as heathrow - far? it has cost us nearly £3 - million just as heathrow airport limited. we have done everything we can to stay open safely because we are so vital for the uk economy, biggest port, so remaining opening so that we can get vaccines and ppp —— pp so that we can get vaccines and ppp __ pp __ so that we can get vaccines and ppp —— pp —— ppe in. so that we can get vaccines and ppp —— pp —— ppe in. export is usually important. iam proud —— pp —— ppe in. export is usually important. i am proud of the work our team has done to do that, but there news today that opens up more market stuff is usually important because it is those passenger planes
4:45 pm
that carry the uk's export, and without planes flying a lot of uk experts haven't been able to get to market. this is a big news for the uk economy and will put us on the runway to recovery.— uk economy and will put us on the runway to recovery. heathrow chief executive. — runway to recovery. heathrow chief executive, john, _ runway to recovery. heathrow chief executive, john, thank _ runway to recovery. heathrow chief executive, john, thank you - runway to recovery. heathrow chief executive, john, thank you very - runway to recovery. heathrow chief i executive, john, thank you very much for your time. with me is paul ludlow, president of p810 cruises. iam sure i am sure you heard what the cheek of second had to say, are you as happy with his announcement? hate of second had to say, are you as happy with his announcement? we are deliahted happy with his announcement? we are delighted with — happy with his announcement? we are delighted with this _ happy with his announcement? we are delighted with this announcement, - happy with his announcement? we are delighted with this announcement, we | delighted with this announcement, we have been— delighted with this announcement, we have been working with the government since march of last year and our— government since march of last year and our policies and procedures, different— and our policies and procedures, different agencies, health authorities to ensure that we assure our cruising — authorities to ensure that we assure our cruising is safe, and the industry— our cruising is safe, and the industry started earlier this summer with domestic cruises and we have been _ with domestic cruises and we have been operating in and around the uk since _ been operating in and around the uk sincejune _ been operating in and around the uk since june. this announcement today aets since june. this announcement today gets us— since june. this announcement today
4:46 pm
gets us back— since june. this announcement today gets us back to travelling further afield, _ gets us back to travelling further afield, which is what our customers love to _ afield, which is what our customers love to do. — afield, which is what our customers love to do, we are delighted. how would this impact _ love to do, we are delighted. fin" would this impact you? this love to do, we are delighted. firm-o" would this impact you? this is for, this particular announcement is for us and eu travellers to england, so how would that affect a cruise company like ourselves? do you have many american and european travellers coming to england and then hopping onto one of your ships? there are actually a couple of announcements today, the one you have refer to around travel corridors, a second one which hasn't had the same headlines but the resumption of international cruising in its entirety. we have been working with the government to ensure that we do that in a considered and thoughtful way. that is what we have done. it is a red—hot new story this afternoon so we will be working with the government to figure out exactly what that means. we plan to cap international cruises again from september, the end of september, ——
4:47 pm
plan to pick up, it is the green light that so many of our guests had been looking forwarding —— looking for, and there will be huge excitement about that. thank you for clari in: excitement about that. thank you for clarifying and — excitement about that. thank you for clarifying and underlining _ excitement about that. thank you for clarifying and underlining that - clarifying and underlining that other announcement for us. how badly did you need this, because we all remember what happened in favouri 2020 with the diamond princess, how badly did that hit the cruising industry? the cruise industry at the start of the pandemic took a lot of headlines, the start of the pandemic took a lot of headlines, ., ., ., ., headlines, the world at large and learnt so much _ headlines, the world at large and learnt so much in _ headlines, the world at large and learnt so much in the _ headlines, the world at large and learnt so much in the months - headlines, the world at large and | learnt so much in the months that followed and the challenges we faced, since then we have worked hard to install protocols, any travel sector principles, the cruise industry has led the way in ensuring that we can provide safe and enjoyable experiences. the crew sector in the uk is worth over £10
4:48 pm
billion to the uk economy, which is just huge, so indirectly and directly we support employment and industry across the country, this announcement today will be great news but only for us but so many suppliers as well as the guests. you talk about protocols and the work you do, working closely with the government, what can your passengers expect now in terms of keeping them safe when they step on board? we have safe when they step on board? 7 have been operating domestically for a couple of months and we have asked all of our guests who come on board to be fully vaccinated and all of our guests have welcomed that as something that gives them peace of mind, we also conduct thorough testing, and of course on our ships we adopt certain protocols to keep everybody well on board, and as the pandemic balls and restrictions begin to ease, we willjust continue to talk to our guests and ask them
4:49 pm
what it is they want from us that they can feel assured and relaxed why they are on holiday. minimum is not enough, we go the extra mile to make sure people have an enjoyable time. make sure people have an en'oyable time. �* ., ., . , , ., make sure people have an en'oyable time. ., , , time. being on a cruise is a very close environment, _ time. being on a cruise is a very close environment, is _ time. being on a cruise is a very close environment, is the - time. being on a cruise is a very| close environment, is the testing ongoing? i am think about lessons learned and how quickly the coronavirus spread on the diamond princess. , , ., , coronavirus spread on the diamond princess. , ., ., princess. yes, so before people 'oin the shi - , princess. yes, so before people 'oin the ship. we — princess. yes, so before people 'oin the ship, we would i princess. yes, so before people 'oin the ship, we would aski princess. yes, so before people 'oin the ship, we would ask them i princess. yes, so before people 'oin the ship, we would ask them to i princess. yes, so before people join the ship, we would ask them to be i the ship, we would ask them to be double vaccinated, and before the board we can conduct thorough testing, so everybody walks on negative for covid, so we are continuing to work with our guests to make sure that remains the case. to most into our domestic programme, hugely successful, this move to international will be an ever losing on the success —— two months into. how much has the pandemic cost you so far? this is a resumption of
4:50 pm
economic activity. it so far? this is a resumption of economic activity.— economic activity. it is a huge boost for _ economic activity. it is a huge boost for the _ economic activity. it is a huge boost for the uk _ economic activity. it is a huge boost for the uk economy, i economic activity. it is a huge boost for the uk economy, 10 economic activity. it is a huge - boost for the uk economy, 10 million us £10 billion a year to the uk, but giving you an example, in hampshire alone we have over 150 suppliers, in dorset we have another 30, that is worth nearly1 billion a year, so it is fair to say that a lot of people have missed the cruise industry and are glad to see us back. flail are glad to see us back. call ludlow, _ are glad to see us back. call ludlow, thank _ are glad to see us back. call ludlow, thank you. -- - are glad to see us back. call ludlow, thank you. —— paul ludlow. the head of the rnli has warned that more lives will be lost in the english channel, if people continue to make the perilous journey in packed dinghies. mark dowie has been speaking to the bbc as the number of migrants making the crossing continues to rise, with this year's total already exceeding the whole of 2020. charlie rose reports. watch your hands.
4:51 pm
children first. cold, tired and desperate. 11 migrants, including two children, are rescued by lifeboat crews in the english channel. this footage is the first of its kind released by the rnli. this is becoming incredibly dangerous. lives will be lost on either side of the channel if these crosses continue in the way that they are. our work is becoming more and more important in bringing people to safety. that is the reason why we are talking about it. the charity has released testimonies from light bpat crews showing the challenges they face do not stop once the rescued migrants are brought ashore. —— lifeboat.
4:52 pm
but it's extreme danger of crossing the channel in small dinghies which the rnli is especially keen to highlight. i was one of a handful of journalists invited to take part in a survival exercise at their training pool. the idea is to replicate the conditions migrants find themselves in when crossing the channel. bags of belongings, sick bags, very basic, and in the conditions already getting really rough. my crews are seeing incredibly harrowing scenes when they come across boats like the oneyou are in this morning,
4:53 pm
in the middle of the channel, out of sight of land, been passed by huge ships going in both directions, it is incredibly frightening. and the rnli is forecasting a busy few weeks ahead. renewable energy could play a crucial role in the uk's attempt to reach an 80. wind is providing more and more of our electricity, but what about energy from our water? experts say we need to use all forms of electricity generation if that target is to be reached. they are calling for government support to help. the tidal industry developed commercially. this comes as what is being described as the most powerful tidal turbine device in the world has been connected to the grid in orkney.
4:54 pm
we are in a spring tide right now, which is when the waterloo is fastest. ~ ., which is when the waterloo is fastest. ~ . ., .. , , fastest. we were given rare access on board. fastest. we were given rare access on board- we _ fastest. we were given rare access on board. we think— fastest. we were given rare access on board. we think this _ fastest. we were given rare access on board. we think this is - fastest. we were given rare access on board. we think this is a - fastest. we were given rare access on board. we think this is a game | on board. we think this is a game chanuer on board. we think this is a game changer for _ on board. we think this is a game changer for the _ on board. we think this is a game changer for the tidal _ on board. we think this is a game changer for the tidal sector. - on board. we think this is a game changer for the tidal sector. we l changer for the tidal sector. we have these two turbines on each of these leis, each one megawatt rated, these leis, each one megawatt rated, the most powerful tidal turbine in the most powerful tidal turbine in the welding operation. this mark bennett is we can recover that to surface to get access for maintenance. —— the smart bit. we can lower them and repair them at height. == can lower them and repair them at heirht. . . can lower them and repair them at heirht. . , ., height. -- at tide. the tides are amon: height. -- at tide. the tides are among the _ height. -- at tide. the tides are among the most _ height. -- at tide. the tides are among the most powerful- height. -- at tide. the tides are among the most powerful in - height. -- at tide. the tides arei among the most powerful in the world, the water flowing so fast it gives the illusion the devices moving, cutting to the water. even though it is tethered tank is on the sea bed. the attraction of tidal power is that it is a predictable form of renewable energy and those powerful current is turning the
4:55 pm
blades on two turbines on this device, generating enough electricity to power up to 2000 homes. in electricity to power up to 2000 homes. , ., ., ~ homes. in the year of cop26, endorsing _ homes. in the year of cop26, endorsing and _ homes. in the year of cop26, endorsing and supporting - homes. in the year of cop26, endorsing and supporting and pioneering innovative technology based like tidal stream is kind of standing for what needs to happen, tidal stream is able to complement the uk's transition to net zero. tidal is still expensive compared to other renewables like wind, experts say government support would help bring costs down and enabled the industry to develop commercially. all of these industries in the year early— all of these industries in the year early phases need government support in one _ early phases need government support in one form _ early phases need government support in one form or another. the industry finance _ in one form or another. the industry finance needs to know that there is guaranteed prices as it commercialises. looking at wind, the part that _ commercialises. looking at wind, the part that was followed there, we need _ part that was followed there, we need to— part that was followed there, we need to follow the same path were tied to _ need to follow the same path were tied to make it work, and we need all of— tied to make it work, and we need all of these — tied to make it work, and we need all of these different energy sources _ all of these different energy sources going forward. the uk
4:56 pm
government — sources going forward. the uk government says _ sources going forward. the uk government says it _ sources going forward. the uk government says it has - sources going forward. the uk government says it has a - sources going forward. the uk government says it has a long | government says it has a long history of supporting the development of wave and tidal stream technologies, the tidal industry would like more. driving further change, in these islands and beyond. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. it feels as if summer is on hold at the moment, not least in northern scotland where as you can see the rain was coming down earlier. we had this weather warning extending across this swathe of the highlands. potential for flooding, travel disruption as heavy rain continues. southern scotland brighter but with a scattering of heavy thundery downpours, some affecting parts of northern ireland, england and wales, frequent downpours with lightning, hail stones and gusty winds. the wind is brisk,
4:57 pm
especially towards the south, brewing the rain through quickly. as we head through this evening and overnight, rain continues to affect parts of northern scotland, only slowly pivoting southwards. rain also getting into northern ireland, much of england and wales dry by the end of the night. some showers taking a while to fade, and cooler than it has been in recent nights. low pressure still close by, sitting to the north—east of the uk and another little area of low pressure running in from the south—west, becoming a feature particularly as we head into the latter part of the day. for scotland and northern ireland, cloud, outbreaks of rain, some into northern england, wales, midlands, east anglia and south wales largely dry. the cloud and rain gathers to the far south—west later in the afternoon. top temperatures 20—21 in the best of the sunshine, quite breezy.
4:58 pm
overnight, the pulse of rain, some uncertainty about the exact track. maybe parts of southern england and wales seeing heavy rain and strong wind at times. we will keep a close eye on that. friday, the worst of the wet weather will clear, sunshine, one or two showers, temperatures in the high teens or low 20s. weeekend, high pressure not too far away, adding up to still some showers but not as many as in recent days. more dry weather, some spells of sunshine, feeling cool, particularly in northern scotland.
4:59 pm
5:00 pm
good afternoon, this is bbc news with me ben brown — our headlines at 5pm. relaxing the rules. from monday, fully vaccinated travellers from the united states and eu will no longer have to quarantine when they arrive in england. labour says it's reckless but the government says the time is right. we always said we would need to move in line with what is going on in the real world and people being vaccinated in europe and america means we can move to the next stage which means i live people to come here and if they are double vaccinated avoiding to have to quarantine. bronze for team gb's charlotte dujardin — who has riden into the record books, as britain's most decorated female olympian of all time —
5:01 pm
with six medals. this is wonderful.

13 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on