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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 28, 2021 10:00am-11:59am BST

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this is bbc news with lucy hockings in tokyo and annita mcveigh in london. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. more olympic gold for team gb in the 200 metre freestyle relay. gymnastics superstar simone biles withdraws from another olympic event as she says she needs to focus on her mental health. we'll be bringing you the latest live in tokyo and with all the sporting action and medal wins. i'm annita mcveigh in london. the other headlines... the prime minister says august the 16th is "nailed on" as the date for easing self isolation restrictions in england. plans for double—jabbed us and eu travellers to be allowed into england without quarantining
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are considered by ministers. let me know if you think it's a good idea. do get in touch on twitter @annita—mcveigh or use the hashtag bbcyourquestions. still in lockdown — sydney and the surrounding area, remains under strict covid measures for at least another four weeks — as infection rates surge. british former senior military commanders urge borisjohnsonto allow more afghan interpreters to settle in the uk. and remembering britain's police officers and staff from across the country who have died while protecting the public — a new memorial will be officially unveiled today
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a warm welcome to day four at the tokyo olympics. and in the past hour, it's just been announced that the american gymnast, simone biles, has pulled out of another gymnastics event — she's withdrawn from the all—around competition, in which she's the defending champion. on tuesday, she pulled out of the team event, saying she needed to focus on her mental health. biles has yet to decide whether to compete in other individual events in tokyo. bbc sport presenter chethan parthak has more. this stems from what we saw in the women's team final, less than 24—hour to go, where simone biles, mid competition, withdrew from that. she had vaulted in that final, not
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to her usual standard. she had vaulted in full the occasion as well. she wasn't happy with the performance. we saw her leave the gym briefly with her coach, which came back, she put on her tracksuit and chose not to take any further part. she stood and supported her team—mates or a very impressive silver medal. afterwards, she said she wanted to prioritise her mental wellness over all else. so she withdrew from that. when she left the arena, she said she wasn't sure about whether she would compete in the all—round event final on thursday, and now we have had confirmation that she will not be taking part in that. we had a statement from usa gymnastics in the past hour saying, after further medical evaluation, simone biles has withdrawn from the final individual all—around competition at the tokyo games in order to focus on her mental health. they say simone will continue to be evaluated daily to determine whether or not to participate in next week's individual event finals. she is
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through to all of those individual finals. forthe through to all of those individual finals. for the moment, this is going to be assessed day to day. there was some support for simone biles, following her decision yesterday. we talk so openly about physical health and sport. that is not a taboo. in mental health terms, we don't talk about it so much. you just have to look at the people giving his support on twitter. there is no bigger star than simone biles coming into the games. she was looking to make history, adding to the four gold medals she won in rio. the weight of expectation, every time simone biles competes, she is expected to win. she has spoken about the challenges of that pressure in the past. clearly at the moment, mentally she does not feel in the right place to put her body in the right place to put her body in her life on the line, which is
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what you do as a gymnast. i think it is interesting that it was 2a hours ago we were talking about naomi osaka. i know she lost in the tennis, but she is one of the faces of the tokyo games and she was very honest afterwards, saying that the pressure got too much for her. there are so much expectation on his athletes and, for the moment, simone biles putting her mental health first. a huge story in tokyo and a big discussion point around the world. you just have to go into social media to see everybody talking about simone biles. we will be covering that throughout the day and bring you a range of views. but let's just take a look at what has been happening on day five in tokyo. australia's ariarne titmus picked up a second gold medal in her latest battle with american katie ledecky. titmus, who beat ledecky in the aoom freestyle final on monday, touched home in one minute and 53.50 seconds. and there's been more glory in the swimming pool for team gb. they took gold in the men's four by 200 metre freestyle relay. the quartet, made up of of 200 metre champion tom dean, silver medallist duncan scott,
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james guy and matthew richards came within 0.03 seconds of the world record, in a stunning performance. the win makes it the first time in 113 years that great britain have won three swimming gold medals at an olympics. britain's rowers have also won silver in the men's quadruple sculls, but there was disappointment in the men's four as a run of golds stretching back over the previous five olympics, ended with a fourth—place finish. let's take a look at where things stand on the medals table. china and japan are leading the way with 11 gold medals each. australia also won gold medals in the men's four and women's four rowing events to lift their overall olympic tally to six, moving them up to fifth in the table.
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of course, it hasn't been all about the sports in tokyo. there is still a huge amount of concern about covid—i9 cases in the japanese capital, which have exceeded 3000 for the first time since the pandemic began. japan has avoided the devastating outbreaks suffered by other nations on the continent, but this fifth wave is fueled by the delta variant and is putting pressure on hospitals in the host city. the focus has been very much on tokyo, but the national broadcaster
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is now reporting figures of 8000 across the whole country, and that is a record high forjapan. 8000 new infections in the past 2a hours. let's get more now from our correspondent mariko oi who is in shimbashi, a district of minato in tokyo. what are the authorities saying? are they blaming these covid levels on they blaming these covid levels on the infection rates on the olympics? no, not at all. though i have to say it was probably inevitable, because even though the full state of emergency was declared, the number of people out and about has not gone down at all. you have to remember that this is not a strict lockdown. so there is no penalty, though the first state of emergency last april, people obliged and stayed at home. but people are fed up. if you asked people on the street, they say, yes, you can't is tell us to stay at home when you are holding the olympics. we have noticed in this popular
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district for office workers to come for a drink after work, that some staff in restaurants and bars who have been asked to close early, at 8pm, and not serve alcohol, some stuff out and about saying, hey, we are open up to 8pm. can we really blame them? because they are supposed to get some financial support from the government, but there have been reports that even when they requested it, it takes up to six months for them to receive that money, which is way too late for small businesses. inevitable, may be, that the number of covid cases has been rising. and now the surrounding prefectures of tokyo, three of them are now asking the national government to declare a state of emergency for those three pre—fractu res state of emergency for those three pre—fractures as well, because they are seeing the number rising as well. , , ., ,, well. every television i passed today was _ well. every television i passed today was tuned _ well. every television i passed today was tuned to _ well. every television i passed today was tuned to the - well. every television i passed i today was tuned to the baseball. well. every television i passed - today was tuned to the baseball. a huge amount of excitement has it got under way. and it was a great match.
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i watched the last 20 minutes and it went right to the ninth, where japan beat the dominican republic. a massive amount of excitement. is this sport a massive year injapan? how are you people feel about it? indeed, japan has always been mad about baseball. so the japanese team having their first victory against the dominican republic was definitely very exciting news. a lot of people were cheering, that they would hopefully get to the finals as well. also a lot of excitement in japan about the second gold medal in the swimming pool. this is the first female swimmer injapan to be winning double gold medals ever. so a huge achievement by her as well. but i have noticed that, while sport headlines have been overtaking all of those controversies and scandals surrounding the games, you can really sense the conflicted emotions of tv commentators, who have been
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publicly, openly against the games, but now are feeling really excited and moved by the strong performance of the japanese athletes, but at the same time, as the number of covid cases goes up, and as hospitals get overwhelmed, they are starting to see the shift of opinion once again. thanks so much forjoining us. but it now. plenty more to come throughout the day, lots of action and more medals as well. we will see you soon. for now, back to you the studio. in the uk, the prime minister has described plans for fully vaccinated people to avoid isolation if they come into contact with a positive coronavirus case as �*nailed on�*. the rule change will come into effect on august 16th and will apply to all fully vaccinated people in england. in scotland, wales and northern ireland, there are plans to ease the same rules at some point in august. this morning, the prime minister said that the 16th of august was always
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the planned date to remove quarantine requirements and will go ahead as planned. it is clear that if we are sensible, and we continue to take a cautious approach, that we can see a very, very strong... approach, that we can see a very, very strong- - -_ very strong... you are still cautious — very strong... you are still cautious about _ very strong... you are still cautious about the - very strong... you are still. cautious about the lockdown? very strong... you are still- cautious about the lockdown? i do. but august — cautious about the lockdown? i do. but august the _ cautious about the lockdown? i do. but august the 16th _ cautious about the lockdown? i do. but august the 16th is _ cautious about the lockdown? i it but august the 16th is nailed on? nailed on, there has never been any question about a review date for august the 16th. we will go ahead with the move. with more on that, i'm joined by our chief political correspondent iain watson in west munster. there has been lots of challenges for the government around isolation of the impact on many businesses, and areas of life. no doubt the prime minister is very keen to get to august the 16th. he seems pretty sure, pretty confident about that date for removing those isolation restrictions for fully java to
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people? restrictions for fully java to eo - le? ., �* , restrictions for fully java to neale? ., �* , , people? that's right. -- fully 'abbed people? that's right. -- fully jabbed peeple- _ people? that's right. -- fully jabbed people. he _ people? that's right. -- fully jabbed people. he said - people? that's right. -- fully jabbed people. he said there j people? that's right. -- fully - jabbed people. he said there has never been any question of a review date for august the 16th. but let's rewind to friday, and that cabinet minister george eustice, who suggested this was an indicative plan on the 16th, and he said we obviously need to keep things under review. the august the 16th date could move in either direction, although at the moment it is not moving forward. indeed, downing street itself told me that this was being kept under review. today, for borisjohnson to say it is nailed on, it is not under review at all, i think that does at least betray growing confidence in government about the nature of the pandemic. we have obviously had fallen cases, although sadly an increasing number of deaths because these tend to follow several weeks after infections. but i think there is a confidence in government that they can then move ahead to the next stage. what would happen august the 16th, just to be clear, is if you are double vaccinated and you come
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into close contact with somebody who has covid, you would be advised to take a test. if the test is negative, then you can continue with your everyday life. continue to go to work. there has been a lot of pressure on the government to move this forward. including from the former health secretary, jeremy hunt, the former prime minister tony blair has been talking about this as well, to try to overcome the ping democrat, is it has been told. —— the pingdemic, as it is being called. �* , the pingdemic, as it is being called. 3 ., ~ the pingdemic, as it is being called. �*, ., ~ ., ., called. let's talk about travel, if we ma . called. let's talk about travel, if we may. proposals— called. let's talk about travel, if we may. proposals for— called. let's talk about travel, if we may. proposals for double i called. let's talk about travel, if - we may. proposals for double jabbed travellers from united states and the eu to be allowed into england without quarantining, being considered by ministers. labour called the idea reckless. what is the government back are saying about the government back are saying about the thinking behind it? at the government back are saying about the thinking behind it?— the thinking behind it? at the moment. _ the thinking behind it? at the moment. as _ the thinking behind it? at the moment, as we _ the thinking behind it? at the moment, as we speak, - the thinking behind it? at the moment, as we speak, there | the thinking behind it? at the i moment, as we speak, there is the thinking behind it? at the - moment, as we speak, there is a
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meeting of the covid operations committee, and they are discussing what to do on this front. they had committed themselves to reviewing the travel advice byjuly the 31st. so, they are trying to reach a decision. but we were told no firm decision. but we were told no firm decision has been taken on this. what it would involve is, again, fully vaccinated travellers coming from the eu, coming into the uk, if they can prove their vaccination status, the eu covid pass, they would be allowed in without the need to quarantine. that would also be extended to the united states citizens, although there it is perhaps not a uniform system across the united states for proving vaccination status, so that might be trickier. where it may also be tricky politically is, of course, the us is advising their people not to travel to the uk because of the prevalence of the delta variant. and not letting us in without quarantine. so, there were attempts to try to see if a travel corridor
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could be opened between the uk and the us, with discussions about this at the recent g7 summit. at the moment, if we decide to allow us travellers in who are double vaccinated, it would be a one—way street. there is a lot of pressure from the travel industry to try to get travel moving again, and we would imagine they would be very pleased indeed if travellers could come here. there are fears that other countries are moving quicker than us and we are losing out in terms of the travel industry. i would expect to see some movement. no final decision has been taken but i think it is moving in one direction and we will have to wait until next week to get the further advice on the traffic light system, which countries we would be able to go to and return from without quarantine. go to and return from without quarantine-— go to and return from without uuarantine. ., ~ , ., , . quarantine. thank you very much. iain watson _ quarantine. thank you very much. iain watson in _ quarantine. thank you very much. iain watson in westminster. - quarantine. thank you very much. iain watson in westminster. you | quarantine. thank you very much. - iain watson in westminster. you have been sending your thoughts on this question about the proposals to allow double jabbed travellers from
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the us and eu to come into the country without quarantine. one says, we know that double jabbed people can still get and transmit it, letting travellers and increases our risk of escalation the problem. leslie smith says while we allow people to come from the usa, will the usa reciprocate and let the uk double jabs travel, as i have been separated from my partner for seven months. another says covid—i9 is staying for the long haul and we can't shut our borders forever. the economy has been damaged enough. what was the point behind the vaccine programme, otherwise? phil england says we need to come further out of lockdown, but only if people are double jabbed. masks must be used in small spaces and large crowds to protect those who haven't
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been vaccinated. another says, will the us travel corridor work both ways? not at the moment. there are no plans to allow people to travel from the uk to the us. thank you very much for sending in those comments. you can get in touch with me on that story or any of the other stories we are covering today on twitter. in australia, it's been announced that the strictest covid measures will remain in place in sydney and the surrounding area for another four weeks. they were first imposed a month ago. here's our correspondent shaimaa khalil in sydney. this is a lockdown that started at the end ofjune. it was supposed to last two weeks and it was extended to five weeks. now we know it is going to extend to four more until the end of august. this is because the pattern of the case numbers just keeps going up. it is persistently high. new south wales recorded its highest number since the outbreak, i77 locally acquired cases, 46 of those were infectious while active in the community. all in all, sydney has recorded its worst outbreak this year, with more than 2500 cases.
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compared to any other country in the world, the cases are low, but look at it from an australian perspective. this is a country that isolated itself from the rest of the world by closing its borders. it has very, very strict hotel quarantine rules and it has, for the most part, really control the spread of covid as recently as may. life looks like it had come back to near normal for most of the country. itjust shows you how transmissible and challenging the delta variant is. but for victoria and south australia, two states that have gone in and out of lockdown successfully, because they went in early and hard, the criticism for new south wales in sydney in particular, where i am, is that the authorities did not nail it early enough. and when the rules came in, they did not come fast enough. so, a lot more uncertainty here, because, yes, it is going to last until august, but experts say
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the way that things are going, if cases don't slow down, it could go on until september. dozens of british former senior military commanders, including four former chiefs of the defence staff, have written to borisjohnson, calling on the government to allow more afghan interpreters to settle in the uk. they say too many of those who worked with british forces have had their applications rejected, and that if any are murdered by the taliban, "the dishonour would lie squarely at our nation's feet". the ministry of defence says it's already helped more than 2,000 afghan staff to come to the uk. this translator, whose identity we're not disclosing, has been turned down for relocation four times and fears retribution from the taliban. the taliban do not care for dismiss, for termination, they don't care anything. theyjust know who worked with the british and who not. anybody who worked with the british, they will kill them, sir.
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now i am worried about my family and myself in future about what will happen when the nato leave afghanistan. i know i will see my wife and daughter get shot, and myself too. with me now is peter ricketts, who was the uk's first national security advisor from 2010 to 2012 under david cameron and lord ricketts also served as chair of the joint intelligence committee under tony blair. he has signed the letter. thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news. so, the government market was saying around 2000 afghan staff admitted to the uk under this scheme. do you have any idea how many have applied and been refused? i don't have the numbers, but there are quite _ i don't have the numbers, but there are quite a — i don't have the numbers, but there are quite a lot more people who have been considered and refused. remember, this is a group of people
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who worked in a committed way with a british— who worked in a committed way with a british military and also the british— british military and also the british embassy, diplomats in afghanistan. and now they suddenly find themselves vulnerable, as british— find themselves vulnerable, as british and other western forces leave _ british and other western forces leave. and our issue is that the scheme — leave. and our issue is that the scheme the government has set up, although— scheme the government has set up, although it _ scheme the government has set up, although it is very welcome, is moving — although it is very welcome, is moving too slowly and has too many exclusions — moving too slowly and has too many exclusions. the gentleman you heard on the _ exclusions. the gentleman you heard on the court — exclusions. the gentleman you heard on the court referred to dismissal. at the _ on the court referred to dismissal. at the moment, anyone who was dismissed — at the moment, anyone who was dismissed for any reason from working — dismissed for any reason from working with the british is now finding — working with the british is now finding it — working with the british is now finding it very, very hard to get accepted — finding it very, very hard to get accepted for relocation. and many other— accepted for relocation. and many other people as well. so, i gather there _ other people as well. so, i gather there are — other people as well. so, i gather there are up to about another 4000 people _ there are up to about another 4000 people who might be eligible, and many— people who might be eligible, and many of— people who might be eligible, and many of them seem to have been turned _ many of them seem to have been turned down in the first look at cases — turned down in the first look at cases and _ turned down in the first look at cases. and yet the taliban don't discriminate between different sorts of people. if you worked for the british— of people. if you worked for the british and they find out about it, then you — british and they find out about it, then you and your family are at risk _ then you and your family are at risk so. — then you and your family are at risk. so, this is a debt of honour that— risk. so, this is a debt of honour that we — risk. so, this is a debt of honour that we need to pay some very loyal
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people _ that we need to pay some very loyal people who worked closely with us. and what _ people who worked closely with us. and what are the reasons that are being given as far as you are aware for refusal to relocate? is there any appeal process? the for refusal to relocate? is there any appeal process? the scheme is uuite any appeal process? the scheme is quite complicated _ any appeal process? the scheme is quite complicated and _ any appeal process? the scheme is| quite complicated and bureaucratic. there _ quite complicated and bureaucratic. there are _ quite complicated and bureaucratic. there are four different levels of accessibility. there is one level where — accessibility. there is one level where if— accessibility. there is one level where if you are judged to be at extreme — where if you are judged to be at extreme risk or threat to life, you are relocated quickly. but there are others _ are relocated quickly. but there are others where tests are applied. one of the _ others where tests are applied. one of the tests is where you dismissed from the _ of the tests is where you dismissed from the service. that could be for being _ from the service. that could be for being late — from the service. that could be for being late at work, or at a relatively minor things. and those were _ relatively minor things. and those were often— relatively minor things. and those were oftenjudgments made without due process and without any right of appeat _ due process and without any right of appeal. then there is the issue of those _ appeal. then there is the issue of those that— appeal. then there is the issue of those that were working with the british— those that were working with the british but not in the public eye. back— british but not in the public eye. back room — british but not in the public eye. back room jobs. all of those people are potentially at risk. and from what _ are potentially at risk. and from what we — are potentially at risk. and from what we gather, an awful lot of people — what we gather, an awful lot of people have been turned down when they made _ people have been turned down when they made their case, and then it is very difficult to get your case reviewed. so, we want the scheme to
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be reviewed. so, we want the scheme to he more _ reviewed. so, we want the scheme to be more generous, more open, quicker and to— be more generous, more open, quicker and to try— be more generous, more open, quicker and to tryand _ be more generous, more open, quicker and to try and get these very vulnerable people out of afghanistan soon, _ vulnerable people out of afghanistan soon, because the risk to them is reat~ _ soon, because the risk to them is real. ,, ., soon, because the risk to them is real, ,, ., ., , soon, because the risk to them is real. ,, ., ., , ., real. strong words from you in the letter, real. strong words from you in the letter. talking _ real. strong words from you in the letter, talking about _ real. strong words from you in the letter, talking about it _ real. strong words from you in the letter, talking about it being - real. strong words from you in the letter, talking about it being a - letter, talking about it being a debt of honour. how fundamental do you think it is to what you believe britain represents that this debt is honoured? , , ., , , honoured? these people were prepared to take a risk — honoured? these people were prepared to take a risk for _ honoured? these people were prepared to take a risk for themselves _ honoured? these people were prepared to take a risk for themselves and - to take a risk for themselves and their— to take a risk for themselves and their families to help the british and what — their families to help the british and what we were trying to do in afghanistan. i think they did that on an— afghanistan. i think they did that on an expectation that they would be looked _ on an expectation that they would be looked after. and if britain is going — looked after. and if britain is going to _ looked after. and if britain is going to find itself during military operations abroad again, and we are going _ operations abroad again, and we are going to _ operations abroad again, and we are going to again require local people to work— going to again require local people to work with us, as will always be the case, — to work with us, as will always be the case, they are going to think too much — the case, they are going to think too much or three times about it if they look— too much or three times about it if they look back and find that some very toyat— they look back and find that some very loyal and committed afghan civilians — very loyal and committed afghan civilians were left to their own fate. — civilians were left to their own fate, when the british and americans
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withdrew— fate, when the british and americans withdrew from afghanistan. so, i think— withdrew from afghanistan. so, i think it _ withdrew from afghanistan. so, i think it is — withdrew from afghanistan. so, i think it is both a question of honour, _ think it is both a question of honour, the kind of country that we are, when— honour, the kind of country that we are, when we go and do military operations— are, when we go and do military operations abroad, but also in our own national interests for when we once again — own national interests for when we once again find ourselves with our forces _ once again find ourselves with our forces fighting somewhere in the world _ forces fighting somewhere in the world. ., . ~' forces fighting somewhere in the world. ., ., ,, ., ., , world. you talk about a very complicated _ world. you talk about a very complicated process, - world. you talk about a very complicated process, a - world. you talk about a very complicated process, a very| complicated process, a very complicated process, a very complicated scheme. given what we know about the movement of the taliban now, clearly of the essence, try to get these afghanis who have worked with britain and who you believe should be allowed to resettle, time is of the essence question of resettle, time is of the essence question o— resettle, time is of the essence question 0 question of yes, and lives are at risk. if question of yes, and lives are at risk- if you _ question of yes, and lives are at risk. if you think _ question of yes, and lives are at risk. if you think the _ question of yes, and lives are at risk. if you think the british - risk. if you think the british government offered 3 million people in honq _ government offered 3 million people in hong kong the opportunity to come to the _ in hong kong the opportunity to come to the uk. _ in hong kong the opportunity to come to the uk, quite rightly, the few thousand — to the uk, quite rightly, the few thousand that might be involved in afghanistan seems to be a number that is— afghanistan seems to be a number that is quite manageable. yes, as you say. _ that is quite manageable. yes, as you say. the — that is quite manageable. yes, as you say, the taliban are spreading their— you say, the taliban are spreading their qrip — you say, the taliban are spreading their grip across afghanistan and therefore — their grip across afghanistan and
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therefore we are on a race against time _ therefore we are on a race against time that — therefore we are on a race against time that is — therefore we are on a race against time. that is why we would like to government scheme to be plummeted more rapidly and more generously, supportinq — more rapidly and more generously, supporting its principle, but the way it— supporting its principle, but the way it is— supporting its principle, but the way it is being applied needs to be speeded _ way it is being applied needs to be speeded up. lord way it is being applied needs to be speeded up— way it is being applied needs to be seeded u. ., , ., speeded up. lord ricketts, thank you ve much speeded up. lord ricketts, thank you very much for— speeded up. lord ricketts, thank you very much forjoining _ speeded up. lord ricketts, thank you very much forjoining us _ speeded up. lord ricketts, thank you very much forjoining us today. - health officials in the us are urging people to resume wearing masks indoors in areas where the delta variant of coronavirus has sparked a rise in cases. the announcement reverses the advice issued two months ago. the centers for disease control says all teachers and students should wear masks indoors when schools re—open after the summer break, regardless of their vaccination status. president biden has again appealed to all americans to be vaccinated. so why the u—turn? here's the bbc�*s north america correspondent peter bowes. this really reflects the growing concern of the federal government and the centre for disease control and prevention about the surge in the number of cases of coronavirus around the country, especially in certain state like florida, where there's been a real peaking of new infections in recent days and weeks.
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so the advice now, it is an advisory body, a government advisory body on health, infectious diseases, and it is saying that all americans, whether vaccinated or not should wear a mask indoors in a public setting. interestingly, i'm in los angeles and that rule was brought in here about ten days ago because this is indeed one of the areas where there has been a surge in the number of cases. as you said, president biden once again urging all americans, if they haven't already, to have the covid—19 vaccine. the president also speaking just a short time ago at the white house said that he is considering requiring all federal workers, government workers, to have the vaccination as well. some media outlets saying here that he will announce this on thursday, perhaps with the caveat they should either have the vaccination or at least have regular tests.
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federal workers are about four million around the country, they include postal workers, members of the military, immigration agents, people who work in the social security department. that would be a significant move. again, reflecting the very serious concern that this isn't beaten, coronavirus is very much here and that surge in numbers is really concerning health officials. police in the uk have released a shocking video showing the moment a lorry driver crashed into another vehicle whilst using a mobile phone. 59—year—old derek holland has been jailed for more than three years after the crash last year that left three people badly injured. an onboard camera shows that over a period of four hours he repeatedly reached for his mobile phone and even steered with his elbows. this report by matt graveling opens with footage you may find upsetting. the worst case of prolonged distracted driving they have ever seen. the damning words of sussex police
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after derek holland drove his lorry straight into the back of the security van. the crash in august that left three people seriously hurt. one suffered a brain injury. two more have been unable to work since. but this devastation could have occurred at a number of points in holland's drive. his on—board camera revealed 41 other incidents of poor driving. most of those incidents involved him utilising his mobile phone on his windscreen, his personal phone, nothing to do with work. there were occasions when he put his seat belt on while driving, and used his elbow to guide the steering wheel as he is eating a piece of fruit. and really, the footage is quite shocking. the aa want more police in cars and greater education in a bid to make texting as socially unacceptable as drink—driving, with the consequences being just as deadly. in 2016, thomas croker
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crashed his lorry while changing the music on his phone. he killed a mother and three young children. i think it is far too common. unfortunately, every day at roadpeace we are supporting people who have been bereaved or suffered life changing injuries off the back of dangerous or reckless driving. i think people don't realise looking at your phone you are just as distracted, whether it is hands—free or hand—held, you are just as distracted as being over the drink—drive limit. the consequences, as have been seen, are devastating. the impact of driving while you are distracted, including the use of a mobile phone, is dangerous. derek holland has been sentenced to three and a half years in prison and disqualified from driving for 57 months. matt graveling, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... team gb has won its fifth gold medal at the olympic games in tokyo, with victory in the pool
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in the men's four by 200 metres freestyle relay. gymnastics superstar simone biles withdraws from another olympic event as she says she needs to focus on her mental health. the prime minister says august 16th is "nailed on" as the date for easing self isolation restrictions in england. still in lockdown — sydney and the surrounding area remains under strict covid measures for at least another four weeks — as infection rates surge. back now to the olympics, and news that the american gymnast, and one of the faces of the tokyo games, simone biles has dropped out of tomorrow's individual all around final. it means she won't defend the olympic title she won in rio five years ago. here she is speaking to reporters yesterday. no injury, thankfully, and that's why i took a step back, because i didn't want to do
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something silly out there and get injured, so i thought it was best if these girls took over and did the rest of the job, which they absolutely did. they're olympic silver medallists now and they should be really proud of themselves for how well they did, last minut,e having to go in, and it's been really stressful these olympic games. of themselves for how well they did, last minute, having to go in, and it's been really stressful these olympic games. i thinkjust as a whole, not having an audience, there are a lot of different variables going into it. it has been a long week, it's been a long olympic process, it's been a long year, so, just a lot of different variables, and i think we'rejust a little bit too stressed out, but we should be out here having fun, and sometimes that's not the case. i just felt like it would be a little bit better to take a back seat, work on my mindfulness, and i knew that the girls would do an absolutely greatjob, and i didn't want to risk the team a medal for kind of my scrubs because they have worked way too hard for that, so ijust decided that those girls need to go and do the rest of the competition.
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we've put mental health first, because if you don't, then you're not going to enjoy your sport and you're not going to succeed as much as you want to, so it's ok sometimes to even sit out the big competitions to focus on yourself, because it shows how strong of a competitor and person that you really are, rather than just battle through it. i'm joined now by amanda owens, a sports psychologist and former member of the british olympic association psychology advisory panel. welcome, thank you forjoining us today. what do you make of what simone biles has had to say? there is a contrast with naomi osaka who said she was dropping out of some events to help protect her mental health but didn't want to talk much about it. . . health but didn't want to talk much about it. , , ,.,, ., about it. yes, it is positive for sort, about it. yes, it is positive for sport. it _ about it. yes, it is positive for sport. it is — about it. yes, it is positive for sport, it is positive _ about it. yes, it is positive for sport, it is positive for- about it. yes, it is positive for| sport, it is positive for olympic sport, it is positive for olympic sport, and it, clearly, it is hugely important here, that simone biles looks after her mental health and
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indeed her mental... wellbeing, but i would like to point out that team gb and uk sport have heavily invested in this, in preparation for tokyo, in fact they have got, they have got mental health professionals out there, assessing our athletes andindeed out there, assessing our athletes and indeed monitoring them due to the covid impact and i would say we are ahead of the curve here and we ought to applaud uk sport and team gb for doing that. stand ought to applaud uk sport and team gb for doing that.— gb for doing that. and what is your knowled . e gb for doing that. and what is your knowledge of— gb for doing that. and what is your knowledge of other _ gb for doing that. and what is your knowledge of other nations - gb for doing that. and what is your knowledge of other nations and - gb for doing that. and what is your. knowledge of other nations and what sort of investment they put into looking after not only the
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a joint effort — firefighters and police now called to deal with the bodies of those who are dying at home. many having been turned away from hospitals which were already full. we can't show you the proceeding inside the house, it obviously won't be fair to the victim
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or the family. they are removing the clothing that's already on the victim's body for their safety. after that, they put the body inside the coffin and even pray for the victim according to their religion. in this house, the virus claimed two lives within a week and infected the entire family. translation: the grandmother died at the hospital. later that day, the test results showed that the grandfather also had the virus. they didn't go to hospital because the whole house was positive with covid, so they tried to get better in self isolation. the highly infectious delta variant means the number of cases here is soaring. this covid—19 response team is used to handling two or three bodies a day, now they are getting calls about more than 50, but only managing to help move a dozen or so. a local crowdsourcing site has been gathering data since the start of the pandemic and says that nationwide, there have been more than 2,700 deaths at home
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since the beginning ofjune. the president has extended the partial lockdown forjava, the most densely populated of indonesia's islands and bali. but people are being allowed to eat outside restaurants and food stalls for a maximum of 20 minutes. translation: as we know, i the trend shows there has been an improvement in getting covid—19 under control. the case rate, hospital bed occupancy and positivity rate show a decline as shown in several provinces in java. two days before that announcement, indonesia hit a daily record of more than 1,500 dead. the government has designated at least seven covid—19 cemeteries in jakarta alone. this one quickly filled up. as you can see behind me, the excavator that digs new graves and the excavator that closes
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the other graves over there are working simultaneously. the ambulances that carry the bodies keep coming one after the other. the workers here could bury more than 200 bodies in a day. indonesia is reporting the world's highest absolute number of new covid—19 cases. this, along with low rates of vaccination, limited testing and the surge in cases of the delta variant, means teams like this will continue to work around the clock. today, the uk will send out a batch of around nine million doses of the coronavirus vaccine — part of 100 million doses promised so far. five million doses will be offered to covax — a worldwide initiative to provide countries with equal access to the vaccine — and another four million will be shared directly with countries in need. james elder is the global
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spokesperson for unicef. james good to have you with us today. so, obviously, good that vaccines are coming from wealthier countries to those countries most in need, because they are poorer, nations, what is the picture like worldwide, in terms of the delivery of vaccines to this 92 nation, we think, roughly, who are beneficiaries of the covax scheme? broadly, it is behind track, there is no doubt about it. that why days like today as you say nine million doses, that is nine million people, often front line workers who have been doing like in the nhs in the uk, 24 hours days after 24 hours day, putting themselves at risk so they can support their communities, so nine million people will be protected. we need to see those country, the g7 country, those whoa have, are well supplied get those doses out quickly today is a very
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good day for that. it is a small start, but it is automobilesly a step in the light direction. i5 step in the light direction. is there enough predictability as to when the doses are coming in, i spoke to someone earlier and she said we need more predictability as to when vaccines are going to be delivered. . . to when vaccines are going to be delivered. . , .. , to when vaccines are going to be delivered. . , .., , . to when vaccines are going to be delivered. . , , . ., delivered. that is the case. we have seen already — delivered. that is the case. we have seen already deliveries, _ delivered. that is the case. we have seen already deliveries, you - delivered. that is the case. we have seen already deliveries, you know, i seen already deliveries, you know, dose sharing deliveries go into haiti and bangladesh and malawi, that was well broadcast, but it hasn't always been the case, the idea is a dose now as you showed, a dose now is a life—saving dose, it's a dose for someone, we have been in these country, and people will do all that i can, but they need that support, so a dose now, saves lives and saves multiple lives, if countries are going to wait and save and dump doses at christmas that is
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not festive so we need that planning today, as you say, say it good start for that but we need simply more doses, a greater supply and acceleration in that dose sharing. and give us an updates on delivering those doses, we know that countries in africa are among the most in need of doses from this scheme, this covax scheme, so, the logistics on the ground, how are they working? look, it really is a mountain to climb, you know, we need lots of thing, we need dose sharing, we need it accelerated. we need vaccine producers to focus on covax, mums and dads there is no magic pot of money, we know what needs to happen, that means getting things on the grounds, health workers training them up, it means getting cold systems and storage facilities out there. we know those things, that requires funding, so it a mountain to climb. we know a pathway through, it is those step on that pathway. if
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we can keep sharing doses, keep funding and helping and keep getting jabs sooner rather than later, after a really horrible 18 months we get a high point for humanity. we need many more doses i think the pathway is clear but it does commences we today, and again, not... accelerating the doses. latte today, and again, not... accelerating the doses. we are out of time but — accelerating the doses. we are out of time but thank _ accelerating the doses. we are out of time but thank you _ accelerating the doses. we are out of time but thank you for _ accelerating the doses. we are out of time but thank you for your - accelerating the doses. we are out| of time but thank you for your time. the island nation of samoa now has its first female prime minister. fiame naomi mata'afa took office on tuesday, three months after winning the election. samoa lies about halfway between new zealand and hawaii. news of its new leader drew congratulations from new zealand's prime minsterjacinda ardern and australia's scott morrison. the bbc�*s gender and identity reporter megha mohan has more. it is a new day. a momentous day in a country that
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had gone almost three months without a clear leader. fiame naomi mata'afa has taken office as samoa's first female prime minister. her party won the country's election in april, defeating her predecessor who had been prime minister for 22 years. a constitutional crisis followed when the hrpp party refused to hand over power. in unusual scenes, fiame was sworn in in a tent outside samoa's parliament in may, after the doors to the legislature were locked. the caretaker government argued that the ceremony was illegal. the political impasse came to an end last week when samoa's court of appeal ruled that the swearing in ceremony was lawful. how is a female leadership going to be different? i would like my leadership to be one where i work with a team, very mindful that, you know,
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going forward, we need to enable upcoming leadership. another priority will be navigating a post covid world. samoa is covid free after locking its borders soon after the pandemic was declared but its economy has struggled without tourism. i'm joined now by lagipoiva cherelle jackson, an independent samoan journalist. lovely to have you with us, she is the daughter of samoa's prime minister. breaking lots of records, what are the key challenges going to be? ~ , . ., , what are the key challenges going to be? ,, , . ., , ., , what are the key challenges going to be? ,, be? the key challenges would be she is cominu be? the key challenges would be she is coming into — be? the key challenges would be she is coming into government _ be? the key challenges would be she is coming into government that - be? the key challenges would be she is coming into government that have | is coming into government that have been serving the same prime minister for over 20 years, so the key challenges would be for her to gain the trust of the public service,
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also to take back control of the executive and legislature arms of government, so, it is going to be an interesting few months for her as she takes leadership of the country. and with the female prime minister, what do you think that means for samoa itself, and for how the rest of the world sees samoa?- samoa itself, and for how the rest of the world sees samoa? well, this is certainly a — of the world sees samoa? well, this is certainly a momentous _ of the world sees samoa? well, this is certainly a momentous occasion . is certainly a momentous occasion for samoa and also for the pacific islands, she has set many records, coming in to the role she was the first deputy prime minister who was female and the first woman prime minister, this means a lot for the women of polynesia but also for the women of polynesia but also for the women of polynesia but also for the women of the pacific islands, it sets the tone for leadership that this is possible, that women can obtain leadership in this way, and become the heads of government as women, so it it's a really exciting time for the pacific and no doubt with her seniority and experience as
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a politician, that she will add value to the split cool landscape of the pass —— political landscape of the pass —— political landscape of the pacific. the pass -- political landscape of the pacific-— the pacific. how will she use that experience _ the pacific. how will she use that experience to — the pacific. how will she use that experience to deal _ the pacific. how will she use that experience to deal with - the pacific. how will she use that experience to deal with the - the pacific. how will she use that| experience to deal with the issues round covid and tourism? which is in a very important for some want and the pacific islands.— the pacific islands. certainly, she has already _ the pacific islands. certainly, she has already indicated _ the pacific islands. certainly, she has already indicated she - the pacific islands. certainly, she has already indicated she will. the pacific islands. certainly, she. has already indicated she will start loosening the very strict covid terms of the previous government had installed and it is something for her, it was part of her promise to the people who voted for her, to assist in small businesses but also to assist in the domestic tourism market, as you know, samoa's covid free, so she has you know, made, she has indicated that she wants to help small businesses by loosening the terms of the state of emergency, her experience as you say, she has been
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in, in government and in parliament for a long time, so no doubt she will be utilising over 20 years of experience as a politician, to put into place legislation but also rules that will assist samoa in build back after testify covid crisis. , ., ., ., build back after testify covid crisis. , ., ., ~' build back after testify covid crisis. , ., ., ,, ., crisis. very good to talk to you, thank you _ crisis. very good to talk to you, thank you very _ crisis. very good to talk to you, thank you very much. _ a bride—to—be has been reunited with her engagement ring that she lost on a beach northern ireland. that she lost on a beach in northern ireland. a father and son metal detecting duo came to the rescue of beth donnelly after she launched a social media campaign on sunday. beth lost the ring when she was visiting with her fiance. with me now is the owner of the ring beth donnelly, and ryan mccloy, who found the ring after responding to the social media plea. wonderful to have you both was, beth
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earthquake tell us first of all how you lost the ring and when you realised you had lost it. hi. so, es, as realised you had lost it. hi. so, yes. as you _ realised you had lost it. hi. so, yes, as you said, _ realised you had lost it. hi. so, yes, as you said, my _ realised you had lost it. hi. so, yes, as you said, my fiance - realised you had lost it. hi. so, yes, as you said, my fiance and realised you had lost it. hi. so, l yes, as you said, my fiance and i went to the beach, on sunday evening, just to get the last of the weather, which has disappeared for us over here, and we were there from 7-9, us over here, and we were there from 7—9, before we had set up anything we had walked up to the sand and i said i still have all my rings and earrings on so i took them off and i thought i had them safely in my hand, ironically i was going to bring them back to car for safe keep, it was only hen we left the beach we had left about half an hour, that i realised i went to the cup holder and went to look and everything was there apart from the most priceless ring, piece of jewellery, so... {3h most priceless ring, piece of jewellery, so...— most priceless ring, piece of “ewelle , so... , ,, , jewellery, so... oh my goodnesses ou must jewellery, so... oh my goodnesses you must have _ jewellery, so... oh my goodnesses you must have just. .. _ jewellery, so... oh my goodnesses you must havejust... i _ jewellery, so... oh my goodnesses you must havejust... i can't - you must havejust... i can't describe how you must have felt when you realised you had lost it. let us
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see the ring, hopefully safely back, where it should be and a beautiful ring it is as well. let's bring ryan in now, so, sorry, i beg your pardon, yes, ryan, i got confused between your fiance ryan and this ryan, you along with your dad came to the rescue, tell us how you got involved. it to the rescue, tell us how you got involved. . . to the rescue, tell us how you got involved. , ., ., , to the rescue, tell us how you got involved. , ., .,' ., involved. it started off that morning. _ involved. it started off that morning. we _ involved. it started off that morning, we were - involved. it started off that morning, we were on - involved. it started off that morning, we were on the l involved. it started off that - morning, we were on the beach at 5.30 metal detecting, and came about 6.00, got a 5.30 metal detecting, and came about 6.00, gota message 5.30 metal detecting, and came about 6.00, got a message from i many mother and it was a screen shot of beth's post on facebook saying she had lost her engagement ring. we packed up, 45 minutes were were on the beach. we never came across anything so i said we will go back to the house, i will send beth a message and see if we can pinpoint the location, i never got a reply back but said we will call it and
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see if we can get it found. we went out there, tried for another hour—and—a—half, and we were unsuccessful. eventually i got a reply back and she said, we were there for 5.00. there is a lovely lady down there, she played a big part infinding lady down there, she played a big part in finding the ring. brian was do —— bryony was down there. we were standing talking to beth and ryan for five minute, standing talking to beth and ryan forfive minute, and i turned on my detector and took four steps to my right and i got a faint beep, and i rightand i gota faint beep, and i says right and i got a faint beep, and i says to myself, i wouldn't normally look for that, so i pulled back the sands, and what ever it was at that point, it was still... sands, and what ever it was at that point, it was still. . ._ at | point, it was still... wow, wow. at that point. — point, it was still... wow, wow. at that point. it _ point, it was still... wow, wow. at that point. it is _ point, it was still... wow, wow. at that point, it is out _ point, it was still... wow, wow. at that point, it is out of _ point, it was still... wow, wow. at that point, it is out of the - point, it was still... wow, wow. at that point, it is out of the sand. i that point, it is out of the sand. beth, i bet you couldn't believe it,
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because i am sure you must have thought, you know, a ring, in among all this sand, it is gone. filth. all this sand, it is gone. 0h, totally needle _ totally needle a haystack moment. i was pessimistic we would find it, so, i think even ryan, who found it, was at that point, it is out of the sand. beth, i bet ou point, it is out of the sand. beth, i bet you couldn't _ point, it is out of the sand. beth, i bet you couldn't believe - point, it is out of the sand. beth, i bet you couldn't believe it, - i bet you couldn't believe it, because i am sure you must have thought, you know, a ring, in among all this sand, it is gone. filth. all this sand, it is gone. 0h, totally needle _ totally needle a haystack moment. i was pessimistic we would find it, so, i think even ryan, who found it, was a bit surprised, he was "i found it" and we ran over, with covid you can't hug anybody, that is all i wanted to do. wejumped forjoy. latte hug anybody, that is all i wanted to do. we jumped forjoy.— hug anybody, that is all i wanted to do. we jumped forjoy. do. we 'umped for 'oy. we are almost out of do. we jumped for 'oy. we are almost out of time- _ do. we jumped forjoy. we are almost out of time. briefly, _ do. we jumped forjoy. we are almost out of time. briefly, beth _ do. we jumped forjoy. we are almost out of time. briefly, beth i _ out of time. briefly, beth i understand you have invited rye arch and his dad to your wedding yes. understand you have invited rye arch and his dad to your wedding- and his dad to your wedding yes, we need some — and his dad to your wedding yes, we need some responsible _ and his dad to your wedding yes, we need some responsible ring - and his dad to your wedding yes, we need some responsible ring bearers| need some responsible ring bearers to keep it safe because i can't be trusted. ~ ., ., ,~ trusted. wonderful and ryan i believe you — trusted. wonderful and ryan i believe you and _ trusted. wonderful and ryan i believe you and your - trusted. wonderful and ryan i believe you and your dad - trusted. wonderful and ryan i. believe you and your dad answer trusted. wonderful and ryan i- believe you and your dad answer andy you have lots of requests to look for missing jewellery.— you have lots of requests to look for missing jewellery. for missing 'ewellery. believe it or not we v i for missing jewellery. believe it or not we v i am _ for missing jewellery. believe it or notweviam am— for missing jewellery. believe it or not we v i am am out— for missing jewellery. believe it or not we v i am am out now - for missing jewellery. believe it or not we v i am am out now on - for missing jewellery. believe it or not we v i am am out now on the l not we v i am am out now on the beach looking for a wedding band, we have pinpointed the location so we are trying to find the ring. goad
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are trying to find the ring. good luck, i are trying to find the ring. good luck. i hope _ are trying to find the ring. good luck. i hope you _ are trying to find the ring. good luck, i hope you have _ are trying to find the ring. good luck, i hope you have as - are trying to find the ring. good luck, i hope you have as sack. luck, i hope you have as sack sessionful with that mission as you were with finding beth's ring. beth donnelly and ryan, thank you both very much. britain's police officers and staff from across the country who have died while protecting the public will be commemorated in a permanent memorial to be unveiled at the national memorial arboretum later. the memorial cost £4.5 million pounds, which took seven years to raise. phil mackie reports. in a place of national remembrance, a new monument stands in a commanding position. it's meant to look like a giant door, which is slightly ajar, and represents the threshold across which police officers step every day into potential danger. its many tiny apertures. signify courage and sacrifice. it's also a place for quiet reflection. itearup. after all this time. it still affects me.
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among those who will take part in this afternoon's ceremony is gillian wombwell, who was widowed after 21 when her husband david, two colleagues, were shot dead in london in 1966. newsreel: for here, - with a congregation of police and relatives, was held a funeral- service for three men who were shot dead, callously murdered, barely a mile from here. . in the coffin was the body of - detective constable david wombwell. he had a boy of three, a girl aged one. - every night, just before i go to sleep, i talk to him. i talk to him about the children. i talk to him about what i've been doing. yes, he is, he is constantly with me. and i'm so sorry that he can't hold his children and tell them how proud he would be of them. and his grandchildren. it's a tragedy for our family that
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will always be a tragedy. it's something to be proud of. something to bring people to and say, look, this is in the memory of my relative. and they were honoured, they were recognised. it took seven years to raise the money to pay for the memorial. a lot of that was raised by police officers and police forces themselves. it's supposed to represent a portal, beyond which is the threshold of the danger that officers regularly put themselves in. and it's a place where colleagues can come and remember those that have lost their lives. i think its great strength is its simplicity. it recognises the danger of space through which police officers go every day of their working lives to protect fellow citizens. and it also, of course, recognises that, sadly, on occasions, those offices don't come out of a dangerous space.
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they give their lives protecting fellow citizens. that is exactly what this memorial was intended to do. the touching part of it is this threshold, unlike the threshold that so many pass through and never return, leads to a garden and a glade, and a place of peace, rather than the danger where they lost their lives. they have been putting the finishing touches to the memorial and getting ready for the dedication ceremony later today. it will be attended by all members of the police family, including parents, spouses and children of those who lost their lives. now the weather with darren bett. hello. it looks like the weather should be turning drier by the end of the week, but before then, today we have got this continued risk of some heavy, perhaps thundery downpours, combined with a stronger wind today too. it will push the showers across, there will be sunshine in between the showers as we saw earlier on today in devon. but we have low pressure in charge of the weather,
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it is not moving very far, very fast. it is around that we are seeing heavier bursts of rain. the winds are lighter in scotland and the rain is going to get stuck across northern scotland, and here with have an amber rain across northern scotland, and here we have an amber rain warning from the met office. this area could see as much as 90 millimetres of rain by the end of the day, leadign to some flooding and travel disruption. the rain could be notjust heavy but thundery as well. wet weather continues across a good part of scotland. the showers we are seeing coming in from the west continue to work their way east wards. they could be heavy and thundery, but away from the showers we will find some sunshine coming through now and again. but it is across more southern parts of the uk we have the strongest of the winds, could be gusting around 40mph, around some southern coasts of england, and because there is a stronger breeze it will a feel cooler today,
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and temperatures are going to be lower than yesterday, so around 18—20 degrees this afternoon. still got heavy downpours fade away overnight, more cloud for scotland and northern ireland, some patchy rain moving southwards. it will turn drier in northern scotland, and we will find temperatures remaining in double figures as we head into thursday morning. this is the big picture though on thursday, still low pressure close by. that one is moving away, so it is taking away the heaviest of the rain, another one approaches the far south—west later in the day. so there probably won't be as much rain wround on thursday, some sunshine in england and wales, before we see more of this cloud moving southwards, bringing in patchy rain, but a drier day for scotland. later in the day we will get cloud and rain coming into the south—west. probably the sunnier skies, more in the midlands, towards the south—east and temperatures could be 21 or 22. still a breezy day, i think, during thursday. friday, we still have the threat of a few showers around, as we head into the weekend it is drier,. some sunshine at times but not that
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warm, with the winds likely to be coming down from the north.
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this is bbc news, i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at 11... team gb wins its fifth gold medal at the olympic games in tokyo, with victory in the pool in the men's 4x200 metres freestyle relay. gymnastics superstar simone biles withdraws from another olympic event as she says she needs to focus on her mental health. it has been not having an audience. there are different variables going into it, it has been a long week, and a long living process. the prime minister says august the 16th is "nailed on" as the date for easing self isolation restrictions in england. plans for double—jabbed us and eu
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travellers to be allowed into england without quarantining are considered by ministers. ministers unveil what they call "transformative plans" to improve the lives of disabled people. campaigners criticise them for not going far enough. and, as the world races to achieve net zero, we take a look at what's being described as the most powerful tidal turbine in the world. good morning and welcome to bbc news. day five of the toyko olympics has seen more glory for team gb — once again in the pool. they took gold in the men's 4 x 200 metre freestyle relay. it's the first time in 113 years
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that great britain has won three swimming gold medals at an olympics. in rowing — team gb won a silver in the men's quadruple sculls — but the men's coxless fours missed out on a medal, after veering off—course. let's take a look at team gb's medal tally so far — 15— putting it in 6th place. for a full round up of the action at the olympics this morning — let's cross to chetan pathak at the bbc sport centre. what a three days it's been in the olympic swimming pool for great britain. another day, another gold — this time in the 4x200m freestyle relay. fresh off the back of his brilliant won yesterday — tom dean, along with duncan scott, james guy and 18—year—old
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matt richards secured victory asjoe lynskey reports. to see how much it meant, just look atjames guy, who watched in tears as the race went on. great britain were so far ahead, olympic champions by more than three seconds. this freestyle relay is the third swimming gold, the most gb have won since 1908. here we go, team great britain. britain had the one and two from the individual race. tom dean, the champion, setting off from the start. but it was an 18—year—old who got them in front. very impressive for matt richards, starting to swim away. look at his feet. matt richards trained through lockdown in a paddling pool with a bungee rope. he handed to duncan scott with the team in control. scott came second in the individual race, but now finally could touch for gold. this is wonderful. gold to great britain.
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it's really special with those boys. matt in third was so composed. the boys up front did their race plan really well. the way the last year has been, and as a kid, olympic gold medals is my absolute dream. to do it finally after 25 years is pretty emotional. but with these four lads here we have the best freestylers in the world. my team—mate, duncan, getting first and second, was amazing. olympic champions, a dream come true. you are the best. there were 300 hundredths of a second off the world record. forjames guy, it didn't matter. his two medals in rio were silver. he has spent a lifetime in the pool for moments like this. for british swimming it means so much. three golds make tokyo their greatest modern games. joe lynskey, bbc news. so another night to rememberfor great britain's men in the pool — and there's been success in the rowing as well.
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the team have won their first men's quadruple sculls medal after winning silver. harry leask, angus groom, tom barras and jack beaumont held off a late charge from australia and poland to secure second place behind the netherlands. meanwhile the only remaining british player in the mens singles, liam broady, has gone out in the third round, losing in three sets tojeremy chardy. this comes as andy murray's olympics are over — he and joe salisbury are out of the men's doubles after losing their quarter—finals match against croatia. they won the first set fairly confortably, taking it 6—4. but lost the second — and then the third set tie break 10—7 against marin cilic and ivan dodig. and great britain's sevens olympic campaign has ended without a medal — after a 17—12 defeat to argentina in the bronze medal match in tokyo. and in the last hour fiji have beaten new zealand to retain their olympic title.
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and disappointment too in the diving forjack laugher and daniel goodfellow as they finished 7th in the 3 metre synchro final — with china taking gold. it means laugher�*s reign as olympic champion is over. american gymnast and four—time olympic gold medallist simone biles has withdrawn from thursday's individual all—around final in tokyo to focus on her mental health. she withdrew from the team final yesterday — during the competition — but remained at the side of her teammates as they went on to win silver. usa gymnastics has said in statement: "after further medical evaluation, simone biles has withdrawn from the final individual all—around competition to focus on her mental health." here she was speaking yesterday.
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it has been really stressful, this olympic games. not having an audience, there are a lot of different variables going into it. it has been a long week, a long olympic process, it has been a long year. so, just a lot of different variables and i think we are just a little bit too stressed out, but we should be out here having fun and sometimes that is not the case. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. earlier we spoke to matthew richards's proud parents, simon and amanda, about how it felt to see him win and how he coped with training during lockdown. amazing, surreal. it really hasn't sunk in yet. it's been a whirlwind, really. just incredible. i'm so pleased for him and the team. last year, when lockdown
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happened, we managed to find a glorified paddling pool. it's technically called an overground pool, five metres long, three metres wide, just over a metre deep. we attached a bungee cord to the garage wall in the garden, and put 15,000 litres of water into it and he was swimming hour after hour each day. and we also caught up with the mum and brother of tom dean — now a double gold medal winner. mum jacquie is, as you'd expect, over the moon. it's quite cheeky, really, isn't it? to go to your first olympics and come back with two gold medals. and to do that in a team event is just the icing on the cake. it means so much to them, to swim for each other, and for the team that they swim as, and they swim out of their skin in team events. i was beyond thrilled for them and i know how much this means for british swimming. this is the blue ribbon event
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of british swimming, the freestyle. and britain has never won that before. so on so many levels i was absolutely thrilled for them. see what the, i swam with tom or i saw him in the pool, that is exactly what we need. we need role models that break up the next generation and role models then produce funding and role models then produce funding and so it goes on. i am thrilled. the ceo of swim england, jane nickerson, says it's been a tremendous first few days and will inspire a new generation of swimmers. it all starts right back at learn to
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swim, that's the best experience we can give any child. not only does it lead to this wonderful success, and all of the things that jacquie has talked about, it also means it is a life skill, it saves lives and stops people drowning. learning to swim is the absolute foundation of this. a big shout out from me, we are a thousand teachers short in this country at the moment. if anybody wants to get into swimming teaching, and breed the next tom, go to the institute of swimming and find out how you can do that. that is the first step. yesterday charlotte dujardin moved alongside dame katherine grainger as great britain's most decorated female olympian as she claimed team dressage bronze in tokyo. today she is bidding to become the only british woman to claim gold at three olympics in the individualfinal. she'll be performing in abour 90 mtnutes. but how did her horse make
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the journey to japan with her? with me now is henry bullen, director of peden bloodstock, who arranges the logistics and travel for team gbs horses to the olympic games. tell us how the horses are taken to the olympic games good morning. latte the olympic games good morning. - have actually shipped all the horses to get in big games so it has been quite a logistical challenge for us all. people will be surprised but they do go in aeroplanes. we have chartered a number of freight aircraft. they flew from belgium, an 18 hour flight. aircraft. they flew from belgium, an 18 hourflight. the stop aircraft. they flew from belgium, an 18 hour flight. the stop of in aircraft. they flew from belgium, an 18 hourflight. the stop of in dubai for a refuelling and crew change. it is a long process, a long trip for
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the horses. they are probably travelling for a good 30 hours from the point of loading up to getting into the venue in tokyo. quite the point of loading up to getting into the venue in tokyo.— into the venue in tokyo. quite a challenae into the venue in tokyo. quite a challenge for — into the venue in tokyo. quite a challenge for them. _ into the venue in tokyo. quite a challenge for them. tell- into the venue in tokyo. quite a challenge for them. tell us - into the venue in tokyo. quite a | challenge for them. tell us more about what conditions are like for them when they are on the plane. do they lie down on a flatbed perhaps if they are going business class, and are they fed?— if they are going business class, and are they fed? they do travel business class _ and are they fed? they do travel business class because - and are they fed? they do travel business class because the - business class because the containers they travel in our sections. they can have three horses, two horses or one horse. they travel in containers that we classify as a business class. they stand the whole way. they do sleep standing generally and they are given food so they have hay and water constantly. we have grooms on the plane so we have professional flying grooms which is all they do, to fly with horses. they oversee it
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and on top of that, we have the grooms from the national federations who fly with them as well. we are limited on seats so there are up to 11 seats on the aircraft. the writers don't _ 11 seats on the aircraft. the writers don't travel - 11 seats on the aircraft. the writers don't travel with - 11 seats on the aircraft. the writers don't travel with them, they meet them injapan? i have to ask you, do the horses have passports? they do have passports, exactly. they do have passports, exactly. they have passports and microchips. they have passports and microchips. they do not have a photo in the passport, they have a silhouette of a horse. all horses have different markings whether it is a patch of white or colour is on the front of their faces and little marks where their faces and little marks where the hair parts, and that is all marked. but they all have microchips so they are all easily identified. everything is different this year because of the pandemic. when they arrive injapan, do the horses have to quarantine? trio. arrive in japan, do the horses have to quarantine?— to quarantine? no, in effect, they are in quarantine _
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to quarantine? no, in effect, they are in quarantine in _ to quarantine? no, in effect, they are in quarantine in japan - to quarantine? no, in effect, they are in quarantine in japan so - to quarantine? no, in effect, they| are in quarantine in japan so there are in quarantine injapan so there isa are in quarantine injapan so there is a bubble injapan at the venue where it isjust is a bubble injapan at the venue where it is just horses that have been tested and quarantined, so they are actually quarantined prior to travel. they have seven days quarantine before they go, during which the time they can train and they are tested for diseases like flu. very much, the virus security is very important. so in effect they are in a bubble or quarantine from the point that they quarantine wherever they are, mostly in europe, up wherever they are, mostly in europe, up to the point where they returned back to belgium at the end of the games. i back to belgium at the end of the names. ., ., ., ., a back to belgium at the end of the names. ., ., ., ., i. back to belgium at the end of the names. ., ., ., ., y., ., games. i do want to ask you, we have seen the conditions _ games. i do want to ask you, we have seen the conditions in _ games. i do want to ask you, we have seen the conditions in japan, - games. i do want to ask you, we have seen the conditions in japan, it - games. i do want to ask you, we have seen the conditions in japan, it is - seen the conditions injapan, it is very, very hot. how do you prepare the horses for those kinds conditions? it the horses for those kinds conditions?— the horses for those kinds conditions? , . , , conditions? it is really interesting that, conditions? it is really interesting that. because _ conditions? it is really interesting that, because i _ conditions? it is really interesting that, because i was _ conditions? it is really interesting that, because i was talking - conditions? it is really interesting that, because i was talking to - that, because i was talking to people in quarantine and they have had indoor schools where they have had indoor schools where they have had heaters on, they have wrapped up horses in rugs and tried to get them
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as used to the high temperatures as possible. but the governing body of the equine sport have been working on this for many years, since atlanta, they do heat antibody tests. the conditions injapan, whilst it is hot, they are in air—conditioned stables, all of the competition is happening at my time when it is cooler or early in the morning so they are very well looked after. they are monitored constantly by a fantastic team of vets.— by a fantastic team of vets. really treat to by a fantastic team of vets. really great to hear— by a fantastic team of vets. really great to hear about _ by a fantastic team of vets. really great to hear about what - by a fantastic team of vets. really great to hear about what happens | by a fantastic team of vets. really l great to hear about what happens to the horses and good luck course to charlotte. thanks so much. in the uk, the prime minister has described plans for fully vaccinated people to avoid isolation if they come into contact with a positive coronavirus case as nailed on. the rule change will come into effect on august 16th and will apply to all fully vaccinated people in england. in scotland, wales and northern,
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there are plans to ease the same rules at some point in august. this morning, the prime minister said that the 16th of august was always the planned date to remove quarantine requirements and will go ahead as planned. it is clear that if we are sensible, and we continue to take a cautious approach, that we can see a very, very strong... you are still cautious about the lockdown? i do. but august the 16th is nailed on? nailed on, there has never been any question about a review date for august the 16th. we will go ahead with the move. with more on that, i'm joined by our chief political the prime ministerfor the prime minister for lifting restrictions has been nailed down
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four august 16. restrictions has been nailed down fouraugust16. how surprisingly restrictions has been nailed down four august 16. how surprisingly is his use of language is mac certainly surprising for one reason and that is that only on friday in a round of interviews, the cabinet minister george eustace was asked about august 16 and he said, we would obviously need to keep things under review. he obviously need to keep things under review. ., , ., review. he said that his move in either direction _ review. he said that his move in either direction though - review. he said that his move in either direction though at - review. he said that his move in either direction though at the i either direction though at the moment it was not moving forward. he suggested it was an indicative plan. downing street themselves said everything was being kept under review last friday. so for the prime minister to say it was nailed down and was never up for review is indeed a surprising but i think we have to look at what he said and what he did not say. firstly i think by stressing in such a strong terms that august 16 is nailed down, while he is using words like caution in public, privately there is more confidence amongst government ministers because of the following two case rates, that they can afford
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to move to the next stage. second, but he didn't say and this is where the political pressures apply for many in his own party, including the former health secretaryjeremy, he did say this would be brought forward, so he is sticking to his plan but he is resisting political pressure to bring this forward to avoid a ping pandemic with so many people are sitting at home. in england from august 16 if you are doublejobs and in england from august 16 if you are double jobs and in close contact with somebody who has tested positive, if you have a negative test, you can go about your everyday life, you can continue to go to work, although there still will be that two—week qualifying period after you have yourjab before you can take advantage of those new rules will. senior cabinet ministers are discussing plans to potentially
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allow fully vaccinated travellers from the eu and us into england without the need to quarantine. a review of the border rules is due by 31july — the second date in the department for transport�*s plan for a safe return to international travel. patricia yates is the deputy chief executive of visit britain. good morning to you. i am assuming you welcome this news, what difference will it make? it will make a huge _ difference will it make? it will make a huge difference - difference will it make? it will - make a huge difference particularly to our cities. if you think america is our most valuable market, we normally get 4.5 million people and they spent £4.5 million in this country. europe, two thirds of our visitors with about £10 million and our cities in particular have been really hit by that lack of international visitors. by people coming in, going to the main attractions, going to our hotels and restaurants and that impacts on us. if you think about attractions like
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the tower of london, edinburgh castle i have seen dips in visitor numbers by more than 90% so that major heritage will not be able to keep going unless we have international visitors coming back. that is despite the fact that so many more british people are on stay occasions this year and staying in the country? it occasions this year and staying in the country?— the country? it is great to see so many staying _ the country? it is great to see so many staying at _ the country? it is great to see so many staying at home _ the country? it is great to see so many staying at home this - the country? it is great to see so many staying at home this year. | many staying at home this year. the preference for domestic visitors tends to be coast and countryside. there is more of a reluctance to go back into cities, to use public transport and that is why we have lodged our major campaign, focused on getting domestic visitors back into the cities. but even so, they will not replace the money that is spent by international visitors on much higher spenders and so important to the country's economy
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and the success of small businesses. my and the success of small businesses. my understanding is, this will only apply initially to entry into england if it goes ahead, have your concerns about the rest of the country? i concerns about the rest of the count ? ~ . . , country? i think it is slightly confusing — country? i think it is slightly confusing for _ country? i think it is slightly confusing for international l confusing for international visitors, i am confusing for international visitors, iam not confusing for international visitors, i am not sure americans know their geography of britain quite that well so obviously it will be helpful if the restrictions apply right across the uk and i'm sure the national governments will act together to try and get that. can ou together to try and get that. can you understand concerns of those who are uneasy about this, that they are worried about the risks of throwing the doors open, if you like, especially to time when it does appear that coronavirus cases seem to be dropping here in britain? what to be dropping here in britain? what i would sa to be dropping here in britain? what i would say is _ to be dropping here in britain? what i would say is that _ to be dropping here in britain? what i would say is that the _ to be dropping here in britain? twat i would say is that the hospitality industry has acted very carefully during covid—19. it has done all the
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restrictions, followed other guidelines that it needs to. we have run those, we are good to go and customers can feel confident in choosing businesses that are offering covid—19 compliance. we know for example that attractions are still doing time tickets, still asking people, so we know hospitality and tourism businesses are being very careful, the relaxation looks as if it is only going to be for people who are doubly vaccinated so a higher degree of protection and we need to get the economy back up and starting. we will not get international visitors back all next week, it is going to be a really slow rebuild to get people confident about travelling to britain again. people confident about travelling to britain again-— jim mcmahon is labour's transport secretary.
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welcome to you. patricia said there that we need to get the economy back up that we need to get the economy back up and running in, do you agree? it is quite clear that tourism industry have been devastated by the restrictions by a government that has been all over the place in its plan and by the constantly changing landscape where travellers don't have the confidence to book ahead so what we have been calling for is an international vaccine passport where we reach an agreement with our key destinations like america, canada, the eu, to make sure that when it is safe to do so, when data allows, passengers have the confidence to travel again. this passengers have the confidence to travel again-— travel again. this is an equivalent of an international _ travel again. this is an equivalent of an international vaccine - of an international vaccine passport, isn't it? everybody would have to be double vaccinated and provide proof of vaccination? it is caettin provide proof of vaccination? it is getting there _ provide proof of vaccination? it 3 getting there and it is lovely to see the data supporting it. we have
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been clear that whatever steps we take to either lockdown or unlock, thatis take to either lockdown or unlock, that is supported by the data and the evidence and scientific advice on the government needs to be more transparent about the data they are relying on because if travellers go to france in faith good few weeks ago, they were devastated by restrictions placed on them. are we going to take one step forward and two steps back? will we have a plan in place that stands the test of time? . . . in place that stands the test of time? , . . , , , in place that stands the test of time? , ,, .,, time? research suggests the economy here is losing — time? research suggests the economy here is losing £639 _ time? research suggests the economy here is losing £639 million _ time? research suggests the economy here is losing £639 million a _ time? research suggests the economy here is losing £639 million a day - here is losing £639 million a day because of the squeeze on inbound tourism. i hear what you are saying about you want to be guided by the data but at what point do you say, actually, we have to open the doors again to foreign travellers? lanthem again to foreign travellers? when the scientific _ again to foreign travellers? when the scientific advice _ again to foreign travellers? when the scientific advice says - again to foreign travellers? when the scientific advice says it - again to foreign travellers? when the scientific advice says it is - the scientific advice says it is safe to do so because when we do take that step to allow international visitors to come to
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the uk, without the quarantine restrictions, we need to know it is not going to bring in a new variant, we need to know that the testing regime is robust and we want to see a simplified system, not this red list, amber glass, amber, frankly it is causing confusion. they want to note that changes are being made, they will stick.— they will stick. australia has one ofthe they will stick. australia has one of the strictest _ they will stick. australia has one of the strictest border _ they will stick. australia has one of the strictest border policies . they will stick. australia has one j of the strictest border policies in the world and they have just had to extend their lockdown for another four weeks, when does it end? the fact is, four weeks, when does it end? the fact is. we — four weeks, when does it end? the fact is, we have _ four weeks, when does it end? tis: fact is, we have to learn four weeks, when does it end? ti9: fact is, we have to learn to four weeks, when does it end? ti9 fact is, we have to learn to live with covid—19 to different degrees and we don't know what variants might undermine our vaccination programme and that is the real issue. we have made fantastic progress through our nhs and front line workers throughout the vaccination and get the majority of the adult population are vaccinated but we cannot afford a new variant coming into the uk that will undermine. i also think we do need to see a uk wide agreement in place.
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if you are a traveller coming from america, there is a good chance that you will have family connections across the uk, history across the uk that you'll want to see as well so do think the simplicity the uk government needs to do more to make sure that within our nations, there is common agreement. in australia, it's been announced that the strictest covid measures will remain in place in sydney and the surrounding area for another four weeks. they were first imposed a month ago. here's our correspondent shaimaa khalil in sydney. this is a lockdown that started at the end ofjune. it was supposed to last two weeks and it was extended to five weeks. now we know it is going to extend to four more until the end of august. this is because the pattern of the case numbers just keeps going up. it is persistently high. new south wales recorded its highest number since the outbreak, 177 locally acquired cases, 46 of those were infectious
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while active in the community. all in all, sydney has recorded its worst outbreak this year, with more than 2500 cases. compared to any other country in the world, the cases are low, but look at it from an australian perspective. this is a country that isolated itself from the rest of the world by closing its borders. it has very, very strict hotel quarantine rules and it has, for the most part, really control the spread of covid as recently as may. life looks like it had come back to near normal for most of the country. itjust shows you how transmissible and challenging the delta variant is. but for victoria and south australia, two states that have gone in and out of lockdown successfully, because they went in early and hard, the criticism for new south wales in sydney in particular, where i am, is that the authorities did not nail it early enough. and when the rules came in, they did not come fast enough. so, a lot more uncertainty here,
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because, yes, it is going to last until august, but experts say the way that things are going, if cases don't slow down, it could go on until september. a long—running study suggests a third of middle—aged british adults have multiple chronic health problems. issues include chronic back problems, mental ill—health, high blood pressure, diabetes, asthma and high—risk drinking. the study was published in the journal bmc public health. with me now is alison giles, she is thejoint associate director for healthy ageing at the charity, centre for ageing better. good morning to you. more than a third of people _ good morning to you. more than a third of people in _ good morning to you. more than a third of people in their— good morning to you. more than a third of people in their late - good morning to you. more than a third of people in their late 40s i third of people in their late 40s have multiple long—term health problems, that is a pretty sobering headline. how concerned are you? i
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think the studies confirmed what the covid—19 pandemic has been telling us which is that the uk is a really unhealthy nation compared with other eu countries. we saw greater numbers of people hospitalised with covid—19, including our prime minister, because of their underlying poor health and it made them more vulnerable to the virus —— virus. it is shocking but it is not surprising. virus. it is shocking but it is not surprising-— virus. it is shocking but it is not surrisinu. ~ :. , :, , :, fl surprising. what needs to be done? a bi aer surprising. what needs to be done? a bigger question- _ surprising. what needs to be done? a bigger question- i _ surprising. what needs to be done? a bigger question. i think _ surprising. what needs to be done? a bigger question. i think prevention i bigger question. i think prevention is always better than cure so we need radical action from the government to promote healthier environments, to address the poverty of opportunity that faces disadvantaged families, so the study highlighted that poorer families, you see much more ill—health in younger age groups. we need a robust plan of action to tackle air pollution, what they found around asthma, but also to improve the
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quality of our food and ensure that everyone has access to green space. as well as prevention, it is important that we don't write off this current generation of people who have these multiple long—term conditions and we really want more attention paid by the health service to physical activity, because it is really a critical part of managing these long—term conditions, particularly mental—health, back pain, asthma and diabetes. what we find, unlike with smoking where you get asked, do you smoke, and you get referred to services, people are very rarely asked about their physical activity and they are not supported or signposted to take appropriate action, so that would be the one thing that we would like the health service to focus on as a result of this study today. sometimes you can get overwhelmed with all the advice, we all know not
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to smoke, drink too much, eat well and exercise. so much advice in our years you almost think i can't be bothered with any of this. how much risk is that?— risk is that? well, i think people still respect _ risk is that? well, i think people still respect the _ risk is that? well, i think people still respect the advice - risk is that? well, i think people still respect the advice of i risk is that? well, i think people still respect the advice of their l still respect the advice of their health professional. i think if they hear those messages from health professionals, when they are diagnosed with the condition, that is the teachable moment to sit people, this will really help you manage this condition. what the study showed is that these health conditions costed together. so you get a 1st decision, perhaps you are depressed or develop asthma, and then develop a 2nd condition. we should be trying to manage the 1st condition well and trying to stop the other 1. we need the health service to really support people to manage those 1st conditions and, in particular, the things you have just said, to stop smoking, support them,
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eat well and be physically active. there's things will make a big difference for how those conditions play out for those individuals. brute play out for those individuals. we don't have much time, but i want to pick up on the importance of not writing off this generation of adults in midlife. it might me wonder if we have to have a new conversation about what it means to get old. what do you think of that? yes, definitely. it is not inevitable we will be plagued with ill—health as we get over so we need to have a positive outlook on what it means to be older. but also, we do need to tackle ageism. so we are seeing workplaces and employers are not recruiting older adults but they are not supporting people as we develop health conditions to stay in work. we really have to embrace this
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idea of the 100 year life expect to live longer and work longer and we really need the support people to make that happen. the state people are having to leave work early because of ill health. we have to turn ageing on its head, see it as a positive thing but make sure people have the opportunities to really capitalise on those extra years of life was the we start with more gold medal success for great britain's men in the olympic pool, this time in the final of the 4x 200metre freestyle relay. tom dean is now a double olympic champion, a day after he won his first gold.
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he and duncan scott, james guy and matthew richards came within 0.03 seconds of the world record as they won in emphatic style, finishing over three seconds clear of the russian olympic committee. it's team gb's fifth gold medal of the games. three have come in swimming — and that's not happened for 113 years. and just look at how much it meant to tom dean's family — this is them celebrating as they watched their son win a second gold medal in two days. so another night to rememberfor great britain's men in the pool — and there's been success in the rowing as well. the team have won their first men's quadruple sculls medal after winning silver. harry leask, angus groom, tom barras and jack beaumont held off a late charge from australia and poland to secure second place behind the netherlands. good news too for helen glover in her attempt for a third olympic medal. she, and partner polly swann finished second in their
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coxless pair semifinal — to qualify for the final tomorrow morning. meanwhile, the only remaining british player in the mens singles — liam broady — has gone out in the third round, losing in three sets tojeremy chardy. this comes as andy murray's olympics are over — he and joe salisbury are out of the men's doubles after losing their quarter finals match against croatia. they won the first set fairly confortably, taking it 6—4. but lost the second — and then the third set tie break 10—7 against marin cilic and ivan dodig. great britain's sevens olympic campaign has ended without a medal — after a 17—12 defeat to argentina in the bronze medal match in tokyo. and in the last hour fiji have beaten new zealand to retain their olympic title. disappointment too in the diving forjack laugher and daniel goodfellow as they finished 7th in the 3m synchro final — with china taking gold. it means laugher�*s reign as olympic champion is over.
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american gymnast and four—time olympic gold medallist simone biles has withdrawn from tomorrow's individual all—around final in tokyo for her mental health. she withdrew from the team final yesterday — during the competition — but remained at the side of her teammates as they went on to win silver. usa gymnastics has said in statement: "after further medical evaluation, simone biles has withdrawn from the final individual all—around competition to focus on her mental health." they go on to say, "she will continue to be evaluated daily to determine whether or not to participate in next week's individual event finals." here she was speaking yesterday. it has been really stressful, this olympic games. not having an audience, there are a lot of different variables going into it. it has been a long week, a long olympic process, it has been a long year.
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so, just a lot of different variables and i think we are just a little bit too stressed out, but we should be out here having fun and sometimes that is not the case. that's all the sport for now. tou can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. dozens of british former senior military commanders — including four former chiefs of the defence staff — have written to borisjohnson, calling on the government to allow more afghan interpreters to settle in the uk. they say too many of those who worked with british forces have had their applications rejected and that if any are murdered by the taliban "the dishonour would lie squarely at our nation's feet". than 2000 afghan staff to come to the uk.
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this translator, whose identity we're not disclosing, has been turned down for relocation four times and fears retribution from the taliban: the taliban do not care for dismiss, for termination, they don't care anything. theyjust know who worked with the british and who not. anybody who worked with the british, they will kill them, sir. now i am worried about my family and myself in future about what will happen when the nato leave afghanistan. i know i will see my wife and daughter get shot, and myself too. we spoke to lord peter ricketts who was the uk's first national security advisor from 2010 to 2012 under david cameron and lord ricketts also served as chair of the joint intelligence committee under tony blair. he has signed the letter.
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i don't have the numbers, but there are quite a lot more people who have been considered and refused. remember, this is a group of people who worked in a committed way with a british military and also the british embassy, diplomats in afghanistan. and now they suddenly find themselves vulnerable, as british and other western forces leave. and our issue is that the scheme the government has set up, although it is very welcome, is moving too slowly and has too many exclusions. the gentleman you heard on the court referred to dismissal. the gentleman you heard on the call referred to dismissal. at the moment, anyone who was dismissed for any reason from working with the british is now finding it very, very hard to get accepted for relocation. and many other people as well. so, i gather there are up to about another 4000 people who might be eligible, and many of them seem to have been turned down in the first look at cases. and yet the taliban don't discriminate between different sorts of people. if you work for the british and they find out about it, then you and your family are at risk. so, this is a debt of honour that we need to pay some very loyal people who worked closely with us.
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our defence correspondent jonathan beale is here.... interesting, his use of language, debt of honour. tell us more about the matter. it debt of honour. tell us more about the matter-— the matter. it is a hoot's who in terms of military _ the matter. it is a hoot's who in terms of military and _ the matter. it is a hoot's who in terms of military and national. terms of military and national security in terms of who has been involved for the last 20 years. clearly they feel that debt of gratitude and a fear for their lives of those left behind now western forces have left the country. particularly on those cases which have been rejected, that they need to be looked at again. there has been no appeals process, often not a proper reason why they have been rejected or felt they haven't been given the proper reason. sometimes there are small misdemeanours. you have to say some serious also, the government has made very clear it
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will not consider people who could be a security threat or committed a crime that wouldn't be considered a crime that wouldn't be considered a crime in the uk. it is almost as if they have done nothing. with the agreement with the withdrawal from afghanistan, the scheme has been expanded. i spoke to 1 afghanistan, the scheme has been expanded. i spoke to1 person leisure who has just arrived back in the uk with his 4 young doctors and is now in safety. there are people coming. you know, there are planes that have been chartered coming over the next few weeks. there will be more, about 800 afghans, 2000 plus of 3rd printers — interpreters. what happens next? you have letters from military commanders that choose this
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country is letting down people that serve them loyally. the difficulty is, and all countries are having this because the americans have just started a scheme, they have had a scheme but they are ramping it up to relocate their interpreters, many more work for them than the british. it is the cut—off. what constitutes a rejection, for what sort of offence? disciplinary, something more serious? what routes do you include or discord. what about drivers? there is a gentleman, a gardener who has come under threat. anyone who has been in afghanistan and worked for the british, there are no secrets in afghanistan, people know. if they are in an area where the taliban are on the rise, there will be a threat.
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the government has set out what it calls "transformative plans" to improve the lives of people with disabilities across the uk. the national disability strategy has cross department involvement and aims to tackle issues such as a lack of accessible housing, access to education and the disability employment gap. but disability campaigners have criticised the plans for not going far enough. nikki fox reports. for disabled children like florence, getting the right support and funding from government and local authority is crucial, especially when it comes to specialist education. this family had to spend £15,000 fighting to get the right school for their daughter. it felt so unfair. it felt so inappropriate to have to fight for something that should be a provision for all kids with special educational needs. 11—year—old florence is autistic, epileptic and has global development delay. we looked at what would be best
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for florence and we came to the conclusion that a school with a specialist provision would be better suited for her. the family weren't happy with the council's first choice of school because they didn't believe it catered for people with more complex needs, like their daughter. so we decided to take the council to tribunal to argue our case, and we had to fund all of our own reports. and employ our solicitor to do that. that is a hugely expensive process. there are hundreds of families that are locked in battles with councils because it seems the first port of call for a council is to say no and make parents fight for it. as part of the strategy, the government admitted that special educational needs system is failing some disabled children, and it is spending £300 million to improve it. there are plans across all departments, like housing. there is a commitment to increase the number of accessible homes. employment is mentioned.
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disabled people are far less likely to have a job, so the government is consulting on ways to make companies more transparent when it comes to declaring how many disabled people they employee. access to health care, learning disabilities and autism training will be offered to all health and social care staff. there are plans for more consultations and audits, including one around public transport. campaigners are frustrated by the promise of more reports and less action. i'm very disappointed. this is a missed opportunity. the prime minister promised it would be the most ambitious and transformative disability plan in a generation. unfortunately, i think an awful lot of disabled people, 14 million of them, are going to see it as a broken promise. the government says their plan will be updated every year and their progress will be scrutinised. florence's family were eventually successful in their battle, and she is now at a school
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which will enable her to be the best she can be. any plan to improve the lives of disabled people will of course be welcomed. but charities believe the strategy falls short, as it doesn't deliver immediate drastic action so millions of people can finally start to see an end to being disabled by the many barriers in society. nikki fox, bbc news. joining me now is the minister for disabled people, justin tomlinson. we saw the conservative peer then who chaired the socialjustice disability commission, and has a condition himself, because there is a damp squib. he knows what he is talking about, how is he wrong? i have met with him and dcsj on many occasions and they have a genuine passion around disability in employment. that runs at the heart
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of the national strategy, we as a government have delivered record disability employment. there are plans for 1,000,000 more by 2027, addressed the fact that thousands drop out of training a year. it is 1 thing to get somebody an opportunity to work but it is about career progression, they want the same opportunities as their friends. this messages talk to me but occur, particularly by young disabled people. i personally absolutely sure his passion to make sure we maximise every opportunity for disabled people of all ages to fulfil their potential. let people of all ages to fulfil their otential. , . ,. , people of all ages to fulfil their otential. , a , :, people of all ages to fulfil their otential. , , :, ' :, potential. let me pick up on 1 word ou potential. let me pick up on 1 word you there. — potential. let me pick up on 1 word you there, ambition. _ potential. let me pick up on 1 word you there, ambition. talk - potential. let me pick up on 1 word you there, ambition. talk me i potential. let me pick up on 1 word i you there, ambition. talk me through i you there, ambition. talk me through 1 or 2 examples of where real change will happen, not a pledge, to list,
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consultation, ambition, it the way someone has a disability and their life will change tomorrow. that someone has a disability and their life will change tomorrow.- someone has a disability and their life will change tomorrow. that is a fair challenge _ life will change tomorrow. that is a fair challenge and _ life will change tomorrow. that is a fair challenge and i _ life will change tomorrow. that is a fair challenge and i am _ life will change tomorrow. that is a fair challenge and i am excited i fair challenge and i am excited about the transformational cross government strategy. we have over 100 commitments for the here and now as well as setting out the policy... in the here and now, looking at national design. i in the here and now, looking at national design.— in the here and now, looking at national design. i am going to have to interrupt — national design. i am going to have to interrupt you. — national design. i am going to have to interrupt you, justin _ national design. i am going to have to interrupt you, justin tomlinson, | to interrupt you, justin tomlinson, you may have just knocked your microphone, your sound has become intermittent. try1 more time. tiff} intermittent. try1 more time. 100 commitments. _ intermittent. try1 more time. 10131 commitments. over intermittent. try1 more time. 1212 commitments. 0ver100 intermittent. try1 more time. 122 commitments. over 100 commitments for the here and now including things such as national design codes, significant changes around public transport, accessible housing, making sure that play equipment is accessible. a really
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good example set out in the national strategy led by inspirational parent becky madden, making sure all local authorities understands the importance of including inclusive equipment. there is leisure, housing, transport, all the things raised in our extensive listening exercise. . raised in our extensive listening exercise. , , :, :, exercise. interesting you mention that because _ exercise. interesting you mention that because 1_ exercise. interesting you mention that because 1 of _ exercise. interesting you mention that because 1 of the _ exercise. interesting you mention that because 1 of the other i that because 1 of the other criticisms have been that not enough people with disabilities were involved in drawing up the strategy. i know you consulted many thousands of people but that is not the same as then feeling the only strategy — they owned the strategy by drawing it up with government.— they owned the strategy by drawing it up with government. people on the team to have — it up with government. people on the team to have a _ it up with government. people on the team to have a disability. _ it up with government. people on the team to have a disability. over i team to have a disability. over 15,000 individuals responded. we have our regional stakeholder network with 225 organisations,
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people with real work experience. — lived experience was that we can make sure the voices are heard and is part of the national strategy make sure they are embedded in future policy development. notjust for me, but cross government with each and every government department having a senior ministerial disabilityjump in. this was a personal focus disabilityjump in. this was a personalfocus of the disabilityjump in. this was a personal focus of the prime minister so everyone is absolutely focused on collectively working together so creating a more inclusive society, removing the day—to—day barriers we understand people with disabilities are impacted by and are committed to make our lives better for everyone. we have heard from a tory peer and former paralympian. she said the progress is seeing how all these
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areas will connect the drive meaningful change. that is an issue, isn't it? on the 1 meaningful change. that is an issue, isn't it? on the1 hand, i am plucking something out of thin air but let's say i have a disability and i need a wheelchair. central government grant? the local authority? a charity? how will it alljoin up?— alljoin up? she is inspirational. you are absolutely _ alljoin up? she is inspirational. you are absolutely spot - alljoin up? she is inspirational. you are absolutely spot on. if i alljoin up? she is inspirational. l you are absolutely spot on. if you take disability employment, it can create all the opportunities but if someone doesn't have access to accessible public transport they might not be able to get to work. no accessible housing and work expects them to move, that is a barrier in itself. the topic of the wheelchair access, that is the whole point of the national strategy, because governments and agencies, together, left hand supporting the right. to remove the barriers. too often things that are straightforward are not. people have enough to juggle
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without having to then navigate complicated systems. again, each and every government department, and as we look to private businesses, local authorities and other key agencies, we all have to collectively work together. the strategy puts in black and white writing our aims, how we are looking to get there. those with lived experience will then identify what are those priorities. justin tomlinson. _ what are those priorities. justin tomlinson, thank _ what are those priorities. justin tomlinson, thank you. - renewable energy could play a crucial role in the uk's attempt to reach net zero. wind is providing more and more of our electricity, but what about energy from our waters? experts say that we need to use all forms of electricity generation if that target is to be reached and are calling for government support to help the tidal industry develop commercially. it comes as what's being described as the most powerful tidal turbine device in the world has connected to the grid in orkney. lorna gordon has been to take a look.
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in the fast flowing waters of orkney, a new tidal device is being connected to the grid. lying low on the surface of the water. we are in spring tide which is when the water moves at its fastest rate. we were given rare access on board. we think this is a game changer for the tidal sector. we have these two turbines on each leg. it is the most powerful turbine in the world. we can recover that to surface to get access to maintenance. we can raise them, repair them and lower them all within a tide. the tides here are among some of the most powerful in the world. water flowing so fast around the 02, it gives the illusion the devices it gives the illusion the device is moving, cutting through the water, even though it is tethered to anchors on the sea bed.
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the attraction of tidal power is that it is a completely predictable form of renewable energy, and this powerful current is turning the blades on two turbines on this device, generating enough electricity to power up to 2000 homes. in the year of cop 26, endorsing and supporting a pioneering, innovative technology space like tidal stream, is kind of standing for what needs to happen. tidal stream is able to complement the uk's transition to net—zero. tidal is still expensive compared to other renewables like wind. experts say government support would help to bring costs down and enable the industry to develop commercially. i think all of these industries in the early phases need government support in one form or another. the industry finance needs to know there are guaranteed prizes there are guaranteed prices as it commercialises.
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when you look at wind, that is the path that was followed with wind. we need the same path followed with tide to make it work. and yes, we need all of these different energy sources going forward. the uk government says it has a long history of supporting the development of wave and tidal stream technologies. the tidal industry would like more. driving further change in these islands and beyond. lorna gordon, bbc news, orkney. people must be protected from excessive pricing for public electric car charging. that's according to a group of mps. the transport select committee says to pay more for using public charging points could put pressure on people who are less able to afford it. it also said the government needs to make sure people in rural areas have equal access. the uk plans to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030.
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j°ey joeyjorgensen left the band 1st not — slipknot in 2013, he has died. sunshine in between the showers as we saw earlier today in devon. we have low pressure in charge of our weather, not moving very far very fast. it is around that we are seeing heavier bursts of rain, went lighter in scotland, the rain stuck across northern parts of scotland and here we have an amber rain warning from the met office. this area could see as much as 90 millimetres of rain. disruption. rain could be heavy, perhaps
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thundery for a while. showers we seen coming from the west work their way eastwards, heavy and thundery. away from the showers we will find sunshine now and again. across more southern parts of the uk we have strong wind. costing around 40 mph around at some southern coasts of england. with a stronger breeze, feeling cooler today. temperatures lower than yesterday. around 18— 20 this afternoon. heavy downpours into the evening. the showers we see across england and wales find overnight, sky is clear. moore cold for scotland and northern ireland. patchy rain moving southward. drier across northern parts of scotland. temperatures remaining in double figures into thursday morning. this is the big picture on thursday, pressure close by. taking where the heaviest of the rain. there probably
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will not be as much rain around on thursday, some sunshine across england and wales before we see all the cloud moving southward bringing patchy rain. a much drier day for scotland. later in the day cloud and rain coming into the south of eglin. sunnier skies more across the midlands, south east of england, temperature 21— 22. breezy day during thursday. friday still the threat of showers, drier into the weekend, some sunshine at times but not that1 weekend, some sunshine at times but not that 1 with wind weekend, some sunshine at times but not that1 with wind coming down from the north. and then that made a little bit of a flat dismount. it wasn't a big deduction, but he was under
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bbc one for 45 minutes, if that is where you're watching, please turn over to two right now.
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another haul of medals for team gb at the tokyo olympics. this is wonderful! gold to great britain in the men's 4x200m freestyle relay. britain's swimmers strike gold again with victory in the men's 200 metre freestyle relay. and we'll find out within the hour if team gb's charlotte dujardin will ride into the record books in the individual dressage. the american gymnast simone biles pulls out of another final saying she wants to focus on her mental health. we'll be live in tokyo for all the latest. also in the programme... the government may drop quarantine rules for fully vaccinated travellers from the eu and united states when
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they arrive in england.

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