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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 28, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines this is wonderful. more olympic gold for team gb — in the 200 metre freestyle relay. it's great britain's first gold in the event since 1908. gb rowers win olympic silver in the men's quadruple sculls. gymnastics superstar simone biles withdraws from another olympic event — the final individual all—round gymnastics competition — due to concerns over her mental health. has been really stressful, the cylinder games. just as a whole, not having an audience. there are a lot of different variables going in. it has been a long weekend along olympic process. long year.
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plans for double—jabbed us and eu travellers to be allowed into england without quarantining are considered by ministers. let me know if you think that is a good idea. get on touch with me on twitter. . and remembering police officers and staff from across the country who have died while protecting the public. a new memorial will be unveiled today. day five of the toyko olympics has seem more glory for team gb —
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once again in the pool. they took gold in the men's four by two—hundred metre freestyle relay. it's the first time in 113 years that great britain have won three swimming gold medals at an olympics. in rowing — team gb won a silver in the men's quadruple sculls — but the men's coxless fours missed out on a medal, after veering off—course. it takes team gb�*s medal tally so far to fifteen. that puts them in sixth place in the table. for a full round up of the action at the olympics this morning. the american gymnast and four—time olympic gold medallist simone biles has withdrawn from the thursday all—around final to focus on her mental health. she withdrew from the team final yesterday during the
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competition, but remained at the side of her team—mates as they went on to win silver. usa gymnastics has set up to further medical evaluation, simone biles has withdrawn from the final individual all—around competition to focus on her mental health. they go on to say that she will continue to be evaluated daily to determine whether or not to participate in xp �*s individual event finals. well back to the action — it's was a thrilling start to the day as britain got another gold in the pool — this time in the 4x200m freestyle relay. fresh off the back of his brilliant victory yesterday — tom dean, along with duncan scott, james guy and 18—year—old matt richards secured team gb�*s fifth gold of the games asjoe lynskey reports. to see how much it meant, just look atjames guy, who watched in tears as the race went on. great britain were so far ahead, olympic champions by more than three seconds.
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this freestyle relay is the third swimming gold, the most gb have won since 1908. here we go, team great britain. britain had the one and two from the individual race. tom dean, the champion, setting off from the start. but it was an 18—year—old who got them in front. very impressive for matt richards, starting to swim away. look at his feet. matt richards trained through lockdown in a paddling pool with a bungee rope. he handed to duncan scott with the team in control. scott came second in the individual race, but now finally could touch for gold. this is wonderful. gold to great britain. it's really special with those boys. matt in third was so composed. the boys up front did their race plan really well. the way the last year has been, and as a kid, two olympic gold medals is my absolute dream. to do it finally after 25 years
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is pretty emotional. but with these four lads here we have the best freestylers in the world. my my team—mate, duncan, getting first and second, was amazing. olympic champions, a dream come true. you are the best. there were 300 hundredths of a second off the world record. forjames guy, it didn't matter. his two medals in rio were silver. he has spent a lifetime in the pool for moments like this. for british swimming it means so much. three golds make tokyo their greatest modern games. joe lynskey, bbc news. so another night to remember for great britain's men in the pool — and there's been success in the rowing as well. the team have won their first men's quadruple sculls medal after winning silver. harry leask, angus groom, tom barras and jack beaumont held off a late charge from australia and poland to secure second place behind the netherlands.
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good news too for helen glover in her attempt for a third olympic medal. she, and partner polly swann, finished second in their coxless pair semi final — to qualify for the final tomorrow morning. and there will be no third gold medalfor andy murray at the olympics — he and joe salisbury are out of the men's doubles after losing their quarterfinals match against croatia. they won the first set fairly confortably, taking it 6—4. but lost the second — and then lost the third set tie break 10—7 against marin cilic and ivan dodig. one british player left — that's liam broady and he's on court right now in the men's singles. it's a disappointment, because we were so close, 6—3, 4—3 in game points, i thought we were in a great position to win. that can happen sometimes in doubles, momentum was with them at the end and they did well to close it out, they served better. really disappointing, because i felt we were playing
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really well. because i felt we were playing really well-— because i felt we were playing reall well. ., �* g , really well. liam broady and jeremy chard is really well. liam broady and jeremy chardy is into _ really well. liam broady and jeremy chardy is into a _ really well. liam broady and jeremy chardy is into a third _ really well. liam broady and jeremy chardy is into a third set _ really well. liam broady and jeremy chardy is into a third set i _ really well. liam broady and jeremy chardy is into a third set i can - really well. liam broady and jeremy chardy is into a third set i can say i chardy is into a third set i can say at the moment. there was disappointment too in the diving for britain's jack laugher and daniel goodfellow. they could only finish seventh in the final this morning — with china taking gold. it means laugher�*s reign as olympic champion is over — after he won gold in this event in rio alongside chris mears. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. earlier we spoke to matthew richards�*s proud parents, simon and amanda, about how it felt to see him win and how he coped with training during lockdown. amazing, surreal. it really hasn't sunkin amazing, surreal. it really hasn't sunk in yet. it's been a whirlwind, really. just incredible. i'm so
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pleased for him on the team. last ear, pleased for him on the team. last year. when _ pleased for him on the team. last year, when lockdown happened, we managed _ year, when lockdown happened, we managed to find a glorified paddling pool managed to find a glorified paddling pool it's _ managed to find a glorified paddling pool. it's technically called an overground pool, five metres long, three _ overground pool, five metres long, three metres wide, just over a metre deep~ _ three metres wide, just over a metre deep~ we _ three metres wide, just over a metre deep. we attached a bungee cord to the garage _ deep. we attached a bungee cord to the garage wall in the garden, and put 15,000 litres of water into it and he _ put 15,000 litres of water into it and he was swimming hour after hour each day _ well we can now speak to tom dean's mum — jacquie hughes — alfie, his brother, have i got your name right? we were not expecting you, we have a bonus. second gold medal in the space of 2a hours. you must be absolutely bursting with emotion? it’s must be absolutely bursting with emotion? �* , must be absolutely bursting with emotion? v . must be absolutely bursting with emotion? h . ., , emotion? it's quite cheeky, really, isn't it? to — emotion? it's quite cheeky, really, isn't it? to go _ emotion? it's quite cheeky, really, isn't it? to go to _ emotion? it's quite cheeky, really, isn't it? to go to your _ emotion? it's quite cheeky, really, isn't it? to go to your first - isn't it? to go to your first olympics and come back with two gold medals. and to do that in a team
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event isjust the medals. and to do that in a team event is just the icing medals. and to do that in a team event isjust the icing on medals. and to do that in a team event is just the icing on the cake. it means so much to them, to swim for each other, and for the team that they swim as, and they swim out of their skin in team events. i was beyond thrilled for them and i know how much this means for british swimming. this is the blue ribbon event of british swimming, the freestyle. and britain has never won that before. so on so many levels i was absolutely thrilled for them. to win that by more than three seconds, thatis win that by more than three seconds, that is a huge margin in swimming, isn't it? a huge margin. it is that is a huge margin in swimming, isn't it? a huge margin.— isn't it? a huge margin. it is huge, as ou isn't it? a huge margin. it is huge, as you say. — isn't it? a huge margin. it is huge, as you say. the _ isn't it? a huge margin. it is huge, as you say, the margins _ isn't it? a huge margin. it is huge, as you say, the margins in - isn't it? a huge margin. it is huge, i as you say, the margins in swimming are normally measured in three hundredths of a second. you could see duncan scott, they had just won the gold, and was three thousandths of a second away from the world record. what all reaching for the next target, i guess. yesterday, after tom won that gold in the
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individual 200 metres freestyle, we loved watching you, when you were watching him. you had 60 or 70 people in your garden, didn't you? you obviously know how to throw a party. you obviously know how to throw a .a . , you obviously know how to throw a .a _ , , , you obviously know how to throw a party. yes, yes. unfortunately i wasn't able _ party. yes, yes. unfortunately i wasn't able to _ party. yes, yes. unfortunately i wasn't able to be _ party. yes, yes. unfortunately i wasn't able to be there, - party. yes, yes. unfortunately i l wasn't able to be there, actually. bulm _ wasn't able to be there, actually. bulm |_ wasn't able to be there, actually. but... , , ., wasn't able to be there, actually. but... , i. .,. wasn't able to be there, actually. but... , .,. ., ., , but... i bet you watched afterwards and wished — but... i bet you watched afterwards and wished you _ but... i bet you watched afterwards and wished you had _ but... i bet you watched afterwards and wished you had been _ but... i bet you watched afterwards and wished you had been part - but... i bet you watched afterwards and wished you had been part of. but... i bet you watched afterwardsl and wished you had been part of the group? and wished you had been part of the arou - ? , and wished you had been part of the i rou . ? , ., , and wished you had been part of the u-rou? , ., , ., , group? yes, it was really, really cool to watch. _ group? yes, it was really, really coolto watch. i _ group? yes, it was really, really cool to watch. i love _ group? yes, it was really, really cool to watch. i love that - group? yes, it was really, really cool to watch. i love that video i group? yes, it was really, really. cool to watch. i love that video so much, _ cool to watch. i love that video so much, i_ cool to watch. i love that video so much, i really do. | cool to watch. i love that video so much, i really do.— much, i really do. ithink it is really incredible, _ much, i really do. ithink it is really incredible, when - much, i really do. ithink it is really incredible, when you i much, i really do. i think it is- really incredible, when you consider your brother had covid twice over the space of the last 12 months, including at the beginning of this year. and then to go on and win two olympic golds, as i say, in the space of 2a hours, it really is quite awesome to think that. it is
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unbelievable, _ quite awesome to think that. it is unbelievable, so _ quite awesome to think that. it is unbelievable, so incredible. he has done _ unbelievable, so incredible. he has done so _ unbelievable, so incredible. he has done so well, train so hard and deserved — done so well, train so hard and deserved every bit of it. jackie, have ou deserved every bit of it. jackie, have you spoken _ deserved every bit of it. jackie, have you spoken to _ deserved every bit of it. jackie, have you spoken to tom - deserved every bit of it. jackie, have you spoken to tom after. deserved every bit of it. jackie, i have you spoken to tom after the latest win? i have you spoken to tom after the latest win?— latest win? i haven't. i did speak to him yesterday, _ latest win? i haven't. i did speak to him yesterday, very _ latest win? i haven't. i did speak to him yesterday, very briefly. . latest win? i haven't. i did speak. to him yesterday, very briefly. but i suspect what he has been... what has happened now is that he has been taken into a huddle and he will do his doping, and they will be briefed, and he will do all of the international media. so i expect that i will speak to him later today. what he doesn't know is that we hosted another watch party last night, for the four by 200 freestyle relay. alfie was away in cornwall, teaching surfing, he saw the individual party and he raced back last night so he could be here for the relay party. i last night so he could be here for the relay party-— the relay party. i guess if there were olympic— the relay party. i guess if there were olympic medals - the relay party. i guess if there were olympic medals for - the relay party. i guess if there i were olympic medals for mums, the relay party. i guess if there - were olympic medals for mums, you would be getting one. i bet you have put in the hours, taking your boys
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to training, to competitions, up early in the morning. tell us about that. you are clearly, and his family, are clearly a huge part of tom's success. i family, are clearly a huge part of tom's success.— tom's success. i think even tom would say _ tom's success. i think even tom would say that. _ tom's success. i think even tom would say that. tom _ tom's success. i think even tom would say that. tom would - tom's success. i think even tom - would say that. tom would absolutely recognise the role that swimming with his brothers and sisters have had. he absolutely recognised the huge effort that goes into supporting an athlete at that level. as he was preparing for tokyo, he said, i would as he was preparing for tokyo, he said, iwould not as he was preparing for tokyo, he said, i would not be getting on this plane if it wasn't for you. so, he recognises that. if you are right, any parent of any athlete, especially swimming, it is such a slog, the early mornings before school, and then getting yourself ready for work, following them around the country and around the world, and competitions. it takes a chunk out of the family life, but look what it gives back. i mean, it is just look what it gives back. i mean, it isjust huge. i used to
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look what it gives back. i mean, it is just huge. i used to say to all of the kids, you get out what you put in. and here it is, made large. there with me when i bring injane, the ceo of swimming land. you must be absolutely loving listening to jackie. —— swim england. watching these victories in the aquatic centre. i i'm sure you had high hopes for all competitors, but have the results surpassed even your expectations? it’s the results surpassed even your exoectations?_ the results surpassed even your expectations? it's been brilliant, tremendous _ expectations? it's been brilliant, tremendous first _ expectations? it's been brilliant, tremendous first few _ expectations? it's been brilliant, tremendous first few days. - expectations? it's been brilliant, - tremendous first few days. listening to jackie, the partisan things, it certainly beats me sitting in bed watching it. iwish certainly beats me sitting in bed watching it. i wish i had been at those parties. fantastic. find watching it. i wish i had been at those parties. fantastic. and what sort of work. _ those parties. fantastic. and what sort of work, give _ those parties. fantastic. and what sort of work, give us _ those parties. fantastic. and what sort of work, give us a _ those parties. fantastic. and what sort of work, give us a sense - those parties. fantastic. and what sort of work, give us a sense of. those parties. fantastic. and what| sort of work, give us a sense of the work it has taken to put the team gb competitors in this position, to get them to this point, at a structural and infrastructure level? it is massive- _ and infrastructure level? it is massive. we _ and infrastructure level? it is massive. we have _ and infrastructure level? it 3 massive. we have performance centres
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across the country. and this truly was a british team. because it was one welsh, once got an two english, and another welshman helped to get them there in the heats. one team, winning well. the whole culture that we have put together, it is all the home countries, working with british swimming, to create the best possible environment we can for these athletes, and the ones that are coming through. and the ones in the future. we have got great performance centres, great coaches and great performance director, ceo, bringing this together, and the home countries all aligned on it. masses of work, but well worth it. assist) of work, but well worth it. also talk about _ of work, but well worth it. also talk about gb _ of work, but well worth it. also talk about gb becoming - of work, but well worth it. also talk about gb becoming a powerhouse in swimming. but looking at the next generations of talent, what is the pathway to get that talent into pools now, so that they can be winning medals at a future international conditions? it all starts right — international conditions? it all starts right back _ international conditions? it all starts right back at _ international conditions? it all starts right back at learning to swim, the best experience we can give any child. not only does it lead to this wonderful success, and
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all of the things that jackie has talked about, it also means it is a life skill, it saves lives and stops people drowning. learning to swim is the absolute foundation of this. a big shout out from me, we are a thousand teachers short in this country at the moment. if anybody wants to get into swimming teaching, and breed the next tom, go to the institute of swimming and find out how you can do that. that is the first step. after that come into the club pathway. we have over 1000 clubs in england, more across scotland and wales, where we have fantastic clubs that give friendship, community, great coaching, that bring swimmers like tom through into the talent pathway. and then we have talent pathways on all of our home countries which leads through to this pinnacle, where they going to perform in centres or stay at home, with a home coach if necessary, and then eventually get into the british team, and this great podium success. let me bring jackie and alfie back in. i am sure that tom, the performances that he has put in, the
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performances that he has put in, the performance of his team—mates in the relay, that is going to be a huge inspiration to so many swimmers, coming through the system. give us your thoughts on that and also what your thoughts on that and also what your plans are to welcome him back home whenever that might be, in a few weeks?— home whenever that might be, in a few weeks? �* . ., , , ., ., few weeks? actually, they are home in a few days. _ few weeks? actually, they are home in a few days, they _ few weeks? actually, they are home in a few days, they are _ few weeks? actually, they are home in a few days, they are not - few weeks? actually, they are home in a few days, they are not allowed i in a few days, they are not allowed to stay to watch the closing ceremony, they have to leave tokyo within three days of the last event, or to map your days of their last event. we should see him early next week. to your first point, event. we should see him early next week. to yourfirst point, i think absolutely 100%, events like this are an inspiration. we had 75 plus people in our garden for two nights in a row. a number of those were young swimmers from the arsenal club and their eyes were wide open. you could see what the journey could be. the number of people who say you have inspired my children, i swam
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with tom all saw him in the pool, thatis with tom all saw him in the pool, that is exactly what we need. we need role models that bring up the next generation with them. role models that produce funding, and so it goes on. i am thrilled, thrilled. jackie, it's been an absolute pleasure to talk to you, and to alfie. send our congratulations to tom. brilliant performances. thank you so much. and to jane nicklinson mbe, ceo of swim england. we will have much more on the pics the morning. senior cabinet ministers will today consider relaxing the covid rules for travellers arriving in england from the european union and the united states. they'll discuss whether people who've been fully vaccinated in those countries should avoid quarantine. there's been pressure for change from airlines and others in the tourism industry.
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with more on that, i'm joined by our chief political correspondent adam fleming from westminster. labour has described the proposal is reckless. what is the government saying about the thinking behind it? i'm told there is a broad coalition of ministers in favour of relaxing the restrictions on travellers into the restrictions on travellers into the uk from the us and the eu. we are at the moment only talking about travellers from the us and the eu who have been fully vaccinated. although i am told a decision might be fairly imminent in the next few days, fairly lightly, it might take a little bit longer to actually operationalise this and actually work through the logistics of how the uk will recognise vaccine certificates from other countries, and also the airlines that will have to check these documents, the departing airports will have to look at them, too. it might not be as soon as people are speculating. of course, than the rest of the world is a different matter.—
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is a different matter. adam, the prime minister _ is a different matter. adam, the prime minister has _ is a different matter. adam, the prime minister has been - is a different matter. adam, the prime minister has been doing i is a different matter. adam, the prime minister has been doing a radio interview this morning, and i know he has been talking about a number of areas, including the 16th of august, and whether self isolation will be eased for fully vaccinated people. what has he been saying on that? the vaccinated people. what has he been saying on that?— saying on that? the prime minister sa s the saying on that? the prime minister says the august — saying on that? the prime minister says the august the _ saying on that? the prime minister says the august the 16th _ saying on that? the prime minister says the august the 16th date - saying on that? the prime minister says the august the 16th date is . says the august the 16th date is fully nailed on in his words, and it is not subject to any kind of review. which is a little bit surprising, because if you have been listening to ministers over the last few days, they started to sound as if it was a little bit more conditional, and that may be the government would be looking at the state of the epidemic and the number of cases before deciding whether to push ahead with the august the 16th lifting of the self isolation rules. but the prime minister is full steam ahead with it. so it looks like that'll definitely be going ahead. what is interesting is exactly the and conditions of that scheme. because there are some reports in the newspapers today that, actually, it might be a lot less owners than you having to have a negative test
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if you are paying it as a contract. —— if you are pinged. you might only have to get a test if you have symptoms. we will have to wait to get the details of that, because the government matter has not unveiled the precise way that will operate. we do know the date, in the prime minister's words, is nailed on. adam, thank you very much. i have been asking you about what you think about the idea of people being allowed to travel into england from the eu and usa. bob farley says the usa still has raging infection rates and we should not let our guard down and cancel quarantine for the sake of tourism. riley taylor says it is a good idea to let the fullyjabbed says it is a good idea to let the fully jabbed from says it is a good idea to let the fullyjabbed from the eu and us travel to britain, but asks if it will undo the progress that has been made in the past seven days. referring to her to the falling number of cases noted over the last seven days. now tk says vaccinated
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people can still carry transmit covid, and fuel new variants, quarantine should still be mandated. if you would like to let me know your thoughts on that point, if you think it is a good idea to allow people from the eu and the us into england, do get in touch with me on twitter. you can use the hashtag, and i will try to read out some more of your comments. in australia, it's been announced that the strictest covid measures will remain in place in sydney and the surrounding area for another four weeks. they were first imposed a month ago. our correspondent shaimaa khalil joins me now from sydney. good morning to you. so, tell us more under the plan for the extended quarantine and what the data is behind that.— quarantine and what the data is behind that. ~ ., , , . behind that. well, it was expected that this was _ behind that. well, it was expected that this was going _ behind that. well, it was expected that this was going to _ behind that. well, it was expected that this was going to happen, - behind that. well, it was expected that this was going to happen, butj that this was going to happen, but it doesn't make it less frustrating
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for millions in sydney and the surrounding areas. this is a lock that started at the end ofjune. it was supposed to last two weeks and it was extended to five weeks. now we know it is going to extend to four more until the end of august. this is because the pattern of the case numbers just keeps going this is because the pattern of the case numbersjust keeps going up. it is persistently high. new south wales recorded its highest number since the outbreak, 177 locally acquired cases, 46 of those were infectious while active in the community. all in all, sydney has recorded its worst outbreak this year, with more than 2500 cases. compared to any other country in the world, the cases are low, but look at it from an australian perspective. this is a country that isolated itself from the rest of the world by closing its borders. it has very, very strict hotel quarantine rules and it has, for the most part, really control the spread of covid as recently as may. life looks like
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it had come back to near normalfor most of the country. itjust shows you how transmissible and challenging the delta variant is. but for victoria and south australia, two states that have gone in and out of lockdown successfully, because they went in early and hard, the criticism for new south wales in sydney in particular, where i am, is that the authorities did not nail is early enough. and when the rules came in, they did not come fast enough. so, a lot more uncertainty here, because, yes, it is going to last until august, but experts say the way that things are going, if cases don't slow down, it could go on until september.— cases don't slow down, it could go on until september. thank you very much. dozens of former senior military commanders, including four former chiefs of the defence staff, have written to borisjohnson, calling on the government to allow more afghan interpreters to settle in the uk. they say too many of those who worked with british forces have had their applications rejected and that if any are murdered by the taliban "the dishonour would lie squarely at our nation's feet".
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the ministry of defence says it's already helped more than 2000 afghan staff to come to the uk. this translator, whose identity we're not disclosing, has been turned down for relocation four times and fears retribution from the taliban. the taliban do not care for dismiss, for termination, they don't care anything. theyjust know who worked with the british and who not. anybody who worked with the british, they will kill them, sir. now i am worried about my family and myself in future about what will happen when the nato leave afghanistan. i know i will see my wife and daughter get shot, and myself too. the government has set out what it calls "transformative plans" to improve the lives of disabled people. the national disability strategy has cross department involvement and aims to tackle issues such as a lack of accessible housing, access to education and the disability employment gap. but disability campaigners have criticised the plans
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for not going far enough. nikki fox reports. for disabled children like florence, getting the right support and funding from government and local authority is crucial, especially when it comes to specialist education. this family had to spend £15,000 fighting to get the right school for their daughter. it felt so unfair. it felt so inappropriate to have to fight for something that should be a provision for all kids with special educational needs. 11—year—old florence is autistic, epileptic and has global development delay. we looked at what would be best for florence and we came to the conclusion that a school with a specialist provision would be better suited for her. the family weren't happy with the council's first choice of school because they didn't believe it catered for people with more complex needs, like their daughter. so we decided to take the council
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to tribunal to argue our case, and we had to fund all of our own reports. that is a hugely expensive process. there are hundreds of families that are locked in battles with councils because it seems the first port of call for a council is to say no and make parents fight for it. as part of the strategy, the government admitted that special educational needs are failing some disabled children, and it is spending £300 million to improve it. there are plans across all departments, like housing. there is a commitment to increase the number of accessible homes. employment is mentioned. disabled people are far less likely to have a job, so the government is consulting on ways to make companies more transparent when it comes to declaring how many disabled people they employee. access to health care, learning disabilities and autism training will be offered to all staff. there are plans for more consultations and audits, including one around public transport.
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campaigners are frustrated by the promise of more reports and less action. i'm very disappointed. this is a missed opportunity. the prime minister promised it would be the most ambitious and transformative disability plan in a generation. unfortunately, i think an awful lot of disabled people, 14 million of them, are going to see it as a broken promise. the government says their plan will be updated every year and their progress will be scrutinised. florence's family were eventually successful in their battle, and she is now at a school which will enable her to be the best she can be. any plan to improve the lives of disabled people will of course be welcomed. but charities believe the strategy falls short, as it doesn't deliver immediate drastic action so millions of people can finally start to see an end to being disabled by the many barriers in society. nikki fox, bbc news.
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let's speak now to becca torrichelli who lives with type two spinal muscular atrophy, a genetic condition that causes muscle weakness and movement problems. great to have you with us today. i know you are diagnosed as a baby. you have used a wheelchair since a young age. and you graduated from university last year, you are now working as a marketing executive. tell us a bit about how this condition has affected your life. so, it is a neuromuscular condition, it basically affects all of my muscles. so, from picking up a drink to getting into bed, i need support with everything i do, basically. i have 24—7 carers, and because the lungs are a muscle, it means i can get very ill and might respiratory system is really weak. in
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get very ill and might respiratory system is really weak.— system is really weak. in fact, i know i system is really weak. in fact, i know i have _ system is really weak. in fact, i know i have spoken _ system is really weak. in fact, i know i have spoken to - system is really weak. in fact, i know i have spoken to you - system is really weak. in fact, i l know i have spoken to you before about the challenges of having your condition and covid, so what support, you talked about needing care 24—7, what support have you had in terms of accessing education, finding ajob, the in terms of accessing education, finding a job, the sorts of things that this government strategy, the national disability strategy, is talking about? ides national disability strategy, is talking about?— national disability strategy, is talking about? as a child, it was very much _ talking about? as a child, it was very much my — talking about? as a child, it was very much my family _ talking about? as a child, it was very much my family had - talking about? as a child, it was very much my family had to - talking about? as a child, it was| very much my family had to push talking about? as a child, it was - very much my family had to push for what we needed. when i went to high school, i was automatically told to go to a special needs school. but we didn't feel that was the best thing for me. so, we had to do quite a lot of campaigning with the council to allow me to go to a mainstream school. in the end, we were successful, but it was a fight. similar to getting a job after university, i had to look for myself, which i expected, but when i was looking for work experience, 80%
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of the companies i phoned said that either the workplace was not wheelchair accessible, or they could not allow me to work there because of health and safety. fire hazard reasons. so, my possibilities were limited, really. it reasons. so, my possibilities were limited, really.— limited, really. it has been a fight all the way. _ limited, really. it has been a fight all the way, how— limited, really. it has been a fight all the way, how disheartening . limited, really. it has been a fight all the way, how disheartening to | all the way, how disheartening to graduate, look for a job and be told by 80% of the companies that you approached that you couldn't work there because of health and safety reasons. i mean, what do you know about the national disability strategy? it says it is going to be transformative, and it is about people with disabilities being able to access housing, transport, education and employment. how much have you heard about this until today? until yesterday i had heard absolutely nothing. until yesterday i had heard absolutel nothini. ., ., absolutely nothing. really? nothing? no, absolutely nothing. really? nothing? no. consider — absolutely nothing. really? nothing? no. consider i — absolutely nothing. really? nothing? no, consider i am _ absolutely nothing. really? nothing? no, considerl am part— absolutely nothing. really? nothing? no, considerl am part of— absolutely nothing. really? nothing? no, consider i am part of a _ absolutely nothing. really? nothing? no, consider i am part of a lot - absolutely nothing. really? nothing? no, consider i am part of a lot of - no, consider i am part of a lot of facebook groups for people with disabilities, i had heard nothing about it. i wasn't aware there was a
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survey we could participate in, so i was surprised to be honest. i have looked at the proposals and things, and obviously it's a step in the right direction but i think a lot of things are missed off, the proposal, things are missed off, the proposal, things that haven't been considered. and what are those things? 50 i and what are those things? so i think things _ and what are those things? so i think things like _ and what are those things? sr i think things like wheelchair service, so for example when you turn 25, there are no charities that will help you find a wheelchair, and for people that have, the nhs don't provided a cat wheelchair service, i have to fund my own wheelchair, which is normally round 20—25,000. and the government provide no support in that. similar to adult service, when you leave children's services and move over, most of the support kind of drops off, out of the blue and you are left to get on and if you need help you have to
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find that doctor, and do your own research and things, things like that. 50 research and things, things like that. , ., , , that. so is there any opportunity for ou that. so is there any opportunity for you to. _ that. so is there any opportunity for you to. you _ that. so is there any opportunity for you to, you know, _ that. so is there any opportunity for you to, you know, feed - that. so is there any opportunity for you to, you know, feed thatl that. so is there any opportunity - for you to, you know, feed that back into what the government is talking about, in this strategy? 50 it into what the government is talking about, in this strategy?— about, in this strategy? so it says the are about, in this strategy? so it says they are going _ about, in this strategy? so it says they are going to _ about, in this strategy? so it says they are going to do _ about, in this strategy? so it says they are going to do ongoing - about, in this strategy? so it says i they are going to do ongoing reviews i would like to be part of those. i am not sure how that works, it will be interesting to see who does get contacted or who does receive the opportunity. contacted or who does receive the opportunity-— contacted or who does receive the opportunity. well, beck eca, thank ou for opportunity. well, beck eca, thank you for talking _ opportunity. well, beck eca, thank you for talking to _ opportunity. well, beck eca, thank you for talking to us, _ opportunity. well, beck eca, thank you for talking to us, give - opportunity. well, beck eca, thank you for talking to us, give us - opportunity. well, beck eca, thank you for talking to us, give us yourl you for talking to us, give us your opinion on theal disability strategy. opinion on theal disability strategy. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello there. there'll still be some sunshine around through the rest of the day, but a growing risk of some heavy downpours as well. and we still have this more persistent and heavy rain affecting this part of scotland, where we have this amber rain warning from the met office. flooding travel disruption likely by the end of the day, maybe some thunderstorms with that rain too.
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some rain elsewhere across scotland, and we are seeing the showers coming in from the west, heading their way eastwards across the rest of the uk. could be heavy and thundery, some sunshine in between, but a blustery wind as well, which is blowing the showers across, making it feel a bit cooler today, temperatures lower than yesterday, around 18—20 degrees. downpours into this evening but gradually the showers ease away from england and wales. skies will clear. more cloud for scotland, northern ireland, and a bit of patchy rain running southwards. it does become a lot drier in northern scotland, and temperatures will be in double figures. not as much rain round on thursday, sunshine for a while for england and wales, that cloud will work its way southwards, a bit of patchy rain in that, some rain in the south—west later on and top temperatures 21 celsius. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines.
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team gb has won its fifth gold medal at the olympic games in tokyo, with victory in the pool in the men's 4 x 200 metres freestyle relay. gymnastics superstar simone biles withdraws from another olympic event as she says she needs to focus on her mental health. the prime minister says august the 16th is "nailed on" as the date for easing self isolation restrictions. a third of middle—aged british adults have multiple chronic health problems, according to a long—running study. we will have mosh on this very soon. —— more. sport centre, here's chetan. good morning. we start with more gold medal success for great britain's men in the olympic pool, this time in the final of the 4x 200 metre freestyle relay. tom dean is now a double
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olympic champion, a day after he won his first gold. he and duncan scott, james guy and matthew richards came within 0.03 seconds of the world record as they won in emphatic style, finishing over three seconds clear of the russian olympic committee. it's team gb�*s fifth gold medal of the games. three have come in swimming — and that's not happened for 113 years. you can see what it meant to them there. the way the last year has been, and you know, as a kid, dreaming of olympic gold medals was my dream, to do it after 25 years it is pretty emotional, you know, these four lads here, we have the best freestyle in the world. it is amazing, how things progress, racing, michael phelps, and now we are the olympic champions and now we are the olympic champions and that is a dream come true. so another night to remember for great britain's men in the pool — and there's been success in the rowing as well.
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the team have won their first men's quadruple sculls medal after winning silver. harry leask, angus groom, tom barras and jack beaumont held off a late charge from australia and poland to secure second place behind the netherlands. good news too for helen glover in her attempt for a third olympic medal. she, and partner polly swann, finished second in their coxless pair semi final — to qualify for the final tomorrow morning. and there will be no third gold medalfor andy murray at the olympics — he and joe salisbury are out of the men's doubles after losing their quarterfinals match against croatia. they won the first set fairly confortably, taking it 6—4. but lost the second — and then lost the third set tie break 10—7 against marin cilic and ivan dodig. one british player left — that's liam broady and he's on court right now in the men's singles. he has gone out in the third round. there was disappointment too in the diving for britain's jack laugher and daniel goodfellow.
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they could only finish seventh in the final this morning — with china taking gold. it means laugher�*s reign as olympic champion is over — after he won gold in this event in rio alongside chris mears. american gymnast and four—time olympic gold medallist simone biles has withdrawn from thursday's individual all—around final in tokyo to focus on her mental health. she withdrew from the team final yesterday — during the competition — but remained at the side of her team—mates as they went on to win silver. usa gymnastics has said in statement... "after further medical evaluation, simone biles has withdrawn from the final individual all—around competition to focus on her mental health." they go on to say "she will continue to be evaluated daily to determine whether or not to participate in next week's individual event finals." here she was speaking yesterday. it has been really stressful this olympic games i think, as a whole,
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not having an audience, there are a lot of different variables it has been a long week, a long process, a long year, so, just a lot of different variables and i think we arejust a different variables and i think we are just a little different variables and i think we arejust a little bit different variables and i think we are just a little bit too stressed out, but we should be out here having fun and sometimes that is not the case. having fun and sometimes that is not the case. there's more reaction and analysis to that on the bbc sport website where you can follow the latest action. geraint thomas finished 12th in the men's time trial. charlotte dujardin goes for her third successive individual dressage olympic title. that is under way at the moment. i will be back with more later. i will be back with more later. sussex police have released a shocking video showing the moment a lorry driver crashed into another vehicle whilst using a mobile phone. 59—year—old derek holland has been jailed for more than three years after the crash last year that left three people badly injured. an onboard camera shows that over a period of four hours he repeatedly reached for his mobile phone and even steered with his elbows.
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this report by matt graveling opens with footage you may find upsetting. the worst case of prolonged distracted driving they had ever seen. the damning words of sussex police, after derek holland drove his lorry straight into the back of this security van. the crash in august left three people seriously hurt. one suffered a brain injury, two more have been unable to work since. but this devastation could have occurred at a number of points in holland's four hour drive, his onboard camera revealing 41 other incidents of poor driving. most of those incidents have been with him utilising his mobile phone that was on a cradle on the windscreen. that was his personal phone, it was nothing to do with work. there was also occasions where he has put the seat belt on when he has seen a police vehicle, where he has used his elbow
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to guide the steering wheel as he was eating a piece of fruit and really the footage is quite shocking. the aa want more police in cars and greater education in a bid to make texting and driving as socially unacceptable as drink—driving, with the consequences being just as deadly. in 2016, thomas croker crashed his lorry, while changing the music on his phone. he killed a mother and three young children. i think it is far too common, and unfortunately at road peace every day, we are supporting people who have either been bereaved or suffered life—changing injuries off the back of dangerous or reckless driving. i think people don't realise, you know, looking at your phone, you are just as distracted, whether it is hands—free or hand—held, you arejust as distracted as being over the drink—drive limit. the consequences as has been seen are devastating. the impact of driving while you're distracted, including the use of a mobile phone is dangerous and also against the law. derek holland has ben sentenced
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to three—and—a—half years in prison and disqualified for driving for 57 months. matt graveling, bbc news. a long—running study suggests a third of middle—aged british adults have multiple chronic health problems. issues include chronic back problems, mental ill—health, high blood pressure, diabetes, asthma and high—risk drinking. the study was published in the journal bmc public health. professor george ploubidis is from university college london's centre for longitudinal studies. he contributed to the study. hejoins me now. professor, thank you for your time joining us on bbc new us. so, just to give our viewers an idea of the scope of this study, it is looking at a cohort of adults born in 1970s is that right?— in 1970s is that right? correct. good morning, _ in 1970s is that right? correct. good morning, thank - in 1970s is that right? correct. good morning, thank you - in 1970s is that right? correct. good morning, thank you for i in 1970s is that right? correct. - good morning, thank you for having me, that study based on the
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well—known british 1970 birth cohort. it's a study following the lives of ability 17,000 individuals born in 1970. this data comes from the survey and when the cohort was aged 46—48. the finding is about a third of our participants, a representative sample of the population, sufferfrom one or two or two or more long—term conditions, we can... or two or more long-term conditions, we can... ., , or two or more long-term conditions, wecan... ., ., ., we can... professor, we have an issue with _ we can... professor, we have an issue with the _ we can... professor, we have an issue with the connection - we can... professor, we have an issue with the connection to - we can... professor, we have an issue with the connection to the | issue with the connection to the professor unfortunately. what a shame. we will see if we can come back, because that is a really interesting study. let us move on to the next story though. and this is about covax.
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today, the uk will send out a batch of around nine million doses of the coronavirus vaccine — part of 100 million doses promised so far. five million doses will be offered to covax — a worldwide initiative to provide countries with equal access to the vaccine — and another four million will be shared directly with countries in need. romilly greenhill is the uk director of the one campaign — a global movement looking into extreme poverty and preventable disease. thank you very much for your time today. so, assess for us the timing of this donation by the uk, and the size of the donation and what sort of impact that might make. it is really positive _ of impact that might make. it is really positive to _ of impact that might make. it 3 really positive to see doses finally starting to be shared with low income countries but from our perspective this is too little and too late. we are on the brink of a third wave, in africa, we are
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looking at a complete humanitarian catastrophe across the continent, so we need to be seeing much more ambitious levels of dose sharing from this country and from across the g7 to be honest.— the g7 to be honest. because the initial goal— the g7 to be honest. because the initial goal of _ the g7 to be honest. because the initial goal of covax _ the g7 to be honest. because the initial goal of covax was - the g7 to be honest. because the initial goal of covax was to, - the g7 to be honest. because the initial goal of covax was to, or i the g7 to be honest. because the initial goal of covax was to, or is | initial goal of covax was to, or is to provide two billion doses of vaccines to those 92 countries in 2021, so, overall, how is that target looking, half way, roughly, through this year?— through this year? well, we are seeini through this year? well, we are seeing far. _ through this year? well, we are seeing far, far _ through this year? well, we are seeing far, far too _ through this year? well, we are seeing far, far too slow - through this year? well, we are| seeing far, far too slow progress through this year? well, we are - seeing far, far too slow progress on the vaccine roll out. if you look at africa, only1.1i the vaccine roll out. if you look at africa, only 1.4 % of the population there is fully vaccinated. and that is having absolutely catastrophic effects, in countries like south africa, namibia, they don't have enough oxygen, these are relatively rich countries as cross africa, if you are thinking about a country like south sudan, they have run out of vaccines entirely, so in this country, we know the difference that vaccines are making, it is saving
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thousands of livings for and we really need to see those vaccines rolling out in africa much more quickly to save lives there too. and, something that the one campaign would like to see is more predictability i understand, in the delivery of vaccines through the covax campaign, how much difference would that make for those countries to be able to plan a programme of getting these vaccinations into people's arms?— getting these vaccinations into --eole's arms? ~ ., ., ,, ., people's arms? well it would make a hue people's arms? well it would make a huge difference. _ people's arms? well it would make a huge difference, just _ people's arms? well it would make a huge difference, just like _ people's arms? well it would make a huge difference, just like here, - people's arms? well it would make a huge difference, just like here, we i huge difference, just like here, we have had a well planned vaccine roll out, you can book the appointment, it is clear and well done here, if... what type of vaccines they are going to be, it makes it very difficult for them to plan, so, we do need, we need a clear plan, what one is calling for, is by the end of next year, we need to get to global herd immunity, we need... round the world vaccinating so we need a clear plan now, commitments on dose sharing and we need money attached
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to that plan, to make sure that countries can really successfully roll out vaccinations.— countries can really successfully roll out vaccinations. global herd immunity by _ roll out vaccinations. global herd immunity by the _ roll out vaccinations. global herd immunity by the ex-of_ roll out vaccinations. global herd immunity by the ex-of next - roll out vaccinations. global herd | immunity by the ex-of next year, immunity by the ex—of next year, thatis immunity by the ex—of next year, that is a huge and vital ambition, is it achievable on the basis of what you have seen so far? indie. is it achievable on the basis of what you have seen so far? we, we need to radically _ what you have seen so far? we, we need to radically scale _ what you have seen so far? we, we need to radically scale up _ what you have seen so far? we, we need to radically scale up the - what you have seen so far? we, we need to radically scale up the level| need to radically scale up the level of ambition, but let us not forget, if we can't end this pandemic everywhere we are not going to end it anywhere so rolling out vaccinations it is the right thing to do four humanitarian reasons, it is the right thing do save lives but it is also the smart thing to do, for us here in the uk, because if we don't do that there is a risk there will be new variant, the global economy won't get back on track, so, it is a very ambitious commitment and target, but we need toe do it for the sake of people in this country, as well as for people round the world. 0k, the world. ok, thank you very much.
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thank you. professor george ploubidis is from uinversity college london's centre for longitudinal studies. he contributed to the study. hejoins me now. professor, sec time lucky i hope in talking to you, hopefully the line will be clear, you were describing for us, weren't you, this is a study that looks at a group of adults born in the 1970s, and growing up, many of them with these multiple long—term health problems, so, does the study show whether the links between childhood and adolescent health and midlife health are based on the economic circumstances, in which somebody grows up? yes. on the economic circumstances, in which somebody grows up? yes, thank ou for which somebody grows up? yes, thank you for having — which somebody grows up? yes, thank you for having me. _ which somebody grows up? yes, thank you for having me, hopefully _ which somebody grows up? yes, thank you for having me, hopefully you - which somebody grows up? yes, thank you for having me, hopefully you can l you for having me, hopefully you can hear me now, yes, this is one of our findings, that early life,
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disadvantage is associated with it, with long—term conditions, in midlife, i also think there are, think there are two major findings, one that the prevalence of two or more chronic conditions is 34%, which is a lot, if you concede the implications this might have for the quality of life and... i implications this might have for the quality of life and. . ._ quality of life and... i understand our quality of life and... i understand your study _ quality of life and... i understand your study is _ quality of life and... i understand your study is observational, - your study is observational, researches don't control what they are exposed to, you simply observer what happens to different groups of people without interventions, but what does that say to you about public health campaigns since the �*705 public health campaigns since the �*70s and there have been many of them, haven't there, focussing on things like stopping smoking on obesity, how to tackle that, what does it say, does it say they are having any impact on public health? i don't, well i don't think our study can answer this question, you are right it is observational, but,
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to look into this phenomenon, we need long—term longitudinal observation studies like this in the uk, i cannot answer the question whether those were successful. i think for smoking if you look at the reduction in smoking it was, but i think what the studies are showing is that there may be an issue, especially in the future, taken into account the population ageing, the labour market, if you caner the number of people living with many long—term conditions, that doesn't necessarily mean that intervention are not successful. on the contrary, some were quite successful but it means we might need more. professor, thank you very much for your time explaining the findings of your time explaining the findings of your study, your time explaining the findings of yourstudy, professor your time explaining the findings of your study, professor from your time explaining the findings of your study, professorfrom ucl. we have been talking about the olympics, but it is not the only big
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sporting event we are talking about. the only big sporting event we are talking about. today marks a year to the start of the birmingham 2022 commonwealth games, with special events taking place across the city to start the countdown. the games will include the largest sports programme in their history, 4,500 athletes from 72 nations and territories competing in 19 sports across 14 venues. sport won't be the only attraction — a six—month cultural festival will also take place at venues across the west midlands, in the months leading up to, and during, the games. with me now is matt kidson, who is the birmingham 2022 director of sport. matt, brilliant to have you with us today, a big milestone on the journey to the game, how is your to—do list looking? journey to the game, how is your to-do list looking?— journey to the game, how is your to-do list looking? good morning, eah, we to-do list looking? good morning, yeah. we are _ to-do list looking? good morning, yeah. we are on — to-do list looking? good morning, yeah, we are on track, _ to-do list looking? good morning, yeah, we are on track, we - to-do list looking? good morning, yeah, we are on track, we are - to-do list looking? good morning, i yeah, we are on track, we are really pleased where we are, we are so delighted that we have a year to go now, very excited the olympic games is clearly getting excited about sport, we can't wait to get people
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into birmingham and the west midlands to watch some amazing sport. midlands to watch some amazing sort. ., , ., . sport. you will be watching the ol mics sport. you will be watching the olympics closely, _ sport. you will be watching the olympics closely, what - sport. you will be watching the olympics closely, what are - sport. you will be watching the olympics closely, what are you learning on an organisational level and how are you preparing for a number of scenarios round the pandemic?— number of scenarios round the andemic? , , , . , ., pandemic? yes, the olympics and paralympics _ pandemic? yes, the olympics and paralympics are — pandemic? yes, the olympics and paralympics are key _ pandemic? yes, the olympics and paralympics are key learnings - pandemic? yes, the olympics and paralympics are key learnings forl pandemic? yes, the olympics and i paralympics are key [earnings for us paralympics are key learnings for us and there are a number of events we will look closely at with the rugby league cup cup, and we are see tow the international federations and the international federations and the governing bodies deal with the pandemic we have at the moment. i think the real benefit for us is that we are obviously next year, so time is on our side. we feel we are on track, we feel we will have good capacity and athletes will be be in a safe environment. you capacity and athletes will be be in a safe environment.— capacity and athletes will be be in a safe environment. you are hoping for full capacity _ a safe environment. you are hoping for full capacity audiences - a safe environment. you are hoping for full capacity audiences and - a safe environment. you are hoping for full capacity audiences and to i for full capacity audiences and to accommodation date that which would be amazing for people to be able to come to watch but for the athletes
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to have that, you know, interaction from the audience in the stadiums, and so forth. from the audience in the stadiums, and so forth-— and so forth. absolutely, you look at what they _ and so forth. absolutely, you look at what they did _ and so forth. absolutely, you look at what they did in _ and so forth. absolutely, you look at what they did in tokyo - and so forth. absolutely, you look at what they did in tokyo and - and so forth. absolutely, you look at what they did in tokyo and to i at what they did in tokyo and to organise the olympics in this environment is an incredible achievement but the one thing missing is spectators and atmosphere, if you ask athletes they thrive on the atmosphere, the noise created and for our home athletes with the home crowd supporting them they will perform better we can't wait for that. ides they will perform better we can't wait for that.— wait for that. as we mentioned, there is going — wait for that. as we mentioned, there is going to _ wait for that. as we mentioned, there is going to be _ wait for that. as we mentioned, there is going to be a _ wait for that. as we mentioned, there is going to be a sixth - wait for that. as we mentioned, i there is going to be a sixth month curl festival round the games as well. you are looking for lots of volunteers for the games, tell us more about that? ._ volunteers for the games, tell us more about that? . yes, absolutely, we are looking _ more about that? . yes, absolutely, we are looking for _ more about that? . yes, absolutely, we are looking for over— more about that? . yes, absolutely, we are looking for over 13,000 - we are looking for over 13,000 volunteer, one of the biggest successes of london 2012 was the volunteer programme, the number of people who did that enjoyed it and went on to volunteer for future event, human legacy is important. we want to showcase the west midlands,
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so warm and friendly o so those opportunities are available, the applications are still open, so people can apply to be volunteers and there are really exciting roles. thank you for talking to us, good luck with the year ahead, the countdown begins one year to go, to birmingham 2022, thank you very much. police officers and staff from across the country who have died while protecting the public will be commemorated in a permanent memorial to be unveiled at the national memorial arboretum later. the memorial cost £4.5 million, which took seven years to raise. phil mackie reports. in a place of national remembrance, a new monument stands in a commanding position. it's meant to look like a giant door, which is slightly ajar, and represents the threshold across which police officers step every day
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into potential danger. its many tiny apertures. signify courage and sacrifice. it's also a place for quiet reflection. itearup. after all this time. it still affects me. among those who will take part in this afternoon's ceremony is gillian wombwell, who was widowed after 21 when her husband david, two colleagues, were shot dead in london in 1966. newsreel: for here, _ with a congregation of police and relatives, was held a funeral. service for three men who were shot dead, callously murdered, barely a mile from here. - in the coffin was - the body of detective constable david wombwell. he had a boy of three, a girl aged one. - every night, just before i go to sleep, i talk to him. i talk to him about the children. i talk to him about what i've been doing. yes, he is, he is
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constantly with me. and i'm so sorry that he can't hold his children and tell them how proud he would be of them. and his grandchildren. it's a tragedy for our family that will always be a tragedy. it's something to be proud of. something to bring people to and say, look, this is in the memory of my relative. and they were honoured, they were recognised. it took seven years to raise the money to pay for the memorial. a lot of that was raised by police officers and police forces themselves. it supposed to represent a portal, beyond which is the threshold of the danger that officers regularly put themselves and it's a place where colleagues can come and remember those that have lost their lives.
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i think its great strength is its simplicity. it recognises the danger of space through which police officers go every day of their working lives to protect fellow citizens. and it also, of course, recognises that, sadly, on occasions, those offices don't come out of a dangerous space. they give their lives protecting fellow citizens. that is exactly what this memorial was intended to do. the touching part of it is this threshold, unlike the threshold that so many pass through and never return, leads to a garden and a glade, and a place of peace, rather than the danger where they lost their lives. they have been putting the finishing touches to the memorial and getting ready for the dedication ceremony later today. it will be attended by all members of the police family, including parents, spouses and children of those who lost their lives. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. it look like the weather
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should be turning drier by the end of the week but before then, today we have got this continued risk of heavy, perhaps thundery downpour, combined with a stronger wind today too. it will push the showers across, there will be sunshine in between the showers as we saw earlier on today in devon. but we low pressure in charge of the weather, it is not moving very far, very fast. it is round that we are seeing heavier bursts of rain. the winds are lighter in scotland and the rain is going to get stuck across northern scotland and here with have an amber rain warning, this area could see as much as 90 millimetres by the end of the day. the rain cob notjust heavy but thundery as well, wet weather continues across a good part of scotland, the showers we are seeing coming in from the west continue to work their way east wards, that could be heavy and thundery, away from the showers we will find some sunshine coming through now and again. but it is across southern parts of the uk we have the strongest of the winds, could be
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gusting round 40mph, round some southern coasts of england and because there is a stronger breeze it will a feel cooler today and temperatures are going to be lower than yesterday, so round 18—20 degrees this afternoon. still got heavy downpours into the evening, the showers that we see across england and wales fade away overnight, skies will clear in many place, more cloud for scotland and northern ireland, patchy rain moving southwards. it will turn drier in northern scotland and we will find temperatures remaining in double figures a wes head into thursday morning. this is the big picture though on thursday, still low pressure close by, that one is moving away, so it is taking away the heaviest of the rain, another one approaches the far south—west later in the day. so there probably won't be as much rain round on thursday, some sunshine in england and wales, before we see more of this cloud moving southwards, bringing in patchy rain but a drier day for scotland, later in the day we will get cloud and rain in the south—west, probably the sunnier skies, more in the midlands, towards
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the south—east and temperatures could be 21 or 22. still a breezy day i think during thursday. friday, we still have the threat of a few showers round, as we head into the weekend it is drier, some sunshine at times but not that warm with the winds likely to be coming down from the north.
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this is bbc news with lucy hockings in tokyo and annita mcveigh in london. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. more olympic gold for team gb in the 200 metre freestyle relay. gymnastics superstar simone biles withdraws from another olympic event as she says she needs to focus on her mental health. we'll be bringing you the latest live in tokyo and with all the sporting action and medal wins. i'm annita mcveigh in london. the other headlines... the prime minister says august the 16th is "nailed on" as the date for easing self isolation restrictions in england. plans for double—jabbed us and eu travellers to be allowed into england without quarantining are considered by ministers.

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