Skip to main content

tv   BBC World News  BBC News  July 28, 2021 5:00am-5:31am BST

5:00 am
this is bbc news. i'm ben boulos with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. day five at the 2020 olympic games in tokyo sees more success for australia. at the aquatics centre, ariarne titmus wins her second gold medal, in the women's 200 metres swimming freestyle. and i'm sarah mulkerrins in tokyo. there mulkerrins in tokyo. has also been successful there has also been successful in australia in the rowing, and another gold medal in the pool for the hosts, japan. us health officials change course on face coverings, advising people to wear masks indoors again — even if they're been vaccinated. a country in crisis. a year after the deadly beirut blast scarred lebanon, we have a special report.
5:01 am
and wildfires threaten parts of greece, as strong winds fan the flames through the countryside north of athens. hello, and welcome to the programme. on to the olympics now, and day five action is well underway in tokyo with medals events in the pool and on the water. we can go live now to our sports presenter, sarah mulkerrins, who's in tokyo, and sarah, ariarne titmus picking up a second gold medal and an olympic record? absolutely, it has been a brilliant 0lympic absolutely, it has been a brilliant olympic games so far for the australian. nicole call
5:02 am
her the terminator, such as her dominance and ferocity in the pool dominance and ferocity in the pool. a couple of days ago she won gold in the 400 metres freestyle in that epic dual that she had been with the american star katie ledecky, and today it was even more of a dominant win for her. she had a slow start but came through to finish and a stunning time, a really interesting race that katie ledecky had actually finished fifth, that is the first time in 36 international competitions that she has not won a medal in the final. so double gold for ariarne titmus, but for katie ledecky, she was unable to go on and move into the 1500 metres freestyle. that final was a little bit later. —— was then able. she had a very dominant performance in that, she was able to win her six 0lympic that, she was able to win her six olympic gold medal and art, and the tears flowed for katie ledecky after that win. there was also a second gold for
5:03 am
hashi ofjapan, a brilliant result in the 200 metres individual medley and a storm of a performance for gigabits�*s men in the relay they were in, the 200 metres freestyle. —— great britain's men. tom, dean and duncan scott were part of the quartet yesterday to take a silver, and they stormed to victory in that, about three seconds clear of the russians and australians, who finished in silver and bronze medal. james guy was also in that, he has been around on the scene for ages and hejust has been around on the scene for ages and he just broke down in tears, he was so emotional he was finally able to get an olympic gold. and we also had matthew richards, just a young 18—year—old, i'm not quite sure he knew what to make of his 0lympic debut, winning gold. it was interesting in that, the americans didn't win a medal at all. tailored dress of is their star swimmer, all. tailored dress of is their starswimmer, he is all. tailored dress of is their star swimmer, he is there 100 metre freestyle heat participant, but didn't feature
5:04 am
in this relay, that has been the big talking point in the us media him not being there and what it meant for their hopes for the final. —— caleb dressel. for the final. -- caleb dressel.— for the final. -- caleb dressel. ., ., dressel. you mentioned the british success, _ dressel. you mentioned the british success, there - dressel. you mentioned the british success, there has . dressel. you mentioned the i british success, there has been plenty of aussie success as well? ~ , ,., , plenty of aussie success as well? ~ ,,., , ., plenty of aussie success as well? ~ , , ., ., plenty of aussie success as well? ~ , ., ., well? absolutely, a great day for them. _ well? absolutely, a great day for them, ariarne _ well? absolutely, a great day for them, ariarne titmus - well? absolutely, a great day for them, ariarne titmus in i well? absolutely, a great day i for them, ariarne titmus in the pool for them, ariarne titmus in the pool, but they've done so well in the rowing. remember, these results were rescheduled because of the tropical storm and typhoon that was approaching forjapan, so we had ourfirst medals approaching forjapan, so we had our first medals awarded approaching forjapan, so we had ourfirst medals awarded in the rowing today, and for australia it was double success, in the women's under the men's fours. an interesting matchup between the australians and the dutch in the women's race, that was nip and tuck all the way along. it was the australians who are just about on the line, the dutch second and ireland winning the bronze medal in the stock but in the men's fours, this was really something spectacular when you consider that great britain have won gold in this event since 2000, they are so dominant in this event, they
5:05 am
were going for gold again, in second place, with 500 metres to go, but then the boat, they stared into the wrong lane and threw themselves off course. the aussies were able to keep going and keep their heads together and they crossed the line to win gold from data, they couldn't quite believe it. great success in tokyo for the australians in the rowing. sarah, looking ahead, what should we be watching out for in the proceedings today? 50. in the proceedings today? so, there is going _ in the proceedings today? srr, there is going to in the proceedings today? s57, there is going to be in the proceedings today? s513, there is going to be a in the proceedings today? sr3, there is going to be a bit of cycling getting under way. we have the road races on the weekend for the men and women, and today is the time when they put themselves up against the clock in the time trial. we will have the women under way first and then the men afterwards. emily found luton will be hoping to upgrade her silverfrom the road, anna van der breggen is the dutch hopeful, the world champion,
5:06 am
and perhaps the favourite along with the usa's chloe di got. in the men's event, you look at belgium's route than not, he is probably the he won silver in the address and will be looking for gold in this, he has a good time trial list. we will also have the final of the men's rugby sevens. we had the semifinals earlier, we know that fiji will face off against new zealand and that final. we know fiji are the defending champions from rio. that is the first time that this sport appeared at the olympics five years ago and they are going to back—to—back titles against new zealand a bit later. we back-to-back titles against new zealand a bit later.— zealand a bit later. we will leave it there _ zealand a bit later. we will leave it there for _ zealand a bit later. we will leave it there for the - zealand a bit later. we will. leave it there for the moment but we will come back to you for a little more from tokyo in a few minutes late in the program. thanks very much for now. let's get some of the day's other news. dozens of former british military commanders have written to the prime minister, borisjohnson, asking for more afghans, who've worked with british forces, to be allowed to settle in the uk.
5:07 am
the group said they were "gravely concerned" about the safety of hundreds of staff who were employed locally in afghanistan but had applications to come to the uk rejected. an armed robber has stolen jewellery worth more than $2 million from one of the oldest jewellery houses in paris. the man entered the chaumet store close to the champs—elysees late on tuesday, brandishing no shots were fired. he then escaped on a scooter. joeyjordison, the founding drummer of the american heavy metal band slipknot, has died at the age of 46. he left the group in 2013, later revealing he had a nerve disease that had affected his ability to play. his family said he died peacefully in his sleep. apple, microsoft and google's parent company, alphabet, have reported sharp increases in sales and profits. the three tech giants have thrived during the pandemic, as lockdowns pushed people to use their services.
5:08 am
the french city of nice has been added to unesco's health officials in the us are urging people to resume wearing masks indoors in areas where the delta variant of coronavirus has sparked a rise in cases. the announcement reverses the advice issued two months ago. the centres for disease control says all teachers and students should wear masks indoors when schools reopen after the summer break, regardless of their vaccination status. president biden has again appealed to all americans to be vaccinated. so why the u—turn? here's the bbc�*s north america correspondent peter bowes. this really reflects a growing concern of the federal government and the centre for disease control and prevention about the surge in the number of cases of coronavirus around the country, especially in certain states like florida where there has been a real peaking of new infections in recent days and weeks. so the advice now and it
5:09 am
is an advisory body, a government advisory body on health and infectious diseases and it's saying all americans whether vaccinated or not, should wear a mask indoors in public settings. interestingly, i am in los angeles where that rule was brought in here about ten days ago because this is indeed one of the areas where there has been a surge in the number of cases and as you say, president biden once again urging all americans if they have not already, to have the covid—i9 vaccine and the president speaking a short time ago at the white house said he is considering requiring all federal workers, government workers, to have the vaccination as well. some media outlets are saying he will announce this on thursday, perhaps with the caveat they should either have the vaccination or at least have regular tests and of course federal workers, there are about 4 million around the country including postalworkers, members of the military, immigration agents, people who work in social
5:10 am
security departments, that would be a significant move and again, reflecting the very serious concern that this isn't beaten, coronavirus is very much here and that surge in numbers is really concerning health officials. it's almost year since a devastating blast in beirut and lebanon is in the grips of one of the world's worst economic crises in more than a century. medicine, electricity and fuel are scarce and it's estimated that more than half the poplualation can no longer afford enough food. jean mackenzie sent us this special report. lebanon is suffering from a collapse of proportions. food, fuel and medicine are scarce. as the currency plunges, people have been left with nothing.
5:11 am
just imagine moving into a refugee camp in your own country. that is how desperate some things have come to less lebanese families. bassam moved here after becoming a taxi driver for his family. at petrol stations, people queue for hours, desperate to secure the little field that is left as the country endures power cuts that can last for more than 24 hours. this, just another sign of lebanon's economic catastrophe which has seen the currency lose more than 90% of its value against the dollar.
5:12 am
at the country's main public hospital, they are missing vital life—saving medicines. look how much i lose on my health. this is another one. i have problems. is this the lowest you ever had your stocks go? yes. last week, a woman claimed she was pregnant, she had cramps, hypertension during pregnancy, and she lost her baby because we don't have magnesium. a year on from the deadly explosion in beirut the city is in tatters and the countries without a government combo bickering politicians unable to agree on a cabinet, leaving the country in freefall. —— country is without a government, bickering politicians unable to agree. frustration spills onto the streets.
5:13 am
these flareups have been every few weeks. wejust heard there some live ammunition. that shows how volatile the situation is here. shows how angry people are in the instability. they have had no economic and financial strategy for this country for decades. for decades. they have been systemically and structurally leading us to this point. why are people not out here again in their masses on the streets? the lebanese people are not well. we need to understand this. we don't feel well. for years, lebanon has been on the brink of collapse. no more. it's day has come. and as it enters another night
5:14 am
of darkness, many fear it has far further to fall. jean mckenzie, bbc news, beirut. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: we have more from the tokyo 2020 limits has been day five events continue. —— as the day five events continue. cheering. the us space agency, nasa, has ordered an investigation after confirmation today that astronauts were cleared to fly while drunk. the last foot patrol in south armagh, once an everyday part of the soldier's lot, drudgery and danger. now no more, after
5:15 am
almost four decades. if one is on one's own in a private house, not doing any harm to anyone, i don't see why all these people should wander in and say you're doing something wrong. six rare white lion cubs are on the prowl at worcestershire park and they been met with a roar of approval from visitors. they are lovely and sweet, yeah, cute. | this is bbc news, the latest headlines: day five at the 2020 olympic games in tokyo sees more success for australia. at the aquatics centre, ariarne titmus wins her second gold in the women's 200 metres swimming freestyle. us health officials change course on face coverings, advising people to wear masks indoors again,
5:16 am
even if they've been vaccinated. police officers who tried to prevent donald trump's supporters from storming the us capitol building injanuary have been giving dramatic evidence at the start of an inquiry into what happened. the panel will look at the reasons for the riot, which happened as lawmakers gathered to certify president biden�*s election victory. but the inquiry�*s already been undermined by partisan divisions, with many republicans refusing to take part. 0ur correspondent barbara plett—usher reports from washington. do you swear to affirm that the testimony you are about to give... police officers who defended the capitoljust months ago formed a steady blue line as they prepared to testify. it was a sharp contrast to the chaos injanuary when they were overrun by a mob of trump supporters trying to overturn the results of an election that h�*de lost.
5:17 am
the committee replayed the shocking images, reminding americans what's at stake in the investigation of how and why this happened. i can feel myself losing oxygen, and recall thinking to myself, "this is how i am going to die, defending this entrance. " i heard chanting from some of the crowd. "get his gun and kill him with his own gun." everybone was reliving that dark day, convinced this enquiry was needed to prevent another attack on the peaceful transfer of power. there was anger at republicans accused of downplaying what unfolded. the indifference shown to my colleagues is disgraceful! for democrats, suspect number one is donald trump. they blame him for inciting the rioters — something he denies. only two republican lawmakers agreed to sit on the committee, saying issues much bigger than party politics are in play. you know, democracy is not defined by our bad days. the republican leadership is trying to send a different message from a much
5:18 am
smaller platform. speaker pelosi will only pick people onto the committee who will ask the questions she wants asked. that becomes a failed committee and a failed report. a sham that no—one can believe. the man at the heart of the investigation is not at the hearing, and probably won't be making an appearance, but donald trump continues to loom large over the republican party and over american politics. as do the divisions he left in his wake, in congress and in the country, the investigation is unlikely to fix that. barbara plett—usher, bbc news, washington. a series of fires are threatening parts of greece, with strong winds making matters worse. north of athens, flames swept through a pine forest. it's unclear what caused it but reports of arson are being investigated with concerns climate change is worsening similar fires and other extreme weather events across europe, as mark lobel reports. a familiar sight at this
5:19 am
time of year in europe, but is it getting worse? tackling forest fires from the skies around athens, the question being asked on the ground is what climate change may be doing to exacerbate the problem. as homes are destroyed and residents evacuated, temperatures are set to rise even further this week after an already tough start. translation: this was a very difficult fire which moved - from area to area with the wind and, as a result, spread extremely quickly with multiple fronts erupting. in northern italy, hailstorms causing extensive damage, with flash flooding and landslides damaging homes. sardinia is still reeling from forest fires, forcing hundreds to evacuate, with a state of emergency declared there.
5:20 am
it's hoped rain will help rescue spain from catalonia's worst wildfires in two years. turkey is also waiting in as a major disaster area is declared after weeks of flooding and landslides in its north—eastern coastal region. translation: just the damaged furniture, shops and cars - amount to millions, and that's not including broken infrastructure and all the recovery work still needed. elsewhere in europe, that recovery work is already under way. in belgium, after the trauma of historic floods, three quarters of annual household waste dumped in just two days, as the death toll continues to rise. while in germany, where bridges once lay, an impromptu ferry service after their floods. in london, a major city
5:21 am
brought to its knees by the flash flooding. all a prescient warning with just a dozen days to go until the latest science on climate change is published, expected to be a clarion call to world leaders to act, with time no longer on their side as the changing climate closes in on our planet. mark lobel, bbc news. a cheering squad is getting some attention injapan. meet this group, known as the japan pom—poms, where the average age is 70! cartwheels in backflips may not be their forte but as you can see, they are no
5:22 am
strangers to, well, some very vivacious choreography! while the dancers say it is a great way to stay in shape, cheerleading for them is more than just cheerleading for them is more thanjust a fun cheerleading for them is more than just a fun workout. translation: is than just a fun workout. translation: , ., , translation: is willing to stay healthy but _ translation: is willing to stay healthy but more _ translation: is willing to stay healthy but more than - translation: is willing to stay healthy but more than that - translation: is willing to stay healthy but more than that is i translation: is willing to stay healthy but more than that is a | healthy but more than that is a reason to be, it is a reason to be, it is nice to bring something different into your daily life. if something different into your dail life. ., ., ., daily life. if you want to 'oin this cheery i daily life. if you want to 'oin this cheery trip, * daily life. if you want to 'oin this cheery trip, you i daily life. if you want to join this cheery trip, you must i daily life. if you want to join | this cheery trip, you must be at least 55 and has what the squad describes as self—proclaimed good looks! don't we all have those? let's go back to tokyo and our olympic games coverage now. we can go live now to our sports presenter sarah mulkerrins in tokyo. i'm carried away with the cheerleaders! give us some reaction from people injapan, given the metal success we have seen. is there more support now for the games compared to how they were looking, say, a week ago? i
5:23 am
they were looking, say, a week auo? ~ �* , , they were looking, say, a week am? ~' �* , , ., , ago? i think it's been really interesting, _ ago? i think it's been really interesting, ben, _ ago? i think it's been really interesting, ben, because i ago? i think it's been really l interesting, ben, because we are in day five now officially of the games getting under way. we have been talking nothing about metals and success in action in this time last week it was all the talk about these games being hosted amidst the coronavirus pandemic because do not forget these games have been delayed by a year because of the global pandemic. so many athletes have had their buildup frustrated by and the japanese public overwhelmingly in the buildup to the games, depending on which surveys and reports your reading, were against the games taking place, even now, and that is because at the moment tokyo is in its fourth state of emergency and cases are rising and you still continue to rise at the games have progressed. we have been getting the daily tallies around midday about the cases related to the games, so those people who have come into the country to take part in the olympic games provide support
5:24 am
for athletes and teams and it's no suitable that those figures are down today, and is seven cases and roughly about 150 cases and roughly about 150 cases since july cases and roughly about 150 cases sincejuly one, so those figures are been stable enough but the ones in the general public have been rising and it is interesting noting the shift from the public perception because last week the front pages of all the newspapers, they were all around the doom and gloom essentially around the games. now we are seeing all the gold athletes from japan on the front of those pages. you are seeing big smiles. even out on the streets, the stuff we are seeing, people lining up to take selfies in front of the olympic rings in front of the olympic rings in front of the olympic stadium and in tokyo, people lining the streets to watch the cycling and triathlon, despite being discouraged to do so. we do think now that the action is under way and seeing a lot of mental success, under way and seeing a lot of mentalsuccess, it under way and seeing a lot of mental success, it is slightly shifting the dial on the focus on these games and i think the
5:25 am
organisers and the japanese government was certainly hoping that that would happen. no coincidence that on day five, japan started the games top of the metal table. you are definitely sensing a softening i think, ben, definitely sensing a softening ithink, ben, towards definitely sensing a softening i think, ben, towards these games is. i think, ben, towards these games is-— i think, ben, towards these games is— i think, ben, towards these games is. i think, ben, towards these names is. ~ , ., games is. looks like there is a little bit more _ games is. looks like there is a little bit more of _ games is. looks like there is a little bit more of a _ games is. looks like there is a little bit more of a breeze - little bit more of a breeze there in terms of the weather. have the high temperatures eased off for the athletes? i5 eased off for the athletes? is a eased off for the athletes? is a very difficult these whole games. the two things the athletes have been battling so far, the extreme heat in the first three days of the competition, players like novak djokovic complaining about having to play in the middle of the afternoon and it's roughly about 35 in their humidity. that is easing a little bit with the typhoon, however, they are set to climb as the week progresses. are set to climb as the week progresses-— progresses. we will leave it there. that _ progresses. we will leave it there. that is _ progresses. we will leave it there. that is sarah - progresses. we will leave it there. that is sarah in - progresses. we will leave it i there. that is sarah in tokyo. you can reach me on twitter and
5:26 am
social media. do not go away. we have the headlines and business news in just we have the headlines and business news injust a we have the headlines and business news in just a few moments. see you soon. hello. with low pressure right across the uk, there were more heavy, even torrential thundery downpours around on tuesday. one storm captured on camera by one of our weather watchers in belfast. here's the area of low pressure. now, later in the week, it will move away, and then the showers are going to ease. but as it exits the scene, it draws in some cooler air as we move from july into august. now, enduring some of the heaviest rain for wednesday will be this part of scotland, with a met office amberwarning. ullapool across to elgin, including inverness, where by thursday morning, rain totals may be approaching 100 millimetres in the wettest spots, bringing the likelihood of flooding and travel disruption. it's not the only area, though, that's going to see some heavy
5:27 am
rain during wednesday. more widely across parts of scotland and northern england, there'll be some areas of heavy rain to begin the day. notice this area of rain in scotland. this is the one that becomes slow—moving across some central and northern areas during the day with that prolonged rainfall. elsewhere, it's a case of, yes, there'll be some sunshine around, but look at the showers getting going for the afternoon. some of these heavy, thundery, with hail, brightness in between. a breezier day for much of england and wales, and the winds gusty around these showers, though they may perhaps move through rather more quickly than they've been inclined to do in recent days. and as for your temperatures, well, many of us just in the teens. parts of eastern england up to around 20, maybe 21 degrees celsius. overnight and into thursday, the worst of these downpours will slowly ease, and the heaviest of the rain in scotland will also begin to ease going into thursday morning. but problems with flooding and disruption may continue even beyond the end of the heaviest rainfall. and temperatures are a bit lower as thursday starts. back to this area of low
5:28 am
pressure, notice itsjourney away from us is under way during thursday. it's around its back edge as it moves away. we get the cooler air moving in, and still bands of showers around as well, though maybe not as frequent as they've been recently. and there will still be a bit of sunshine to be had, but catch a shower, it could still be heavy and thundery as it moves through on thursday. again, for the most part, temperatures just into the high teens, a few spots reaching 20, maybe 21 degrees. temperatures aren't any higher at the weekend, but what is clear by then, there will be fewer showers around and what showers there are will be less intense.
5:29 am
5:30 am
this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the tech titans bite back at the pandemic, as apple, google and microsoft announce bumper profits. the imf raises its forecast for the uk economy, but warns a slower vaccine roll—out will hurt developing nations. a potential game—changer for the hotel industry — the company using 3d—printing technology to build vacation rooms and flat—pack them across the world.

71 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on