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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 28, 2021 3:00am-3:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news — i'm richard preston. our top stories: powerful testimony, from the police officers who say they feared for thier lives — as they tried to keep the mob at bay, during january's storming of the us capitol. a writer called me a traitor. —— he said i should be executed. day five of the 2020 olympic games is underway in tokyo. rowing, surfing and hockey continue, and at the aquatics centre there are more swimming and synchronized diving finals. us health officials change course on masks — vaccinated people are now being advised to wear them indoors, in places where
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infections are high. indonesia reports a record number of covid deaths, as more than 2000 people die in under 2a hours — we have a special report. and a focus on climate change — we look at earth 0vershoot day, as humans pass the point where they have already consumed all the natural resources the earth can renew ina year. police officers who tried to prevent donald trump's supporters from storming the us capitol building injanuary have been giving dramatic evidence at the start of an inquiry into what happened. the panel will look at the reasons for the riot, which happened as lawmakers gathered to certify president biden�*s election victory. but the inquiry�*s already been undermined by partisan divisions, with many republicans refusing to take part. 0ur correspondent barbara plett—usher reports from
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washington. do you swear to affirm the testimony you are about to give... police officers who defended the capital formed a as they to testify. it was a sharp contrast to the chaos in january when they were overrun by a mob of trump supporters trying to overturn the results of an election that he lost. this is now officially a riot! they repaid the images, reminding americans what is at stake, and how and why this happened. i can feel myself losing oxygen, thinking to myself, this is how i am going to die, defending this entrance. i remember people chanting in the crowd, get his gun, kill him — the crowd, get his gun, kill him with_ the crowd, get his gun, kill him with his gun. everybody was reliving this dark day, saying the enquiry
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was needed to prevent an attack on the peaceful transfer of power. there was anger at republicans for downplaying what unfolded. the indifference shown to my colleagues is disgraceful! for democrats, suspect number one is donald trump, blaming him for inciting rioters. 0nly him for inciting rioters. only two republican lawmakers agreed to sit on the committee, saying that there are bigger issues while democracy is not defined by our bad days. and here, a smaller platform. nancy pelosi will only pick peorfle _ nancy pelosi will only pick people in the committee who will ask— people in the committee who will ask the questions she once asked~ — will ask the questions she once asked. that is a failed report, asked. that is a failed report, a sham — a sham. the man at the a sham. — the man at the heart of the investigation is not at the hearing and won't be making an appearance, probably, but donald trump continues to loom apart over the party and american politics. as do the
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divisions he left in his wake, in congress and in the country. the investigation is unlikely to fix that. barbara plett—usher, bbc news, washington. we can now speak to tracy walder who's a former fbi special agent and cia operative. this enquiry is now under way, running in parallel with criminal investigations. bring us up to speed on those. itruiith us up to speed on those. with reaard us up to speed on those. with regard to _ us up to speed on those. with regard to the _ us up to speed on those. with regard to the criminal- regard to the criminal investigations, it is somewhat of an arduous technical process. basically, we have about 500 that are still outstanding in regard to prosecution, penalties that have been given to people. it has become very difficult, because washington needs to sign off on a lot of dealing. his prosecutors have a lot of discretion over that, so it is becoming a very long more than
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6-1 becoming a very long more than 6—1 process. what sorts of things are these people being charged with. there are state offences and a federal offences. where do they fall? that is a great question and it really depends on what the person dead. we have some that are being charged with minor trespassing charges. 0ther being charged with minor trespassing charges. other ones are being charged with, you know, beating a federal officer, so there is a huge gamut that runs. six—month prison sentences to two years in prison. that has been part of the difficulty as well, we really don't have this on barella federal charging statute that can really charge all of them with one crime, just varying degrees. i prosecutors finding it easy enough to get witness testimonies and statements, considering the size of the crowds we saw? you think it would be
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relatively easy, it was played out on iphones, on twitter, on social media. i think, honestly, the biggest problem they have right now is too much evidence, having to comb through all of it and pare that down and decide on, what are the most prosecutable charges that we can put on these people, and also how can we get these folks to sort of strike a deal. i think, really, these folks to sort of strike a deal. ithink, really, the mountain of evidence is what is calling the delay. we have heard of offerings from the prosecutors. what are they? what they do is perhaps if somebody is charged with a light felony, perhaps they can bring it down to a misdemeanour if the person agrees to, first, plead guilty to the lesser charge, misdemeanour, then provide the government with access to their social media, their cellphones, those kinds of things. really, what that is
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as a way for the government to get access to any of those contacts, assumed a deal of them have access to domestic terrorist organisation like the proud boys. the hope is that getting access to that information will allow the government to get ahead of this issue and get ahead of future attacks. tracy walder for attacks. tracy walderforjoining us, thank you. thank you for having me. on to the olympics now where it's day 5. tuesday had some major surprises, but none bigger than the womens team gymnastics. the russian olympic committee won the gold beating the us who won gold back to back in london and rio. but the real shock came earlier in the final. simone biles, a four—time olympic gold medallist — pulled out of the final after her first vault, later saying she did it due to her mental health. she said, "i was just shaking, i'vejust neverfelt like this going into a competition before. at the end of the day, i have to do what is right for me.
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itjust sucks that it happened at the olympic games." our sports presenter sarah mulkerrins is in tokyo and described the reaction. it was really remarkable scenes, wasn't it? late on day fourin scenes, wasn't it? late on day four in tokyo. there was a lot of washing around the world, social media, wondering what was happening, whether there was happening, whether there was an incidence of simone biles walking away from the vault, leaving the arena, collecting her thoughts and re—emerging. we didn't know she would continue or not until we got a statement from the usa gymnastics. afterwards, we got those quotes from simone biles talking about the pressure that she has been feeling, and that she has been feeling, and that she didn't feel quite at the races after that initial vault. she didn't feel herself... she didn't feel that because of that she could carry on. we
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know that gymnastics is a high—risk sport, and we are used to seeing simone biles poll of some of the very best most excellent skills in her routines, so she stepped aside, showed a great level of maturity and was open and honest about that. we don't yet know what that means for future participation and the games, because she does have the all—round final on friday, and the individualfinals. she says she willjudge this day by day, but it has raised the conversation again about athletes talking about the mental health that they enjoyed at times because of the pressured environments that they compete in, and the glare of the world on them, the opec games only coming around every four years. a huge amount of pressure for them to cope with, so let's speak to professor adam brown who joins us, clinical psychologist who has done a lot of work on athletes performing under the intense glare and spotlight. professor,
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thank you forjoining us. i wonder what you made of simone biles making the decision for herself, and being able to speak openly afterwards about why she removed herself from the competition? i think it was an incredible decision _ i think it was an incredible decision. we are seeing young people — decision. we are seeing young people worldwide everywhere open — people worldwide everywhere open up conversations about mental— open up conversations about mental health in ways we havenl— mental health in ways we haven't seen before, including an elite — haven't seen before, including an elite sports. mental health has been _ an elite sports. mental health has been so taboo in elite sports _ has been so taboo in elite sports for as long as we know. ithink— sports for as long as we know. i think when we look back at this olympics we will see this as a _ this olympics we will see this as a milestone and change in the history of well—being in the history of well—being in the context of sports. i think young — the context of sports. i think young athletes coming up now will see — young athletes coming up now will see emotional well—being will see emotional well— being as a _ will see emotional well— being as a part _ will see emotional well—being as a part of what it means to be a — as a part of what it means to be a great _ as a part of what it means to be a great athlete — not as something that comes at the expense _ something that comes at the expense of it.— something that comes at the expense of it. yes, because we
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talk so much — expense of it. yes, because we talk so much about _ expense of it. yes, because we talk so much about physical - talk so much about physical injuries from a knock or leg break, whatever it is, but it is only in the last couple of years that we are hearing about the emotional and mental toll that these athletes face. what sort of work can athletes do to prepare for the intense scrutiny they are under? great question. _ scrutiny they are under? great question, there _ scrutiny they are under? great question, there are _ scrutiny they are under? great question, there are a - scrutiny they are under? great question, there are a few - question, there are a few things— question, there are a few things we can absolutely do. we can look— things we can absolutely do. we can look to psychology literature, neuroscience on resilience and well—being to help— resilience and well—being to help prepare individuals for what — help prepare individuals for what it— help prepare individuals for what it is likely to be in situations where they are confronted with high levels of stress, — confronted with high levels of stress, and then i think we need — stress, and then i think we need to— stress, and then i think we need to consider all of the things— need to consider all of the things we could be doing for athletes after they are performing at the olympics and other_ performing at the olympics and other high situations, people should — other high situations, people should be encouraged to seek out cave — should be encouraged to seek out cave they needed, and just changing — out cave they needed, and just changing the culture in general. if a person feels they need — general. if a person feels they need additional support, they don't — need additional support, they don't feel they need to hide it, don't feel they need to hide it. but— don't feel they need to hide
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it. but it _ don't feel they need to hide it, but it isjust something like — it, but it isjust something like if— it, but it isjust something like if they broke they are more _ like if they broke they are more twisted and ankle, they can get— more twisted and ankle, they can get help for their emotional well—being as well. emotional well— being as well. we live — emotional well— being as well. we live in— emotional well—being as well. we live in the age of social media, it can bring many positives but many negatives as well. how do much do you think the attention and comments, the spotlight potentially exacerbates the situation? i agree, social media has been such— i agree, social media has been such a — i agree, social media has been such a wonderful tool to connect _ such a wonderful tool to connect with the stories, the identities, the histories, and the lives _ identities, the histories, and the lives of these amazing athletes. at the same time, i have — athletes. at the same time, i have been— athletes. at the same time, i have been struck by how many athletes — have been struck by how many athletes have noted specifically that social media has been exacerbating the stress _ has been exacerbating the stress levels during the games. i stress levels during the games. i don't — stress levels during the games. i don't have an answer but i hope — i don't have an answer but i hope we _ i don't have an answer but i hope we can pause to think about— hope we can pause to think about the ways in which we are engaging — about the ways in which we are engaging with these digital tools— engaging with these digital tools and the mental health impacts— tools and the mental health impacts it is having on our athletes _ athletes. professor adam brown, athletes. — professor adam brown, lovely to get your thoughts on the programme. we appreciate your time. professoradam
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programme. we appreciate your time. professor adam brown, clinical psychologist. it was interesting, naomi osaka is another athlete who has been a vocal person on mental health. we know she withdrew from the french open a couple of months ago. she cited mental health, wanting to protect it. she hasn't competed for the last couple of months until she arrived here at the elements. of course she is the poster girl for the games here in japan. she had first two round matches go very well, but she did exit the tournament yesterday, so another one of those athletes who have been speaking up about this issue. and, sarah, plenty on the cards today, and we have already seen our first metals in today, and we have already seen ourfirst metals in rowing? we absolutely have. you would have known and heard about this typhoon and tropical storm that has been hitting the coast of japan. that has altered some of the events. these are the first finals in rowing that are now getting under way this morning here. romania won the first of
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the gold medals on offer. very comfortable win for them. the women in the double skulls, then a brilliant measure between france and the netherlands in the men's doubles skulls. they finished last, france. that was in rio five years ago, so this was a wonderful gold medal. recently, and at the women's all the way down to the wire. ireland was pipped to beat great britain in that race but there are six medals on offer, and they are all an action right now close to tokyo bay here, over to the venue on my right. sarah mulkerrins in tokyo. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: we look at earth overshoot day. humans have already consumed the natural resources and earth can produce in a year. cheering. the us space agency, nasa,
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has ordered an investigation after confirmation today that astronauts were cleared to fly while drunk. the last foot patrol in south armagh, once an everyday part of the soldier's lot, drudgery and danger. now no more, after almost four decades. if one is on one's own in a private house, not doing any harm to anyone, i don't see why all these people should wander in and say you're doing something wrong. six rare white lion cubs are on the prowl at worcestershire park and they been met with a roar of approval from visitors. they are lovely and sweet, yeah, cute.
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this is bbc news, the latest headlines: the police officers who tried to keep the mob at bay during january's storming of the us capitol tell the inquiry they feared for thier lives. day five of the 2020 olympic games is underway in tokyo — rowing, surfing and hockey continue and at the aquatics centre there are more swimming and synchronized diving finals. health officials in the us are urging people to resume wearing masks indoors in areas where the delta variant of coronavirus has sparked a rise in cases. the announcement reverses the advice issued two months ago. the centres for disease control says all teachers and students should wear masks indoors when schools re—open after the summer break, regardless of their vaccination status. president biden has again appealed to all americans to be vaccinated. so why the u—turn?
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here's the bbc�*s north america correspondent peter bowes. this really reflects a growing concern of the federal government and the centre for disease control and prevention about the surge in the number of cases of coronavirus around the country, especially in certain states like florida where there has been a real peaking of new infections in recent days and weeks. so the advice now and it is an advisory body, a government advisory body on health and infectious diseases and it's saying all americans whether vaccinated or not, should wear a mask indoors in public settings. interestingly, i am in los angeles where that rule was brought in here about ten days ago because this is indeed one of the areas where there has been a surge in the number of cases and as you say, president biden once again urging all americans if they have not already, to have the covid—i9 vaccine and the president speaking a short time ago at the white house said he is considering requiring all federal workers, government workers, to have the vaccination
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as well. some media outlets are saying he will announce this on thursday, perhaps with the caveat they should either have the vaccination or at least have regular tests and of course federal workers, there are about 4 million around the country including postalworkers, members of the military, immigration agents, people who work in social security departments, so that would be a significant move and again, reflecting the very serious concern that this isn't beaten, coronavirus is very much here and that surge in numbers is really concerning health officials. indonesia has become the epicenter of asia's covid crisis. the country is reporting tens—of—thousands of new infections daily, and more than a thousand people are dying every day. that's putting a strain on hospitals, and on those who bury the dead. bbc indonesia's valdya baraputri has been following the funeral workers.
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ajoint effort — firefighters and police now called to deal with the bodies of those who are dying at home. many having been turned away from hospitals which were already full. we can't show you the proceeding inside the house, it obviously won't be fair to the victim or the family. currently the team is tending to the body. they covered them in a shroud, and most of the time, they are removing the clothing that's already on the victim's body for their safety. after that, they put the body inside the coffin and even pray for the victim according to their religion. in this house, the virus claimed two lives within a week and infected the entire family. translation: the grandmother died at the hospital. _ later that day, the test results showed that the grandfather also had the virus. they didn't go to hospital
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because the whole house was positive with covid, so they tried to get better in self—isolation. the highly infectious delta variant means the number of cases here is soaring. this covid—i9 response team is used to handling two or three bodies a day. now they are getting calls about more than 50, but only managing to help move a dozen or so. a local crowdsourcing site has been gathering data since the start of the pandemic and says that nationwide, there have been more than 2,700 deaths at home since the beginning ofjune. the president has extended the partial lockdown forjava, the most densely populated of indonesia's islands and bali. but people are being allowed to eat outside restaurants and food stalls for a maximum of 20 minutes. translation: as we know, i the trend shows there has been an improvement in getting covid—i9 under control.
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the case rate, hospital bed occupancy and positivity rate show a decline as shown in several provinces injava. two days before that announcement, indonesia hit a daily record of more than 1,500 dead. the government has designated at least seven covid—i9 cemetaries in jakarta alone. this one quickly filled up. as you can see behind me, the excavator that digs new graves and the excavator that closes the other graves over there are working simultaneously. the ambulances that carry the bodies keep coming one after the other. the workers here could bury more than 200 bodies in a day. indonesia is reporting the world's highest absolute number of new covid—i9 cases. this, along with low rates of vaccination, limited testing and the surge in cases of the delta variant, means teams like this will continue to work
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around the clock. every week at this time on bbc world news, we focus on climate change, with a different story every week about the implications for our planet's future. this week we're looking at what's called earth overshoot day. it's the symbolic day of the year when humans are considered to have consumed all the natural resources the earth can possibly renew in a year. so from tomorrow until the end of the year, the global economy is considered to be operating in ecological deficit. so how does it happen and what can we do about it? mathis wackernagel, founder and president of the global footprint network which hosts and calculates earth overshoot day. he's in oakland, california. thank you for being with us. how do you calculate earth overshoot day?— how do you calculate earth overshoot day? the principles are extremely _ overshoot day? the principles are extremely simple. - overshoot day? the principles are extremely simple. we - overshoot day? the principles are extremely simple. we are| are extremely simple. we are using a lot of data, about
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15,000 data points per country and is so we compare demands for cheese, cotton, co2 emissions and compare that with how much area is necessary to provide those services. we can compare the area with how much we use in any get a ratio and what we find is the use about 70% more, then what it can renew, and that means from january the first untiljuly 29, we are using as much of the earth can renew in a year. haifa earth can renew in a year. how lona earth can renew in a year. how long have _ earth can renew in a year. how long have you _ earth can renew in a year. how long have you been _ earth can renew in a year. how long have you been calculating earth overshoot day and i dread to ask, are we getting better or the years go on? the to ask, are we getting better or the years go on?- or the years go on? the data noes or the years go on? the data goes back — or the years go on? the data goes back to _ or the years go on? the data goes back to 1961 _ or the years go on? the data goes back to 1961 and - or the years go on? the data goes back to 1961 and we - or the years go on? the data. goes back to 1961 and we have been tracking this since the late 90s and earth overshoot day has become bigger and bigger every year and there has been some declines but most of them are not by design, all crises, the financial crisis, the pandemic last year, have
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got big dance in bringing earth overshoot day down but now it is back to pre— pandemic levels. is back to pre- pandemic levels. ~ . . levels. what are the next ste s? levels. what are the next steps? we _ levels. what are the next steps? we hear- levels. what are the next steps? we hear lots - levels. what are the next steps? we hear lots of i steps? we hear lots of discussion about emissions, especially after cop 21 in paris and cup 26 on the horizon in glasgow, what should countries and governments be doing when it comes to natural resources?— doing when it comes to natural resources? ~ , ,, ., , resources? absolutely emissions are a big part _ resources? absolutely emissions are a big part of— resources? absolutely emissions are a big part of overall - are a big part of overall demand on the planet —— cop26. that is why we are moving the date, we are presenting a platform called 100 days of possibility exactly because of cop, because of this conception that finally we need to agree to do something when the opposite is reality. we are entering a storm of climate change and resource constraints. if you are a country or a city who is not ready, we need to run fast start to get to an agreement.
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give us some positive news, what progress that we made and how optimistic are you about the future? it how optimistic are you about the future?— the future? it is not about optimism _ the future? it is not about optimism or _ the future? it is not about optimism or pessimism. l the future? it is not about l optimism or pessimism. we the future? it is not about - optimism or pessimism. we are providing bookkeeping so we can see how much we use compared to what we have and we recognise that moving in the right direction of climate change perspective is very much in the national or the city self interest. so investing in becoming fit for the future is one of the best investments you can make and in some places are making these investments. briefly, do some countries do better or worse than others? we are better or worse than others? - are working quite closely with scotland, for example. that is one place in the world that has significantly reduced co2 emissions, over47% significantly reduced co2 emissions, over 47% since 1990 because they said the end of the fossil fuel age. that is quite impressive.— the fossil fuel age. that is quite impressive. we're running out of time. _ quite impressive. we're running out of time, so _ quite impressive. we're running out of time, so we'll— quite impressive. we're running out of time, so we'll have - quite impressive. we're running out of time, so we'll have to - out of time, so we'll have to leave there, unfortunately. thank you for being with us. that is the end of the
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programme. you can reach me on twitter. for me and the rest of the team, thank you for watching. goodbye. hello. with low pressure right across the uk, there were more heavy, even torrential thundery downpours around on tuesday. one storm captured on camera by one of our weather watchers in belfast. here's the area of low pressure. now, later in the week, it will move away, and then the showers are going to ease. but as it exits the scene, it draws in some cooler air as we move from july into august. now, enduring some of the heaviest rain for wednesday will be this part of scotland, with a met office amberwarning. ullapool across to elgin, including inverness, where by thursday morning, rain totals may be approaching 100 millimetres in the wettest spots, bringing the likelihood of flooding and travel disruption. it's not the only area, though, that's going to see some heavy rain during wednesday.
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more widely across parts of scotland and northern england, there'll be some areas of heavy rain to begin the day. notice this area of rain in scotland. this is the one that becomes slow—moving across some central and northern areas during the day with that prolonged rainfall. elsewhere, it's a case of, yes, there'll be some sunshine around, but look at the showers getting going for the afternoon. some of these heavy, thundery, with hail, brightness in between. a breezier day for much of england and wales, and the winds gusty around these showers, though they may perhaps move through rather more quickly than they've been inclined to do in recent days. and as for your temperatures, well, many of us just in the teens. parts of eastern england up to around 20, maybe 21 degrees celsius. overnight and into thursday, the worst of these downpours will slowly ease, and the heaviest of the rain in scotland will also begin to ease going into thursday morning. but problems with flooding and disruption may continue even beyond the end of the heaviest rainfall. and temperatures are a bit lower as thursday starts. back to this area of low pressure, notice itsjourney away from us is under way during thursday. it's around its back
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edge as it moves away. we get the cooler air moving in, and still bands of showers around as well, though maybe not as frequent as they've been recently. and there will still be a bit of sunshine to be had, but catch a shower, it could still be heavy and thundery as it moves through on thursday. again, for the most part, temperatures just into the high teens, a few spots reaching 20, maybe 21 degrees. temperatures aren't any higher at the weekend, but what is clear by then, there will be fewer showers around and what showers there are will be less intense.
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this is bbc news,
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the headlines: police on duty during january's storming of the us capitol building by donald trump supporters have told a congressional inquiry what happened was an attempted coup. one officer described being beaten, tasered and called a traitor, as rioters smashed windows and broke through doors. day five of the 2020 olympic games is under way in tokyo — with surfing, rowing, and hockey on the agenda. it will also be another busy day at the aquatics centre with five swimming finals, and the men's diving, synchronised springboard finals, all due to take place. united states health officials have changed their advice on wearing masks. vaccinated people are now being advised to wear them indoors, in places where infections are high. the announcement reverses the advice issued two months ago.

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