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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 28, 2021 2:00am-2:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news — very good to have you with us. i'm rich preston — our top stories... powerful testimony from the police officers who say they feared for their lives — as they tried to keep the mob at bay during january's storming of the us capitol. the riders called me trader, a disgrace, and shouted that i, a veteran police officer, should be executed. i'm sarah mulkerrins in tokyo where day five of the 2020 games is underway. and we have the first golds in the rowing. us health officials change course on masks — vaccinated people are now being advised to wear them indoors, in places where infections are high. indonesia reports a record
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number of covid deaths — more than 2,000 people die in under 2a hours — we have a special report. behind me, the excavator that digs new graves and the excavator that closes the other grapes over there are working simultaneously, the ambulances that carry the bodies keep coming, one after the other. and you're never too old to cheerlead. we meet the seniors injapan who're getting ready for their 25th anniversary show. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe police officers who tried to prevent donald trump's
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supporters from storming the us capitol building injanuary have been giving dramatic evidence at the start of an inquiry into what happened. the panel will look at the reasons for the riot which happened as lawmakers gathered to certify president biden�*s election victory. but the inquiry�*s already been undermined by partisan divisions with many republicans refusing to take part. 0ur correspondent barbara plett—usher reports from washington. do you swear or affirm that the testimony you are about to give... police officers who defended the capitoljust months ago formed a steady blue line as they prepared to testify. it was a sharp contrast to the chaos injanuary, when they were overrun by a mob of trump supporters trying to overturn the results of an election that he'd lost. this is now a riot. the committee replayed the shocking images, reminding americans of what's at stake in the investigation of how and why this happened. i could feel myself losing oxygen, and recall thinking
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to myself, "this is how i'm going to die, defending this entrance." i heard chanting from some of the crowd, "get his gun "and kill him with his own gun." everyone was reliving that dark day, convinced this inquiry was needed to prevent another attack on the peaceful transfer of power. there was also anger at republicans accused of downplaying what unfolded. the indifference shown to my colleagues is disgraceful! for democrats, suspect number one is donald trump. they blame him for inciting the rioters, something he denies. only two republican lawmakers agreed to sit on the committee, saying issues much bigger than party politics are in play. you know, democracies are not defined by our bad days. the republican leadership is trying to send a different message from a much smaller platform. speaker pelosi will only pick. on people on to the committee that will ask the questions she wants asked. - that becomes a failed committee
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and a failed report, _ a sham that no one can believe. the man at the heart of this investigation is not at the hearing, and probably won't be making an appearance, but donald trump continues to loom large over the republican party and over american politics. as do the divisions he left in his wake, in congress and the country. the investigation is unlikely to fix that. barbara plett—usher, bbc news, washington. we can now speak to us political analyst max kutner. thank you for being on the programme. some very powerful and moving testimony. what do you make of what you heard? certainly powerful, this was probably in the six months since these events, the first time we have heard this perspective from the officers on the ground that day. we have heard from prosecutors, from lawmakers, statements from the different law enforcement agencies but this was a nearly
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four hour hearing where these four hour hearing where these four officers from different agencies were able to really help us understand what happened that day and what they said was harrowing. they spoke about as in the clip you played, overhearing let's kill him with his own gun, they said it was like being in a medieval battle field. and that they were fighting inch for inch. in addition to their words, we also saw their emotions and we saw one of them appear to wipe tears away from his eyes, we saw another officer consoling him as in the clip you play, we are and we heard one banging on the table, saying it was disgraceful how some politicians had acted so this was really powerful testimony and really the first time we have heard this perspective in six months. have heard this perspective in six months-— have heard this perspective in six months. republicans were aenerall six months. republicans were generally against _ six months. republicans were generally against a _ six months. republicans were generally against a bipartisan| generally against a bipartisan hearing, does that dilute the significance of this inquiry? what the republicans really wanted was more control over which of their members would get to be on the panel and so
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when the democrats asserted their control over which republicans would be on the panel, that perhaps dilutes it a bit, maybe we would have seen something differently but we also know how some of these republicans including the ones that that site wanted in the panel, we know how they have acted in different congressional panels during the trump administration so that behaviour would have looked like, they would have been questioning these officers today in a much different way i think than the democrats were but we did hear from the republicans today and they are making it clear from this very first hearing that this is in their view, a part as an exercise and their comments today as much as the democrats comments really set the tone for what this is going to be like, this wasjust for what this is going to be like, this was just the first hearing and they're presumably will be many more.— will be many more. walk us throu~h will be many more. walk us through briefly _ will be many more. walk us through briefly what - will be many more. walk us through briefly what is - will be many more. walk us through briefly what is the i through briefly what is the process over the next weeks and
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months. ,, ., , , , months. the us congress is about to _ months. the us congress is about to go _ months. the us congress is about to go on _ months. the us congress is about to go on a _ months. the us congress is about to go on a break - months. the us congress is about to go on a break and l months. the us congress is i about to go on a break and so as the committee alluded to today, it is going to go on pause for a bit and they actually don't have another hearing lined up. that said, the whole point of these hearings is to aid in the legislative process and the committee can also make referrals to the department of justice for prosecution so we know the department ofjustice has more than 500 defendants related to the january six events so presumably, information that comes from this committee hearings over the coming months and even years, can't be used towards those cases, or like i said, legislative aide, maybe they could come up with legislation around what happened. so that is looking long term. in the short term we are expecting things to quiet down unless something major breaks and they will be called back from recess for that but that seems unlikely.
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for that but that seems unlikely-— for that but that seems unlikely. for that but that seems unlikel . ~ , ., unlikely. we must leave it there, thank— unlikely. we must leave it there, thank you - unlikely. we must leave it there, thank you for - unlikely. we must leave it there, thank you for being unlikely. we must leave it - there, thank you for being with us. on to the olympics now where it's day five. tuesday had some major surprises but none bigger than the women's team gymnastics. the russian olympic committee won the gold beating the us who won gold back to back in london and rio. but the real shock came earlier in the final. simone biles — a four time olympic gold medallist — pulled out of the final after her first vault, later saying she did it due to her mental health. she said, "i was just shaking. i've just never felt like this going into a competition before. at the end of the day, i have to do what is right for me. itjust sucks that it happened at the olympic games." we can go live now to our sports presenter sarah mulkerrins in tokyo. and sarah, what's the reaction been to this? it was really remarkable, wasn't it, late on the fourth day here in tokyo, all of the journalists and media really
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surprised. there was an awful lot watching all around the world on social media who were wondering what was happening, there was that incident of simone biles walking away after the initial vault, leaving the arena for a time, collecting her thoughts on re—emerging. we did not know whether she would continue until we got the statement from us gymnastics saying she was pulling out of the tournament, but she stayed on and cheered on her team—mates to their silver medal and we got the quotes afterwards from her, talking about the pressure that she has been feeling and that she didn't feel quite at the races after that initial vault, she didn't feel herself and she didn't feel herself and she didn't feel herself and she didn't feel that because of that, she could carry on. we note gymnastics is such a high tariff, high—risk sport and we are used to seeing simone biles pull off some of the very best and most excellent skills in her routines so she stepped aside, showed a great level of maturity to do that and was open and honest. we don't know yet what that means for her
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future participation in these games because she has the all—around final on thursday and then her individualfinals, she says she is going to judge it day by day but it really has kind of raised this conversation again about athletes talking about their mental health that they endure, at times, because of the pressure environments that they compete in and the glare of the world on them, the olympic games only coming around every four years. a huge amount of pressure for them to be able to cope with. i'm joined now by professor adam brown who's a clinical psychologist at the new school for social research in new york. and he's done so much work on athletes performing under intense glare. thank you for joining us. i wonder what you're made of simone biles making a decision for yourself and being able to speak about it openly afterwards? being honest about the reasons why she removed herself from competition? i she removed herself from competition?— she removed herself from competition? she removed herself from cometition? ~ ., , ., competition? i think it was an
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incredible _ competition? i think it was an incredible decision _ competition? i think it was an incredible decision that - competition? i think it was an incredible decision that she i incredible decision that she made _ incredible decision that she made i_ incredible decision that she made. i think what we are seeing _ made. i think what we are seeing worldwide are young people _ seeing worldwide are young people everywhere opening up conversations about mental health — conversations about mental health in ways we have never really — health in ways we have never really seen before, including in elite — really seen before, including in elite sports. mental health has been _ in elite sports. mental health has been so taboo in elite sports _ has been so taboo in elite sports for as long as we know. and _ sports for as long as we know. and i— sports for as long as we know. and i think— sports for as long as we know. and i think when we look back at this— and i think when we look back at this olympics, we are going to see — at this olympics, we are going to see this as a milestone and a sea — to see this as a milestone and a sea change in the history of the way— a sea change in the history of the way we think about emotional well—being in the emotional well— being in the context_ emotional well—being in the context of sport. i think young athletes — context of sport. i think young athletes coming up now are going — athletes coming up now are going to _ athletes coming up now are going to see emotional well—being as part of going to see emotional well— being as part of what it means— well— being as part of what it means to _ well— being as part of what it means to be a great athlete, not something that comes at the expense — not something that comes at the expense of it. not something that comes at the exnense of it— expense of it. because we talk so much in _ expense of it. because we talk so much in sport _ expense of it. because we talk so much in sport about - expense of it. because we talk| so much in sport about physical injuries and recovering from a knock or a leg break or a knee injury, whatever it is but it is only in the last couple of years that we hear more about the emotional and mental toll that these athletes face. what sort of work can athletes do to prepare for the intense scrutiny that they are under?
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that's a great question. i think— that's a great question. i think there is a view things we can do. — think there is a view things we can do. we _ think there is a view things we can do, we can look towards the psychology and neuroscience on resilience — psychology and neuroscience on resilience and well—being to help— resilience and well—being to help prepare individuals for what — help prepare individuals for what it— help prepare individuals for what it is like to be in situations where they are confronted with very high levels _ confronted with very high levels of stress and then i think— levels of stress and then i think we _ levels of stress and then i think we need to be considering all the — think we need to be considering all the things we could be doing _ all the things we could be doing for athletes after they perform at the olympics in other— perform at the olympics in other high context situations, things— other high context situations, things like social support, making _ things like social support, making sure people are encouraged to seek out care if they— encouraged to seek out care if they need it and really changing the culture in general or if a — changing the culture in general or if a person feels like they are in— or if a person feels like they are in need of additional support, they don't feel like they— support, they don't feel like they have to hide it, at something, just like if they broke — something, just like if they broke an _ something, just like if they broke an arm or twisted an ankle. _ broke an arm or twisted an ankle, they could get help for their— ankle, they could get help for their emotional well—being. ankle, they could get help for their emotionalwell—being. | their emotional well— being. wonder, their emotional well— being. i wonder, we their emotionalwell—being. i wonder, we live in the age of social media, it can bring many positives but it can bring many negatives as well. how much do you think the attention and
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comments and spotlight that that brings potentially exacerbates the situation? i agree. social media has been such— agree. social media has been such a — agree. social media has been such a wonderful tool to connect _ such a wonderful tool to connect with the stories and identities and histories and lives — identities and histories and lives of— identities and histories and lives of these amazing athletes but at — lives of these amazing athletes but at the same time, i have been — but at the same time, i have been struck by how many athletes have noted specifically that social media has been exacerbating their stress — has been exacerbating their stress levels over the course of the — stress levels over the course of the games. i don't have an answer— of the games. i don't have an answer to— of the games. i don't have an answer to it but i hope we can all pause _ answer to it but i hope we can all pause to think about the ways— all pause to think about the ways in— all pause to think about the ways in which we engage in these — ways in which we engage in these digital tools and the mental— these digital tools and the mental health impacts that it has on — mental health impacts that it has on our athletes. professor, lovel to has on our athletes. professor, lovely to get — has on our athletes. professor, lovely to get your _ has on our athletes. professor, lovely to get your thoughts. - has on our athletes. professor, | lovely to get your thoughts. we appreciate your time. it was interesting, naomi 0saka is another young athlete who has been a focal person on mental health, we know she withdrew from the french open a couple of months ago citing her mental health and wanting to protect it, she hasn't competed for the last couple of months until she
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arrived here at the olympics. she is the poster girl for the games here injapan stop she had herfirst two round matches that went really well and she exited the tournament yesterday. another one of those athletes speaking up about this issue. .. ., athletes speaking up about this issue. ., , , ., issue. sarah, plenty on the cards today _ issue. sarah, plenty on the cards today and _ issue. sarah, plenty on the cards today and we've - issue. sarah, plenty on the i cards today and we've already seen our first medals in rowing?— seen our first medals in rowinu? , ., seen our first medals in rowina? ~ ., , , ., ., rowing? we absolutely have. you will have known _ rowing? we absolutely have. you will have known and _ rowing? we absolutely have. you will have known and heard - rowing? we absolutely have. you will have known and heard about| will have known and heard about this typhoon and tropical storm that has been hitting the coast of japan, that has been hitting the coast ofjapan, that that has been hitting the coast of japan, that has altered some of japan, that has altered some of the events so these are the first finals in rowing that are getting under way this morning. romania won the first of the gold medals on offer. very comfortable win for them, the women in the double sculls and there was a brilliant matchup between france and the netherlands in the men's double sculls, france winning that, they finished last in the final in rio five years ago so a wonderful gold medalfor in rio five years ago so a wonderful gold medal for them. just recently, in the women's
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force, another brilliant highly competitive race, nip and tuck all the way to the wire, australia winning that and ireland actually pipping great britain to win the bronze medal in that race. but there are six medals on offer and they are all in action right now, close to us here in tokyo bay, just over the sea forest when you over the sea forest when you over to my right hand side. thank you so much. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: we meet the japanaese seniors — proving you're never to old to cheerlead — as they prepare for their 25th anniversary show. cheering. the us space agency, nasa, has ordered an investigation after confirmation today that astronauts were cleared
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to fly while drunk. the last foot patrol in south armagh, once an everyday part of the soldier's lot, drudgery and danger. now no more, after almost four decades. if one is on one's own in a private house, not doing any harm to anyone, i don't see why all these people should wander in and say you're doing something wrong. six rare white lion . cubs are on the prowl at worcestershire park- and they've been met with a roar of approval from visitors. they are lovely and sweet, yeah, cute. this is bbc news, the latest headlines... the police officers who say they tried to keep the mob at bay during january's storming of the us capitol tell
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the inquiry they feared for thier lives. health officials in the us are urging people to resume wearing masks indoors in areas where the delta variant of coronavirus has sparked a rise in cases. the announcement reverses the advice issued two months ago. the centre for disease control says all teachers and students should wear masks indoors when schools re—open after the summer break, regardless of their vaccination status. president biden has again appealed to all americans to be vaccinated. let's speak now to our north america correspondent peter bowes. it wasn't long ago the cdc said vaccinated americans should feel comfortable taking their masks off so why the change in advice? , . , ., ., advice? this reflects a growing concern that _ advice? this reflects a growing concern that the _ advice? this reflects a growing concern that the number- advice? this reflects a growing concern that the number of. concern that the number of cases of coronavirus is surging around the country, almost 90,000 new cases on monday, we know some 97% of people who are
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taken to hospital now with coronavirus are not vaccinated and that is the key issue and thatis and that is the key issue and that is why people are now being advised by the cdc to wear a mask indoors in a public setting, whether you have had the vaccination or not and that is because people who have had the vaccination can still carry the vaccination can still carry the virus, there is a strong scientific evidence to suggest thatis scientific evidence to suggest that is happening quite a lot. president biden once again appealing to everyone up and down the country to get a vaccination but especially in those hotspot areas, florida is one of them but i'm in los angeles, an area with quite a high vaccination rate and we had that rule imposed here ten days ago, wearing a mask in a public place inside, and a lot of people here are abiding by it but the real concern is a lot of people are not. president biden has referred to the pandemic of the unvaccinated, what does he
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mean? what is the vaccination rate in the us and what is the government doing? he rate in the us and what is the government doing?— rate in the us and what is the government doing? he is talking about a pandemic _ government doing? he is talking about a pandemic of _ government doing? he is talking about a pandemic of the - about a pandemic of the unvaccinated exactly because of the 97% taken to hospital with coronavirus and potentially a very serious illness because they are not vaccinated. that is where the pandemic is focused now and that is why he is also talking and we will hear more from him on thursday about this, about getting all of the country �*s federal workers, government workers, to have the vaccine, some media outlets reporting that he will say that, there might be the caveat if they do not get the vaccine they must be regularly tested but there are 4 million government workers in this country, members of the military, postal workers, immigration agents, people working in social security offices, that will be a very significant move, really reflecting the growing concern that this isn't finished, this is not over yet. the government wants to and as you indicated,
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really turn the clock back to the kind of regulations we got very well used to several months ago.— very well used to several months ago. very well used to several months ao. ., ,, months ago. peter, thank you for the update. _ indonesia has become the epicentre of asia's covid crisis. the country is reporting tens—of—thousands of new infections daily, and more than a thousand people are dying every day. that's putting a strain on hospitals, and on those who bury the dead. bbc indonesia's valdya baraputri has been following the funeral workers. a joint effort — firefighters and police now called to deal with the bodies of those who are dying at home. many having been turned away from hospitals which were already full. we can't show you the proceeding inside the house, it obviously won't be fair to the victim or the family. currently the team is tending to the body. they covered them in a shroud, and most of the time, they are removing the clothing
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that's already on the victim's body for their safety. after that, they put the body inside the coffin and even pray for the victim according to their religion. in this house, the virus claimed two lives within a week and infected the entire family. translation: the grandmother died at the hospital. _ later that day, the test results showed that the grandfather also had the virus. they didn't go to hospital because the whole house was positive with covid, so they tried to get better in self isolation. the highly infectious delta variant means the number of cases here is soaring. this covid—i9 response team is used to handling two or three bodies a day, now they are getting calls about more than 50, but only managing to help move a dozen or so. a local crowdsourcing site has been gathering data since the start of the pandemic and says that nationwide,
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there have been more than 2,700 deaths at home since the beginning ofjune. the president has extended the partial lockdown forjava, the most densely populated of indonesia's islands and bali. but people are being allowed to eat outside restaurants and food stalls for a maximum of 20 minutes. translation: as we know, i the trend shows there has been an improvement in getting covid—i9 under control. the case rate, hospital bed occupancy and positivity rate show a decline as shown in several provinces injava. two days before that announcement, indonesia hit a daily record of more than 1,500 dead. the government has designated at least seven covid—i9 cemetaries in jakarta alone. this one quickly filled up. as you can see behind me, the excavator that digs
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new graves and the excavator that closes the other graves over there are working simultaneously. the ambulances that carry the bodies keep coming one after the other. the workers here could bury more than 200 bodies in a day. indonesia is reporting the world's highest absolute number of new covid—i9 cases. this, along with low rates of vaccination, limited testing and the surge in cases of the delta variant, means teams like this will continue to work around the clock. some breaking news from australia. authorities in greater sydney have announced they will be extending lockdown restrictions there for an additional four weeks. they will now run until the 28th of august, that comes as officials confirm i77 august, that comes as officials confirm 177 new cases. a woman
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in her 90s has become the 11th person in the area to die from coronavirus in the current outbreak. all people in a lockdown area are restricted to travelling no more than ten kilometres. and before we go, while all eyes are onjapan's 0lympic games, one out of the ordinary cheering squad in the country is getting some attention. meet the group known as "japan pom pom" where the average age is 70 years old. cartwheels and backflips may not be their forte but they're no stranger to vivacious choreograhies. and while it's a great way for these dancers to stay in shape, for this group of seniors, cheer goes far beyond just a fun workout. translation: it�*s important to stay healthy but more than that, it is a reason to be. it's nice to bring something different into your daily life. and if you want to join that cheery troupe,
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you must be at least 55 — and have what the squad describes as "self—proclaimed good looks." so it's a very inclusive group of cheerleaders. britney spears has officially asked for her father to be replaced as her conservator — 13 years after he assumed control of her life and finances because of concerns over the popstar�*s mental health. the star's new lawyer petitioned the court on monday and asked for accountantjason rubin — who has experience managing complex trusts and financial exploitation — to be named conservator of spears' estate. public support for the star has surged after her emotional court testimony last month, in which she described the conservatorship as �*abusive', said she had been drugged, forced to perform against her will and prevented from having children. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @ rich preston and you can't get much more on all those new stories on the bbc news website. i will be back with you in a moment.
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hello. with low pressure right across the uk, there were more heavy, even torrential thundery downpours around on tuesday. 0ne storm captured on camera by one of our weather watchers in belfast. here's the area of low pressure. now, later in the week, it will move away, and then the showers are going to ease. but as it exits the scene, it draws in some cooler air as we move from july into august. now, enduring some of the heaviest rain for wednesday will be this part of scotland, with a met office amberwarning. ullapool across to elgin, including inverness, where by thursday morning, rain totals may be approaching 100 millimetres in the wettest spots, bringing the likelihood of flooding and travel disruption. it's not the only area, though, that's going to see some heavy rain during wednesday. more widely across parts of scotland and northern england, there'll be some areas of heavy rain to begin the day.
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notice this area of rain in scotland. this is the one that becomes slow—moving across some central and northern areas during the day with that prolonged rainfall. elsewhere, it's a case of, yes, there'll be some sunshine around, but look at the showers getting going for the afternoon. some of these heavy, thundery, with hail, brightness in between. a breezier day for much of england and wales, and the winds gusty around these showers, though they may perhaps move through rather more quickly than they've been inclined to do in recent days. and as for your temperatures, well, many of us just in the teens. parts of eastern england up to around 20, maybe 21 degrees celsius. overnight and into thursday, the worst of these downpours will slowly ease, and the heaviest of the rain in scotland will also begin to ease going into thursday morning. but problems with flooding and disruption may continue even beyond the end of the heaviest rainfall. and temperatures are a bit lower as thursday starts. back to this area of low pressure, notice itsjourney away from us is under way during thursday. it's around its back
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edge as it moves away. we get the cooler air moving in, and still bands of showers around as well, though maybe not as frequent as they've been recently. and there will still be a bit of sunshine to be had, but catch a shower, it could still be heavy and thundery as it moves through on thursday. again, for the most part, temperatures just into the high teens, a few spots reaching 20, maybe 21 degrees. temperatures aren't any higher at the weekend, but what is clear by then, there will be fewer showers around and what showers there are will be less intense.
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this is bbc news, the headlines police on duty during january's storming of the us capitol building by donald trump supporters have told a congressional inquiry what happened was an attempted coup. 0ne officer described being beaten, tasered and called a traitor, as rioters broke through windows and doors. us health officials have changed their advice on wearing masks. vaccinated people are now being advised to wear them indoors, in places where infections are high. the announcement reverses the advice issued two months ago. president biden has again appealed to all americans to get vaccinated. day five of the 2020 olympic games is underway in tokyo — with surfing, rowing, and hockey on the agenda. it will also be another busy day at the aquatics centre with five swimming finals, and the men's diving, synchronized springboard finals. all due to take place. now on bbc news — clean energy hello, i'm kevin fong,
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and welcome to the engineers: clean energy.

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