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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 27, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines — police on duty during january's storming of the us capitol building by donald trump supporters have told a congressional inquiry what happened was an attempted coup. one officer described being beaten, tasered and called a traitor as rioters broke through windows and doors. the us gymnast simone biles is to be monitored daily by medics after pulling out of the final few events of the team gymnastics contest. biles won four gold medals in rio in 2016. two people have died and three others are missing after an explosion at an industrial park in the western german city of leverkusen. the former king of spain, juan carlos, is being sued by his ex—lover, who accuses him of having used the spanish intelligence service to spy on her. corinna zu sayn—wittgenstein alleges he put her under surveillance and hacked her phone.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are sonia sodha, who's the chief leader writerfor the observer, and christopher hope, the chief political correspondent and assistant editor at the daily telegraph. we will hear from both of them in a moment. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... let's start with the telegraph. it says that the government is set to drop restrictions for double—vaccinated people and reopen the border to european and american travellers from next month. the daily mail reports the words of an unnamed senior minister who said that "covid is all over bar the shouting" after cases fell for a seventh consecutive day. the express carries an encouraging message by a leading epidimiologist and government adviser, professor neil ferguson, who says that the "bulk of the pandemic" could be done by october.
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the metro front page carries the story of a young man, aged 3a, who has died of covid after two weeks in coma. he had refused to get a jab and had told his doctors he wished "he could turn back time" to get one. the ft reports a warning from the imf that the limited access to covid vaccines by developing countries risks hindering global economic recovery from the pandemic. the times carries a photo of american gymnast simone biles, who walked away from the women's team final at the tokyo olympic games. she said she had been "fighting demons" and needed to withdraw to protect her mental health. so, let's begin. chris can kick us off this time with your paper in fact, if we start with that one, the telegraph, and that is
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freedom for the double jabbed as a uk reopens to the world. some watching this might say we with some of stories we have heard over the recent months that we have closed to the world. , _ ., recent months that we have closed to the world. , ,, ., ., ~ , recent months that we have closed to the world. , ., ., ~ , ., the world. they say that a week is a lona time the world. they say that a week is a long time and _ the world. they say that a week is a long time and politics, _ the world. they say that a week is a long time and politics, well - the world. they say that a week is a long time and politics, well it's - the world. they say that a week is a long time and politics, well it's an l long time and politics, well it's an age in terms of covid—19. just last week we reported on minister saying that the day can be pushed back beyond august the 16th which was the date when we are told the pcr jab and demo jabs date when we are told the pcr jab and demojabs and pcr date when we are told the pcr jab and demo jabs and pcr test and you can go back to work. but it seems that some seven days in isolation for borisjohnson at the countryside has done wonders for his clarity of thinking about covid—19. seven days in which the number of infections has fallen daily. we will come on to what that means later on in other papers but the result of that is it seems that borisjohnson is back at
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work for his first day back today, tuesday, he now says that we are going to drop restrictions for the devil vaccinated people and reopen our borders to european and american travellers from next month. he is doubling down on the deviljabbed it seems, and this is good news i suppose if he is doing in a safe way. many doubt this and say this could release what they called the johnson variant, which is worse than a delta variant. but luckily we are not there yet, touch wood, so the government thinks is going well. and we will see later in this review, others think so too.— we will see later in this review, others think so too. what do you make of it? _ others think so too. what do you make of it? i _ others think so too. what do you make of it? i think— others think so too. what do you make of it? i think it _ others think so too. what do you make of it? i think it is - others think so too. what do you make of it? i think it is sort - others think so too. what do you make of it? i think it is sort of i make of it? i think it is sort of a mixed bag. _ make of it? i think it is sort of a mixed bag. i— make of it? i think it is sort of a mixed bag, i suppose _ make of it? i think it is sort of a mixed bag, i suppose was - make of it? i think it is sort of a mixed bag, i suppose was can l make of it? i think it is sort of a i mixed bag, i suppose was can see make of it? i think it is sort of a - mixed bag, i suppose was can see why the government wants to encourage more _ the government wants to encourage more tourism into the uk given other parts _ more tourism into the uk given other parts of— more tourism into the uk given other parts of the _ more tourism into the uk given other parts of the world are giving it and given— parts of the world are giving it and given it _ parts of the world are giving it and given it really only applies to the double _ given it really only applies to the double jab coming in from the uk, the us— double jab coming in from the uk, the us in— double jab coming in from the uk, the us in the eu rather who don't
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have _ the us in the eu rather who don't have to _ the us in the eu rather who don't have to quarantine if they are coming — have to quarantine if they are coming in _ have to quarantine if they are coming in from an amber or dreamless countrx _ coming in from an amber or dreamless countrx you _ coming in from an amber or dreamless country. you can see what the government wants to do that. it's a very fine _ government wants to do that. it's a very fine line to tread. you can also _ very fine line to tread. you can also see — very fine line to tread. you can also see why the self isolation for ten days— also see why the self isolation for ten days if— also see why the self isolation for ten days if you are deviljabbed has really— ten days if you are deviljabbed has really sort — ten days if you are deviljabbed has really sort of been gumming up big parts _ really sort of been gumming up big parts of— really sort of been gumming up big parts of the economy, the nhs, the police _ parts of the economy, the nhs, the police force — parts of the economy, the nhs, the police force as people get pinged and asked to stay home and many think— and asked to stay home and many think that — and asked to stay home and many think that is a bit excessive if you have _ think that is a bit excessive if you have been— think that is a bit excessive if you have been double jabbed. but at the same _ have been double jabbed. but at the same time, — have been double jabbed. but at the same time, i think that is a sort of element _ same time, i think that is a sort of element here with the government has -ot it element here with the government has got it wrong _ element here with the government has got it wrong before and you don't want _ got it wrong before and you don't want them — got it wrong before and you don't want them to put the cart before the horse _ want them to put the cart before the horse and _ want them to put the cart before the horse and i_ want them to put the cart before the horse and i would question why go as far as _ horse and i would question why go as far as saying — horse and i would question why go as far as saying if you have been double jabbed, you don't even have to do— double jabbed, you don't even have to do a _ double jabbed, you don't even have to do a test— double jabbed, you don't even have to do a test if you come in contact with a _ to do a test if you come in contact with a positive case was of the people — with a positive case was of the people who are double jabbed are still getting covid—19 so if you want — still getting covid—19 so if you want to— still getting covid—19 so if you want to keep infection rates down low, as— want to keep infection rates down low, as we — want to keep infection rates down low, as we will to get a test even if you _ low, as we will to get a test even if you are — low, as we will to get a test even if you are not asked to self—isolate feels _ if you are not asked to self—isolate feels really — if you are not asked to self—isolate feels really sensible. so i think we are going — feels really sensible. so i think we are going to see a lot of this sort of debate — are going to see a lot of this sort of debate over the next couple of
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weeks _ of debate over the next couple of weeks. obviously usually good news that cases _ weeks. obviously usually good news that cases have come down now for six days _ that cases have come down now for six days in— that cases have come down now for six days in a — that cases have come down now for six days in a row, lower than they were two— six days in a row, lower than they were two weeks ago, that's brilliant _ were two weeks ago, that's brilliant. but a lot of scientists think— brilliant. but a lot of scientists think that _ brilliant. but a lot of scientists think that this is not the absolute end think that this is not the absolute and of— think that this is not the absolute and of the — think that this is not the absolute end of the story. we will see spikes in camp— end of the story. we will see spikes in camp and — end of the story. we will see spikes in camp and falls away again. we've honestly got to learn to live with this virus— honestly got to learn to live with this virus came the vaccines are not quite _ this virus came the vaccines are not quite as— this virus came the vaccines are not quite as effective against delta and the spread of delta as they were against — the spread of delta as they were against the alpha variant. sol think— against the alpha variant. sol think if— against the alpha variant. sol think if we _ against the alpha variant. sol think if we had been in the place we did not— think if we had been in the place we did not have the delta variant, we will be _ did not have the delta variant, we will be fine — did not have the delta variant, we will be fine to do all of this but i think— will be fine to do all of this but i think one — will be fine to do all of this but i think one of the reasons why some people _ think one of the reasons why some people are — think one of the reasons why some people are of the bit nervous about it is because the vaccines are still effective — it is because the vaccines are still effective against delta, they are not as _ effective against delta, they are not as effective in terms of stopping spread. as they were against — stopping spread. as they were against the alpha variant. let�*s against the alpha variant. let's move on if— against the alpha variant. let's move on if we _ against the alpha variant. let's move on if we may _ against the alpha variant. let's move on if we may and - against the alpha variant. let's move on if we may and talk - against the alpha variant. let�*s move on if we may and talk about a related story. this is on the front of the daily express. this is one of those voices we hurt her lot from at the beginning of a pandemic regarded as very authoritative and one of the
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words is alerted government to quite how serious could be. this words is alerted government to quite how serious could be.— how serious could be. this is professor — how serious could be. this is professor neil _ how serious could be. this is professor neil ferguson. - how serious could be. this is i professor neil ferguson. so, how serious could be. this is - professor neil ferguson. so, his team _ professor neil ferguson. so, his team have — professor neil ferguson. so, his team have done a lot of the modelling that has informed the government possibly decisions and he is well— government possibly decisions and he is well respected. and he was saying on the _ is well respected. and he was saying on the radio— is well respected. and he was saying on the radio this morning that he thinks _ on the radio this morning that he thinks there is a good chance that we are _ thinks there is a good chance that we are going to be passed this, past the worst— we are going to be passed this, past the worst by september or october and honestly that is coming and the look of— and honestly that is coming and the look of this— and honestly that is coming and the look of this good news in recent days— look of this good news in recent days and — look of this good news in recent days and a — look of this good news in recent days and a lot of scientists i think i've actually been taken by taken by surprise _ i've actually been taken by taken by surprise hy— i've actually been taken by taken by surprise byjust how much infection rates _ surprise byjust how much infection rates have — surprise byjust how much infection rates have dropped. we honestly have to wait _ rates have dropped. we honestly have to wait and _ rates have dropped. we honestly have to wait and see what happens in the next couple — to wait and see what happens in the next couple of weeks with the july the 19th _ next couple of weeks with the july the 19th opening up but i think a lot of— the 19th opening up but i think a lot of people will feel quite reassured to see what he says. the thing _ reassured to see what he says. the thing is _ reassured to see what he says. the thing is he — reassured to see what he says. the thing is he does not say this is no such— thing is he does not say this is no such thing. — thing is he does not say this is no such thing, it does not make a cast iron guarantee and there is no such thing _ iron guarantee and there is no such thing as— iron guarantee and there is no such thing as a _ iron guarantee and there is no such thing as a cast iron guarantee with it codd-19— thing as a cast iron guarantee with it covid—19 so as long as things go
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up it covid—19 so as long as things go up to— it covid—19 so as long as things go up to keep — it covid—19 so as long as things go up to keep our fingers crossed. we should _ up to keep our fingers crossed. we should be — up to keep our fingers crossed. we should be past the worst event here in the _ should be past the worst event here in the uk _ should be past the worst event here in the uk even if other parts of the water— in the uk even if other parts of the water going to be fighting it for much _ water going to be fighting it for much longer. but i think we could be unlucky— much longer. but i think we could be unlucky and — much longer. but i think we could be unlucky and could get another variant — unlucky and could get another variant that is even more vaccine resistant— variant that is even more vaccine resistant than delta. that may be more _ resistant than delta. that may be more likely to come about if we have -ot more likely to come about if we have got lots _ more likely to come about if we have got lots of _ more likely to come about if we have got lots of ice mixing with some double — got lots of ice mixing with some double jabbed and some not. sol think— double jabbed and some not. sol think we — double jabbed and some not. sol think we are not out of the woods yet and _ think we are not out of the woods yet and that is very much the message _ yet and that is very much the message the government is giving out as well— message the government is giving out as well even boris johnson, message the government is giving out as well even borisjohnson, not known — as well even borisjohnson, not known for— as well even borisjohnson, not known for his caution when it comes to covid, _ known for his caution when it comes to covid, has— known for his caution when it comes to covid, has been sort of urging people _ to covid, has been sort of urging people to — to covid, has been sort of urging people to sort of understand that we are not— people to sort of understand that we are not out— people to sort of understand that we are not out of the woods yet. so i think— are not out of the woods yet. so i think there — are not out of the woods yet. so i think there are some really tentative good news this week but covid _ tentative good news this week but covid can — tentative good news this week but covid can always take us by surprise _ covid can always take us by surprise-— covid can always take us by surprise.- you - covid can always take us by surprise.- you have . covid can always take us by| surprise.- you have to surprise. chris. you have to question — surprise. chris. you have to question why _ surprise. chris. you have to question why the _ surprise. chris. you have to| question why the expressive splashing on comments from professor neil ferguson. this is the man dubbed professor lock last year with a lot of his forecast led to some said to the lockdown approach and the government. and looking at the data, he told andrew the 18th of
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july that the uk cases could hit 200,000 a day. he has a big number and get to the number was just yesterday 23,000 511. so a fraction of the number he was forecasting just two weeks ago. and that's why when ferguson says on your sister programme this morning that he thinks he can be over the worst by october, people might start to believe it and that's why it matters. believe it and that's why it matters-— believe it and that's why it matters. ., matters. good point about the credibility as _ matters. good point about the credibility as it _ matters. good point about the credibility as it were _ matters. good point about the credibility as it were and - matters. good point about the credibility as it were and also l credibility as it were and also being someone who is intending to take quite a cautious approach to this. that's particularly striking a story with a way to in the pandemic and let's move on to a subject that is the abuse of children in care and it is a terrible story and a lot people may it uncomfortable but in a sense, the lack of comfort he will have about the reasons you might argue that a lot of people who
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should have cared about what was going on with these children did not or did not want to know. or the extent of what was going on. talk us through this because the mirror is using its front page, it's got a photograph, not a new photograph, the photograph that used in its coverage as far as i can tell from online search is about four years ago because it came up in the connection with the place for a man called janelle and him and the children's home in north wales and inventory is and was jailed back in 2017 but of the man photographs here is one of those who has been accused of crimes and convicted of crimes and is worth stressing that is michael carol, who was also involved and he was one of those who was mentioned in this report into what happened at lambeth council in south london. can you give us a flavour of what this story is about? this london. can you give us a flavour of what this story is about?— what this story is about? this is truly shocking _ what this story is about? this is truly shocking and _ what this story is about? this is truly shocking and it _ what this story is about? this is truly shocking and it is - what this story is about? this is truly shocking and it is coming i what this story is about? this is i
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truly shocking and it is coming out first in an independent inquiry into the child's active you set up by theresa may, when she was prime minister, and from the hundreds of little people in the chair of lambeth council in south london were subjected to horrendous cruelty and sexual abuse over decades on a scale that was hard to comprehend. they found more than 700 allegations of sexual abuse against hundreds of staff and individuals connected with just three homes in the borough but the true scale of the abuse could be far higher. and no wonder the daily mirror has put it on its front page. it's a leader talks about a moment of shame, and it says and its leader column every page of this report makes for shocking reading and is beyond belief it so many vulnerable children were abuse over 70 decades. this report was established back by theresa may and one of the legacies of her time in government that finally shining a light on an uncomfortable past in this country
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and i think it's right that this inquiry is going and it has been going for a while now and it's costing millions of pounds but this is the kind of thing that he should be producing and now is producing and that is welcome because shining light on this suffering is vital. vital because we know these things have not stopped happening because of them and it happened on the scale they happened in lambeth but they go on to this date sadly. we obviously have the recent cases of young girls being abused and taken from care homes in part to the northwest and taken out for the day or for the night and then returned and apparently nothing happening in a lot of situations. what do you take from the story? i lot of situations. what do you take from the story?— from the story? i think it's 'ust terrific and fi from the story? i think it's 'ust terrific and horrifying �* from the story? i think it's 'ust terrific and horrifying and h from the story? i think it'sjust terrific and horrifying and the l terrific and horrifying and the scariest — terrific and horrifying and the scariest thing about it is that these — scariest thing about it is that these are _ scariest thing about it is that these are notjust historic injustices, it is terrible and dreadful— injustices, it is terrible and dreadful as these are. we know this is been _ dreadful as these are. we know this is been going on relatively recently in some _
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is been going on relatively recently in some part of the country and not 'ust in some part of the country and not just the _ in some part of the country and not just the northwest but happening in nottingham and telford and we know that whenever there are institutions, whether they are externally vulnerable children who have been taken away from their own families— have been taken away from their own families for— have been taken away from their own families for their own protection, we know— families for their own protection, we know this has been going on and we know this has been going on and we know— we know this has been going on and we know that the care system has attracted — we know that the care system has attracted paedophiles and people who -et attracted paedophiles and people who get off— attracted paedophiles and people who get off on— attracted paedophiles and people who get off on disgusting and cruel abuse — get off on disgusting and cruel abuse of— get off on disgusting and cruel abuse of children and i'm afraid actually— abuse of children and i'm afraid actually if— abuse of children and i'm afraid actually if you read off the reports today— actually if you read off the reports today of— actually if you read off the reports today of some privately run children homes _ today of some privately run children homes that— today of some privately run children homes that are run by sometimes the involvement _ homes that are run by sometimes the involvement of private equity, there is still— involvement of private equity, there is still terrible cruelty happening to children and one of the things i find so _ to children and one of the things i find so unfathomable is every time a story breaks about institutional child _ story breaks about institutional child abuse and the sex abuse and vulnerable — child abuse and the sex abuse and vulnerable children, we all say never — vulnerable children, we all say never again a hack and we stop this happening — never again a hack and we stop this happening again itjust never be allowed — happening again itjust never be allowed to happen and then somehow we all— allowed to happen and then somehow we all get _ allowed to happen and then somehow we all get on with life and then another— we all get on with life and then another story like this breaks and it's not— another story like this breaks and it's not always historic. so i agree
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with chris — it's not always historic. so i agree with chris that this is incredibly important work that the independent inquiry— important work that the independent inquiry on _ important work that the independent inquiry on chelsea abuse is doing and the _ inquiry on chelsea abuse is doing and the third report looking at rochdale and nottingham council as well and _ rochdale and nottingham council as well and there will be more it reports — well and there will be more it reports the comment i think we really have to ask ourselves questions as a society how have we let this _ questions as a society how have we let this happen. these are the most vulnerable — let this happen. these are the most vulnerable children in society and yet this— vulnerable children in society and yet this report says they have been taken _ yet this report says they have been taken out _ yet this report says they have been taken out of some pretty terrible situations — taken out of some pretty terrible situations with a been neglected and abused _ situations with a been neglected and abused and were put into even worse situations— abused and were put into even worse situations in— abused and were put into even worse situations in the care of the state. it situations in the care of the state. itjust— situations in the care of the state. itjust leaves me speechless to be honest _ itjust leaves me speechless to be honest. ., , , ., , honest. some of this is horrifying --eole honest. some of this is horrifying people listening _ honest. some of this is horrifying people listening to _ honest. some of this is horrifying people listening to the _ honest. some of this is horrifying people listening to the radio - honest. some of this is horrifying people listening to the radio may| people listening to the radio may have heard for example now and talking about her experience as a 12—year—old girl on the first day in the home being examined by a doctor who when the examination violently sexually assaulted her and it was the staff pattern abuse that continued with other adults aware it was happening and apparently powerless or indifferent to it. one of the interesting things it came out was a reporter said he thinks
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there was a link between the political conflict going on between labour's level and leadership in lab at the time and margaret thatcher present government that is people from it. iwill stop present government that is people from it. i will stop by something that was set in the interview which quotes a couple of papers were she said the former leader of lambeth sit in the four years he was leader she'd not visited any of these children's home. if we asked that question to council leaders today, do you think it might still be the case? do people visit children's homes with my do politicians visit places like that? i homes with my do politicians visit places like that?— places like that? i certainly hope so but i think— places like that? i certainly hope so but i think that _ places like that? i certainly hope so but i think that back - places like that? i certainly hope so but i think that back then - places like that? i certainly hope l so but i think that back then she'll rip off metlife were not valued in the same way as a i think there was a cultural thing and appalling. we are reporting it in tomorrow's telegraph about how the children in care were used by lambeth council to appoint against the thatcher government in a toxic game of the children were being abused. i think politics to come into it is a bigger
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port but i don't think and don't want to take any spotlight away from these children because that's who we should be about. find these children because that's who we should be about.— should be about. and those who did the abuse of — should be about. and those who did the abuse of course. _ should be about. and those who did the abuse of course. i _ should be about. and those who did the abuse of course. i would - should be about. and those who did the abuse of course. i would say - should be about. and those who did | the abuse of course. i would say was to have a cultural _ the abuse of course. i would say was to have a cultural problem _ the abuse of course. i would say was to have a cultural problem where - the abuse of course. i would say was to have a cultural problem where we j to have a cultural problem where we don't _ to have a cultural problem where we don't value _ to have a cultural problem where we don't value the lives of the vulnerable children enough also look at will— vulnerable children enough also look at will be _ vulnerable children enough also look at will be cheap children in the system — at will be cheap children in the system at _ at will be cheap children in the system at the moment, children aged between _ system at the moment, children aged between 16—8 and have been living in unregulated accommodation in substance entered accommodation without _ substance entered accommodation without the proper care of adults and that— without the proper care of adults and that is— without the proper care of adults and that is disgraceful. so this is still going — and that is disgraceful. so this is still going on to children in care today~ — still going on to children in care today we — still going on to children in care today. we have not sorted this out by any _ today. we have not sorted this out by any trip — today. we have not sorted this out by any trip to the imagination. pick u . by any trip to the imagination. pick u- on the by any trip to the imagination. pick up on the times — by any trip to the imagination. f ca. up on the times now. by any trip to the imagination. i ca. up on the times now. this is a story that would have barbara castle spinning in her grave to find the lady who faced her political career on forcing to wear seat belts finds us getting sloppy again. will be
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getting complacent by the risk of death or serious injury in car accidents? death or serious in'ury in car accidentsah death or serious in'ury in car accidents? , ., ., accidents? interesting to read the story because _ accidents? interesting to read the story because actually _ accidents? interesting to read the story because actually i _ accidents? interesting to read the story because actually i sort - accidents? interesting to read the story because actually i sort of. story because actually i sort of thought — story because actually i sort of thought that culturally we had hopefully cracked seat belts and everyone just kind of reaches automatically for the seat belt when they get _ automatically for the seat belt when they get in the car. but this story suggest — they get in the car. but this story suggest is — they get in the car. but this story suggest is that we do have a bit of more of— suggest is that we do have a bit of more of an— suggest is that we do have a bit of more of an issue than we thought and it is incredibly dangerous to be in a car— it is incredibly dangerous to be in a car without a seat belts of the story suggests that a government are looking _ story suggests that a government are looking at— story suggests that a government are looking at increasing the penalty for not _ looking at increasing the penalty for not wearing a seat belt post up at the _ for not wearing a seat belt post up at the moment, it's £100 for a driver and _ at the moment, it's £100 for a driver and make at the moment, it's £100 for a driverand make up at the moment, it's £100 for a driver and make up to £500 if they io driver and make up to £500 if they go to— driver and make up to £500 if they go to court — driver and make up to £500 if they go to court. 0r driver and make up to £500 if they go to court. or you could get off it by paying — go to court. or you could get off it by paying £50 for a seat belt awareness course for the government is thinking — awareness course for the government is thinking about increasing the penalty— is thinking about increasing the penalty to three penalty points wish to be honest i think is a fantastic idea i_ to be honest i think is a fantastic idea i does _ to be honest i think is a fantastic idea. i does not think there is any excuse _ idea. i does not think there is any excuse if— idea. i does not think there is any excuse if you are in a car put it seat _ excuse if you are in a car put it seat belt — excuse if you are in a car put it seat belt on _ excuse if you are in a car put it seat belt on and that's why they are there _ seat belt on and that's why they are there and — seat belt on and that's why they are there. and so i would not have a problem with this.— there. and so i would not have a problem with this. having done one of those speed _ problem with this. having done one of those speed awareness - problem with this. having done one of those speed awareness courses i problem with this. having done one | of those speed awareness courses in order to avoid points on my licence
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when i was done for speeding, i found it a really valuable thing. intrigued by what eight seat belt where this course might involve but anyway what you make of this? i recall back to the click adverts in the 70s when seat belts were made mandatory and i cannot imagine adding in a car not putting in a seat belt. i would not feel safe. but the increase in those killed in road accidents were not wearing seat belts has gone up from 90% in 2013 to 22% now. —— belts has gone up from 90% in 2013 to 22% now. “19%. could be got some not a big deal but needs to be addressed and i would not feel safe in a car without a seat belt on so it's a cultural thing. maybe it is these big chelsea tractors in these big suvs we have got where you have protection all the way around and of course if you get much faster in the scars, often you know how fast you were going because my car rentals quiet at certain speeds. so i will aware how fast it is. irate quiet at certain speeds. so i will aware how fast it is.— aware how fast it is. we have a minute so _ aware how fast it is. we have a minute so i _
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aware how fast it is. we have a minute so i think— aware how fast it is. we have a minute so i think the _ aware how fast it is. we have a minute so i think the one - aware how fast it is. we have a minute so i think the one the l aware how fast it is. we have a - minute so i think the one the recall is clock click every trip was a slogan. let's end with the mobiles briefly. quick leftward about her. quite a thing to pull out of the loop event. it quite a thing to pull out of the loop event-— quite a thing to pull out of the loo event. , ., loop event. it is in her quote there that i loop event. it is in her quote there that i don't — loop event. it is in her quote there that i don't examine _ loop event. it is in her quote there that i don't examine the _ loop event. it is in her quote there that i don't examine the proper. loop event. it is in her quote there | that i don't examine the proper and i'm not if it is i use to and she is only 24. i was quite strong. this kind of self—doubt kind of creeping in with age the more we know and the less you know about ourselves but i think she's only 24 in that so sad. i hope she does find a way to get through this and compete in the games. a, through this and compete in the names. �* ' , ., ., ., games. a different photograph on the front of your — games. a different photograph on the front of your sister _ games. a different photograph on the front of your sister paper _ games. a different photograph on the front of your sister paper and - front of your sister paper and briefly good that she said she was doing a probably because she did not want to miss out a metal.— want to miss out a metal. incredibly unselfish and _ want to miss out a metal. incredibly unselfish and i _ want to miss out a metal. incredibly unselfish and i think _ want to miss out a metal. incredibly unselfish and i think it's _ want to miss out a metal. incredibly unselfish and i think it's very - unselfish and i think it's very brave — unselfish and i think it's very brave of— unselfish and i think it's very brave of her to talk openly about her mental health and mental well—being and how she was feeling and apparently she just could not -et and apparently she just could not get any— and apparently she just could not get any sleep in the hours for the competition when she was mostly
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napping _ competition when she was mostly napping so if you yourself says i hope _ napping so if you yourself says i hope people can see this as a sign of strength— hope people can see this as a sign of strength and at the site so mobiles— of strength and at the site so mobiles has overcome so much to become _ mobiles has overcome so much to become ours with the world's greatest _ become ours with the world's greatest gymnast of all time and -rip greatest gymnast of all time and grip and — greatest gymnast of all time and grip and extreme poverty and she was neglected _ grip and extreme poverty and she was neglected and adopted by her grandparents. she had to undergo sexual— grandparents. she had to undergo sexual abuse out some of the gymnast so everyone _ sexual abuse out some of the gymnast so everyone will look at her and thanked — so everyone will look at her and thanked that is a strong athlete. truly— thanked that is a strong athlete. truly in — thanked that is a strong athlete. truly in spirit. thank you both very much for being with us and thank you for your company. much for being with us and thank you foryour company. more much for being with us and thank you for your company. more papers same time tomorrow and every day. hello, i'm marc edwards with your sports news. day five of the tokyo olympics is getting under way. we'll be crossing to the japanese capital in a few moments, but first, a quick look at the medals table. swimmer tom dean sensationally clinching team gb�*s fourth gold of the games on day four
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as great britain secured its best ever start to an olympic games. gb claiming six medals on tuesday, including two silvers, three bronzes as well, to take their tally to 13 overall and put them fifth in the medal table. most of the drama on day four came at the ariake gymnastics centre. it provided great britain with a historic medal and also could well have delivered one of the stories of tokyo 2020. team gb won bronze in the women's team final. it's a first medal since 1928 in that event. alice kinsella, amelie morgan, and twin sistersjennifer and jessica gadirova. jessica with that vault that helped secure a dramatic bronze after italy made a series of mistakes in their final discipline. so, historic moment for team gb in the gymnastics, but there were a lot of questions surrounding one of the games�* biggest stars, simone biles. our reporter sarah mulkerrins is in tokyo for us. hi, sarah, tell us a bit more about what happened to the us gymnast? yes, marc, good morning from tokyo.
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it was really remarkable last night here in the japanese capital because all eyes were on the american superstar simone biles. she was going in that team event in the gymnastics. she did vault. that was her first piece of apparatus that she was doing. she was unhappy with it. and afterwards she left the arena for a while. we were wondering what was going on. she did reappear, she did seem to have her arm guards, which seemed to suggest that she would take part in the next event, the bars. however, we soon got a statement from the us gymnastics saying that wasn't going to compete in the rest of the event. now, she has spoken afterwards since then, saying she needed to protect her mental health, that she didn't quite feel at the races within her performance in the vault and she just wanted to protect yourself. and i think it's a really interesting discussion point for sport and athletes at the moment because we're so used to hearing about athletes
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protecting their physical injuries, but this was something that simone biles said is more prevalent in sport now and that she really wanted to protect her mind and it was important to remember that they may be superstar athletes, but they are people at the end of the day. well, sarah, from one star to another, and a huge upset for the hosts, the face of tokyo 2020, naomi osaka, knocked out of the tennis. absolutely, and it was naomi osaka as well, one of people that we have seen in the world to sport talk about mental health issues recently. this was her reappearance in competitive tennis since withdrawing from the french open a couple of months ago talking about mental health. she had looked good in the first two rounds, pretty dominant performance there, but however yesterday in that matchup against marketa vondrousova, she was uncharacteristic in the amount of errors that were on display, so a real shock exit for naomi osaka. she said afterwards that perhaps she was feeling the pressure. she has never been
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to an olympics before. perhaps maybe there was something on the break away from tennis, but she says she has had breaks before and she's re—emerged fine. so, really interesting when you think that she is one of the faces of games. she lit the olympic flame at the opening ceremony last friday. many people would've expected her to go further, particularly because the number one seed ashleigh barty had also crashed out earlier in the tournament, but naomi osaka is out. thank you very much, sarah mulkerrins talking to us there from tokyo. away from the olympics, there are a few other sports events taking place around the world. in rugby union, british and irish lions head coach warren gatland has made three changes to their line—up ahead of their second test against south africa on saturday. scotland scrum—half ali price drops to the bench to make way for ireland's conor murray to come into the side. prop mako vunipola replaces rory sutherland, and centre chris harris will start instead of elliot daly, while number eight taulupe faletau is on the bench after missing out on the first test altogether. the lions came from behind, of course, to win the series opener 22—17.
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you want them to build on that first test performance cos you think the cohesion with the combinations and them playing that first game that they'll get better as well, so it's just trying to get that balance between what we have achieved. not making too many changes, and thenjust picking what we thinks the best team that can do a job on sunday. manchester united have continued their summer spending spree by signing real madrid defender raphael varane. an initialfee of around £34 million pounds has been agreed, potentially rising to 42 million with add—ons. varane won four champions league titles with real along with the world cup with france in 2018. united secured the signing of jadon sancho last week. toby alderweireld has completed a transfer from tottenham hotspur to qatar stars league side al—duhail. the belgium international had two years remaining on his contract, but he'll make the move to the middle east after spending six years at spurs, where he made
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over 200 appearances. in the hundred men's tournament tonight, jonny bairstow hit 72 off just 39 balls as his welsh fire side beat southern brave by 18 runs in cardiff. he and ben duckett put on a partnership of 116 in their winning total of 165—4. southern brave could only reach 147 off their 100 balls. earlier, in the women's competition, the result went the other way, with the southern brave comfortably beating the welsh fire. after being set 111 to win, a superb knock from smriti mandhana saw them coast to victory with 16 balls to spare. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. hello. with low pressure right across the uk, there were more heavy, even torrential thundery downpours around on tuesday. one storm captured on camera by one
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of our weather watchers in belfast. here's the area of low pressure. now, later in the week, it will move away, and then the showers are going to ease. but as it exits the scene, it draws in some cooler air as we move from july into august. now, enduring some of the heaviest rain for wednesday will be this part of scotland, with a met office amber warning. ullapool across to elgin, including inverness, where by thursday morning, rain totals may be approaching 100 millimetres in the wettest spots, bringing the likelihood of flooding and travel disruption. it's not the only area, though, that's going to see some heavy rain during wednesday. more widely across parts of scotland and northern england, there'll be some areas of heavy rain to begin the day. notice this area of rain in scotland. this is the one that becomes slow—moving across some central and northern areas during the day with that prolonged rainfall. elsewhere, it's a case of, yes, there'll be some sunshine around, but look at the showers getting going for the afternoon. some of these heavy, thundery, with hail, brightness in between.
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a breezier day for much of england and wales, and the winds gusty around these showers, though they may perhaps move through rather more quickly than they've been inclined to do in recent days. and as for your temperatures, well, many of us just in the teens. parts of eastern england up to around 20, maybe 21 degrees celsius. overnight and into thursday, the worst of these downpours will slowly ease, and the heaviest of the rain in scotland will also begin to ease going into thursday morning. but problems with flooding and disruption may continue even beyond the end of the heaviest rainfall. and temperatures are a bit lower as thursday starts. back to this area of low pressure, notice its journey away from us is under way during thursday. it's around its back edge as it moves away. we get the cooler air moving in, and still bands of showers around as well, though maybe not as frequent as they've been recently. and there will still be a bit of sunshine to be had, but catch a shower, it could still be heavy and thundery as it moves through on thursday. again, for the most part, temperatures just into the high teens, a few spots reaching 20,
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maybe 21 degrees. temperatures aren't any higher at the weekend, but what is clear by then, there will be fewer showers around and what showers there are will be less intense.
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'welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. a shock withdrawal at the olympics. gymnast, simone biles explains why she left the floor in tokyo — the latest athlete to put mental health first. and — i'm sarah mulkerrins in tokyo — where day 5 of the 2020 games is about to get underway. rowing, swimming and cycling time trails are all on the agenda. indonesia reports a record number of covid deaths — more than 2000 people died in the last 24 hours — we have a special report. behind me, the excavator and the excavator that closes the
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other graves over there or working simultaneously.

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