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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 27, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. our top stories: compelling testimony, as the hearings start in congress into the attack on the us capitol. officers tasked with protecting people and property that day recount the violence and hatred they experienced. the rioters called me traitor... ..a disgrace, and shouted that i, an army veteran and a police officer, should be executed. the four—times us gold medallist simone biles pulls out of the gymnastics team final at the olympics, citing medical reasons. us health officials say people should again wear masks indoors in certain places, even if they're been vaccinated.
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plus, how high—flying criminals were brought back down to earth by one feisty parrot. hello and welcome. we start in washington and the first hearing into the january 6 attack on the us capitol. it got under way earlier today. police officers have been giving harrowing first—hand accounts of what happened that day to a congressional panel, set up to investigate the siege. opening the session, the chairman of the committee said the events that day were a co—ordinated attempt to derail the peaceful transfer of power. one of the officers who testified was michael fanone, who was violently attacked and beaten by the mob. a warning — you may find some of his words distressing.
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they ripped off my badge, they grabbed and stripped me of my radio, they seized ammunition that was secured to my body. they began to beat me with their fists and with what felt like hard metal objects. at one point, i came face—to—face with an attacker, who repeatedly lunged for me and attempted to remove my firearm. i heard chanting from some in the crowd — "get his gun" and "kill him with his own gun". i was aware enough to recognise i was at risk of being stripped of and killed with my own firearm. i was electrocuted again and again and again with a taser. what makes the struggle harder and more painful is to know so many of my fellow citizens, including so many of the people i put my life at risk to defend, are downplaying or outright denying what happened.
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i feel like i went to hell and back to protect them and the people in this room. earlier, the inquiry heard from aquilino gonell from the us capitol police department, who was beaten with a pole while serving as an officer. he said he was more afraid for his life on that day than during his military deployment to iraq. the rioters called me traitor... ..a disgrace, and shouted that i, an army veteran and a police officer, should be executed. some of the rioters had the audacity to tell me it was nothing personal, that they would go through me, through us police officers, to achieve their goal, as they were breaking metal barriers to use as a weapon against us.
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sadly, as a result of that day, we lost officers — some really good officers. but we held the line to protect our democratic process, because the alternative would have been a disaster. we are not asking for medals, recognition. we simply wantjustice and accountability. liz cheney — one ofjust two republicans on the committee — asked sgt gonell what he made of donald trump's comments about the attack. when you hearformer president trump say, quote, "it was a loving crowd, there was a lot of love in the crowd," how does that make you feel? it's upsetting. it's a pathetic excuse for his behaviour, for something that he himself helped create, this monstrosity. i'm still recovering from those hugs and kisses.
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our correspondent nada tawfik has been watching today's hearing and joins us now. what do you think stood out most from today's testimony?— from today's testimony? certainly the ower from today's testimony? certainly the power of _ from today's testimony? certainly the power of the _ from today's testimony? certainly the power of the testimony, - from today's testimony? certainly the power of the testimony, but l the power of the testimony, but which was so compelling, and the emotion in the room as the officers and the congress members broke down in tears, you could tell this was still very raw, of course, because these were men who believed they could have lost their lives on that day, but what struck me the most was just... about those who downplayed the events and making their position clear, one commerce member asked the officers, what you make of the opinion that you are supposed to serve the united states as officers but not voice your opinions? and they said that this was just too important to stay silent, that nothing like this ever happen in the history of the united states and they were very clear that they
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thought the mob were demented terrorists, that this was an attack on the democracy of this country —— domestic terrorists. but if unchecked and uninvestigated, can only lead to a future possible event, and so certainly was the powerful to hear those warnings about necking is not a partisan issue but on focusing on getting to the bottom of what really happened that day. the the bottom of what really happened that da . ., ., ., ~ that day. the thing about not making this a partisan _ that day. the thing about not making this a partisan issue, _ this a partisan issue, notwithstanding the presence of two republican on the committee, other were nominated, the democrat speaker rejected their names because they felt it would undermine the committee, it is difficult to see this as a bipartisan process, isn't it? i this as a bipartisan process, isn't it? 4' this as a bipartisan process, isn't it? ~ . ., , ., it? ithink, certainly, those who side with president _ it? ithink, certainly, those who side with president trump - it? ithink, certainly, those who side with president trump is - it? ithink, certainly, those who side with president trump is a l side with president trump is a version of events and still also are synthetic to two republicans dashed next a pathetic two republicans who believe this is just
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—— —— sympathetic to republicans. the two republicans on the committee will not use those concerns. house republicans before the committee met this morning held a press conference and called them policy republicans, so this is very much a partisan issue, but i think it was interesting was to hear from those officers, saying that those who committed whose atrocities on january 6 still feel justified committed whose atrocities on january 6 still feeljustified in their actions, to believe what they did was ok. they have said that his latest so important for americans to watch the body cam, social media footage for themselves and to listen to the accounts of these officers. that is how thick, thank you. —— nada tawfik. let's bring in olivia troye, who served as a homeland security and counterterrorism adviser to vice president mike pence. olivia, it is good to speak to you again. what is your impression of this first day of hearings? i thought the committee did a really good job of level setting and
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setting the baseline for the investigation of moving forward. i think it was important to really get the honest factual accounts from these officers, who were so courageous and brave that day, who did hold the line and i think that the end of the day, we saw humans, we saw fellow americans there, giving their testimony about what they saw, what they lived in a very honest account, and i think it was also important to see the committee members who were asking the questions, who also lives that day and were clearly emotional about it. watching adam kinzinger, that was very heartbreaking to watch, someone who has been a military service member, who obviously is just beside himself on everything that has happened across our country that led to this moment, and so i think it was important to start this way, so that, hopefully, this hearing starts to really reach the american
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populace in a manner that is honest and that we concert to have this honest conversation about the events of that day. honest conversation about the events of that da . ~ . ., ,., honest conversation about the events ofthatda .~ . ., .,., of that day. what about the decision that the minority _ of that day. what about the decision that the minority house _ of that day. what about the decision that the minority house leader - of that day. what about the decision | that the minority house leader kevin mccarthy made, first of all in nominating members who were very close supporters of president trump and sceptics about what happened on generally six, and the claimed linkage between what mr trump did at the valley and what happened on capitol hill that day? but also then to say, republicans are knocking to recognise this process? —— not going to. i recognise this process? -- not going to. ~' n ., , recognise this process? -- not going to. ~' a ., , ., , to. i think kevin mccarthy has roven to. i think kevin mccarthy has proven himself _ to. i think kevin mccarthy has proven himself not _ to. i think kevin mccarthy has proven himself not to - to. i think kevin mccarthy has proven himself not to just - to. i think kevin mccarthy has proven himself not to just be | to. i think kevin mccarthy has| proven himself not to just be a coward but a fraud, to be perfectly frank the sub came forward right afterjanuary 6, was passionate and said that donald trump was impossible for this event and that he certainly incited it, and then he changed his tune —— responsible for. his intent to obscure and obstruct this investigation and to continue to double down on the lies it
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continues to today, and the people he wanted to appoint to the committee likejim jordan would have just turn this into a circus, and this is serious matter that matters for national security. we need to the to the bottom of this and really understand any process failures that took place as well from that perspective, and really understand going forward, because these underlying movements to remain across our country, it is part of our homeland security, it is a threat, and we need to get to the bottom of it. threat, and we need to get to the bottom of it— bottom of it. used to work with former vice _ bottom of it. used to work with former vice president - bottom of it. used to work with former vice president mike - bottom of it. used to work with i former vice president mike pence. what do you hope will be his attitude towards this committee and its materials? i attitude towards this committee and its materials?— its materials? i hope you will cooperate — its materials? i hope you will cooperate if— its materials? i hope you will cooperate if asked _ its materials? i hope you will cooperate if asked to - its materials? i hope you will cooperate if asked to testify l its materials? i hope you will - cooperate if asked to testify about the event of that day, what he knew, what he did not know, in a very factual matter. we are seeing discounts being reported by reporters and books coming forward about what happened, what he lives that day, but i do not know. i've seen them double down on things such as election integrity, in the guise
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of pushing the big ally, the big lie that almost led to his own threats against his own life that day, and it was clear to those people outside that mob, outside the capital, had every intent of hurting these people. i hope he will come forward with the truth if asked to do so. olivia troye, former national security adviser at the white house, thank you so much for being with us on bbc news. thank you so much for being with us on bbc newa— thank you so much for being with us on bbc news. thanks for having me. much more — on bbc news. thanks for having me. much more on _ on bbc news. thanks for having me. much more on that _ on bbc news. thanks for having me. much more on that story _ on bbc news. thanks for having me. much more on that story still- on bbc news. thanks for having me. much more on that story still to - much more on that story still to come in the course of this hour, but now let's move on to the tokyo olympic games. and a shock for the us team. four—times gold medallist simone biles pulled out of the us team gymnastics final today after a rare mistake in her opening vault. ms biles issued a statement confirming she wasn't injured — just a little injury to her pride. lucy hockings is in tokyo for us. watching the women's gymnastics team
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event, when it was announced that simone biles would not be continuing after the last rotation, there was a real shock. after the last rotation, there was a realshock. it after the last rotation, there was a real shock. it was palpable. you can sense how people were reacting to this, because she is such a superstar in the sport, by far and away the most decorated gymnast in the world. she was expected to do incredibly well and carry her team, forced to withdraw from the event, as you mentioned, and just releasing as you mentioned, and just releasing a statement, citing mental health reasons for that stuff i have to say, the event was won by the russian old and the committee. they are not competing under the russian flag because of a punishment handed out by the world anti—doping agency, so they are competing as neutrals, but they won the event and team usa came second and then the great british athletes took the bronze. the big developed here, we are waiting to see what implications this will have for simone files when she competes, we hope, later in the week in the individual events, but let's bring you some thoughts and
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the perspective of the sports reporter for the washington post. the perspective of the sports reporterfor the washington post. we have had the statement through from simone files. can you tell us what she said? . simone files. can you tell us what she said? ,, ., , , ., she said? she said that she is not hurt, that she said? she said that she is not hurt. that only — she said? she said that she is not hurt, that only the _ she said? she said that she is not hurt, that only the injury - she said? she said that she is not hurt, that only the injury was - she said? she said that she is not hurt, that only the injury was to l hurt, that only the injury was to her pride — hurt, that only the injury was to her pride. she performed poorly, uncharacteristically poorly, sunday night _ uncharacteristically poorly, sunday night in _ uncharacteristically poorly, sunday night in the full exercise and devote — night in the full exercise and devote and she felt that it was best for her_ devote and she felt that it was best for her team—mates to go on without her in _ for her team—mates to go on without her in the _ for her team—mates to go on without her in the team competition, because she was_ her in the team competition, because she was afraid she was going to cost them _ she was afraid she was going to cost them a _ she was afraid she was going to cost them a medal with her sloppiness, imprecision, i think is probably a better— imprecision, i think is probably a better word. imprecision, i think is probably a better word-— better word. how had she been performing _ better word. how had she been performing up _ better word. how had she been performing up until _ better word. how had she been performing up until now? - better word. how had she been performing up until now? we . better word. how had she been l performing up until now? we had better word. how had she been - performing up until now? we had been promised a new move from her, for instance. has she been on form? no, she stepped — instance. has she been on form? no, she stepped up during the floor exercise — she stepped up during the floor exercise on sunday, she stepped off the mat, _
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exercise on sunday, she stepped off the mat, which is very, very un—characteristic for her. she had another— un—characteristic for her. she had another poor performance in the vault _ another poor performance in the vault she — another poor performance in the vault. she changed her mind on one of her— vault. she changed her mind on one of her spins— vault. she changed her mind on one of her spins in mid air and cut it down_ of her spins in mid air and cut it down from— of her spins in mid air and cut it down from i_ of her spins in mid air and cut it down from i think three and have spins— down from i think three and have spins to — down from i think three and have spins to two and a half. it was just not _ spins to two and a half. it was just not it— spins to two and a half. it was just not it was— spins to two and a half. it was just not... it was clear something was not... it was clear something was not right — not... it was clear something was not right. and she was interacting with her— not right. and she was interacting with her team—mates, she was smiling, — with her team—mates, she was smiling, but there just was not joy on her— smiling, but there just was not joy on her face, — smiling, but there just was not joy on herface, and smiling, but there just was not joy on her face, and you don't really want _ on her face, and you don't really want to— on her face, and you don't really want tojump to on her face, and you don't really want to jump to that conclusion on the first— want to jump to that conclusion on the first day of competition, you 'ust the first day of competition, you just want— the first day of competition, you just want to watch and see what happens. — just want to watch and see what happens, but then today it just, she 'ust happens, but then today it just, she just pulled _ happens, but then today it just, she just pulled out, she said i'm just not going — just pulled out, she said i'm just not going to do it, going into the human_ not going to do it, going into the human pics, she had been asked what she was— human pics, she had been asked what she was looking forward to, and she said, _ she was looking forward to, and she said. "i _ she was looking forward to, and she said. "i am — she was looking forward to, and she said, "i am looking forward to them being _ said, "i am looking forward to them being over," — said, "i am looking forward to them being over," so that also was in her mindset— being over," so that also was in her mindset coming in. being over,�* so that also was in her mindset coming in.— being over," so that also was in her
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mindset coming in.— mindset coming in. cindy, so great to net mindset coming in. cindy, so great to get your — mindset coming in. cindy, so great to get your insights, _ mindset coming in. cindy, so great to get your insights, thanks - mindset coming in. cindy, so great to get your insights, thanks for - to get your insights, thanks for joining us. cindy boren there of the washington post. they will be a lot of talk now about athletes and their mental health after this issue with simone biles any she has probably talked about it. in the same way came after naomi osaka started talking about it, and it was another shock here earlier today in tokyo, when the japanese superstar tennis player also lost in her third round. she had a shock exit against a czech player in straight sets, and just to give you some perspective, naomi osaka, second in the world at the moment, and the czech player 42nd, so naomi osaka did not speak straight after the match, but afterwards said her disappointed —— how disappointed and trust she was, and that the olympics is a special kind of pressure. she has been one of the main faces here in tokyo, you see here everywhere you go, on billboards, she was the one chosen to like the old and the elliptic flame, so this really was a shock in japan today when she went out in the
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third set. the other concerning thing here in the past few hours as we have heard from the japanese print minister, telling people to watch the olympics from the safety of their homes, do not come out and share the experience of watching the olympics, to stay safe and watch it at home, and that's because we've had over 2800 new infections reported here today of covid — that the highest infection rate reported since the pandemic began. and also we are hearing some of the hospitals being told to prepare more bets and possibly also delay some surgeries, so there is concern about the rising infection rates. lucy hockings there in tokyo for us. in the us, the centers for disease control has updated its stance on mask wearing for vaccinated americans. the revised guidance says that vaccinated individuals should wear masks in indoor public settings where there is a high risk of transmission. officials site that the growing threat of the delta
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variant has caused them to update their guidance. new guidance about mask wearing isn't the only thing being introduced. as vaccination rates stall in parts of the us, some workers will now face losing theirjobs if they don't get a covid—i9 jab. in the past hour, president joe biden has said the white house is considering whether to require all federal employees to be vaccinated. just take a look at the increasing number of places embracing vaccine mandates. the us department of veterans affairs became the first american federal agency to require its employees to be vaccinated. in new york city, all city workers are being told they have to be vaccinated by mid—september. california also announced that state employees and health care workers must show proof of vaccination or get tested regularly. it's notjust the us — these mandates are also taking hold in europe. france has passed a law that makes
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a coronavirus health pass required for dining and travel, and italy will also require a similar covid—i9 pass for many activities. axios reporter caitlin owens has been writing about the implications of vaccine mandates and joins us now to explain more. caitlin, let me ask you first of all, has there been a material shift in what you might call... what is driving it? in what you might call. .. what is driving it?— driving it? well, this is to developing- _ driving it? well, this is to developing. less - driving it? well, this is to developing. less than - driving it? well, this is to developing. less than an| driving it? well, this is to - developing. less than an hour ago, as you just mentioned, president biden said there is a federal employee vaccine mandate under consideration, so that is as official as it gets, but we saw yesterday on monday a giant surgeon momentum for vaccine mandates starting among health care workers and health organisations, trickling down to some cities and states requiring workers to be tested, or vaccinated, and then as you mentioned the va came out with its
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announcement, so yesterday really felt like a turning point for the idea of vaccine mandates which have not been all that popular in the us. was struck, a ticket might�*ve been friday evening into saturday, when the president was engaged in a rally and spoke about how he agreed with k iv, the republican governor of alabama, who said, the people event to fight now are the unvaccinated —— kay ivey. is there a sense there is more hostility for the people in the united states who have for whatever reason i chose to be vaccinated? it does seem that way to me. there is growing recognition that the vaccines work really well, particularly the ones that are in the us, there is a very low percentage still even with the delta variant of people who are vaccinated that are a risk of hospitalisation and death. that means that if the domestic situation worsens here, this is primarily, at least among severe cases, an issue for
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unvaccinated americans, and we are started see the consequences of that. your sink hospital saying they're getting overwhelmed again, now the cdc is recommending vaccinated americans returns wearing masks, there could be economic implications, there's gotta be more spread, which mean more breakthrough infections among vaccinated, so i think you are seeing frustration with people who have held out and are not vaccinated yet, whether that is... . . are not vaccinated yet, whether that is... . , ., are not vaccinated yet, whether that is... caitlin owens from axios, thank you _ is. .. caitlin owens from axios, thank you for— is... caitlin owens from axios, thank you for being _ is... caitlin owens from axios, thank you for being with - is... caitlin owens from axios, thank you for being with us. i stay with us on bbc news. still to come: how sky the parrot really was the limit for some unsuspecting burglars. an independent review of child sexual exploitation in bradford has found that some children "remain unprotected" while some perpetrators "remain unknown and unchallenged". the author of the review, commissioned after nine local men were jailed for the sexual exploitation of girls in council care, says it makes for "distressing" reading. here's danny savage.
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this did concentrate on five young people who grew up as children in this city, who were known to social services, who, after reading this, you can see were repeatedly let down by adults whose job it was to keep them safe. one of them referred to as anna said of her experiences, "if only authorities had done what was recommended for me," and that recommendation was to send her to a secure unit. instead, aged 15, this report said she was allowed to marry her abuser in an islamic ceremony, and then go on and live with his family. and it's alleged that her social worker attended that ceremony when she was just 15 years old. now, truly a story to parrot on about. sarah white returned home in mid—june to find
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she had been burgled. they'd taken a number of things, including jewellery, but what hurt the most was that the thieves had taken her 20—year—old african grey parrot sky. but the parrot was to much to much of a "bird—en" for its abductors — what, with the bird's love of biting, her singing and her passionate hatred of men. so, with the help of charity beauty's legacy, the burglars returned sky to a much relieved sarah, whojoins us now. along with sky the parrot. sarah, welcome first of all. tell us about getting him back, because you had one of the worst days of your life, and then you got i guess what was one of the best?— and then you got i guess what was one of the best? yes. basically, we ut out one of the best? yes. basically, we put out an — one of the best? yes. basically, we put out an appeal. _ one of the best? yes. basically, we put out an appeal, and _ one of the best? yes. basically, we put out an appeal, and we - one of the best? yes. basically, we put out an appeal, and we had - one of the best? yes. basically, we put out an appeal, and we had a . one of the best? yes. basically, we| put out an appeal, and we had a few people contact us, and we put a massive appeal out. we basically had
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a gentleman that claims to have bought her and, a gentleman that claims to have bought herand, in a gentleman that claims to have bought her and, in bedfordshire, and i saw, he sent me the pictures, and over the months, all the pictures i had seen, none of them look like sky in this picture looks like her, and i knew straightaway it was sky, and we went on a bit of a road trip to go and get her. and, yeah, it was sky, and we were very, very lucky to find her. . �* . . sky, and we were very, very lucky to find her. ,, �* , ., , sky, and we were very, very lucky to find her. ,, �*, ., , , ., find her. she's a very beautiful arent. find her. she's a very beautiful parent- it _ find her. she's a very beautiful parent. it sounds _ find her. she's a very beautiful parent. it sounds like - find her. she's a very beautiful parent. it sounds like she's - find her. she's a very beautiful- parent. it sounds like she's quite a character, shall we say was not tell us about this hatred of men? —— shall we say? i us about this hatred of men? -- shall we say?— shall we say? i think with all parents. _ shall we say? i think with all parents. they _ shall we say? i think with all parents, they often - shall we say? i think with all parents, they often like - shall we say? i think with all| parents, they often like male shall we say? i think with all. parents, they often like male or female, and she is a rescue parent, so perhaps in her previous life, she may have... —— rescue parrot.
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so perhaps in her previous life, she may have... -- rescue parrot. sarah, i have to may have... -- rescue parrot. sarah, i have to say. — may have... -- rescue parrot. sarah, i have to say. i _ may have... -- rescue parrot. sarah, i have to say, ithink— may have... -- rescue parrot. sarah, i have to say, i think she _ may have... -- rescue parrot. sarah, i have to say, i think she may - may have... -- rescue parrot. sarah, i have to say, i think she may know l i have to say, i think she may know you're talking to a because she is displaying not her best side to me. laughter i will try not to take it personally. sky, it is genetic, i cannot do anything about it. i wonder if i can say hi to her. hello, sky! wonder if i can say hi to her. hello. sky!— wonder if i can say hi to her. hello. sky!_ i- wonder if i can say hi to her. hello, sky!_ i do . wonder if i can say hi to her. i hello, sky!_ i do not wonder if i can say hi to her. - hello, sky!_ i do not know hello, sky! say hello! i do not know if she has had _ hello, sky! say hello! i do not know if she has had anything _ hello, sky! say hello! i do not know if she has had anything to _ hello, sky! say hello! i do not know if she has had anything to say - hello, sky! say hello! i do not know if she has had anything to say to - if she has had anything to say to us. ,, , if she has had anything to say to us. . , ., if she has had anything to say to us. ,, , ., .. if she has had anything to say to us. . , ., ., ., ., if she has had anything to say to us. ,, , ., ., ., ., she us. she is not going to do it. she is a proper _ us. she is not going to do it. she is a proper star. _ us. she is not going to do it. she is a proper star. she _ us. she is not going to do it. she is a proper star. she is _ us. she is not going to do it. she is a proper star. she is not - us. she is not going to do it. she is a proper star. she is not going j is a proper star. she is not going to do it. i am not an owner of a parrot, i've never owned the birds, but i wondered how important she is to enter yourfamily but i wondered how important she is to enter your family life. i but i wondered how important she is to enter your family life.— to enter your family life. i mean, she is a very _ to enter your family life. i mean, she is a very intelligent - to enter your family life. i mean, she is a very intelligent parrot, i she is a very intelligent parrot, they have the mental age of a five—year—old, and they are very
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loving, and they live with you for a long time they can live up to 60 to 80 years old, she is only 20, so she is gone to live a long time, and we all adore her. she greets us every morning we get up and says goodbye to us when we leave the house, and she's a pleasure to have around, and obviously with me she's very loving, and she tolerates everybody else in the family! she is not as aggressive as people may think — it'sjust the family! she is not as aggressive as people may think — it's just with people she does not know. just as people may think - it'sjust with people she does not know.- people she does not know. just a ve less people she does not know. just a very less brief — people she does not know. just a very less brief question. - people she does not know. just a very less brief question. did - people she does not know. just a very less brief question. did the l very less brief question. did the man who had bought her and then put you in contact — was he slightly relieved to let go of her, being a man? i relieved to let go of her, being a man? ~ , relieved to let go of her, being a man? ~' , ., ., , man? i think they would have been, es, man? i think they would have been, yes. because _ man? i think they would have been, yes. because she — man? i think they would have been, yes, because she would _ man? i think they would have been, yes, because she would not - man? i think they would have been, yes, because she would not have i man? i think they would have been, i yes, because she would not have been quiet, she would given him a hard time. i knew that about her, so, yeah, they would've found her difficult to deal with.— yeah, they would've found her difficult to deal with. terrific it. thank you _ difficult to deal with. terrific it. thank you for _ difficult to deal with. terrific it. thank you forjoining _ difficult to deal with. terrific it. thank you forjoining us, - difficult to deal with. terrific it. | thank you forjoining us, sarah, difficult to deal with. terrific it. - thank you forjoining us, sarah, and sky as well, and thank you for being
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a lot more than a bird brain, you have to say that, don't you? thank you very much for your company as well. you are watching bbc world news. hello. tuesday has brought us a day of some sunny spells, but also some really torrential showers and frequent thunderstorms, too. this was the picture in lincolnshire earlier on tuesday. and we will be keeping that theme of really heavy downpours over the next couple days, too, because this area of low pressure is driving our weather — and it is a slow—moving feature, just slowly drifting its way northwards through this evening and on into wednesday, as well. it's producing particularly heavy rainfall across parts of scotland. the met office issued an amber warning earlier on tuesday, for all those thunderstorms across central and northern parts of scotland. so, torrential downpours leading to potential flooding and some disruption, too. the showers across scotland will only gradually ease as we head through the evening hours into tonight, as well — whereas further south, this evening and through tonight,
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most of those will tend to ease in intensity, as well. this is the story overnight — drier towards the south, still plenty of heavy showers for northwest england, parts of scotland in particular, too, where there could be some ongoing flooding issues, and temperatures overnight falling to between 13—15 celsius. during the day tomorrow, this area of low pressure is still with us, just drifting slowly northwards. got a bit more of a breeze developing in the south especially, tending to push the showers through a bit quicker. but again, across parts of scotland, they will be really slow—moving. so another amber warning from the met office, this time for heavy rainfall across parts of central and northern scotland, as well. so here, that rainfall will not only be heavy, but persistent through the course of the day — whereas further south, the showers and thunderstorms will move through a little bit quicker. a bit more of a breeze will be developing through the day. so hit—and—miss heavy showers and thunderstorms, as well, blustery close to parts of southern england in south wales, whereas further north, those lighter winds will be quite slow—moving in nature.
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temperature—wise, cooler than recent days, highs of around 16—21 celsius during the day on wednesday. some sunshine in between some of these heavy downpours. and then, moving through wednesday night into thursday, low pressure starts to ease off towards the northeast, the winds rotating around the area of low pressure — so coming in and north or northwesterly direction. still some showers on thursday for parts of scotland, northern ireland, and northern england too, whereas further south it should be a dry day. so sunny spells, it's still an unsettled story, and temperatures a little bit cooler particularly in the north, around 15—21 celsius. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. our top stories. the congressional inquiry into the capitol riot has begun with dramatic testimony from police officers on duty that day. we are not asking for medals, recognition. we simply wantjustice and accountability. north and south korea have restored a communication hotline after agreeing to rebuild trust and improve ties. parents rejoice! forget square eyes — new evidence says plonking your kids in front of the tv is actually good for them. and he's out of the ballroom and back on the comedy circuit. we talk to bill bailey about his wild year.
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welcome back. the first day of hearings into the capitol riots serve as a brutal reminderjust what the serving officers went through that day. the testimony, which included previously unseen video footage from january 6th, was both emotional and dramatic in equal parts, as the officers described being overwhelmed by rioters who were better equipped for the clashes that unfolded. i too was being crushed by the rioters. i could feel myself losing oxygen and recall thinking to myself, "this is how i'm going to die, defending this entrance." also on display, the sheer anger and frustration towards the rioters who believed they did nothing wrong. the people that were there, even to this day, think that they were right. they think that they were right,
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and that makes for a scary recipe for the future of this country. let's bring in former adviser to president george w bush, ron christie, and former national political director for hillary clinton's 2016 campaign, amanda renteria. some friends of the programme for whose knowledge were always grateful. let's speak to you both. can i start with the first of all. let's take up the point harry dunn was making, the perception around some of those who rioted that they were right and their critics are wrong. do you think this hearing has any chance of shifting any of that perspex and?— perspex and? good evening. -- perception- _ perspex and? good evening. -- perception. yes _ perspex and? good evening. -- perception. yes i _ perspex and? good evening. -- perception. yes i do. _ perspex and? good evening. -- perception. yes i do. i- perspex and? good evening. -- perception. yes i do. ithink- perspex and? good evening. -- perception. yes i do. i think it. perspex and? good evening. -- i perception. yes i do. i think it was very emotional and compelling testimony from four brave police officers who had nothing to do other than to share their story, and they
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share their story with video and with audio. and the american people could see for themselves what happened that day. it wasn't a peaceful protest, it wasn't people out protesting against a stolen election, it was people trying to penetrate the united states capitol building, and they often very violent manner. i expect the pendulum will ship from a lot of these pro trump supporters who realise once they seen this video how atrocious it was.— how atrocious it was. let's talk a bit about what _ how atrocious it was. let's talk a bit about what the _ how atrocious it was. let's talk a bit about what the democrats . how atrocious it was. let's talk a | bit about what the democrats are hoping to achieve with this. they have had the spat with kevin mccarthy over who would serve on the committee. two republicans on the committee, but two who are well—known critics of donald trump and were clearly passionate and angry. does that risk of this being first—rate as a partisan process? i think it was very important to have
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these _ think it was very important to have these two — think it was very important to have these two republicans front and centre _ these two republicans front and centre with the democrats on that. i think— centre with the democrats on that. i think it _ centre with the democrats on that. i think it was — centre with the democrats on that. i think it was very important to make sure the _ think it was very important to make sure the conversation really was around — sure the conversation really was around what happened and really giving _ around what happened and really giving space for these police officers _ giving space for these police officers who are on the front lines. ithink— officers who are on the front lines. i think it _ officers who are on the front lines. i think it was — officers who are on the front lines. i think it was very effective. you wouldn't — i think it was very effective. you wouldn't have been better if there were more — wouldn't have been better if there were more republicans, sure. ithink everyone _ were more republicans, sure. ithink everyone has— were more republicans, sure. ithink everyone has said that. i think the door— everyone has said that. i think the door is— everyone has said that. i think the door is very— everyone has said that. i think the door is very open to having that going _ door is very open to having that going forward, but the reality is this needs to be taken very seriously— this needs to be taken very seriously and you do have two republican voices out there naming that, republican voices out there naming that. and _ republican voices out there naming that, and that's what will have this be a much — that, and that's what will have this be a much more bipartisan process. the other— be a much more bipartisan process. the other thing that's important to note is— the other thing that's important to note is there aren't just republicans in congress a bit in the house. _ republicans in congress a bit in the house. but— republicans in congress a bit in the house, but there are republicans outside _ house, but there are republicans outside the host body you know the truth of _ outside the host body you know the truth of what this was and for them, they are _ truth of what this was and for them, they are speaking on behalf of them. ithink— they are speaking on behalf of them. i think we _ they are speaking on behalf of them. i think we will see a lot more of those _ i think we will see a lot more of those voices come forward as well. innocence. — those voices come forward as well. innocence, amanda is suggesting this will give courage to those who have
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kept their heads down —— in a sense. i agree with amanda on this. i think the minority leader has put himself in a really bad situation. do you pledge 100% fealty to donald trump or do you pledge 100% fealty to the truthfulness of and what we saw today was a truthful accounting of what happened on that day. the republicans would be wise, both inside congress and outside, of stepping up and saying this should be a nonpartisan process, they should be an american process of getting to the truth. any attempt to shake this towards a donald trump pro narrative is a mistake and one that i think a lot of voters will take out on these people who aren't seeking the truth. do take out on these people who aren't seeking the truth.— seeking the truth. do you think that nancy pelosi _ seeking the truth. do you think that nancy pelosi took _ seeking the truth. do you think that nancy pelosi took a _ seeking the truth. do you think that nancy pelosi took a risk _ seeking the truth. do you think that nancy pelosi took a risk by - nancy pelosi took a risk by nominating benny thompson was mac he's not known as mr bipartisan on
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the democrat side? ida. he's not known as mr bipartisan on the democrat side?— he's not known as mr bipartisan on the democrat side? no, he's not and i've known the democrat side? no, he's not and i've known the _ the democrat side? no, he's not and i've known the chairman _ the democrat side? no, he's not and i've known the chairman for - the democrat side? no, he's not and i've known the chairman for many . i've known the chairman for many years. he is an outspoken partisan democrat, but he's also a nice guy. if anybody spent time watching the hearings today, he came across as being very fair and very reasonable. yes, did the speaker take a risk? yes, did the speaker take a risk? yes, but did he report himself well today? i think he did. i yes, but did he report himself well today? i think he did.— today? ithink he did. i agree. i think one _ today? ithink he did. i agree. i think one thing _ today? ithink he did. i agree. i think one thing is _ today? ithink he did. i agree. i think one thing is he's - today? ithink he did. i agree. i think one thing is he's very - think one thing is he's very approachable. those kinds of thing manners _ approachable. those kinds of thing manners -- — approachable. those kinds of thing manners —— matter, so i think what is really— manners —— matter, so i think what is really clear— manners —— matter, so i think what is really clear here is this was to see what— is really clear here is this was to see what was the truth today, and he stuck to _ see what was the truth today, and he stuck to that — see what was the truth today, and he stuck to that and allow people the space _ stuck to that and allow people the space to _ stuck to that and allow people the space to talk about what was happening. in general, the emotion of today— happening. in general, the emotion of today was a surprise to a lot of people. _ of today was a surprise to a lot of people, certainly as i watched it and remembered those rooms and really— and remembered those rooms and really hearing those details of what those _ really hearing those details of what those officers said. you have to
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have _ those officers said. you have to have a — those officers said. you have to have a chair— those officers said. you have to have a chair or somebody who is leading — have a chair or somebody who is leading it — have a chair or somebody who is leading it to allow that kind of space — leading it to allow that kind of space to — leading it to allow that kind of space to happen, and so today, he did a _ space to happen, and so today, he did a great— space to happen, and so today, he did a greatjob and really space to happen, and so today, he did a great job and really setting the stage for this. i think what you heard _ the stage for this. i think what you heard today was also the people that showed _ heard today was also the people that showed up _ heard today was also the people that showed up to talk about it, how much emotion— showed up to talk about it, how much emotion they brought to this conversation was a really important aspect. _ conversation was a really important asect. �* . . conversation was a really important asect, �* ., ., ., conversation was a really important asect. �* . . . ., conversation was a really important asect. �* ., ., ., ., �* conversation was a really important asect. �* . ., ., ., �* , aspect. amanda and ron, we'll be fascinated to _ aspect. amanda and ron, we'll be fascinated to see _ aspect. amanda and ron, we'll be fascinated to see how— aspect. amanda and ron, we'll be fascinated to see how this - aspect. amanda and ron, we'll be fascinated to see how this hearingj fascinated to see how this hearing develops develops. thank you so much for giving us your first for giving us yourfirst impressions. north and south korea have restored a communication hotline after agreeing to rebuild trust and improve ties. the direct line was set up to avoid tension and possible conflict between the two neighbours, which are officially still at war. all contact was severed lastjune by the north after kim jong un's sister described the south as "riff raff" who should pay for their crimes. they even blew up the border office built to improve communications. our correspondent laura bicker explains what these hotlines are for.
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they are there to avoid any kind of tension. they are there to avoid conflict. they were set up back in 1971. now remember, these two countries are officially still at war because when the fighting ended, it ended in an armistice, not a peace treaty. this today, actually, is the anniversary of that armistice signing and on this anniversary, this communication lines have been reopened. last year, lastjune, north korea turned its back on the south. not only did he cut the communication lines, it blew up what is known as the inter—korean liaison office. this was in office built at the border specifically for the two sides to talk. and having turned its back on the south, this happened after the relationship between pyongyang and remember all that hope when kim jong—un met donald trump that there would be a nuclear deal, well all of that fell through and so did north
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and south relations, and they began to sour. and in the last year, there has been very little contact between the two countries. now, we understand that since april, there have been a number of letters between seoul's president moon and the north korean leader, kim jong—un. we understand those letters have been about things like covid response but also about reestablishing this communication lines. so, today, a short conversation was had between the person who mans the south korean line and the person who mans the north korean line, and we hear that the person on the south korean side said, "it's good to be talking to the north once again." you might see what's... the british museum says it will restore eight ancient glass artefacts that were smashed in last year's devastating explosion in the lebanese capital, beirut. the objects were among roman, byzantine and islamic—era glass vessels in a museum
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near the port, which was at the centre of the blast. the artefacts are said to hold huge historic, artistic and cultural significance. it's hoped their restoration will be a symbol of healing following the disaster. earlier, i spoke with jamie fraser, curator of the british museum, and asked him how its involvement came about. we were shocked as everyone was, when the news of the explosion occurred on the 4th of august last year. and so, the curator for the contemporary middle east, myself, and the curator for the ancient levant, we got in touch with colleagues in lebanon and asked what the situation was with the cultural institutions and what the british museum could do to help. it could be described as the most complicated jigsaw ever, but it's much more complicated, isn't it? the issue here is that one museum had one case that held 7a really fragile glass vessels. the force of the blast was that on to the ground, so 72 of those specials smashed
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into smithereens, plus the glass from the place and that their surrounding windows. imagine getting all the pieces from 7a differentjigsaw boxes mixing altogether, and you're approaching the scope of the problem. we've seen some pictures of the state of the inside of the museum at this point. having got the stuff all out, is there a kind of logic to how you pieced together something like this, or is it almost a random exercise for the first few days and weeks? i guess it's like being first on the scene in a traffic accident. immediate first aid before you do the reconstructive surgery. our colleagues have taken the lead with this with assistance from french conservators from paris, and what they're doing very slowly is working out which glass shard
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belongs to which glass vessel and which shard is from which display case, to work out first of all what bits should go together before they actually put them together later on. it reminds me of an exercise they've conducted in germany with records of the former stasi, where they were all shredded when they tried to put the pieces together. and they're still going, as far as i know. how long do you think this will take? unfortunately, the majority of the vessels have been identified as not reconstructable at all, but of those, eight have been identified as potentially reconstructable. they are still in beirut at the moment. they will cross to the british museum later this year, and in maybe three or four months, with our expertise here in the conservation laboratory to the british museum, we should be able to mend them as they once were. it's a terrific thought.
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is this the biggest challenge you've faced? it's a remarkable project, it's certainly one that we'll test our patience. will test our patience. i think it's really important. with funding from the european arts foundation, i think it's easy to look at these sorts of disasters and say, well, you define a museum by what it's lost. i think we're all driven by defining on what it can gain. that's a wonderful thing that drives us to do this. stay with us on bbc news. still to come — comedian bill bailey on comedy, cabaret and the bbc news theme tune. a woman who suffered life—changing injuries when an unoccupied car ran over a tent in north wales says her two—year—old daughter
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was saved when her husband threw her out of the way. rob thomas reports. this weekend's event was the fifth time that the conscious tribal gathering festival has been held. billed as a family friendly event, it features musical performances and a range of self—improvement courses and activities. but forjenna o'neill and herfamily from gloucestershire, it nearly ended in tragedy. asjenna and her husband, stephen, sat by their tent along with two—year—old daughter ayla early on saturday afternoon, a car parked at the top of the field began rolling down the hill towards them. in fact, as the car approached, he grabbed his daughter and hurled her to safety — something he says he has no memory of. ayla was left with just minor cuts, while herfather suffered a fractured ankle. mum jenna was not so lucky. she suffered a broken
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collarbone, ten broken ribs, a fractured pelvis and injuries to her liver and spleen. ..jenna told the bbc from hospital in stoke, where she's still being treated for her extensive injuries. the husband turned around and saw in time and moved him and his daughter out of the way, and then... yeah, helped the mum because the car was going so fast, it was a little bit too late, and they were stopped by a tree. the family have raised questions about how vehicles arriving at the festival were positioned on the site, and if rules about safe parking were properly enforced. some of those that witnessed the incident on saturday if you're a parent of a young child,
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there's every chance have panicked at some moment about the amount of screen time your kid is getting. unsurprisingly, children's tv viewing skyrocketed during lockdown, and online school forced many to spend hours in front of a computer. but what if i told you that experts are now saying screen time might not actually be such a bad thing? research is suggesting that screen time can in fact increase a child's social and emotional intelligence. here to explain more is dr colleen russojohnson, a developmental psychologist who studies the effect of media and technology in children and the co—founder of the ok play app, which encourages creative digital play for kids. she joins us from toronto. doctorjohnson, it's lovely to have you with us to talk about this. i know a lot of people say that we would say that because we work on tv, but more seriously, what lies behind the reassessment?-
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tv, but more seriously, what lies behind the reassessment? thank you so much for — behind the reassessment? thank you so much for having _ behind the reassessment? thank you so much for having me. _ behind the reassessment? thank you so much for having me. we _ behind the reassessment? thank you so much for having me. we know - behind the reassessment? thank you | so much for having me. we know from research that children do indeed learn valuable skills from tv shows and apps. whether it's facial skills or vocabulary or social emotional learning. we need to move past these old ways of thinking. there's so much variety would not only with content, but the technology itself, and lumping it all together in making this concrete rules is doing us a disservice, especially to the parents who are encouraging that judgment. we also have to realise every kid is different and the ability to even have a screen time debate in the first place is a privileged position to be in because some kids don't have the luxury for there to be a choice. you need guidelines that take into account the fact that screens might at times be the best options are families of. i suppose their circumstances where
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the alternative of screen —based learning is better than no learning at all, but there are still people who ask whether it's the best option. who ask whether it's the best 0 tion. . , ., who ask whether it's the best otion. . , ., ., , , option. certainly, a common-sense a- roach option. certainly, a common-sense approach is — option. certainly, a common-sense approach is what — option. certainly, a common-sense approach is what we _ option. certainly, a common-sense approach is what we need - option. certainly, a common-sense approach is what we need to - option. certainly, a common-sense approach is what we need to take i approach is what we need to take care. if you can be playing with your children, your kids can be safely in school learning, that's wonderful. but what we want to move her away from our these absolute rules is based on the research we have seen in the last decades. these are not evil devices and there's a lot of quality content out there that can benefit your child. tell! lot of quality content out there that can benefit your child. tell us about the 0k _ that can benefit your child. tell us about the ok play _ that can benefit your child. tell us about the ok play app _ that can benefit your child. tell us about the ok play app because . about the ok play app because it's time to apply some of this to that. in the way it's used and what it encourages children to do. absolutely. ev creators and app creators, ifeel like i'm lucky to be one of those, but i have an
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academic background. i'm a researcher person i'm applying years of research into the ok play app. it's based on... what we're focusing on is celebrating kids ability to star in their own mini show. the kid is in the director 's chair and gets to create their own personalised stories. ., g ., to create their own personalised stories. ., �*, stories. doctorjohnson, it's fascinating _ stories. doctorjohnson, it's fascinating to _ stories. doctorjohnson, it's fascinating to talk _ stories. doctorjohnson, it's fascinating to talk to - stories. doctorjohnson, it's fascinating to talk to you . stories. doctorjohnson, it's i fascinating to talk to you about this. thank you very much for being with us. . ~ this. thank you very much for being with us. ., ,, , ., ., this. thank you very much for being with us. . ~' , ., ., . that would cheer up my parents because they were convinced i was sitting too close to this television. they were right, i did need glasses. now, he was the breakout star of last yea r�*s strictly come dancing, from unlikely dancer to deserving winner bill bailey entertained a nation desperate for fun during the cold winter of 2020. and now with theatres, and festivals back open, he's back to doing what he does best.
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from a new stand—up tour, to starring at proud cabaret in london, the multi—talented performer is taking advantage of the new found freedoms, even performing in front of his first live crowd in a year over the weekend as he told me a little earlier. it's the first i've done in a year, yes. i did a gig in london nearly a year ago now, and that was an outdoor gig as well, greenwich festival. but this was a much bigger crowd, i have to say, and it was extraordinary that luckily, the weather held out. the forecast was lightning — notjust rain, but actual lightning — and that never materialised, so i guess the gods were being kind to us. it was quite overwhelming, i have to say, being in front of that number of people after having not done a gig for nearly a year. it did occur to me, i've done a
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little pub gig to work myself... first get back, a massive arena, 30,000 people, on you go! anybody who watched — 30,000 people, on you go! anybody who watched his _ 30,000 people, on you go! anybody who watched his british _ 30,000 people, on you go! anybody who watched his british television i who watched his british television and things of you as a mainstay of it. —— wash his british television. of course, i imagine that would've propelled me to a wider audience because it's such a popular show and its watched by so many people of all ages. when i was on sunday morning. there's always a thought with festivals because people go and wander around, festivals because people go and wanderaround, but festivals because people go and wander around, but i thought saturday night, it was a big night, everyone had gone out. maybe half 11 on a sunday morning. i'm just going
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to lie in my tent for another five minutes, and somebody will film it on their phone. i was a little bit nervous about this. about 11 o'clock, i went off to see if there would be anyone there. they all showed up, so i guess the strictly affects have had something to do with that. ., �* , , with that. you're mixing things up because you're — with that. you're mixing things up because you're going _ with that. you're mixing things up because you're going to _ with that. you're mixing things up because you're going to be - with that. you're mixing things up because you're going to be the i with that. you're mixing things up| because you're going to be the mc with that. you're mixing things up i because you're going to be the mc of proud cabaret, filling in the shoes ofjulian clary. it’s proud cabaret, filling in the shoes ofjulian clary-— ofjulian clary. it's quite a different _ ofjulian clary. it's quite a different show. _ ofjulian clary. it's quite a different show. my i ofjulian clary. it's quite a i different show. my standup is, i ofjulian clary. it's quite a - different show. my standup is, i do a two hour set. i have lots of instruments of stories and jokes. i'm joining the cast of what is already an established show. one of them was whenjulian clary was hosting, which he did brilliantly. it's a cast of burlesque dancers and
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swords welders and fire eaters. it's almost from another age. you're in an intimate setting. —— sword swallowers. you get a table near the stage, you get dinner, its proper old school — dinner and a show. i'm going to be master of ceremonies. i get to host this and interact with the audience in this intimate setting, which is brilliant because it's something i very rarely get to do. i it's something i very rarely get to do. . , ., �* ., ., it's something i very rarely get to do. . �* ., ., ., do. i gather you're quite a fan of the bbc news _ do. i gather you're quite a fan of the bbc news theme. _ do. i gather you're quite a fan of the bbc news theme. why? it's| do. i gather you're quite a fan of. the bbc news theme. why? it's got this terrific sort _ the bbc news theme. why? it's got this terrific sort of _ the bbc news theme. why? it's got this terrific sort of pulsing _ the bbc news theme. why? it's got this terrific sort of pulsing beat i this terrific sort of pulsing beat to it, which it pulses as the clock ticks down to when the news starts. and i thought this would make a great dance track, so i messed around with it and post it to some dance music. it became a bit of a viral youtube hit. when i was on
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tourin viral youtube hit. when i was on tour in europe a few years ago, people give me their own mix of it. "i've done a remix of your new theme." they do this dance version, dubstep version, trance version, rave version. it's a testament to the fact that it's a great piece of music, but it works and so many different ways.— different ways. sounds to me that the are different ways. sounds to me that they are playing — different ways. sounds to me that they are playing our— different ways. sounds to me that they are playing our song. - different ways. sounds to me that they are playing our song. that i they are playing our song. that might be a point at which to fade out. search for it online, i'm sure you'll find it. and just before we go, it cost £2 million and it was hoped that the marble arch mound would draw people back to the west end after the pandemic. the designers had promised a park—like landscape, as seen here in the design proposals. but punters have been left dissapointed, with one describing it as the worst attraction in london. tickets to climb the man made hill start at £4.50, but tourists have complained that instead of soaring views of central
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london, they've been greeted with rubble and scaffolding. hello. this time last week, many places were seeing temperatures over 30 degrees. but the heatwave is now well and truly behind us and we've seen that change already to much more unsettled weather. there's been some heavy downpours with disruptive flooding recently. more of that to come, because this area of low pressure is dominating our weather. it's going to be pretty slow—moving over the next few days, and the met office have issued an amber weather warning for particularly heavy rain across parts of central and northern scotland. across parts of central here, flooding and significant disruption is likely. it's notjust across parts of central and northern scotland that we've got the heavy rain. in fact, lots of heavy showers and thunderstorms quite widely across the uk developing on wednesday with some sunshine in between. but there's a bit more of a breeze in the south so that will pull the showers through, whereas across parts of scotland they will be really quite slow—moving, affecting a few places for several hours in a row. so, with that threat of some heavy
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rain and some thunderstorms, could be some disruption to travel over the next couple of days. risk of surface water flooding in those intense downpours. so, as we head through into wednesday evening, then, the showers in the south and south—east gradually easing away but we'll see some showery rain continuing overnight further north, particularly across parts of scotland, into the early hours of thursday. now through thursday, low pressure will start to drift off towards the east, and that's going to open the doors for more of a north or north—westerly airflow. still going to bring some showers on thursday, particularly for scotland, northern ireland and northern england. rainfall totals will be mounting up across scotland, but it has been very dry so far this month. further south and east on thursday, it's looking largely dry. some sunny spells, and temperatures up to about 21 degrees in the warmest spots, typically the mid to high teens across the north of the uk. looking towards the end of the working week and into friday, then, another area of low pressure looks like it moves in towards the south, so we could see some showery rain just shifting its way eastwards across parts of england and wales. but quite a bit of drier weather developing behind that.
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so, sunny spells and a few scattered showers around through the course of friday. still reasonably mild in the south, 20 degrees or so, but we're looking at the mid to high teens across the north of scotland. so, heading on through into friday and then into the weekend as well, we've got this north—westerly airflow that is going to be affecting the uk. so, low pressure sitting out towards the east, a ridge of higher pressure building in in time for the weekend from the west. that means into the end of the week and this weekend, i think the showers will be quite few and far between. still isolated showers, but some spells of sunshine breaking through for both saturday and for sunday. so, saturday, sunny spells, you can see a few showers bubbling up during the afternoon, but it's starting to turn a bit cooler in the north with the arrival of those northerly winds. so, aberdeen for instance just 1a degrees or so, but we're holding on to the slightly warmer conditions, 21 or so, down towards the london region. and it's a similar day for sunday as well. again, sunny spells, few isolated showers during the course of the afternoon, a northerly breeze, so feeling quite chilly once again across the north and north—east of scotland,
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but still reasonably mild across southern parts of england and wales too. so, then, that's the weekend, what about into next week? heading into the start of august, then, if you look at these winds, this is the jet stream. it will start to move its way closer towards the uk, driving in areas of low pressure and some scattered showers at times through the course of next week. so, that does mean that it's going to be a fairly unsettled theme to the weather through the course of next week. the first week of august is looking a bit cooler certainly than it has been during much ofjuly. unsettled, with a mix of some showers, could be heavy at times, but equally there'll be some drier and brighter interludes as well. all the warnings are on our website. bye— bye.
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