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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 27, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm nuala mcgovern, this is outside source. in washington, hearings have begun in congress, into the attack on the us capitol. they ripped off my badge, they grabbed and stripped me of my radio. they seized ammunition that was secured to my body. they began to beat me with their fists and with what felt like hard metal objects. i'm frustrated that six months after a deadly— i'm frustrated that six months after a deadly insurrection breached the united _ a deadly insurrection breached the united states capital for several hours _ united states capital for several hours on — united states capital for several hours on live television, we still don't _ hours on live television, we still don't know_ hours on live television, we still don't know exactly what happened or why -- _ don't know exactly what happened or why —— capitol. the events are described as a coordinated attack to derail the
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peaceful transfer of power. we will have the latest. an explosion at a chemical plant in western germany kills at least one person was stop several others are miller singh. and simone biles withdraws from the team gymnastics at the tokyo olympics. she said she suffered an injury to her pride after stumbling that a. she comes in with pressure from so many directions. she comes in bearing the mantle of, you know, america's sweetheart, the big olympic star. seven months ago, on the 6th of january, hundreds of donald trump supporters launched an attack on the us capitol. now the first full congressional investigation into what exactly happened that day, has begun. the first witnesses to be called were four men who had been on duty that day. two capitol hill officers and two washington dc police officers gave evidence about the violence
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and hatred they experienced. here's what the very first witness had to say. sadly as a result of that day, we lost some good officers. but we held our line to protect the democratic process. because the alternative would have been a disaster. we are not asking for metals or recognition. we simply wantjustice and accountability. another officer gave his account of being violently attacked and beaten by the mob. a warning — you may find some of his words distressing. i heard chanting from some of the crowd — "get his gun" and "kill him with his own gun" to recognise i was at risk of being stripped of and killed with my own firearm. i was electrocuted again and again, and again with a taser. the nine—person committee listening
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to the testimony has the stated goal of providing "a complete and authoritative account of the attack". its members were selected by the democrat house speaker, nancy pelosi, and here's what she said ahead of the inquiry. my confidence is high. i do believe that the work of this committee, in order to retain the confidence of the american people, must act in a way that has no partisanship, is all about patriotism. and i'm very proud of the members of the committee, and i'm certain that they will accomplish that goal. you heard nancy pelosi refer to partisanship there, and some of her decisions have been controversial. ahead of the inquiry, she rejected two of the five republicans put forward by house minority leader, kevin mccarthy. there are now only two republicans on the committee, compared with seven democrats. they are liz cheney and adam kinzinger, both forceful critics of donald trump. and this imbalance gives republicans an avenue to criticise
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the committee as biased. let's quickly recap the events which brought us here. on 6january, thousands of donald trump supporters attended a so—called "save america" rally at the ellipse park in washington, dc. they were calling for congress to rejectjoe biden�*s victory in the presidential election. here's mr trump addressing the crowd that day. we will never give up, we will never concede| ,it doesn't happen, - you don't concede when there's theft involved. our country has had enough. we will not take it anymore, - and that's what this is all about. cheering and, to use a favourite - term that all of you people really came up with, i we will stop the steel. after the speech, hundreds of supporters walked to the capitol.
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and atjust after 2pm in the afternoon, they managed to storm the capitol building. here's the moment they broke through a line of police guarding the stairwell. screaming and this was the result. the offices of congressmen and women ransacked, 140 police officers injured, and five people dead. it's the exact circumstances surrounding what happened that day which the inquiry will hope to shed light on. our correspondent nada tawfik joins us from new york. thank you so much forjoining us. i must say, so compelling watching this testimony that was coming through today. but some people might be wondering, they having this hearing? what could come of that? yeah, and i think the answer really comes from what we've heard today.
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liz cheney, one of the republicans you mentioned who is on this committee, said that what happened on the 6th of january remains committee, said that what happened on the 6th ofjanuary remains a cancer on the democracy of this country, and that if they don't investigate what happened, there's a fear that this could happen every four years or so when another peaceful transfer of power. you the officers who spoke acknowledged that even those who righted that day, the mob who attacked them still believed they were justified in what they were doing, and that's why they think it is so important for them to be able to speak in a hearing like this and for the committee to do its work so that americans who have an opinion about what happened or a certain stance can get the full facts and make up their minds. certainly for them, they believe that this was a huge national security threat, and one that is the job of congress to deal with. so
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this hearing, how divisive would you say it is? because i think our viewers would remember even when the riots were taking place, it was immediately politically divisive, as well. , ., , , ., , well. yes, it absolutely was. the house republicans _ well. yes, it absolutely was. the house republicans rushed - well. yes, it absolutely was. the | house republicans rushed before well. yes, it absolutely was. the - house republicans rushed before the hearing this morning to hold a press conference, labelling the two republicans who joined as pelosi democrats, really viewing them as traders. they believe that democrats are reallyjust motivated here by political considerations to try to hurt their chances ahead of the house midterm elections in 2022. remember, republicans have really wanted to wait until those elections had passed to look further into the details of what happened that day. so this is very, very divisive, that if democrat republicans have not only questioned the motives but also the makeup of this committee. but when you actually watch this hearing, i think all around, every
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single member on the panel, as well as the officers really try to stress that this is not about partisan politics. and i think their testimony really hit home the gravity of what happened that day. just briefly, do you think the testimony could change anybody�*s mind? i testimony could change anybody's mind? ~' ., testimony could change anybody's mind? ~ ., .,, ., testimony could change anybody's mind? ~ ., ., mind? i think for those who watch and listen. _ mind? i think for those who watch and listen. it— mind? i think for those who watch and listen, it was _ mind? i think for those who watch and listen, it was very _ mind? i think for those who watch and listen, it was very powerful i mind? i think for those who watch i and listen, it was very powerful and it certainly could. but i think, given the divisions in this country, thatis given the divisions in this country, that is a tall order. many are so entrenched in their beliefs and in this country, it is very easy to, you know, pick an outlet that will really just you know, pick an outlet that will reallyjust mirror back your beliefs to you. that said, there will at some point be a conclusion to this committee to read and make their own conclusions. . ~ committee to read and make their own conclusions. ., ~ , ., . now to the olympics — and a shock for the us in the gymnastics. the russian olympic committee won the gold in the women's team event,
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an event the us won back—to—back in london and rio. but the real shock came earlier in the final. simone biles, four times gold medallist, pulled out of the us team gymnastics final after a rare mistake in her opening vault. initially there was talk that she had an injured ankle. but following the event, she confirmed that she wasn't physically injured — but that she had only suffered "a little injury to her pride." she said "today has been really stressful. we had a work—out this morning. she went on to say... for more, here's cindy boren, sports reporterfor the washington post.
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she comes in with pressure from so many directions. she comes in bearing the mantle of, you know, america's sweetheart, the big olympic star, the star of the games. she comes in as the big hope for gymnastics. and she also comes in as someone who survived the usa gymnastics sexual abuse scandal by dr larry nasser, she was a victim. and she thought about retiring, she was ready to quit. then she said, "no, i'm the last survivor who is still actively competing, and i think it's important for me to be there." she also comes in as aspokesperson who had stepped up and talk about social injustice and racial inequality. so she comes in with, you know, she's put herself out there in ways that aren't just athletic. and it became overwhelming — someone asked her today if she felt the weight of the world
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on her shoulders, and she said, "that" expletive "is heavy." that's where she is right now, she's got six more events she's qualified in, we'll see if she's able to compete when they start up again on thursday, they have an off day tomorrow. joining me now is dr norman freed, a clinical psychologist and expert in sports counselling and mental health from columbia university. thank you so much forjoining us. first off, what do you make of the comments that simone biles has made so far about why she could not compete today? i’m so far about why she could not compete today? so far about why she could not com ete toda ? �* , , ., compete today? i'm extremely proud of miss biles — compete today? i'm extremely proud of miss biles for _ compete today? i'm extremely proud of miss biles for the _ compete today? i'm extremely proud of miss biles for the honesty - compete today? i'm extremely proud of miss biles for the honesty she's i of miss biles for the honesty she's expressing, for so many people in this world who go through similar experiences of eggs and emotional turmoil —— anxiety, she's able to speak to us in a way that says, "if you're not feeling right, find out what's going on inside of you."
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because if you persist, you make it worst. so i'm —— you might get worse. worst. so i'm -- you might get worse. ~ . . ~' worst. so i'm -- you might get worse. ~ . ., ~ ., worse. we are talking about the us caital worse. we are talking about the us capital hearing. _ worse. we are talking about the us capital hearing, that _ worse. we are talking about the us capital hearing, that was _ capital hearing, that was compelling, this was also compelling. but there is also talk about mental health — but still, the olympics in a global pandemic, perhaps it'sjust so olympics in a global pandemic, perhaps it's just so overwhelming that the athletes simone biles and naomi osaka — how much can you take to or teach resilience for something like this? ~ ., �* , to or teach resilience for something like this? ~ . �* , , , like this? what's interesting is that everyone _ like this? what's interesting is that everyone of _ like this? what's interesting is that everyone of us _ like this? what's interesting is that everyone of us is - like this? what's interesting is that everyone of us is capable | like this? what's interesting is l that everyone of us is capable of being traumatised by events in our lives. simone biles�*s struggle between larry nasser years ago and the memories of sex abuse then, there are many of us in the limelight that carry with us the traumas and burdens of our past. so the answer to your question is first, when you have a hero, take a
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closer look — they are as normal and human as you are, but also we have to find a way to rise above those memories, those voices inside of us that say "you're not good or capable enough." there so many things we do in the field of psychology to help people recognise the greatness that lies within them. and if simone were to think about how the world is watching, she would crumble. she thinks aboutjust watching, she would crumble. she thinks about just what watching, she would crumble. she thinks aboutjust what her message is, she would shine. my prayer is that on thursday, she'll have had time to think about what she wants to say to the world in her sports, and she'll be able to let everyone know that she's back and overcome the anxiety that was in front of her. now it'sjust the anxiety that was in front of her. now it's just alongside the anxiety that was in front of her. now it'sjust alongside her, not stopping her.— her. now it'sjust alongside her, not stopping her. that's amazing, that focus that _ not stopping her. that's amazing, that focus that perhaps _ not stopping her. that's amazing, that focus that perhaps she - not stopping her. that's amazing, that focus that perhaps she will i not stopping her. that's amazing, | that focus that perhaps she will be able to bring for thursday. but i wonder with naomi osaka or simone biles, these amazing role models, is
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therejust biles, these amazing role models, is there just to much expected of young athletes? i there just to much expected of young athletes? , ., ., ., athletes? iwill tell you, and that was wonderful _ athletes? iwill tell you, and that was wonderful question - - athletes? iwill tell you, and that was wonderful question - i - athletes? iwill tell you, and that was wonderful question - i was l was wonderful question — i was listening to the interviews with the 4-5 listening to the interviews with the 4—5 women that were on the team, including simone, and it strikes me how young they really are. and we are expecting something from young adults who have not really even entered the world knowing who they are. that's why it's important that people in a high—pressure environment develop a therapy to align them. talk to someone and get to know themselves better, to tell their story and fear and worry so they aren't minimised, but honoured, and to take very good care of themselves, including proper diet, sleep and physical fitness. themselves, including proper diet, sleep and physicalfitness. but themselves, including proper diet, sleep and physical fitness. but to know that inside each and every one of them is indeed a light of greatness, and they don't need to be afraid of it. that's the most powerful medicine of all. doctor, thanks so much, _ powerful medicine of all. doctor, thanks so much, we _ powerful medicine of all. doctor, thanks so much, we wish -
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powerful medicine of all. doctor, j thanks so much, we wish simone powerful medicine of all. doctor, - thanks so much, we wish simone biles all the best on thursday. phil and i. —— thank you. an explosion has rocked an industrial park in the western german city of leverkusen. one person is dead and four are missing with several others injured. local residents have been advised to shut all windows and doors. the bbc�*s damien mcguinness is in berlin with this update. what appears to have happened this morning, there was an explosion — the reason or cause behind that is still unclear — but there was an explosion in a chemical refuse centre within that industrial complex. that explosion then caused a fire in a number of large chemical tanks where solvents were kept, presumably quite flammable liquids — this fire then caused the loss of problems and reasonably the injuries and fatalities. —— caused a lot of problems. the broader situation is also quite serious for the local people, because the city of leverkusen — quite a large city with almost 150,000 people — that area has been told really
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still, people should stay at home, they should close windows and doors, and that's because it's still not clear whether that huge plume of black smoke which we saw earlier today, how toxic that might be. officials say when they measured the air, it doesn't seem dangerous at the moment, but they're playing it safe, is how they put it. so they closed playgrounds, they told people to stay inside, even saying to people, "if you pick fruits and vegetables from your garden, make sure it's really well—washed." so they don't want these chemicals really to spread or cause any problems. in the uk, an official inquiry has found that hundreds of children in the care of lambeth council in south london, were abused on a scale it says was "hard to comprehend," over many years, from the 19605 to the 1990s. more than 700 former residents complained about sexual abuse at five children's homes, butjust one senior member of staff was ever disciplined.
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mark easton has the story. a chance conversation between a music producer and a friend he knew from a south london children's home is what led to the worst child sexual abuse scandal in british history being uncovered. this video features some of hundreds of survivors from care homes and fosterfamilies in lambeth — people who, according to today's enquiry report, suffered almost an compensable cruelty from dozens of abusers over four decades. —— incomprehensible cruelty. i felt dirty, i felt ashamed. ifelt like i had nobody to listen to me. i've got eight siblings, and all of us have been through the care system, through lambeth. each and every one of them has gone through horrific abuse. i cannot forgive lambeth for what they have done to me or my family. and no amount of money that they've paid out is going to put right what they done wrong.
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today's report identifies a culture of cover—up. police failed to follow up evidence leads, in particular links between perpetrators. lambeth council gave known abusers unimpeded access to children, despite 33 council and police investigations into child abuse involving lambeth, they have been only six convictions and only one senior council employee has ever been disciplined. —— there have only been. the report says that children in the care of lambeth council were treated as worthless, pawns in a toxic power game that inspired a vicious culture that left sex offenders feeling untouchable and children as captive victims. there was such a culture of cover—up that you need to look at the whole environment to make sure that you really get to the heart of why this happened. and that is our role, to get to the heart of why this happened — and to do that, you need to poke in every corner, and every corner we poked in here,
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we found something wrong. this used to be a music production office. we turned it into an investigations room. it is a measure of the establishment's failure that it took the abuse survivors themselves to piece together the full scale and horror of what had happened. these are care records. we've got 1,600 care records... raymond stevenson, himself abused at a home, turned his music production office into an incident room. an equal number of case files and references... the survivors association has helped hundreds of victims claim more than £75 million in compensation from lambeth council, and there are many more. this afternoon, dozens of survivors assembled to give their verdict on the enquiry report. this is a missed opportunity. the failure to identify the police involvement in this cover—up isjust horrendous, and actually leaves the public exposed. the enquiry is calling on scotland yard to consider
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a criminal investigation into why allegations of sexual abuse made by a boy — laterfound dead at the shirley oaks care home — were not passed on to the coroner by lambeth. this afternoon, the council reiterated their apology for what had happened, and apology the enquiry suggested had come far too late. let's return now to the tokyo olympics where there was another major surprise on day four — in the tennis. japanese tennis star naomi osaka also suffering a shock exit in her home olympics as czech marketa vondrousova earned a straight—set win in tokyo. she had the honour of lighting the olympic cauldron in last week's opening ceremony. and had high hopes to try and win gold forjapan, but the world number two fell short. here's our correspondent mariko oi, who is north of tokyo in miyagi. a lot of shock and surprise reaction
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here injapan about naomi osaka — the world number two, of course, as you said, and world four—time major champion losing that match. she was, of course, one of the favourites to win the tournament, but she's leaving her first olympics without a medal. she did express her disappointment — though she did say that she was glad to have participated in the olympics. but a lot of shock and surprise here injapan. as has been the case throughout the games, the weather continues to be an issue. the olympics started with some soaring heat, but now the opposite extreme is causing issues. typhoon nepartuk has been downgraded to a tropical storm, but it still brought heavy rainfall and strong winds to japan on tuesday. here's our correspondent ruper wingfield hayes who is in the port of choshi on the east coast. you wouldn't necessarily know it from the scene behind me here, but
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this typhoon has actually been downgraded in the last few hours to a tropical storm and is now tracking northwards along the coast, it's actually changed direction quite dramatically in the last few hours. we've been talking about the heat here in tokyo for the last two days. it's been incredibly hot and humid, which is affecting athletes like the men's triathlon in the tennis in particular. and there was worry that the heat would then be followed by a massive storm hitting the city, causing further disruption. it looks like that is now not going to happen. the storm is about 200 nautical miles off the coast here, it's heading north towards me augie and the city of sendai, which is also holding olympic events —— me augie. some of the events in tokyo have been affected by torrential rain, but the city itself will now
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be passed by the storm, which is good news. the other good news is that has brought the temperature in and around tokyo down by around a few degrees. an hour athletes will be very relieved by that. but the wild conditions were good news for one sport — surfing. it's one of the sports that's debuted at the olympics in tokyo. and the tropical storm brought some huge swell to the beaches, giving the athletes some great conditions. american carissa moore took out the gold medal in the women's event. while the world number two, brazilian italo ferreira, won the men's event. here's the president of the international surfing association on the first—ever olympic surfing event. it's three days of very intense competition. and as you know, the ocean has its own ways. but the ocean has its own ways. but the ocean came up to the challenge and we finished with three waves. there was no news, no visibility for that typhoon or tropical storm. we even
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had a rainbow at the end of the day, so it was wonderful. the four athletes here were notjust incredible, but they represent their culture. surfing is a world culture. it is also mankind's playground, and of course, civilisation doesn't always treat the oceans and nature in similar ways. so the arrival of serving in the olympics comes with... as well as the weather, there's also the pandemic to deal with. tokyo has recorded its highest number of coronavirus infections since the pandemic began. more than 2,800 cases in the last 2a hours. for more, here's dan orlowitz, from the japan times. the government is in a tough position just because the state of emergency in tokyo — this is ourfourth now since the start of the pandemic. it has been going on for quite a while, and i think that other officials are keen to work outjust
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any way possible to keep cases down and to get people to cooperate with the measures that are in place. the amount of beds being used in the tokyo area has gone up — we are seeing that across the board. it should be noted that today's announcement did only see the rise in serious cases of plus four to 82 in total. so if there's anything that can be taken away from today's announcement, it is that most cases are minor or asymptomatic — which is a good sign that shows the vaccine, as it's being distributed, is working. but of course officials are worried that if more serious continues to grow and we see an explosion though serious cases, then it would affect the bed availability of local hospitals. -- if —— if more serious cases continue. let's just take a look now at the overall medal tally japan still leads the way with ten gold, one ahead of the us and china. and team gb is doing well, with four gold medals.
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and of course there is plenty of action still to come. hello. tuesday has brought us a day of some sunny spells, but also some really torrential showers and frequent thunderstorms too. this was the picture in lincolnshire on tuesday. we'll be keeping that theme of really heavy downpours in the next couple days too, because this area of low pressure is also driving our weather and is a slow—moving future, just drifting its way northwards this evening and into... some particularly heavy rainfall across scotland. the met office issued an amber warning on tuesday, with thunderstorms across central and northern parts of scotland. torrential downpour is leading to flooding and disruption too. the showers across scotland will only ease as we had to the evening hours into the morning. further south,
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this evening and through tonight, most of those downpours will tend to ease in intensity, as well. this is the story overnight then, drier towards the south, still plenty of heavy showers for england. temperatures overnight falling to between around 13—15 c. during the day tomorrow, this area of low pressure still with us, just drifting slowly northwards. we've got more of a breeze developing in the south especially, tending to push the showers through a little bit quicker. but again across parts of scotland, there will be really slow moving. another amber warning from the met office, this time for heavy rain falls across northern scotland. that rainfall will not only be heavy here, but persistent throughout the course of the day, whereas further south, the showers and thunderstorms will move a bit quicker, with a breeze developing through the day. hit and miss heavy showers and thunderstorms, blustery and close to parts of southern england, english showers will be a
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slow nature. tempter whites, cooler than in recent days, highs of around 16-21 c than in recent days, highs of around 16—21 c during the day on wednesday. sunshine in between these heavy downpours, then thursday night in ash wednesday night to thursday, the winds rotating around the area of low pressure. so coming in from the north, going into a northwesterly direction. further south, north, going into a northwesterly direction. furthersouth, it should be a dry day, so sunny direction. further south, it should be a dry day, so sunny spells still an unsettled story, temperatures cooler particularly in the north, about 15—21 c. bye—bye.
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hello, i'm nuala mcgovern, this is outside source. in washington, hearings have begun in congress into the attack on the us capitol. in congress into the attack on the us ca - itol. , in congress into the attack on the us caitol. , ,, in congress into the attack on the us capitol-— us capitol. they ripped off my badae. us capitol. they ripped off my badge- they — us capitol. they ripped off my badge. they grabbed - us capitol. they ripped off my badge. they grabbed and - us capitol. they ripped off my - badge. they grabbed and stripped me of my radio, theses ammunition that was secured in my body. they begin to beat me with their fists and with what felt like hard metal objects. i'm frustrated that six months after a deadly— i'm frustrated that six months after a deadly insurrection breached the united _ a deadly insurrection breached the united states capitol for several hours _ united states capitol for several hours on — united states capitol for several hours on live television, we still don't _ hours on live television, we still don't know— hours on live television, we still don't know exactly what happened. y. don't know exactly what happened. y the don't know exactly what happened. the events don't know exactly what happened. y. the events ofjanuary the 6th are the events of january the 6th are described as a coordinated effort to derail peaceful transfer
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of power. the united nations is warning that food aid for people caught up in the conflict in ethiopia will run out by friday. it wants more allowed in immediately. and simone biles withdraw from the team gymnastics at the tokyo olympics, the world —positive most—watched athlete said she suffered a little injury to her pie —— pride after summary on her land she comes in with pressure from so many directions. she comes beafina from so many directions. she comes bearing the — from so many directions. she comes bearing the mantle _ from so many directions. she comes bearing the mantle of— from so many directions. she comes bearing the mantle of america's - bearing the mantle of america's sweetheart, the big olympic star... let's turn to the situation in ethiopia's tigray region now. two developments regarding the tens of thousands of refugees living there. firstly the world food programme has warned that it will run out of supplies in tigray before the end of this week. in a tweet, the head of the programme,
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also today, the united nations has said thousands of people living in two particular refugee camps in tigray are trapped and cut off from humanitarian aid. they're warning that clean drinking water is running out, no health care services are available, and that hunger is a real danger. let's just remind ourselves how this situation has arisen. a conflict between ethiopia's government and forces in the northern tigray region has thrown the country into turmoil. fighting has been going on since november 2020, destabilising the country and leaving thousands of people dead. hundreds of thousands of others are now living in famine conditions. let's speak now to babar baloch, spokesman for the unhcr. thank you so much forjoining us and i suppose first off people will want
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to know why can't that aid to make it through? to know why can't that aid to make it throu~h? . ~ to know why can't that aid to make it through?— to know why can't that aid to make itthrou:h? . ~ , . . it through? thank you very much. we relaunched a — it through? thank you very much. we relaunched a desperate _ it through? thank you very much. we relaunched a desperate appeal- it through? thank you very much. we relaunched a desperate appeal to - relaunched a desperate appeal to save 211,000 eritrean refugees who are living into refugee camps inside tigray, they are trapped. there are too many armed groups who are operating inside and around the camp. there have been refugees killed inside those camps, so we are really, really worried about their lives and we as unhcr and other humanitarian partners have lost all access to these two refugee camps inside tigray for the last two weeks and in terms of access and bringing in aid to tigray, from the tigray capital, there also is relief
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supplies which are stuck in afar. our worries for the civilians in tigray but also specifically the eritrean refugees have been caught up eritrean refugees have been caught up in the conflict for the last two weeks. their last food distribution happened injune. they were given just enough food rations for a month and we are afraid that those supplies have run out. i and we are afraid that those supplies have run out. i understand and ou supplies have run out. i understand and you mentioned _ supplies have run out. i understand and you mentioned afar _ supplies have run out. i understand and you mentioned afar and - supplies have run out. i understand and you mentioned afar and other. and you mentioned afar and other places will have heard of the tigray region but the conflict has open on other fronts and hence some of these difficulties. what happens if the aid does not come through in the coming days?— aid does not come through in the coming days? civilians have been sufferin: coming days? civilians have been suffering and _ coming days? civilians have been suffering and what _ coming days? civilians have been suffering and what we _ coming days? civilians have been suffering and what we have - coming days? civilians have been suffering and what we have seen| suffering and what we have seen quite often is when conflict breaks
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out, its impact on a civilian is the hardest. and as far as the eritrean refugees are concerned, they have been trying to make desperate pleas with us as well as with these armed groups operating inside the camp and around the camp and have we been trying to work together with tigray authorities but also with the federal ethiopian authorities who are trying to move these refugees to safety but because we have no access to the refugee camps since the last two weeks, it is a very hard task and also, if humanitarian supplies don't go in, there are an estimated 1.7 million civilians who are displaced inside the tigray region according to estimates. their life
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will get harder and harder every day for supper so it is very important thing we as humanitarians have access to those desperate people in tigray. i access to those desperate people in tiura . .., access to those desperate people in ti ra . . ., ., access to those desperate people in tiara. ., tigray. i can hear you, babar baloch, what _ tigray. i can hear you, babar baloch, what you _ tigray. i can hear you, babar baloch, what you are - tigray. i can hear you, babarj baloch, what you are looking tigray. i can hear you, babar- baloch, what you are looking for is access to the scamps again. let's see what happens in the coming days. thanks so much for shedding light on the situation. —— access to the camps. the first person to be charged under hong kong's controversial national security law has been found guilty in a landmark ruling. this man, tong ying—kit, you see him here on his way to court last year. he is the first person to be charged under the law. mr tong was arrested injuly 2020. this man, tong ying—kit, you see him here on his way to court last year. after he drove his motorcycle into three riot police while carrying a flag with a political slogan. that flag said, "liberate hong kong, revolution of our times." and it is that slogan that the prosecutors argued contravened the national security law. here's danny vincent. now, that political slogan was used
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quite widely throughout the hong kong protest movement in 2019. during his court case, this was a topic — the words of this slogan were a topic for hot debate and now he's been found guilty, there is an argument that the prosecutors use that they claimed that the words that were used on his banner, the political slogan that used the words "liberate hong kong", that now has been deemed as essentially an act of terrorism. we don't know when his sentencing will be. we know there will be mitigation later this week, but we do know that he's been found guilty of these charges. so let's take a closer look at the national security law. it passed last year and it covers four main areas. secession that's breaking away from the country subversion which is undermining the power or authority of the central
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government, terrorism which is using violence or intimidation against people, and collusion with foreign or external forces. the prosecution in this case said it had proven "each and every element" of the terrorism and secession charges against tong ying—kit. mr tong has not been sentenced yet but the law does carry a maximum sentence of life in prison. now, the national security law was introduced in response to the protests in 2019. you might remember pictures like these. this is the authorities in hong kong using water cannons against protesters. these demonstrations were sparked by a proposed and controversial law that would have allowed extraditions bill hong kong and china. here's danny vincent again with what authorities wanted to achieve with the law. with what authorities wanted 2019 saw back to back protests across this city. sometimes almost every weekend there were protests and often, they became violent.
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the authorities would say the law has returned stability to the city, but people who are against the law would argue that it's been a stretch. they would say that it's challenged, it's eroded some of the freedoms that hong kong residents were guaranteed when the city was returned to china, and many people feel that it's simply being used to try to silence people that try to speak out against beijing. let's take a look at some of the reaction to the trial. amnesty international has called tong ying—kit�*s conviction... simon cheng is a pro—democracy hong kong activist who has been granted asylum in the uk. here's his reaction. this is the first and dangerous start of speech and thought crime in hong kong'sjudiciary story. and that is the first case in court
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following the public statement by hong kong authorities, stating that any form of slogan or expression about like this — liberating hong kong, revolution of our time — is secession criminal acts. so even out in london, let's not forget, beijing said the national security law operates around the world, even in the uk. so, i could be hunted down. so, this is the first verdict on hong kong court made without a jury, but solely by politically—appointed judges. the judiciary was being rejected by the court. it is a historical departure from english commonwealth traditions in hong kong. let's take a closer look at the trial. it lasted for 15 days and was a trial withoutjury. that's a departure from hong kong's common law tradition the defence that's a departure from hong kong's common law tradition. the defence team had requested a trial with a jury but the government argued that it could put the juror�*s safety at risk. here's pro—democracy activist nathan law.
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this is definitely a political show trial. it deprives tong ying—kit�*s rights to access a jury trial, and the judges of the court are all appointed by the government which possibly serve the best interest of the government instead of clinging to the legal expertise and the whole verdict shows that the government intend to portray protesters in hong kong as terrorists and impose speech crime into the way that we put forward slogans and these words. stay with us on outside source. the former austrian pm tells us that not ordering enough shots was a colossal failure by his country. back to the olympics and what a night it was for the family of team gb�*s gold medal winner, tom dean. they watched him triumph from the family home in berkshire,
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and our sports correspondent, eleanor roper, has been to meet them. it's an all—nighter, but not like any other. tom's family this morning, having still not been to bed. wild cheers this was the scene last night as tom swam his way to olympic gold. hours later, and his family still can't believe it. i can't even put it into words. it's just like the most amazing thing... oh, i'm going to cry, that's not good! ..that�*s ever happened. it's just like it makes everything worth it. and this is him at nationals. tom is one of five children who are all keen swimmers. his youngest brother william shows us tom in his goggles when he was barely old enough to walk but it is mum jacquie that has spent years driving everyone to the pool. i've taken tom to every one of his training sessions since he was a baby. i got him in the water when he was a few weeks old.
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i've taken him to all his events, counties, regionals, nationals, and all the open meets, and i've followed him around the world. you know, it's galling to not be there at the big one. making it to the olympics is an enormous challenge for anyone, but for tom, this achievement is all the more amazing for the fact he has had coronavirus twice in the last year. i'm so thrilled to see the journey go as far as you could imagine it could go. there's nowhere else to go, and i am so thrilled for him. you know, he is having the best time of his life. tom is now preparing for the final of the 4x200 metre freestyle relay as he looks to add another medal to his already impressive collection. eleanor roper, bbc news. this is outside source live
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from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... police officers testifying at a congressional hearing into the january the 6th riots say they feared for their lives — with one describing it as like a "mediaeval siege." the international monetary fund has warned limited access to covid vaccines threatens to hinder the global economic recovery from the pandemic. it says that access to covid vaccines has become the main factor affecting the growth of national economies and warns about the dangers of some countries not having equal access. well, let's take a look at how vaccines have been distributed globally. over 3.8 billion doses have been administered globally that would be enough to fully vaccinate 25% of the world's population. but the vaccine roll—out hasn't been even across the world.
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nigeria, vietnam and cameroon have fully vaccinated less than 1% of their populations fully. compare that with the uk, israel and canada who have vaccinated over 56% of their populations. and now this warning is stark, that it could impact economic recovery. michelle fleury is in new york. at first we were thinking about infections and what countries might suffer more in a health care sense. but this goes wider, talk more about what the imf is warning. it is what the imf is warning. it is focusin: what the imf is warning. it is focusing on _ what the imf is warning. it is focusing on the _ what the imf is warning. it 3 focusing on the economic consequences that we are seeing as a result of the pandemic and the vaccine roll—out is the fault line if you like in terms of which economies are rebounding faster and which ones are lagging behind. if you look at the countries with the leading growth forecast for this year, it is the united states and it
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is the uk, two countries where they have had pretty successful vaccination roll—outs. you look at those countries where they have lower growth, it tends to be developing and emerging economies where there is over immunisation rates and that they say is really the diverging point you are going to see going forward. but it says the wealthier countries where there is better vaccination rates could not find record should not be complacent if there is not global progress... thinking about the uk, the confidence in the mobility of this change has shown that has changed so much as since the vaccination programme has rolled out but what is the imf calling for? because i am sure it would be beneficial to the united states or israel or at the uk to have other countries that they need to trade with in a more confident position. i need to trade with in a more confident position.— need to trade with in a more confident position. i think that is one of the _ confident position. i think that is one of the arguments _ confident position. i think that is one of the arguments they - confident position. i think that isj one of the arguments they make confident position. i think that is i one of the arguments they make in this report. it is notjust an assessment of where they think economies are going. they also try
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and sound the alarm if you'd like and sound the alarm if you'd like and what they are saying is the world these to come together, they need to ordinate policy specifically with a focus on vaccinations but also when it comes to central banking and the knock on implications for example if the us central bank were to tighten financial conditions, that would have a knock on effect in others. it's this idea of returning to more coordination that we saw after the last financial crisis but in some ways is missing this time around and with the specific focus on vaccinations that they don't see happening fast enough yet. thank you so much michelle _ happening fast enough yet. thank you so much michelle fleury, _ happening fast enough yet. thank you so much michelle fleury, the - happening fast enough yet. thank you so much michelle fleury, the figures i so much michelle fleury, the figures is a difference when it comes to those vaccination rates. we will be talking about austria also trailing when it comes to vaccines just a little later in the programme. north and south korea have restored a communication hotline after agreeing to rebuild trust and improve ties. the direct line was set up to avoid tension and possible conflict
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between the two neighbours, which are officially still at war. our correspondent laura bicker explains what these hotlines are for. they are there to avoid any kind of tension. they are there to avoid conflict. they were set up back in 1971. now remember, these two countries are officially still at war because when the fighting ended, it ended in an armistice, not a peace treaty. this today, actually, is the anniversary of that armistice signing and on this anniversary, this communication lines have been reopened. last year, lastjune, north korea turned its back on the south. not only did he cut the communication lines, it blew up what is known as the inter—korean liaison office. this was in office built at the border specifically for the two sides to talk. and having turned its back on the south, this happened after the relationship between pyongyang and
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remember all that hope when kimjong—un met donald trump that there would be a nuclear deal, well all of that fell through and so did north and south relations, and they began to sour. and in the last year, there has been very little contact between the two countries. now, we understand that since april, there have been a number of letters between seoul's president moon and the north korean leader, kim jong—un. we understand those letters have been about things like covid response but also about reestablishing this communication lines. so today, a short conversation was had between the person who mans the south korean line and the person who mans the north korean line, and we hear that the person on the south korean side set, "it's good to be talking to the north once again." officials in bangladesh say that six rohingya refugee children have been killed in cox's bazar as torrential rains flooded most of the camps. a government aid official says that five children died in a landslide while another drowned in flood waters. bangladesh has been suffering heavy
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monsoon rain over the past few days. ethirajan anbarasan reports from delhi. bangladesh has been witnessing heavy rains as part of the monsoon season for the past few days and this has created lots of trouble for the hundreds of thousands of muslim rohingya refugees living in the southeastern part of the country. they fled violence from neighbouring myanmar several years ago and they are living in a difficult condition in these a small tin roof or plastic made hudson these refugee camps. the pictures posted on social media showed how some of these refugees were trying to wade through waist high water to the tree belongings from their huts and these situations are on hills and because there are no trees and because of these heavy rains in these hilly areas, part of the hillside caved in during quite a few hudson that is were several deaths occurred for some people
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there are really worried. if this trend continues, that will add to the misery in the southeastern part of bangladesh. —— these huts. the former australian prime minister malcolm turnbull has told the bbc his country's failure to buy more coronvirus vaccines was a "collossal failure". australia is dealing with increased numbers of infections despite enacting tough measures. authorities in sydney are expected to confirm in the next few hours there will be four more weeks of lockdown for sydney and the rest of new south wales. only about 16% of australians aged over 16 have so far been fully vaccinated, placing it fifth from bottom, in the g20 of the world's richest countries. let's hear from malcolm turnbull on that. well, the big mistakes were made last year when not enough vaccines were bought. the reality is that apart from astrazeneca, we don't have a plentiful supply of any vaccines, and the astrazeneca vaccine was recommended only for people over 60. that recommendation has changed, in sydney in particular because of the delta variant spread
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here in the city which is a very strong. but nonetheless, there is a lot of vaccine hesitancy about the az vaccine. now, the problem is we don't have the alternatives. the government last year, that's the federal government, the national government, chose not to buy enough pfizer let alone any moderna. so, you know, they failed. look, it's the biggest failure of public administration i can recall. some stern criticism there for scott morrison the man who succeeded malcolm turnbull as prime minister three years ago. here they are in happier times. the two men are from the same party — but there's perhaps no love lost between them. scott morrison was the winner in a power struggle that saw malcolm turnbull ejected by his own mps.
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as goes vaccines, australia had based its plans of astrazeneca — but due to its association with extremely rare blood clots more than half of australia's population have been in lockdown in recent weeks although some states are now easing back. victoria is lifting restrictions from wednesday after recording just ten new infections amongst people already in quarantine. south australia is doing the same after recording zero cases in the past 2a hours. all eyes are on new south wales however which is widely expected to extend its lockdown after recording 172 cases. the state premier had this to say ahead of the announcement. we are seeing around the world that when you have too many people who've been infectious in the community and you open up too early, countries that have claimed to have done so well with covid that have much higher vaccination rates than ours have failed with delta because they opened up too quickly. we know we've put in the hard yards for five weeks, and we don't want to waste all the great work we've done by opening to early, and then having the virus spread again. as goes vaccines, australia had based its plans of astrazeneca — but due to its association with extremely rare blood clots the contry�*s health authority
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advised that the pfizer vaccine was the "preferred" choice for under 605. it's now changed that advice — for the sydney area — saying adults of all ages should take "any available vaccine". but there's resistance amongst some, here's one woman on the streets in sydney. i'm kind of opposed to getting - astrazeneca, due to the information that was provided earlier about the blood clots - and everything. and now, them saying that you should consult your gp is kind _ of something that i might, "weiim" _ it's not the information i that was provided earlier. and i'm not willingl to get astrazeneca. altogether 920 australians have now died from covid—19. it's avoided the far higher death tolls seen in other countries in large part by shutting its borders. let's hear what malcom turnbull had to say when asked when would australia be able to open its doors again? i think probably not before the first quarter of next year. you know, that's to say the march quarter of 2022. and the reason is we cannot — we simply won't have enough of the mrna vaccines until,
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you know, october or november, to get a large percentage of the population vaccinated, you know, to get to the same level that you have in the uk or in most parts of the usa, or indeed, in singapore. so, you know, the very reason we are locked down — which is so frustrating when so many other parts of the world are opening up — is simply because our government failed to buy enough vaccines. it was a colossal failure, and the problem is you can't, you know, wind the clock back and fixed what should've been done last year. australia has now acted to secure more vaccines with 25 million doses of moderna due to arrive this year and next. scott morrison meanwhile has defended his government's record — saying more vaccines wouldn't stop tough restrictions being needed in sydney. he said...
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you have been watching outside source, goodbye. hello. tuesday has brought us a day of some sunny spells, but also some really torrential showers and frequent thunderstorms, too. this was the picture in lincolnshire earlier on tuesday. and we will be keeping that theme of really heavy downpours over the next couple days, too, because this area of low pressure is driving our weather — and it is a slow—moving feature, just slowly drifting its way northwards through this evening and on into wednesday, as well. it's producing particularly heavy rainfall across parts of scotland. the met office issued an amber warning earlier on tuesday, for all those thunderstorms across central and northern parts of scotland. so, torrential downpours leading to potential flooding and some disruption, too. the showers across scotland will only gradually ease as we head through the evening hours into tonight, as well — whereas further south, this evening and through tonight, most of those will tend to ease in intensity, as well.
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this is the story overnight — dryer towards the south, still plenty of heavy showers for northwest england, parts of scotland in particular, too, where there could be some ongoing flooding issues, and temperatures overnight falling to between 13—15 celsius. during the day tomorrow, this area of low pressure is still with us, just drifting slowly northwards. got a bit more of a breeze developing in the south especially, tending to push the showers through a bit quicker. but again, across parts of scotland, they will be really slow—moving. so another amber warning from the met office, this time for heavy rainfall across parts of central and northern scotland, as well. so here, that rainfall will not only be heavy, but persistent through the course of the day — whereas further south, the showers and thunderstorms will move through a little bit quicker. a bit more of a breeze will be developing through the day. so hit—and—miss heavy showers and thunderstorms, as well, blustery close to parts of southern england in south wales, whereas further north, those lighter winds will be quite slow—moving in nature. temperature—wise, cooler than recent days, highs of around 16—21 celsius during the day on wednesday.
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some sunshine in between some of these heavy downpours. and then, moving through wednesday night into thursday, low pressure starts to ease off towards the northeast, the winds rotating around the area of low pressure — so coming in and north or northwesterly direction. still some showers on thursday for parts of scotland, northern ireland, and northern england too, whereas further south it should be a dry day. so sunny spells, it's still an unsettled story, and temperatures a little bit cooler particularly in the north, around 15—21 celsius. bye— bye.
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hello, i'm nuala mcgovern. this is outside source. in washington, hearings have begun in congress into the attack on the us capitol. they ripped off my badge, they grabbed and stripped me of my radio, they seized ammunition that was secured to my body. they began to beat me with their fists and with what felt like hard metal objects. i'm frustrated that six months after a deadly insurrection breached the united states capitol for several hours on live television, we still don't know exactly what happened, why. the events of january 6 are described as a co—ordinated effort to derail the peaceful transfer of power.
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