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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 27, 2021 12:30pm-2:01pm BST

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red octopus on the shore. sightings of the animal are rare in water north of the english channel, but are becoming more common as sea temperatures warm. ditte�*s son torin described the moment he found the octopus. it looked fine. it didn't look like it was going to hurt you, but then it started making some weird sounds so we gave it a little bit of space to see what it would do. it wasn't going into the water, it was just staying at shore, so we decided to go and help it with my shoe, try and get it into the... well, my water shoe, try and get it into the water. but it grabbed onto my shoe and almost stole it. time for a look at the weather. here's sarah keith—lucas. the heatwave of last week is a thing of the past, things really changing. we have already had lots of torrential showers and thunderstorms over recent hours, this is the
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mumbles. through the rest of the day we keep the unsettled theme, a bit of sunshine here and there but plenty of really heavy, thundery downpours that could cause disruption today. the reason for these downpours is this area of low pressure, not many isobars so the wind is not planning those showers through any hurry and across parts of scotland the met office has issued an amber warning for those thunderstorms. they will bring really torrential downpours, a risk of severe flooding and disruption due to a happy nature of those intense storms and it is notjust across parts of scotland, 2a northern ireland, wales and parts of england too. if you catch one it could bring hail and a lot of rain ina could bring hail and a lot of rain in a short space of time. temperatures cooler than recently, between 15 and 21. we could see 23 or 2a across parts of eastern england if you miss the torrential downpours, if you catch one it could bring disruption. most of the
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showers in the south will ease away so it becomes drier overnight but further north, particularly north west england and scotland, outbreaks of heavy, fun to be rain overnight. reasonably mild into wednesday morning but this area of low pressure will still be with us, another troublemaker tomorrow with winds rotating around the area of low pressure. some sunshine to start the day tomorrow but showers will bubble up, heavy and thundery downpours almost anywhere that particularly across scotland, they will be slow—moving. some persistent rain here, further south they are pushed through with more of a breeze to move them through. it will feel cooler than recently with heights of about 16 to 21 on wednesday but with the slow—moving nature of the downpours across scotland, another amber warning has been issued for heavy rain for the likes of ullapool and elgin, disruption, potentially dangerto and elgin, disruption, potentially
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danger to life with severe flooding across parts of northern and central scotland. into thursday low pressure drifting towards the north—east but more showers, rainfall totals really mounting a particularly for parts of scotland. more showers for northern ireland in north—west england, things looking drier with semi spells further south and highs of around 15 to 21. you can find details of those weather warnings that the bbc weather website. thank ou. a reminder of our top story... yes, tom dean is olympic champion in the 200 metres freestyle and duncan scott has silver. a stunning achievement by team gb swimmers at the olympics in tokyo — as tom dean wins britain's fourth gold of the games — with duncan scott behind him that's all from us — so it's goodbye from me — and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are.
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good afternoon. with ten medals in total, as things stand, this is the best start for great britain in olympic history. what a moment in the pool this morning where, for the first time since 1908, two male british swimmers finished on the podium together. at his debut games, tom dean taking gold and duncan scott silver in the 200m freestyle final. in a thrilling finish, dean, who's in lane six, touched home in one minute 114.22 seconds, securing a british record at his debut games. scott finished just 0.04 seconds behind his team—mate. it might have been the early hours of the morning — but that wasn't going to stop tom dean's family back in maidenhead from inviting friends, family and neighbours over. around 70 in their garden cheering dean all the way to gold! back in tokyo, dean could barely believe it, and was thankful for all the support
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he's received afterwards. my my coach, dave, i can thank him enough for what he has done. he said we are a might writing an amazing story with the covid, six or seven weeks out of the pool is unheard of. we brought me through it and i can ping him in upper bann and here we are, i couldn't ask for a better ending to the story. but there was huge disappointment for britain's bianca walkden in her taekwondo semifinal. she had a two—point lead with just three seconds left on the clock, but south korea's lee da—bin was able to land a head—kick in the final second to win by a point. walkden, from liverpoool, can still win bronze this afternoon, like she did in rio five years ago, but was understandbly devastated after coming so close to reaching the final in the above 67 kilogram category. great britain's first medal of the day came in the women's triathlon, where georgia taylor—brown took silver. she was beaten by bermuda's flora duffy, who made history by winning the island nation's first gold
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at an olympics and first medal of any kind since a bronze in boxing at the montreal games in 1976. for taylor—brown, second was a great achievement too. she revealed afterwards she was on crutches just 12 weeks ago and spent part of the bike stage of the race with a flat tyre, but powered on. this is the biggest achievement i've ever got. it's even more special because it's something i dreamt of as a ten—year—old child and i've grown up in sport and sport is all i've known in my family. we are just a very sporty family and it's something i've dreamt of in my parents dream of for themselves as well sought to have their child here and actually getting that medal is quite special. i just want to get home to everyone now and just share the moment with them. there's been a shock in the tennis as the home favourite and one of faces of the games, naomi osaka, was knocked out in the third round by the world
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number 42, marketa vondrousova. osaka, who made history as the first tennis player to light the olympic cauldron at an opening ceremony, was beaten in straight sets. but andy murray goes on in the men's doubles. he and his partner, joe salisbury, are through to the quarterfinals in tokyo. they backed up their impressive opening—round win to beat germany's kevin krawietz and tim putz 6—2 7—6. and what a win for liam broady in the men's singles! he was only called up to the team a week before the games and he's now knocked out hubert hurcazh, the man who beat roger federer at wimbledon. broady winning in three sets to reach the third round for one of the biggest wins of his career so far. simone buyouts has pulled out of the team event in their gymnastics final. team usa, the favourites going into this, of course. simone biles had her struggles and qualification. ijust
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biles had her struggles and qualification. i just want to bring you what happened on herfault, if we can. it was a pretty impressive start, the run up, and the height, but the lamp and wasn't stuck, and there are over we saw simone biles woke at the gym with her coach. we weren't sure whether there was a problem or not. she did return, but it has been confirmed she has pulled out of the team event. a huge shock, the overwhelming favourite, simone biles. four gold medals at the branch she won in rio, the big superstar of these games. but in the team of them, at least, she is out, not in contention and the russian olympic committee will really fancy their chances now. you can follow that live on the bbc sport website.
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there was a brilliant comeback from great britain's men's rugby sevens side to reach the semifinals. they were 21—0 down to the united states but fought back to win 26—21, with dan norton crossing for the decisive score. they will meet new zealand tomorrrow, as they try to go one better than the silver they picked up in rio. that's all the sport for now. you can head over to the bbc sport website, which is the best place to follow everything at the olympics. thanks for that. borisjohnson has promised to cut crime by tackling drug misuse and using electronic tagging on more burglars after release. here he is speaking outside surrey police headquarters in the last hour. what we are doing is, of course, investing massively in the police. when i stood on the steps of downing
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street two years ago i said i wanted an extra 25 officers on the streets of our country, we are now almost have way there. of course, it has been a tough time financially for the whole country. we have had to deal with the cost of the pandemic, about £407 billion supporting jobs and livelihoods across the country. what we are seeing today are plans to back the police, but also backed the public so if you are victim of a crime you have a crime you have an unnamed police officer that you can go to wherever you live who will attend you and make sure that we deal, the police deal with this crime. the point of that is safe to do that in some parts of the country already, but what you need is somebody who understands what is going on in your neighbourhood, who understand through the likely miscreants are, who can understand the crime that you are experiencing is a one—off or part of a trend and can really help to deal with it. we
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are also backing the police with more body worn cameras, with more tasers, more protection against those who assault police officers in the course of their duty. mit? those who assault police officers in the course of their duty.— the course of their duty. why are ou the course of their duty. why are you relaxing _ the course of their duty. why are you relaxing the _ the course of their duty. why are you relaxing the rules _ the course of their duty. why are you relaxing the rules don't - the course of their duty. why are you relaxing the rules don't stop| you relaxing the rules don't stop and search when you know there are huge concerns about the discriminatory aspects of this, especially among black communities and while there is limited evidence if this policy that works? i disagree with the opponents of stop and judge. disagree with the opponents of stop andjudge. section disagree with the opponents of stop and judge. section 60 is stop and search orders can play an important part in fighting crime. i want to stress that they are not the only tool we have got. they are part of a range of things we have got to do to fight street crime, but i think giving police the backend that they needin giving police the backend that they need in law to stop someone, to search them, to relieve them of a dangerous weapon, i don't think that a strong arm tactics, that is a kind and loving thing to do. the people
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who often support stop and search most passionately are the parents of the kids who are likely themselves to be the victims of knife crime, so i am not going to give in on that. you have got to make sure that we back our beliefs with proper powers of stop and search. we back our beliefs with proper powers of stop and search.— of stop and search. we have had 11 ears of of stop and search. we have had 11 years of conservative _ of stop and search. we have had 11 years of conservative government | of stop and search. we have had 11 . years of conservative government and anti—social behaviour is at the highest it has been for seven years. how can your party came to be tough on crime? ~ . , ., , ., ., on crime? what the statistics on crime now _ on crime? what the statistics on crime now shows _ on crime? what the statistics on crime now shows that _ on crime? what the statistics on - crime now shows that neighbourhood crime now shows that neighbourhood crime is not a party third, homicide by 60%, serious violence down 11%. i am looking to rest at the statistics because yes, i do think the lockdown has driven some anti—social behaviour and we need to deal with it and about is why we are backing the police in the way that we are, but i also want to seize those who are guilty of anti—social behaviour improperly paying their debt to
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society. somebody�*s anti—social behaviour may be treated as a minor crime, but it could be deeply distressing for those who are victims. if you are guilty of anti—social behaviour and you are sentenced to unpaid work, as many people are, i don't see any reason why you shouldn't be out there in one of those fluorescent jacketed chain gangs visibly paying your debt to society, so you are going to be seen more of that as well. six. to society, so you are going to be seen more of that as well. six days in a row the — seen more of that as well. six days in a row the following _ seen more of that as well. six days in a row the following cases. - seen more of that as well. six days in a row the following cases. do - seen more of that as well. six days | in a row the following cases. do you think we are past the peak of this now? , ., , , ., , think we are past the peak of this now? , ., , ., now? obviously, we are six days into some better — now? obviously, we are six days into some better figures, _ now? obviously, we are six days into some better figures, but _ now? obviously, we are six days into some better figures, but it _ now? obviously, we are six days into some better figures, but it is - now? obviously, we are six days into some better figures, but it is very, . some better figures, but it is very, very important that we don't allow ourselves to run away with premature conclusions about this. step four of the opening up only took place a few days ago. people have got to remain very cautious and that remains the
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approach of the government. imilli approach of the government. will students in _ approach of the government. will students in england need to be double jab to go to lectures, we'll flip up and need to have two injection to go to football matches when the premier league starts? i think young people in this country are doing an incrediblejob to come forward to get vaccinations. the figures are outstanding. 70% have come forward to getjobs. it is just wonderful, but it is a great thing to do. i willjust say that my message to everybody is get your firstjob if you haven't yet got one, but get your second jab, too, it will help protect you, protect your family and help us all to move forward. ~ , .,, , your family and help us all to move forward. ~ , ., , . forward. why has there been so much confusion over _ forward. why has there been so much confusion over who _ forward. why has there been so much confusion over who should _ forward. why has there been so much confusion over who should be - confusion over who should be examined. isolation? have you been slow to recognise the widespread impact on services who have to self—isolate? i impact on services who have to self-isolate?— impact on services who have to self-isolate? ~ ., , ., , ., self-isolate? i know the people have been frustrated _ self-isolate? i know the people have been frustrated by _ self-isolate? i know the people have been frustrated by the _ self-isolate? i know the people have been frustrated by the pinging - self-isolate? i know the people have been frustrated by the pinging and l been frustrated by the pinging and south isolation, i totally understand that. particularly now as we are starting to see better figures. but i think everybody
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understands this is still a very dangerous disease, we do need to use the tool that we have, self isolation is the one that we have got. i urge people to do it, but don't forget, folks, we are coming forward with the new system from august 16, we will comport with the test to elites —— release approach. until then, test to elites —— release approach. untilthen, please test to elites —— release approach. until then, please everybody, stick with the programme. mps are urging the government to introduce a national register to monitor children in england who are being educated at home. the commons' education committee says there's an "astonishing" lack of information about children who aren't in school. the committee has also suggested there should be an assessment in literacy and numeracy for children studying at home. ministers say they are committed to introducing a national register soon. i spoke to the chair of the commons education committee, robert halfon, a little earlier and he told me that the number
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of children being educated at home has shot up recently. we know surveys suggest that there has been a 38% increase over the past year, up until october 2020. that is around 78,000 children being home educated. of course, there are parents that believe it is the right thing to do for their children. we are not trying to stop that or prevent that in any way. but there are other parents forced into it because they have been let down by the system. there are often too many cases of off—rolling, which is informal exclusion, where parents are again forced into home—educating their children. we know that 5% of schools, according to the previous children's commissioner, 5% of schools are responsible for 40% of children withdrawn from school to be home educated. clearly, there is a problem. we are saying there should be this register, there should be assessment and there also should be a level playing field for exams, because if we are saying that
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children should be assessed once a year if they are home—educated, on their basic maths and english, we should at least fund through the government the ability to do gcses or a—levels, or other qualifications. at the moment, they have to pay the costs themselves. the headlines on bbc news: more medaljoy for team gb at the olympics — as tom dean and duncan scott pick up gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle. jubilation for tom dean's family and friends back home as they celebrated his gold medal success. georgia taylor—brown also won a silver medal in the women's traithlon, despite a puncture during the cycling. health officials are warning the nhs is as stretched now as it was at the peak of the pandemic. in a letter to borisjohnson,
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nhs providers say hospitals in england are dealing with the backlog of non—urgent surgery, record demand for emergency care and an increasing number of covid patients. they're asking the government to give trusts what they described as the "right funding". the number of confirmed daily cases coronavirus cases in the uk has fallen for six days in a row. it's now standing at 24,950. it is little over a week since there were warnings we could reach 100,000 or even 200,000 cases a day. unlike the previous two waves of covid, it is happening without a national lockdown. nick triggle is our health correspondent and i asked him how significant the fall in the figures was. yes, they are very significant. if you look at yesterday's figures, just below 25,000 cases. last
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monday, there are nearly 40,000 cases. the drops have been more significant than even the most optimistic scientists expected, so it seems there is likely to be a range of factors that is contributing to this downward trend. clearly, the growing levels of immunity from the vaccination programme, but also from infection natural immunity that people are acquiring is critical here. but i think there are a number of other factors, or that is what santas are digesting. we have had good weather recently, which means people are more likely to be mixing outdoors where the risk of transmission is lower. we have seen the euros football competition ends. during the tournament people were gathering in quite large groups to watch the football, so there was a suggestion that was driving some of the rise, and now that has stopped. that is helped. we also have significant numbers of people being asked to
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self—isolate because they are close contacts of infected cases. some people have suggested people may be becoming more reluctant to come forward for testing if they have got symptoms. we are yet to see strong evidence of this, but what will be crucial and what everyone is looking for is whether the ball in infection levels translates to a similar skill fall in hospital admissions. there is always a lag between infections and hospital cases, so it is likely to be next week before we really see that, but if we do i think we can be very confident that we are not going to see those large numbers, the 100,000 even 200,000, they are increasingly confident that we will not see those figures. one person has died and four people are missing following an explosion at an industrial site housing the headquarters of the pharmaceutical company, of the pharmaceutical company bayer in north—western germany.
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footgage on social media shows a thick cloud of black smoke billowing above the city of leverkusen. the police have closed the nearby autobahns. the german government's civil protection agency warned residents in the area of "extreme danger" and urged people to keep doors and windows closed. the trial begins at the vatican today of a roman catholic cardinal who used to be a close ally of pope francis. cardinal angelo becciu faces accusations including using church money to buy a multi—million dollar property in london. he denies any wrongdoing. a little earlier, our correspondent in rome mark lowen explained the background to the case.
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the cases being inside the walls of vatican city. the cardinal is facing several counts of embezzlement and misuse of office, partly including a botched property deal a few years ago. he was charged with embezzling some 350 million euros of church money that prosecutors allege was intended for church charitable work. a pout that money into a property in london to buy a property in sloane avenue in chelsea that used to belong to harrods and was to be converted into a luxury block of flats. the deal was done through to italian financiers based in london, who are charged with extortion and trying to abuse their office, as well. they are also on trial. the cardinal denies all the charges, saying he is the victim of a dark plot. there are other charges against him also related to alleged
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funnelling of church money to a charity run by his brother in sardinia, and also to a woman who allegedly used tens of thousands of church money to buy designer shoes and bags. for more than 3,000 car workers at swindon's honda plant, this week is their last at the plant. the japanese car—maker has been a vital part of the area's economy for 35 years, but by friday the last vehicle will have rolled off the production line. even though the closure has been two years in the pipeline, many are still looking forjobs that match their skills. the bbc�*s dave harvey has been hearing from some of them. it felt like my world had just collapsed. i liked working at honda. when they announced it, we were on an apprenticeship as well. it was just like my world had collapsed. it was a huge shock. for me personally, i felt i'd got my foot on the ladder
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in terms of a career i was really interested in. it sort of knocked us for six, really. it was quite a blow. it has been a long three years forjim, michael and thousands of other honda workers trying to find work. midway through their apprenticeships they have now been taken on by a new firm making cutting edge recycling machines, eager to snap up staff with the honda track record. the guys are really great, really enthusiastic, always willing to dive in, be hands on. always wanting to be learning things, training. you know, they crave learning and continuous improvement. it's fantastic. it is completely different to honda. for example, on monday i was at the university of birmingham setting up our research rig. it is a completely different job. it's not even comparable. very positive, honestly. in fact, i think i am in a better place now. the promise of further training and even degree
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level qualifications, i am really happy, honestly. for the other 3,000 workers in this vast factory, their fortunes lay with the union, negotiating redundancy packages to keep them going while they look for work. they are unprecedented, in my view. i've not experienced anything in this industry or any other industry. it equates to about six and a half weeks for every year itself. it is uncapped, unlike the statutory minimum. and there are additional bonuses wrapped up within that. they will walk out with very, very lucrative redundancy packages. especially if you have been here for a long time. honda swindon is surrounded by trading estates, small factories and several big warehouse operations. soon, thousands of ex—car workers will be here looking for work. the current conditions of the market, i'll be honest with you, there are more jobs than people. the biggest challenge for these guys is going to be
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their salary expectations. we had a conversation with a production operative. worked there for more than 20 years, and he was on over £20 an hour. you are probably looking realistically at anything from minimum wage to up to £10 an hour. so i think there will be a bit of a reality check for a lot of the honda workers. for michaelandjim, a bright future. but they have hundreds of friends are still searching forjobs. you try and think, there are 3500 people there. so, they might not all be so lucky. the bbc�*s business reporter dave harvey reporting from swindon. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello, again. we've seen some heavy thundery downpours in some parts of the country already this morning, and as we go through this afternoon, well, there will be further to come. some heavy thundery downpours, the risk of flash flooding in a few places. in between there will
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be some sunny spells. it won't be raining everywhere and it won't be wet all day, either. but you can see the extent of the cloud that has already been producing what we have seen this morning. the showers will be enhanced by a weather front drifting from the west to the east. low pressure firmly in charge and not much in the way of isobars to move the showers along, so not much of a breeze today. so if you catch a shower you will know all about it. it is likely notjust to be slow—moving but also torrential, and through the afternoon, turning more thundery as the showers become a bit more widespread across north wales, the north midlands, northern england, scotland and northern ireland. in fact, parts of scotland is where we could see some issues with flash flooding. temperatures 15 to about 24 degrees. through this evening some the showers will fade, but we will hang on to them across scotland, northern england and what is going to happen is this weatherfront coming in from the west will merge, so again some heavy rain to come through the night. but it is not going to be a cold night. 12 to about 15 degrees will be our overnight lows. as we head on into tomorrow, low
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pressure still very much in charge, no wind in the centre of it to speak of, but you can see the isobars are a bit closer together as we come further south. so more of a breeze in southern areas tomorrow than we have seen of late, but still a lot of showers, again not all of us will catch them, but if you do, they are likely to be heavy and thundery, and torrential downpours, as you can see in scotland, so still the risk of flash flooding. these circles represent the average wind speeds. the gusts round the showers are more likely to round 30, maybe 40mph, and temperatures up to 21. now on wednesday night into thursday you can see how we have got the low pressure drifting towards the north sea. still more isobars in the chart, coming in from the north—west and a weather system just waiting in the wings. so on thursday, it is going to be wet across scotland, northern england and northern ireland, something drier across the rest of england and wales, but we have this system coming in from the south—west. this could change but it is something we think at the moment
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and these are our temperatures, 15 to 21.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: can they be gold and silver? more medaljoy for team gb at the olympics — as tom dean and duncan scott pick up gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle. jubilation for tom dean's family and friends back home as they celebrated his gold medal success. georgia taylor—brown also won a silver medal in the women's traithlon — despite a puncture during the cycling.
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an independent review into child sexual exploitation in bradford says some children in the city remain unprotected and are still being abused damning criticism of a london council for allowing the decades—long abuse of more than 700 children in 5 children's homes. and a woman who was seriously injured after being hit by a car at a festival says her two—year old daughter was saved by her husband throwing her out of the way. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. there's been more triumph for team gb at the olympics in tokyo, with gold and silver medals in the men's swimming 200 metres freestyle. tom dean touched home in one minute 44.22 seconds,
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securing a british record on his debut games, with duncan scottjust 0.04 seconds behind his teammate. it's the first time in more than 100 years that two british male swimmers have shared the podium. tom dean described it as a "dream come true," after contracting covid twice in the past year. and there there was more success, with georgia taylor—brown winnning silver in the women's triathlon. let's go over now to natalie pirks who's been watching all team gb's georgia taylor—brown fought back from a puncture to take triathlon silver — just behind bermuda's flora duffy, who celebrated her country's first ever gold medal. a century has passed since a british man last won an individual freestyle event in the olympics, but today came two contenders. the hope was that tom dean might make the podium, but having qualified fastest for the 200—metre final, focus was on duncan scott. commentator: a long hold - from the start, and nerves really jangling...
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keep your eye on the two red caps. in the centre, the favourite initially trailed his younger team—mate, but soon there was nothing between them. commentator: duncan scott is going to come back, - i wouldn't write scott off in the middle. having won two silvers in rio, scott was aiming to go one better, but dean, despite twice recovering from covid in the last year, was proving more than a worthy match — this the thrilling finale. commentator: tom dean and duncan scott _ looking really good at the moment, and they've got 15 metres to go. tom dean in six, duncan scott in four, and we could get two medals. and can they be gold and silver? can they be gold and silver? yes! tom dean is olympic champion in the 200 metres freestyle and duncan scott's got the silver. but if the celebrations in tokyo were joyous, just watch what it meant to dean's family and friends back home in maidenhead, watching on in the early hours as the drama unfolded. wild cheering. and then a chance to listen to the two medallists. i just want to say thanks so much to everyone back home. my mum, my family, my girlfriend.
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i'm just lost for words. all the boys back in maidenhead, thanks for staying up. cheering. he did it. we've come on so far in the last 18 months, it's a pleasure to watch. it's great to be able to say he is a good mate out of the pool. announcer: tom dean! what a moment this is. you'd have been forgiven for thinking that british swimming was all about adam peaty at the olympics, but tom dean and duncan scott have changed all that. their remarkable one—two continuing what is becoming a phenomenal time for team gb here in the pool.
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these are the first british male swimmers to share a podium at the games since 1908. later, dean telling me his take on the closing stages in the race of his life. i couldn't even see duncan, i was breathing to the right, and he wasjust closing down the competitors to my right. so it was going to be tight, four hundredths in it, that's how olympic races come down to it. but, i mean, two brits on the podium, silver, gold, that's unheard of. roommates in the athletes' village, this pair now also share a piece of history, and with the prospect of more medals to come, team gb's swimmers could be set for their most successful games in decades. dan roan, bbc news, tokyo. team gb's georgia taylor—brown fought back from a puncture to take triathlon silver — just behind bermuda's flora duffy, who celebrated her country's first ever gold medal. dan roan, bbc news, tokyo. team gb's georgia taylor—brown fought back from a puncture but, there was disappointment for team gb's bianca walken in the taekwondo. andy swiss reports. georgia taylor—brown! just three months ago she was on crutches. today she was on an olympic podium. for georgia taylor—brown,
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it has been some journey. on your marks... on a wild, wet day for the triathlon she began well with a solid swim. but come the cycling, calamity. i think she has a flat back tyre. a puncture meant she had to nurse her bike home. taylor—brown now trailing the leaders. but once by one she picks them off in a superb run. she couldn't quite catch flora duffy, who clinched a first ever olympic gold for bermuda. but taylor—brown followed her home for silver and after overcoming a puncture — and, she revealed, a serious leg injury in may — it was some feat. i had two weeks on crutches. no load through the bone at all. then i had another four weeks of no running and then i managed to basically cram my training in for the past six weeks. you just want to make everyone proud and give everyone a reason to be happy and lift everyone up.
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but in the taekwondo, what heartbreak. britain's bianca walkden fighting for a place in the final against south korea's lee da—bin. and as the clock ticked down she edged into the lead. victory beckoned, but then with just one second remaining, guess what? shot to the head. lee da—bin, in the last seconds, can you believe it? well, walkden couldn't. her pain all too plain after the ultimate last—gasp defeat. she'll fight for bronze later, but her hopes of gold are over in the most agonising fashion. andy murray's hopes, though, are still very much alive in the tennis as he and joe salisbury progress to the quarterfinals of the doubles. there was a big shock in the women's singles — marketa vondrousova knocking out naomi osaka —japan's biggest star, who lit the olympic cauldron at the opening ceremony, making an early exit. but the stormy weather in japan
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made life particularly interesting for the surfers. brazil's italo ferreira breaking his board, but he found a replacement and duly claimed the sport's first—ever olympic gold. and if you ever wondered just what it means to make history — well, here's your answer. excited shouting. andy swiss, bbc news. let's speak to georgia taylor—brown's mum, beverly brown, now. so good to have you with us, i bet you haven't had much sleep. congratulations to your doctor and to you as well. i'm sure you've played a part in her success along the way. first of all, have you spoken to her and what did she say? yes, i did speak to are. i spoke about 30 minutes after she finished the race. it was very quick, it was a facetime call and it wasjust
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the race. it was very quick, it was a facetime call and it was just to show me her medal and then she went off to do lots and lots of media and since then i've not been able to speak to natal. 50 since then i've not been able to speak to natal.— since then i've not been able to speak to natal. so you went crying to rather speak to natal. so you went crying to gather our _ speak to natal. so you went crying to gather our weather _ speak to natal. so you went crying to gather our weather a _ speak to natal. so you went crying to gather our weather a few - speak to natal. so you went crying j to gather our weather a few tears? —— so you went crying to are where of that tears? -- so you went crying to are where of that tears?— -- so you went crying to are where of that tears? there were definitely a few tears- — of that tears? there were definitely a few tears. when _ of that tears? there were definitely a few tears. when you _ of that tears? there were definitely a few tears. when you realise - of that tears? there were definitely a few tears. when you realise she l a few tears. when you realise she had this puncture _ a few tears. when you realise she had this puncture in _ a few tears. when you realise she had this puncture in the _ a few tears. when you realise she had this puncture in the cycling, l had this puncture in the cycling, talk us through it. she had this puncture in the cycling, talk us through it.— had this puncture in the cycling, talk us through it. she came out the swim with probably _ talk us through it. she came out the swim with probably one _ talk us through it. she came out the swim with probably one of _ talk us through it. she came out the swim with probably one of the - talk us through it. she came out the swim with probably one of the best| swim with probably one of the best swims i have seen from our and in a small group and she had that opportunity and then to be on the last lap and she dropped back and i wondered why she dropped back and she was kind of looking around and i thought something had happened. then she seemed to make her way back to the group and dropped off again. it was at that point we realise she had a flat tire and started to think that said, the games are over for her. if she's got a flat she is not going to be able to go on but she
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seemed composed and took it easy, took it easy around the corners and came in 20 seconds down. and took it easy around the corners and came in 20 seconds down. and then she made up — came in 20 seconds down. and then she made up this _ came in 20 seconds down. and then she made up this incredible - came in 20 seconds down. and then she made up this incredible 22 - she made up this incredible 22 seconds on the run. how much did that surprise you are where you sitting there watching i know you can do it, i know you can do it. there's that element of yes, you can do it, but georgia has mentioned it's not been ideal preparation for her building up to the olympics and she had a stress response or her running had been pretty limited and it's only been in the last five weeks she's been able to run up to that so i wasn't sure where her running was and first she set off and then started to pick people off, i thought she had an opportunity. and we know what happened next. tell us a little more about this serious leg injury she had in me. there was a point she thought she wouldn't be
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going to the olympics. —— in the month of may. it was a response in the femur so it wasn't a fracture. they phoned it soon so they were able to take off any load bearing and she was able to do other things like swim and cycle with one leg on a terrible so she was still able to keep yourself fit —— to keep fit and it was very lucky to find it when the dead and if they had left it longer possibly the games would not have happened for her. had she gone to tokyo expecting a medal? that was her challenge — to tokyo expecting a medal? that was her challenge to _ to tokyo expecting a medal? that was her challenge to make _ to tokyo expecting a medal? that was her challenge to make the _ to tokyo expecting a medal? that was her challenge to make the olympics. i her challenge to make the olympics. if you had asked go she would have probably said she was expecting top five. but she also likes to play down things. five. but she also likes to play down things-— five. but she also likes to play down thins. , , ., ., down things. does she? i wanted to know a little — down things. does she? i wanted to know a little bit _ down things. does she? i wanted to know a little bit more _ down things. does she? i wanted to know a little bit more about - down things. does she? i wanted to know a little bit more about her - down things. does she? i wanted to know a little bit more about her as i know a little bit more about her as a person. she is clearly incredibly
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determined. was she always like that? , ., , , �*, determined. was she always like that? , ., , that? yes, i would see she's always been determined _ that? yes, i would see she's always been determined about _ that? yes, i would see she's always been determined about something. | that? yes, i would see she's always i been determined about something. if she wants something, she wants it early. as a child she always did. she goes about it in quiet way. she says things we don't think she is determined but when you put her on the start line, especially in a top—level race, something switches with her and she becomes not determined and focused person. we can't know what went through her mind when the puncture happened but if you were watching it, did you get any sense of how it happened? ida. i any sense of how it happened? no, i didn't. any sense of how it happened? no, i didn't- she — any sense of how it happened? no, i didn't. she said — any sense of how it happened? no, i didn't. she said with _ any sense of how it happened? no, i didn't. she said with the _ any sense of how it happened? iirr, i didn't. she said with the rain coming down as well and the roads in japan there are lots of markings, all the white lines but a lot more of them and there isn't anywhere on the course you don't have any white marking which becomes quite
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dangerous when wet so she actually had different tires on her bike. i had different tires on her bike. i had no idea whether that was any reason why and she is not quite sure where it happened but i have heard there have been other triathletes that are fired a similar thing that had flat tyres. —— that are fired a similar thing that had flat tyres. -- and that are fired a similar thing that had flat tyres. --_ that are fired a similar thing that had flat tyres. -- and we shouldn't underestimate _ had flat tyres. -- and we shouldn't underestimate how _ had flat tyres. -- and we shouldn't underestimate how difficult - had flat tyres. -- and we shouldn't underestimate how difficult it - had flat tyres. -- and we shouldn't underestimate how difficult it is i had flat tyres. -- and we shouldn't underestimate how difficult it is to | underestimate how difficult it is to cycle on a flat tyre. she almost made it look easy. she cycle on a flat tyre. she almost made it look easy.— cycle on a flat tyre. she almost made it look easy. she was trying to find throughout _ made it look easy. she was trying to find throughout the _ made it look easy. she was trying to find throughout the course - made it look easy. she was trying to find throughout the course a - made it look easy. she was trying to find throughout the course a place i find throughout the course a place where you can get a real change so if it had happened before it she would have had to look for somewhere like that for a wheel change. i would have had to look for somewhere like that for a wheel change.— like that for a wheel change. i must 'ust ask like that for a wheel change. i must just ask you — like that for a wheel change. i must just ask you how — like that for a wheel change. i must just ask you how you _ like that for a wheel change. i must just ask you how you will— like that for a wheel change. i must just ask you how you will celebrate | just ask you how you will celebrate when your daughter gets old. what if you got planned? i when your daughter gets old. what if you got planned?— you got planned? i think probably famil and you got planned? i think probably family and friends, _ you got planned? i think probably family and friends, we _ you got planned? i think probably family and friends, we will- you got planned? i think probably family and friends, we will get - you got planned? i think probably family and friends, we will get all| family and friends, we will get all together and organise some celebration, whether at a venue
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somewhere or somebody�*s house. it’s somewhere or somebody's house. it's been lovely to talk to you. beverly brian, thank you so much forjoining us here on the bbc. —— brown. bianca walkden kim agh in italy close in the tae kwon do final to be knocked out —— in the —— she went agonisingly close in the tae kwon do but has won the bronze medal. an independent review into child sexual exploitation in bradford says some children in the city remain unprotected
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and are still being abused. the review assessed child protection in the city over a seventeen year period, focusing on five victims. let's get more from our correspondent in bradford, danny savage. this makes shocking reading. tell us more about what is in this review. this is a 56 page report of investigation, explanation and recommendations to tackle the issue of child sexual abuse in bradford. this report focuses on five victims over a 17 year period and goes into quite some detail about each of them, for girls and one boy, most of whom are now adults who suffered abuse ten or 15 years ago. it's a fairly familiar theme that runs through it. these were vulnerable children preyed upon by all the men who would win their trust and then take them away and sexually abuse them. the biggest question that
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comes out of this report is how many children were abused over the last two or three decades in the city? and the biggest worry that comes out of the report as it appears to be ongoing in places and the number of perpetrators is unknown. what happened next? there are calls from some of the five in this investigation what they want to see is an investigation like that in rotherham with a much more broad remit to try to establish how widespread the abuse of children was in the city, how long it has gone on for and how many perpetrators there where and how many more people need to be brought tojustice. various agencies involved in this report, police, shall protection authorities have been giving interviews this afternoon and will not be drawn on whether it is a good idea to have a further enquiry. that will be down to the secretary of state to decide whether or not the should be a wide
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investigation but it certainly raises some very worrying questions. it's quite similar to what we've heard before from is other large english towns like rotherham and rochdale about how children were trafficked and abused. some of the revelations and it have been heard before but it is what happens now and i think that i difficult questions for the authorities to answer. particularly the thing that stood out to me is they still haven't got a handle on how widespread this issue years. it hasn't yet been stamped out in bradford. —— how widespread is this issue. it bradford. -- how widespread is this issue. , bradford. -- how widespread is this issue. . issue. it says some children in the city remain _ issue. it says some children in the city remain unprotected _ issue. it says some children in the city remain unprotected and - issue. it says some children in the city remain unprotected and are i city remain unprotected and are still being abused. how can that be the case? i still being abused. how can that be the case? ~ ., ., , the case? i think the authorities would say there _ the case? i think the authorities would say there is _ the case? i think the authorities would say there is certainly - the case? i think the authoritiesl would say there is certainly much wider awareness of this issue in old times across the uk now since we've had the revelations from places like rochdale and rotherham. i think
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there are much stronger measures in place to look after looked after children as they are known. those that are in children's homes, those are to be looked after by the authorities and much more effort goes on for the warning signs that people are trying to win their trust and take them away from their protected environment. but what this report highlights as these young people were filled by the authorities and the adults are supposed to look after them. one child got married at the age of 15 and the social worker it is claimed was actually at the ceremony. she is below the legal age to get married, it's a shocking revelation and that a further other revelations in this report. what the authorities say is they actually don't know, they cannot prove it isn't still happening in bradford at the moment. so it might be certain children are being looked after better but there are still some vulnerable children out there who may still be falling victim to the all district in the book, if you like, of an older
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person coming up trying to win the trust of a vulnerable child, doing so quite effectively and then abusing that position so that is something the authorities say they are onto but that is why some of the victims in this report say that is to be a much wider investigation, things need to be rattled a lot more in the city to try to find out the truth. an inquiry report has criticised the london borough of lambeth for allowing the abuse of hundreds of children in its homes for decades. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse has been investigating allegations dating back as far as the 1970s. it said it was hard to comprehend the cruelty that was inflicted, and officials left children to cope with trauma on their own. our correspondent, tom symonds, has been looking at the findings.
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the child abuse inquiry has been going for a few years now and this is one of its most scathing reports. it says that children in the care of lambeth council were shown little warmth or compassion. they were left to cope with the trauma of their abuse on their own. the report says it is hard to comprehend the cruelty and sexual abuse inflicted on them in the care of lambeth council over many years. 705 children were abused by 177 adults in five children's homes. one of the worst was shirley oakes near croydon, that place was a brutal place, the inquiry found. violence, sexual assault and racism were allowed to flourish. the report follows that lambeth council failed in four particular ways. firstly they allow is known of users access to children. it failed to investigate
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and when abusers left theirjobs at lambeth it failed to tell their future employers about their suspicions that they were under. also it finds that lambeth, run by the labour party in the 1980s, was focusing not on children but on politicised behaviour and the turmoil that resulted from the council's attempt to take on the conservative government run by margaret thatcher at the time. as a result, children became pawns in a toxic power game, the inquiry finds. it makes recommendations for the police and the council, which apologise for what happened in 2016. let's cross to lucy hockings in tokyo. the big story in the past hour or so is one of the superstar names, the american gymnast simone biles has
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pulled out of the women's team event which is happening right now. she competed in the first rotation of the vault in sport. she then went off to the treatment room and returned flexing her ankle. the treatment room and returned flexing herankle. not the treatment room and returned flexing her ankle. not necessarily a sign of injury at the time but possibly she has injury to your ankle. earlier in the day she put up ankle. earlier in the day she put up a tweet stressing the amount of pressure she feels she is under at these olympics. we do not know how it will affect her performance in the individual event which gets under way later in the week. she is due to perform in every category later in the week but she is out of the women's team event for team usa. after she vaulted, the russians and
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her team—mates on team usa all scored highly —— more highly than her. not the only surprise of the day — with japanese superstar who let the olympic cauldron, — lit naomi osaka also suffering a shock exit in her home olympics who let the olympic cauldron, as czech marketa vondrousova earned a straight—set win in tokyo. indeed lucy, a shock defeat for world number two, also
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four—time major champion, she was a favourite to win the tournament but leaving the olympics without a medal. she didn't actually speak to the press after being defeated but when she came back she clearly showed her disappointment, though she said she was glad to have participated but a lot of surprise here injapan. translation: they didn't perform too well without spectators so i came to i cheer, to hopefully bring out their best ability. good luck. this is a once in a lifetime opportunity for me to be able to watch an olympic event in my home town, in my home country, so i want to cheer without any regret. those were spectators walking into the stadium behind me which is the
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only one allowing spectators. at the moment there is a football match and earlier today we had sweden versus new zealand. they are only allowing 2000 spectators inside so we cant exactly hear any of them cheering and so far neither side has scored a point. japan has to win this match in order to get to the quarterfinals but one of the reasons we are here is because it was one of the prefectures hardest hit. at last the largest number of people, more than 10,000 lives were lost —— it lost the largest number of people. this was supposed to short the recovery of japan and was supposed to short the recovery ofjapan and the region was supposed to short the recovery of japan and the region recovering from that natural disaster although the pandemic have been dominating the pandemic have been dominating the headlines. we discovered the
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grass used in the stadium was actually drawn here stop i caught up with mr otsubo. yamamoto time but i was born is 40 kilometres from here. the yamamoto time but i was born is 40 kilometres from here.— yamamoto time but i was born is 40 kilometres from here. the day of the earth . uake kilometres from here. the day of the earthquake l — kilometres from here. the day of the earthquake i was _ kilometres from here. the day of the earthquake i was so _ kilometres from here. the day of the earthquake i was so shocked - kilometres from here. the day of the earthquake i was so shocked i - earthquake i was so shocked i couldn't even drive. i decided to get the local farmers together to go grass for the stadium for the rugby world cup and the olympics. it has been my dream so i'm really happy. i'm very glad they're allowing spectators. a lot of people helped us out after the earthquake and we wanted to show people we have overcome them to express our
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gratitude. i overcome them to express our gratitude-— overcome them to express our cratitude. ., ., . ., , gratitude. i have got three japanese weather apps _ gratitude. i have got three japanese weather apps on _ gratitude. i have got three japanese weather apps on the _ gratitude. i have got three japanese weather apps on the go _ gratitude. i have got three japanese weather apps on the go at _ gratitude. i have got three japanese weather apps on the go at the - weather apps on the go at the moment. lots of us are trying to track what is going with the wind and rain and this typhoon, what are you hearing? me and rain and this typhoon, what are you hearing?— you hearing? we have lost track as well. we thought _ you hearing? we have lost track as well. we thought we _ you hearing? we have lost track as well. we thought we might - you hearing? we have lost track as| well. we thought we might actually get hit but that typhoon which seems to have avoided tokyo but came towards the north—east of the country where we are but so far we have been quite lucky. we can start to feel a tiny bit of rain but i think it is fair to say the organisers are very pleased this football match betweenjapan and chile could take place without the athletes having to run around in the rain. ,., ., ., athletes having to run around in the rain. ., , i. , rain. good to see you, 'ust reflecting i rain. good to see you, 'ust reflecting on i rain. good to see you, 'ust reflecting on that i rain. good to see you, just reflecting on that news - rain. good to see you, just| reflecting on that news that rain. good to see you, just - reflecting on that news that simone biles is out of the women's team event. she won four gold medals and a bronze in real so a lot of pressure on her. a lovely story. ——
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rio. the suffering winner is owen wright from australia who four years ago had a bleed on his brain and couldn't walk our talk and had to learn these things and to suffer again and today he took a bronze medalfor again and today he took a bronze medal for australia so an inspiring story to leave you with from here in tokyo. more burglars will have to wear electronic tags on release from prison, under a government plan to cut crime in england and wales. borisjohnson launched the programme on his first day
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out of covid isolation. it includes removing rules introduced by the former prime minister theresa may which made it harderfor police to stop and search suspects — and having a named officer for each local area. but the police federation said these were old ideas presented as new. daniel sandford reports. a dramatic arrest in london this year as armed officers intercepted a man carrying two scorpion submachineguns. as the lockdowns ended, criminal activity has started up again — much of it linked to drugs. aware that crime is a high priority for the public, the prime minister and home secretary promised today to "build back safer" after the pandemic — with less crime, fewer victims and a safer society. what we are announcing today is plans to back the police but also to back the public so that if you are the victim of a crime you have a named police officer that you can go to, wherever you live, who will attend you, and make sure the police deal with your crime.
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while the government's beating crime plan has no major new policies, several pilot projects are being expanded, including one where burglars and robbers wear satellite tags so that movements can be monitored after their release from prison, and project adder, which looks to fight drug crime by tackling dealers and people who are addicted. ministers are also promising everybody in england and wales will be able to look up a name and contact details for a police officer responsible for their area. controversially, under the plan, the government has abandoned theresa may's tightening up of the stop and search rules. she introduced the changes because of concerns that the power was being used more against certain ethnic groups, but ministers say stop and search can have a big impact on reducing knife crime and that is the priority. labour is accusing ministers of using gimmicks to cover up the impact of cuts. this government is soft on crime, frankly, and soft on the causes of crime.
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and that is the record of the past 11 years. you think of the cuts that have happened to youth clubs, to the number of youth workers, the number of social workers. and the criminaljustice system is still under huge pressure. the police federation is furious about a recent pay freeze, the courts have an enormous backlog caused by the pandemic and thejustice committee of mps warned today that cuts to legal aid have hollowed out parts of the system, and this is putting fair trials at risk. daniel sandford, bbc news. i'm joined now byjohn hayward—cripps, ceo of the neighbourhood watch network. thanks watch network. forjoining us. an unnamed officer thanks forjoining us. an unnamed officerfor thanks forjoining us. an unnamed officer for each thanks forjoining us. an unnamed officerfor each local thanks forjoining us. an unnamed officer for each local area, can thanks forjoining us. an unnamed officerfor each local area, can i assume this is the kind of recommendation that you agree with? yes, certainly. we are aware that in many parts of the country and in most neighbourhoods this is the case
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already, but to have that put—down is a priority is a real benefit. our members have said that the numbers of police stacey locally and those who represent their local community have been cut recently. me have been cut recently. we understand _ have been cut recently. we understand there are significant vacancies within the local neighbourhood police schemes, so you do wonder how workable this recommendation really is. this needs to be ut recommendation really is. this needs to be put through _ recommendation really is. this needs to be put through in _ recommendation really is. this needs to be put through in practice, - recommendation really is. this needs to be put through in practice, it - to be put through in practice, it needs to happen on the ground, not just in words but happen on the ground, but having that there is an increased focus is definitely a good thing. the police need to be able to facilitate that and make it happen. what do people tell you about the most common crimes and how they are dealt with by the police? i most common crimes and how they are dealt with by the police?— dealt with by the police? i guess that is two _ dealt with by the police? i guess that is two things. _ dealt with by the police? i guess that is two things. most - dealt with by the police? i guess that is two things. most of - dealt with by the police? i guess that is two things. most of our i that is two things. most of our members and the public when we survey them for one of the things they're most concerned about now is
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cyber crime and fraud. we know there has been a huge increase in that while there has been a drop of another crimes in the few years. many people across the country are really concerned about that. that is one area of huge concern to the residents. i think that would be the number one issue that has changed over the last five or six years. that is interesting because i think my understanding is that fraud and that sort of thing isn't touched in this report at all. there are no measures planned to tackle that. what about on the streets? do people feel if they report a burglary or if their car is broken into that the police have the time and resources to deal with that? i police have the time and resources to deal with that?— to deal with that? i think lots of --eole to deal with that? i think lots of people would — to deal with that? i think lots of people would report _ to deal with that? i think lots of people would report them - to deal with that? i think lots of people would report them when to deal with that? i think lots of - people would report them when they respond to the police, the 101 number is very sporadic across the country. we hear of members of the public contacting 101 that is very
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time consuming. that is an issue. we know that organisations like crimestoppers provide an ominous reporting, so that would be one issue, people dealing with nonemergency crimes. gaining a response from the police is challenging and when we speak to senior police officers, they need to prioritise crimes that have potentially have a higher impact on other crimes, but we knew that it is patchy across the country and plenty other members would say they are at times very frustrated at not getting the response they would like. itruihat the response they would like. what could help and _ the response they would like. what could help and what _ the response they would like. what could help and what needs to change in your view on the view of your members? i in your view on the view of your members?— in your view on the view of your members? i think a lot of this is around investment _ members? i think a lot of this is around investment in _ members? i think a lot of this is around investment in the - members? i think a lot of this is| around investment in the police. there have been significant cuts during the austerity year to the police and the police would echo that and have done on numerous occasions. also the changing nature of crime, the increased use of cyber
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and online to defraud people. also just making sure that the link between communities and the police are increased. we know there are significant impacts on police numbers being cut. people do not feel that police happiness time to deal with issues in their community. the police obviously need to balance their priorities and that is hugely challenging with limited resources. it is about people feeling that lower level crimes to look at the time that they would want. thank you for “oininr time that they would want. thank you forjoining us- — now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. plenty of heavy thunderstorms
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and downpours with us today and the next couple of days, too. there is an amber weather warning for parts of scotland for thunderstorms today and flooding being likely. there are slow moving intense downpours. elsewhere across the uk, sunny spells and scattered heavy showers, hail and a lot of rain falling on a short space of time. not impossible for many areas. overnight, the showers fade away in the side quite quickly but we will continue to see slow moving downpours in central scotland and the north west of england, so quite a soggy start for many for wednesday morning. we could have flooding problems. temperatures between 13 and 15 degrees. to start the day, centring on the south at least, but heavy thundery showers developing. a central and northern parts of scotland they could be prolonged. flooding lightly over the next three days. all the warnings are on a website. goodbye.
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hello this is bbc news with rebecca jones. the headlines: more medaljoy for team gb at the olympics as tom dean and duncan scott pick up gold and silver in the men's 200m freestyle. jubilation for tom dean's family and friends back home as they celebrated his gold medal success. georgia taylor—brown also won a silver medal in the women's traithlon, despite a puncture during the cycling. an independent review into child sexual exploitation in bradford says some children in the city remain unprotected and are still being abused. damning criticism of a london council for allowing the decades—long abuse of more
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than 700 children in five children's homes. a woman who was seriously injured after being hit by a car at a festival says her two—year—old daughter was saved by her husband throwing her out of the way. the prime minister has urged people to "remain cautious" and not jump to "premature conclusions" following the latest fall in covid cases. borisjohnson was speaking on a visit to surrey. our political correspondent nick eardley has the latest. it is only a couple of weeks since there was concern, there were warnings from government that the number of cases could reach 100,000 a day. as of yesterday, it is now under 25,000. the prime minister had been pinged
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as it was contact at the health secretary. today is his birthday out of self isolation. it is quite clear from the government that they don't want to read too much into these figures yet. there is still damp message of caution, of not wanting to relax too soon because these numbers are going down. i’ee to relax too soon because these numbers are going down. i've noticed that obviously — numbers are going down. i've noticed that obviously we _ numbers are going down. i've noticed that obviously we are _ numbers are going down. i've noticed that obviously we are six _ numbers are going down. i've noticed that obviously we are six days - numbers are going down. i've noticed that obviously we are six days into . that obviously we are six days into some betterfigures, but it is that obviously we are six days into some better figures, but it is very, very important that we don't allow ourselves to run away with premature conclusions about this. step four of the opening up only take place a few days ago. people have got to remain very cautious and that remains the approach of the government. there is approach of the government. there is a similar message _ approach of the government. there is a similar message coming _ approach of the government. there is a similar message coming from - approach of the government. there is a similar message coming from the l a similar message coming from the scientists, as well. while these figures look encouraging, they look like good news, people shouldn't be
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jumping to conclusions just yet. there has to be a bit of time worked through to see exactly what is happening. at the same time, we are seeing some of those experts who are warning less than two weeks ago the cases could reach 100,000 a day now saying something slightly different. niall ferguson, one of the modellers who has been pretty crucial to some of the big decisions the government has made over the last couple of years, saying that potentially we could have seen the worst of the pandemic now over by the end of september. talking to people who are involved in some of these decisions, there does seem to be a bit of optimism at the moment, but we have set it so many times before, this virus has proven to be surprising in the past and that is why you are going to continue to hear that message of caution in the short term. lord clarke has been giving evidence to the inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal.
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around 3,000 people died after being given blood products containing hiv and hepatitis c in the 1970s and 1980s. lord clarke is the first former health minister from the time to testify. lord clarke has been giving evidence to the inquiry this enquiry in the building behind me has been examining events that happened 40 or 50 years ago but are still having an effect today. one group particularly effective or around 4500 people with haemophilia. some were young children at the time and were infected with viral hepatitis and hiv after being given these contaminated blood products. lord clarke was the chief nhs person in charge of the health policy around that time at the beginning of the 1980s when the first report of a crisis around aids emerged. giving evidence this morning, he said when hejoined that evidence this morning, he said when he joined that department in 1982 he never expected a problem like this
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to arise. ., , , to arise. the whole setup, the structure _ to arise. the whole setup, the structure was _ to arise. the whole setup, the structure was completely - to arise. the whole setup, the - structure was completely shambolic bureaucracy, which is why blood products, relatively calm area that had this horrendous problem it took us all by surprise when in use disease emerge, it was a quiet little part about this. it is very big because of the tragedy now, big because of this enquiry. s0 big because of the tragedy now, big because of this enquiry.— because of this enquiry. so lord clarke will— because of this enquiry. so lord clarke will be _ because of this enquiry. so lord clarke will be given _ because of this enquiry. so lord clarke will be given further - clarke will be given further detailed evidence here for the next three days at this enquiry. it is very important for the families, the relatives of people who have lost their lives and the survivors, not just because of the detail he is providing, because of the principle here. this is the first time such senior minister has been giving evidence under oath at an like this. one person has been killed and 16 injured in an explosion
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at an industrial site housing the headquarters of the pharmaceutical company bayer in north—western germany. footgage on social media shows a thick cloud of black smoke billowing above the city of leverkusen. the police have closed the nearby autobahns. the german government's civil protection agency warned residents in the area of "extreme danger" and urged people to keep doors and windows closed. officials in the united states have made renewed appeals to the unvaccinated, as the delta variant of covid—19 begins to take hold there. only around half the us population is fully jabbed against the virus and local leaders are warning people of the dangers of refusing the vaccine. a growing number of counties in california are now asking people to wear face masks in all indoor places, regardless of whether they've had the jab.
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our north america correspondent sophie long reports. well, here's the truth. if you are fully—vaccinated, you are safer with a higher degree of protection. but if you are not vaccinated, you are not protected. cheering. and now... what we have now is a pandemic of the unvaccinated. the message from the president is clear. but covid cases are climbing, and it's causing deep concern. we are going in the wrong direction. if you look at the inflection of the curve of new cases, and as you said in the run—in to this interview, that it is among the unvaccinated. and since we have 50% of the country not fully vaccinated, that is a problem. in some states like alabama, the vaccination rates are much lower, fuelling fears that intensive care units could reach capacity once more. the new cases in covid
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are because of unvaccinated folks. almost 100% of the new hospitalisations are with unvaccinated folks. and the deaths, certainly, are occurring with unvaccinated folks. these folks are choosing a horrible lifestyle of self—inflicted pain. from the east coast to the west, officials are redoubling their efforts to push people to act responsibly. anybody that's hospitalised or is in an icu from covid right now, is there by choice, is there because they didn't make the effort to get vaccinated. and that's what we need to fix. but this is the land of the free. and in california's orange county, where hospitalisations are surging, even the seriously ill remain reluctant to have the injection that could save lives. i think it's an individual decision. there's a lot of factors that are going into it. there are politics involved.
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and there are multiple sides of the equation. due to this latest surge being driven by the highly transmissible delta variant, la county have now reinstated its indoor mask wearing mandate, even for those who have been vaccinated. with the us in another pivotal moment, officials in other states could soon follow suit. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. a congressional panel set up to investigate the siege of the us capitol is preparing to hold its first public hearing. supporters of donald trump stormed the building injanuary, as lawmakers gathered to certify the results of the presidential election which he lost. our state department correspondent barbara plett usher told us more about the inquiry. it's going to investigate what exactly happened during the attack on the capitol building on the 2nd
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ofjanuary and the on the capitol building on the 2nd of january and the events leading up to it in order to establish an official public record. it will be looking at things like what intelligence was and wasn't shared. what did trumpeter officials know or not know. what with the role of a white supremacist groups and why did it take so long to secure the capitol building? they will hear testimony from more police officers to start. they were attacked and beaten by the rioters, some quite savagely. this is a way to put a human face on the investigation, but also try to win public support for it because there is an issue with legitimacy. in the months since the insurrection, republicans have started to play or even deny the violence. they are basically rejecting this committee, saying it is politically partisan. the republican leader in the house is in effect boycotting it because two of the members he picked to sit on the panel were vetoed by the democratic house speaker, nancy pelosi. they were strong trump loyalist and she
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said this would damage the integrity of the investigation. in turn, she has selected herself to republicans to sit on the committee. they are strong trump critics. this is a way to try to win bipartisan legitimacy for the panel. one of these republicans, liz cheney, has impeccable conservative credentials, but she was ousted from party leadership a few months ago and she has been given a prominent role. she will be delivering one of the opening statements. that is a way to try to bring this together as a bipartisan event. it has really exposed how divided the politics are here and the country. the headlines on bbc news: more medaljoy for team gb at the olympics as tom dean and duncan scott pick up gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle. jubilation for tom dean's family and friends back home as they celebrated his
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gold medal success. georgia taylor—brown also won a silver medal in the women's traithlon, despite a puncture during the cycling. now on bbc news it's time to take a look some of the stories from our colleagues in our newsrooms �*across the uk'. a woman seriously injured when an unoccupied car ran over a tent in debighshire says her two—year—old daughter was saved only when her husband through her out of the way. jenna o'neill suffered life—changing injuries in the incident at the conscious tribal gathering festival on saturday. rob thomas sent this report. jenna o'neill, her husband and their two—year—old daughter
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were camping at the bottom of a steep hill when this incident happened. according tojenna, the family were sat outside their tent just after eating their lunch. a number of vehicles were parked at the top of the hill above them and it seems one of the vehicles, which was an occupied, began rolling towards where the family were sitting. jenna says her husband was able to throw their daughter out of their way of the vehicle. stephen o'neill suffered a fractured ankle in the incident and was treated in hospital in wrexham. but she was more badly injured. she was left with a broken collarbone, broken ribs and a fractured pelvis. she also suffered damage to her liver and her spleen. she was airlifted to hospital in stoke, where she is still being treated. she told the bbc that at the time of the incident, she thought her whole family had been killed. she described her husband as a hero for acting so quickly to
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protect their daughter. the conscious tribal gathering event was being staged here for the fifth time and it ended yesterday. it is described as a family friendly event featuring live music and a range of other activities. although it ended yesterday, a number of people are still at the site today, and the organisers have been asked to comment about the incident but have yet to issue any statement about what happened. a man from norfolk is back home with his family at last, after spending all of 2021 in hospital with coronavirus. a man from norfolk is back home with his family at last, after spending all of 2021 in hospital with coronavirus. sean hunte was in the norfolk and norwich hospitalfor 203 days, 120
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in critical care. now he's urging everyone who can, to get vaccinated. mike liggins reports. sean hunte back in his garden with wifejenny for the first time in a long time. he was taken ill in january this year he had pancreatitis and call it covid in the hospital. the 58—year—old teacher was put on a ventilator, but the doctors did not thinbk he would survive. the doctors said to me i was that close to death, they called my wife in two or three times. they sent to palliative care assistant to see me and she talked me through whatever the process was, the different drugs they would use to help him pass. i said, i'm not ready to see you. i'm not ready to let him go. there were times i thought i wouldn't wake it until the end of the week. there are many times i thought i wouldn't make it through the night. i felt dreadful, i couldn't move. i couldn't speak because i had a tracheotomy.
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on friday, sean left hospital after 203 days. he can't speak highly enough of the staff and is now urging anybody who has not been vaccinated to get a jab. the risks of not having it, i think, are just too great. you've got to get a vaccine. you've got to protect yourself, protect your loved ones. it's too much. sean hunte now is his recovery is likely to be long and hard. but he loves food and dancing. and he is planning to be back on the dance floor as soon as possible. nearly 800 people are currently in need of social housing in mid—devon. as part of the solution, the district council has plans to bring in pre—built modular homes which could go on former garage block sites to provide much needed social housing. it's hoped they could help ease
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the lack of low cost housing. spotlight�*sjohn ayres has more. it's a one up, one down 38—square metre home and can be installed in just a few days. mid devon district council wants to try out properties like this to provide more social housing. we got a super insulated building. it's got treble—glazed buildings, comes with a fully fitted kitchen. upstairs, you've got a bedroom, bathroom. you've got 2.5 kilowatts of solar panels, an electric battery, a heat pump. all of these technologies will mean you have a performing building that will ensure your tenants, whoever lives here, will not have to spend a lot of money on energy bills. the plan would be to put up a total of 14 of these at garage block sites in tiverton and cullompton. the council on the land which would keep the cost down and rents would be 60% less than normal.
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it's better than being in a b&b or mum's back bedroom. it's an opportunity to have their own front door, their own space and on privacy. so therefore, it is that an initial step away from that and it gives them the opportunity to have their own property and start their own lives. zed pods are built on a factory, then installed on site. this is hope rise in bristol. these homes can be built on stilts to go over car parking spaces or garages. i think it could really help, because you can move the men, we've got in the district quite a lot of garage sites that are no longer used, so we can actually make sure that these houses are up and running very quickly. the council's consulting with the public, and this unit goes on show this week. the council still needs planning permission, but if things go their way, they hope tenants could move in as early as the start of next year.
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some more good olympic newsjust in. team gb hasjust won some more good olympic newsjust in. team gb has just won a some more good olympic newsjust in. team gb hasjust won a bronze medal in the women's artistic gymnastics. that is the event that simon biles withdrew from a little earlier. another medal for team gb, withdrew from a little earlier. another medalfor team gb, a bronze in the women's artistic gymnastics. artistic gymnastics. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith—lucas. hello. over the last couple of days we have had plenty of downpours that have led to flooding in parts of the uk and there is morbid to come. some heavy, torrential downpours can continue for today and over the next few days, too. we have a slow—moving area of low pressure dominating our weather. not many isobars across the uk today, meaning these intense
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downpours are not moving too quickly on the breeze. there is an amber warning over parts of scotland for the thunderstorms, bringing torrential, slow—moving downpours. flooding and disruption is likely across the region. and it's notjust across the region. and it's notjust across scotland that we are seeing heavy showers. if you do catch one, it could bring hale an intense flooding rainfall. temperatures for most of us and or 22 degrees. those showers are going to continue to be a problem across scotland and north—west england through this evening and overnight. elsewhere, they tend to fade away. it will become drier in the side for wednesday morning. the temperatures will be between 13 and 15. further intense downpours with this area of low pressure and not moving anywhere in a hurry as he move through the course of wednesday, so particularly across scotland once again tomorrow that it will be concerned about more heavy rain. another amber warning
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and force for scotland, heavy rain likely to bring flooding problems. elsewhere, we can see disruption with the heavy showers and thunderstorms. they move through quicker on the breeze the further south you are, but almost anywhere to catch an intense downpour. some something in between for most of us in temperatures between 16 and 21 degrees, and touch growth in recent days by the time we get to wednesday. moving through into thursday, low—pressure starting to shift further toward the north—east. we want take those winds rotating around. further rainfall pointing up across parts of scotland, northern england and northern ireland. a little bit drierfurther england and northern ireland. a little bit drier further south and top temperatures by thursday afternoon coming down a notch, between 15 and 21 degrees. to for now.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... damning criticism of a london council for allowing the decades—long abuse of more than 700 children in five children's homes. can they be gold and silver? yes, tom dean is olympic champion of the 200 metres freestyle and duncan scott gets the silver! 200 metres freestyle and duncan scott gets the silver! more medaljoy for team gb at the olympics, as tom dean and duncan scott pick up gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle. they cheer. jubilation for tom dean's family and friends back home as they celebrated his gold medal success. and georgia taylor—brown won a silver medal in

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