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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  July 27, 2021 12:00pm-12:31pm BST

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a stunning achievement by team gb swimmers at the olympics in tokyo — gold and silver in the men's 200—metre freestyle. can they be gold and silver? yes! tom dean is olympic champion of the 200m freestyle, and duncan scott's got the silver! tom dean sensationally won britain's fourth gold of the games — with duncan scott four hundredths of a second behind him. it's the first time in over 100 years that two british male swimmers have shared the podium together. screaming. for tom dean's family and supporters watching back home, there was delirious joy. and more success in the women's
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triathlon, with team gb's georgia taylor—brown winning the silver medal. we'll bring you all the latest from the fourth day of the games, with britain now in fifth place on the medals table. also on the programme... damning criticism of a london council for allowing the decades—long abuse of more than 700 children in 5 children's homes. electronic tagging of burglars after release from prison — part of a government plan to cut crime in england and wales. and a rare sight on northern shores — we hear from the family who met a red octopus on the beach. and coming up on the bbc news channel... more from the olympics, where bianca walkden misses out on a taekwondo final after being beaten in the last second. she'll now go for bronze.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. there's been more triumph for team gb at the olympics in tokyo, with gold and silver medals in the men's swimming 200 metres freestyle. tom dean touched home in one minute a422 seconds, securing a british record on his debut games, with duncan scottjust 0.04 seconds behind his teammate. it's the first time in more than 100 years that two british male swimmers have shared the podium. tom dean described it as a "dream come true" after contracting covid twice in the past year. and there there was more success with georgia taylor—brown winnning silver in the women's triathlon. let's go over now to natalie pirks, who's been watching all the action in tokyo for us. natalie. welcoming resort glorious
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old -la natalie. welcoming resort glorious gold play moore — natalie. welcoming resort glorious gold play moore yesterday - natalie. welcoming resort glorious gold play moore yesterday in - natalie. welcoming resort glorious gold play moore yesterday in the i gold play moore yesterday in the aquatics centre and it has been another in the morning. great britain has got its best start ever at an olympic games with ten medals and counting unjust day for competition. first of our sports editor watched tom dean and duncan scott battle it out in the pool. a century has passed since a british man last won an individual freestyle event in the olympics, but today came two contenders. the hope was that tom dean might make the podium, but having qualified fastest for the 200—metre final, focus was on duncan scott. commentator: a long hold - from the start, and nerves really jangling... keep your eye on the two red caps. in the centre, the favourite initially trailed his younger team—mate, but soon there was nothing between them. commentator: duncan scott is going to come back, - i wouldn't write scott off in the middle. having won two silvers in rio, scott was aiming to go one better, but dean, despite twice recovering from covid in the last year, was proving more
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than a worthy match — this the thrilling finale. commentator: tom dean and duncan scott _ looking really good at the moment, and they've got 15 metres to go. tom dean in six, duncan scott in four, and we could get two medals. and can they be gold and silver? can they be gold and silver? yes! tom dean is olympic champion in the 200 metres freestyle and duncan scott's got the silver. but if the celebrations in tokyo were joyous, just watch what it meant to dean's family and friends back home in maidenhead, watching on in the early hours as the drama unfolded. wild cheering. and then a chance to listen to the two medallists. i just want to say thanks so much to everyone back home. my mum, my family, my girlfriend. i'm just lost for words. all the boys back in maidenhead,
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thanks for staying up. he did it. we've come on so far in the last 18 months, it's a pleasure to watch. it's great to be able to say he is a good mate out of the pool. announcer: tom dean! what a moment this is. you'd have been forgiven for thinking that british swimming was all about adam peaty at the olympics, but tom dean and duncan scott have changed all that. their remarkable one—two continuing what is becoming a phenomenal time for team gb here in the pool. these are the first british male swimmers to share a podium at the games since 1908. later, dean telling me his take on the closing stages in the race of his life. i couldn't even see duncan, i was breathing to the right, and he wasjust closing down the competitors to my right.
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so it was going to be tight, four hundredths in it, that's how 0lympic races come down to it. but, i mean, two brits on the podium, silver, gold, that's unheard of. roommates in the athletes' village, this pair now also share a piece of history, and with the prospect of more medals to come, team gb�*s swimmers could be set for their most successful games in decades. dan roan, bbc news, tokyo. honestly, i could watch that footage of tom's family and friends celebrating all day long. ijust hope they have a very forgiving neighbours. elsewhere there was a stunning silver in the women's triathlon with georgia taylor—brown. she told me this afternoon she had already been able to face time her mum and dad. they cried together and she cannot wait to get home to share their success with them. here is our sports correspondent. just three months ago she was on crutches. today she was on an olympic podium. georgia
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0lympic podium. georgia taylor—brown, it has been some journey. 0n the wild, wet day for the triathlon she began well with a solid swim. come the cycling, calamity. i solid swim. come the cycling, calami . ~ , ., , solid swim. come the cycling, calami . ~ , ., ., calamity. i think she has a flat back tyre _ calamity. i think she has a flat back tyre step _ calamity. i think she has a flat back tyre stop at _ calamity. i think she has a flat back tyre stop at the - calamity. i think she has a flat back tyre stop at the culture i calamity. i think she has a flat - back tyre stop at the culture meant she had to nurse her bike home. now trailing the leaders. fine she had to nurse her bike home. now trailing the leaders.— trailing the leaders. one once one she icks trailing the leaders. one once one she picks them — trailing the leaders. one once one she picks them off _ trailing the leaders. one once one she picks them off with _ trailing the leaders. one once one she picks them off with a - trailing the leaders. one once one she picks them off with a superb l she picks them off with a superb run. she couldn't quite catch flora duffy, who pledged a first ever 0lympic duffy, who pledged a first ever olympic gold for bermuda. at tyler brown followed her home for silver and after overcoming a puncture, and and after overcoming a puncture, and a serious leg injury in may, it was some feat. i a serious leg in'ury in may, it was some feat.— some feat. i had two weeks on crutches- _ some feat. i had two weeks on crutches. no _ some feat. i had two weeks on crutches. no load _ some feat. i had two weeks on crutches. no load through - some feat. i had two weeks on crutches. no load through the | some feat. i had two weeks on - crutches. no load through the bone at all. then another four weeks of no running and then i managed to basically cram my training in the past six weeks. you just want to make everyone proud and give everyone a reason to be happy to let everyone a reason to be happy to let everyone up. but
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everyone a reason to be happy to let everyone oo— everyone a reason to be happy to let everyone no— everyone up. but in tae kwon do, what heartbreak. _ everyone up. but in tae kwon do, what heartbreak. britain's - everyone up. but in tae kwon do, what heartbreak. britain's bianca | what heartbreak. britain's bianca walkden fighting for a place in the final. as the clock ticked down she edged into the lead. victory beckoned, but then with just one second remaining, guess what? shot to the head- — second remaining, guess what? shot to the head. in _ second remaining, guess what? srirrt to the head. in the last seconds, can you believe it?— can you believe it? walked in couldn't- _ can you believe it? walked in couldn't. her— can you believe it? walked in couldn't. her pain _ can you believe it? walked in couldn't. her pain all - can you believe it? walked in couldn't. her pain all to - can you believe it? walked in couldn't. her pain all to play| can you believe it? walked in - couldn't. her pain all to play after the ultimate last—gasp defeat. she will fight for bronze later, but her hopes of gold are over in the most agonising fashion. andy murray's hopes are still very much alive in the tennis as he and joe salisbury progress to the quarterfinals of the doubles. a big shot in the women's singles. naomi 0saka knocked out. japan's biggest star who lit the olympic cauldron making an early 0lympic cauldron making an early exit. but the stormy weather in
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japan made life particularly interesting the surface. the resilient breaking his board, but found a replacement and duly claimed the sport's of this ever 0lympic the sport's of this ever olympic gold. if you ever wondered what it means to make history, here is your answer. and the swiss, bbc news. well, bianca walkden's bronze medal fight in tae kwon do is in about one hour stop the british women have just started the team gymnastics final and right now it is the dressage team final. charlotte dujardin aiming to become the first british woman to win gold at three different games are. so british woman to win gold at three different games are.— british woman to win gold at three different games are. so much to look forward to- — different games are. so much to look forward to. thank _ different games are. so much to look forward to. thank you. _ different games are. so much to look forward to. thank you. natalie - different games are. so much to look forward to. thank you. natalie pirks i forward to. thank you. natalie pirks in tokyo. we will be live in maidenhead, where tom dean is from, later in the programme. to the rest of the day's news now. an inquiry report
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has strongly criticised the london borough of lambeth for allowing the decades—long abuse of more than 700 children in five children's homes. the report has been released in the last few minutes. let's speak to our home affairs correspondent tom symonds, who's been following the story. just tell us more about what this report says. just tell us more about what this report says-_ just tell us more about what this reort sa s. . .,, , , report says. the child abuse inquiry has been going _ report says. the child abuse inquiry has been going for— report says. the child abuse inquiry has been going for a _ report says. the child abuse inquiry has been going for a few _ report says. the child abuse inquiry has been going for a few years - report says. the child abuse inquiry has been going for a few years now| has been going for a few years now and this is one of its most scathing reports. it says that children in the care of lambeth council were shown little warmth or compassion. they were left to cope with the trauma of their abuse on their own. the report says it is hard to comprehend the cruelty and sexual abuse inflicted on them in the care of lambeth council over many years. 705 children were abused by 100 77 adults in five children's homes —— 107 seven adults. 0ne adults in five children's homes —— 107 seven adults. one was shelling out near croydon, that place was a brutal place, the inquiry found.
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violence, sexual assault and racism were allowed to flourish. the report follows that lambeth council failed in for particular ways. firstly they allow is known of users access to children. it failed to investigate and when abusers left theirjobs at lambeth it failed to tell their future employers about their suspicions that they were under. also it finds that lambeth, run by the labour party in the 1980s, was focusing on children but on politicised behaviour and the turmoil that resulted from the council's attempt to take on the conservative government run by margaret thatcher at the time. as a result, children became pawns in a toxic power game, the inquiry advice. it makes recommendations for the police and the council, which apologise what happened in 2016. thank you, tom. more burglars will have to wear electronic tags
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on release from prison, under a government plan to cut crime in england and wales. borisjohnson launched the programme on his first day out of covid isolation. it includes removing rules introduced by the former prime minister theresa may which made it harderfor police to stop and search suspects — and having a named officer for each local area. but the police federation said these were old ideas presented as new. daniel sandford reports. a dramatic arrest in london this year as officers intercept a man carrying two scorpion submachineguns. as the lockdowns ended, criminal activity has started up again — much of it linked to drugs. aware that crime is a high priority for the public, the prime minister and home secretary promised today to "build back safer" after the pandemic — with less crime, fewer victims and a safer society.
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what we are announcing today its plans to back the police but also to back the public so that if you are the victim of a crime you have unnamed police officer that you can go to, wherever you live, will attend you, and make sure the police deal with your crime. while the government's beating crime plan has no major new policies, several pilot projects are being expanded, including one where burglars and robbers wear satellite tags so that movements can be monitored after their release from prison, and project adder, which looks to fight drug crime by tackling dealers and people who are addicted. ministers are also promising everybody in england and wales will be able to look up a name and contact details for a police officer responsible for the area. controversially, under the plan, the government has abandoned theresa may's tightening up of the stop and search rules. she introduced the changes because of concerns that the power was being used more against certain
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ethnic groups, but ministers say stop and search can have a big impact on reducing knife crime and that is the priority. labour is accusing ministers of using gimmicks to cover up the impact of cuts. this government is soft on crime, frankly, and soft on the causes of crime. and that is the record of the past 11 years. you think of the cuts that have happened to youth clubs, to the number of youth workers, the number of social workers. and the criminaljustice system is still under huge pressure. the police federation is furious about a recent pay freeze, the courts have an enormous backlog caused by the pandemic and thejustice committee of mps warned today that cuts to legal aid have hollowed out parts of the system, and this is putting fair trials at risk. daniel sandford, bbc news. lord clarke has been giving evidence under oath to the contaminated blood scandal inquiry — the first senior health minister from the time to testify.
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around 3,000 people died after being given blood products containing hiv and hepatitis c in the 1970s and 1980s. let's speak to jim reed, who is outside the inquiry. what has lord clarke been saying? yes, this inquiry in the building behind me has been examining events that happened a0 or 50 years ago but i still having an effect today. one group particularly effective working 1500 people with haemophilia. some were young children at the time and they were 1500 people. they were infected with hepatitis and hiv after being given contaminated blood products. ken clarke, now lord clarke, was the chief nhs person in charge of that health policy around that time at the beginning of the 19805 that time at the beginning of the 1980s when the first reports of a crisis around aids image. giving evidence this morning, he said when
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hejoined that evidence this morning, he said when he joined that department back in 1982 it was not clear, never expected a problem like this to arise. the whole setup, the structure was a completely shambolic bureaucracy. which is why blood products, which was a comparatively calm area, until it had this horrendous problem and took us all by surprise when a new disease — a new infection — was a quiet little part of all this. it's very big because of the tragedy now, big, this inquiry. 0ne one to lord clark will be giving further evidence, _ one to lord clark will be giving further evidence, detailed - one to lord clark will be giving - further evidence, detailed evidence for the next few days at this inquiry. it is important, very much so, for the families, relatives of those who lost the lights, and the survivors, notjust because of the detail he is providing but the principle, this is the first time such a senior minister has given
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evidence like this at an inquiry. thank you, jim reed. the prime minister has competed itself isolation. during a trip to surrey he urged people to be cautious and notjump he urged people to be cautious and not jump to he urged people to be cautious and notjump to premature conclusions after the latest fall in the coronavirus cases. 0ur corresponding nick eardley chances, i did seems the prime minister is not sure why cases have fallen? lats the prime minister is not sure why cases have fallen?— cases have fallen? lots of people are t in: cases have fallen? lots of people are trying to _ cases have fallen? lots of people are trying to figure _ cases have fallen? lots of people are trying to figure out _ cases have fallen? lots of people are trying to figure out exactly i cases have fallen? lots of people l are trying to figure out exactly why full six days now we have seen the number of positive cases apparently going down. it is only a couple of weeks since i was concern and warnings from government that the number of cases could reach 100,000 a day, yesterday it was under 25,000. the prime minister is one of those affected by that, as a close contact of the health secretary he was pinged and today is his first
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day out of self—isolation. it is clear the government does not want to read too much into these figures yet, there is still the message of caution, not wanting to relax too soon because these numbers are going down. listen to what the prime minister said in the last hour. i have noticed obviously we are six days _ have noticed obviously we are six days into — have noticed obviously we are six days into some better figures, but it is very. — days into some better figures, but it is very, very important that we do not _ it is very, very important that we do not allow ourselves to run away with a _ do not allow ourselves to run away with a premature conclusion about this _ with a premature conclusion about this step— with a premature conclusion about this. step four of the opening up only to _ this. step four of the opening up only to place a few days ago, people have to _ only to place a few days ago, people have to remain very cautious, that remains _ have to remain very cautious, that remains the — have to remain very cautious, that remains the approach of the government.— remains the approach of the government. there is a similar messaue government. there is a similar message coming _ government. there is a similar message coming from - government. there is a similar message coming from the - government. there is a similar - message coming from the scientists too, but while these figures looking curry chain and look like good news, people should not be jumping to conclusions just yet people should not be jumping to conclusionsjust yet —— people should not be jumping to conclusions just yet —— while these figures look encouraging. there has to be time to see exactly what is
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happening but we are seeing some of those experts who were warning less than two weeks ago that catered could reach 100,000 per day, now saying something slightly different —— that cases could reach. niall ferguson is one of the modellers who has been crucial to some of the big decisions made by the government over the last couple of years and he is saying that potentially we could have seen the worst of the pandemic now over by the end of september. talking to people involved in some of these decisions, there seems to be some optimism at the moment, but we had said it so many times before, this virus has proven to be surprising in the past and that is why we will continue to get the message of caution in the short—term. message of caution in the short-term.— message of caution in the short-term. , ., short-term. many thanks, nick eardle . the time is 12:20. our top story this lunchtime... yes, tom dean is 0lympic yes, tom dean is olympic champion of
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the 200 metres freestyle and duncan scott has the silver. aha, the 200 metres freestyle and duncan scott has the silver.— scott has the silver. a stunning achievement _ scott has the silver. a stunning achievement by _ scott has the silver. a stunning achievement by team - scott has the silver. a stunning achievement by team gb - scott has the silver. a stunning - achievement by team gb swimmers at the tokyo 0lympics as tom dean sensationally wins britain's fourth gold of the games, with duncan scott four hundredths of a second behind him. we will be speaking to tom dean's mum live about his historical medal win. coming up in sport on the bbc news channel... more action from day four of the olympics, where great britain's rugby sevens side fight back from 21—0 down to beat the united states and reach the semi finals. officials in the united states are issuing stark warnings to the unvaccinated, as the delta variant of covid—19 begins to take hold there. 0nly around half the us population is fully jabbed against the virus, and local leaders are warning people of the dangers of refusing the vaccine. a growing number of counties in california are also now asking
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people to wear face masks in all indoor places, even those who have had the jab. 0ur north america correspondent, sophie long, reports. well, here's the truth. if you are fully vaccinated, you are safer with a higher degree of protection. but if you are not vaccinated, you are not protected. cheering. and now... what we have now is a pandemic of the unvaccinated. the message from the president is clear. but covid cases are climbing, and it's causing deep concern. we are going in the wrong direction. if you look at the inflection of the curve of new cases, and as you said in the run—in to this interview, that it is among the unvaccinated. and since we have 50% of the country not fully vaccinated, that is a problem. in some states like alabama, the vaccination rates are much lower, fuelling fears that intensive care units could reach
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capacity once more. the new cases in covid are because of unvaccinated folks. almost 100% of the new hospitalisations are with unvaccinated folks. and the deaths, certainly, are occurring with unvaccinated folks. these folks are choosing a horrible lifestyle of self—inflicted pain. from the east coast to the west, officials are redoubling their efforts to push people to act responsibly. anybody that's hospitalised or is in an icu from covid right now, is there by choice, is there because they didn't make the effort to get vaccinated. and that's what we need to fix. but this is the land of the free. and in california's orange county, where hospitalisations are surging, even the seriously ill remain reluctant to have the injection that could save lives. i think it's an individual decision.
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there's a lot of factors that are going into it. there are politics involved. and there are multiple sides of the equation. due to this latest surge being driven by the highly transmissible delta variant, la county have now reinstated its indoor mask wearing mandate, even for those who have been vaccinated. with the us in another pivotal moment, officials in other states could soon follow suit. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. a congressional panel set up to investigate the siege of the us capitol will hold its first public hearing today. supporters of donald trump stormed the building injanuary, as lawmakers gathered to certify the results of the presidential election which he had lost. our state department correspondent barbara plett usher is in washington. what will this committee seek to establish, and how much legitimacy is it seen to have?
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well, it is going to investigate what exactly happened during the attack on the capitol building on january the 6th and the events leading up to eight in order to establish an official public record. it will look at things like what intelligence was shared and not shared, what did trump officials know and not know, what was the role of white supremacist groups and why did it take so long to secure the capitol building? they will start with hearing testimony from four police officers attacked and beaten by the rioters, some of them quite savagely. i think this is a way to try to put a human face on the investigation and also to try to win support because there is an issue with legitimacy. in the months since the insurrection republicans have started to downplay and some have even started to deny the violence and they are rejecting the committee, saying it is politically
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partisan. the republican leader in the house it effectively boycotting it because two of the members he chose to sit on the panel were vetoed by the democratic house speaker nancy pelosi, they were strong trump loyalists and she said it would damage the integrity of the investigation, that she herself has selected two republicans, strong trump critics, and this is a way to try to win bipartisan legitimacy for the panel. 0ne try to win bipartisan legitimacy for the panel. one of these republicans, liz cheney, has impeccable conservative credentials but was ousted from party leadership a few months ago and has been given a prominent role, she will be delivering one of the opening statement so that is a way, as i said, to try to bring this together as a bipartisan event, but it has really exposed how divided the politics are here, and the country. barbara plett usher, many thanks. a
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number of people are missing and one person has reportedly died after an explosion at an industrial site housing the headquarters of a pharmaceutical company in north—western germany. footage on social media shows a thick cloud of black smoke billowing above the city of leverkusen. police have closed the nearby autobahns and the german government civil protection agency warned residents of extreme danger and urged people to keep windows and doors closed. the first person to be charged under hong kong's national security law has been convicted in a landmark ruling. tong ying—kit was found guilty of inciting secession and terrorism after riding a motorcycle into police officers while carrying a flag calling for hong kong's liberation, the day after the controversial law was enacted. his sentencing is due at a later date. let's return to the olympics
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and go live to maidenhead, tom dean's hometown. of course, he won gold overnight. 0ur reporter eleanor roper is there with his mum, jackie, who stayed up on my to watch the victory. brute with his mum, jackie, who stayed up on my to watch the victory.— on my to watch the victory. we are in tom's lodge _ on my to watch the victory. we are in tom's lodge where _ on my to watch the victory. we are in tom's lodge where the _ on my to watch the victory. we are in tom's lodge where the family i on my to watch the victory. we are l in tom's lodge where the family had been celebrating all night, you might have seen pictures of them watching the race —— we are in tom's garden. we are with jackie now, how are you feeling? i garden. we are with jackie now, how are you feeling?— are you feeling? i think i am still on a high. _ are you feeling? i think i am still on a high. i _ are you feeling? i think i am still on a high, i think— are you feeling? i think i am still on a high, i think it _ are you feeling? i think i am still on a high, i think it is _ are you feeling? i think i am still| on a high, i think it is adrenaline, ifeel_ on a high, i think it is adrenaline, ifeei i_ on a high, i think it is adrenaline, ifeei i am— on a high, i think it is adrenaline, i feel i am buzzing even though i had not — i feel i am buzzing even though i had not been to bed for 48 hours, i do not _ had not been to bed for 48 hours, i do not think— had not been to bed for 48 hours, i do not think i have eaten yet but it is fantastic. — do not think i have eaten yet but it is fantastic, it is such a buzz. it is fantastic, it is such a buzz. a lold is fantastic, it is such a buzz. gold medal winner in the family, he has worked incredibly hard but so have you, yes of driving him to the pool first thing in the morning, competitions all over the world, you must be disappointed you could not
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go to tokyo?_ must be disappointed you could not go to tokyo?— go to tokyo? yes, having gone to exotic places _ go to tokyo? yes, having gone to exotic places like _ go to tokyo? yes, having gone to exotic places like coventry - go to tokyo? yes, having gone to exotic places like coventry and i exotic places like coventry and southampton it would have been great to be there _ southampton it would have been great to be there at the biggest event of his life _ to be there at the biggest event of his life to— to be there at the biggest event of his life to be with, make eye contact — his life to be with, make eye contact and give him a hug, but i am pleased _ contact and give him a hug, but i am pleased the — contact and give him a hug, but i am pleased the racers are on, there will be _ pleased the racers are on, there will be another olympics i can go to but it— will be another olympics i can go to but it feels— will be another olympics i can go to but it feels fantastic, like all the hard _ but it feels fantastic, like all the hard work. — but it feels fantastic, like all the hard work, and it is hard work and a lot of— hard work, and it is hard work and a lot of sacrifice on the whole family and on _ lot of sacrifice on the whole family and on the — lot of sacrifice on the whole family and on the kids, but it feels like, wow, _ and on the kids, but it feels like, wow, you — and on the kids, but it feels like, wow, you did that. all that work and you did _ wow, you did that. all that work and you did that, — wow, you did that. all that work and you did that, sol wow, you did that. all that work and you did that, so i am thrilled for him _ you did that, so i am thrilled for him. ., ., . ., . , him. you touched on the sacrifices, it has been — him. you touched on the sacrifices, it has been hard _ him. you touched on the sacrifices, it has been hard work— him. you touched on the sacrifices, it has been hard work that - him. you touched on the sacrifices, it has been hard work that he - him. you touched on the sacrifices, it has been hard work that he had l it has been hard work that he had served with coronavirus and been quite unwell? he served with coronavirus and been quite unwell?— quite unwell? he had a double whammy. _ quite unwell? he had a double whammy. the _ quite unwell? he had a double whammy, the lockdown - quite unwell? he had a double i whammy, the lockdown cancelled quite unwell? he had a double - whammy, the lockdown cancelled all the training, they could not go to the training, they could not go to the pool. — the training, they could not go to the pool, swimmers can't get enough time in _ the pool, swimmers can't get enough time in the _ the pool, swimmers can't get enough time in the water so that blew a hole _ time in the water so that blew a hole in— time in the water so that blew a hole in the _ time in the water so that blew a hole in the olympic plans. he got covid _ hole in the olympic plans. he got covid very— hole in the olympic plans. he got covid very early on, which is very unusual— covid very early on, which is very unusual because he was a young, fit athlete, _ unusual because he was a young, fit athlete, he — unusual because he was a young, fit
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athlete, he got through it in ten days _ athlete, he got through it in ten days he — athlete, he got through it in ten days. he got it together christmas 'ust days. he got it together christmas just got— days. he got it together christmas just got really badly and it knocked in 46, _ just got really badly and it knocked in 46, he _ just got really badly and it knocked in 46, he could not control his heartrate, _ in 46, he could not control his heartrate, he was out of the water for weeks — heartrate, he was out of the water for weeks right when they had started — for weeks right when they had started this heart block of training as part _ started this heart block of training as part of— started this heart block of training as part of olympic prep and he was really— as part of olympic prep and he was really like. — as part of olympic prep and he was really like, mum, icompany as part of olympic prep and he was really like, mum, i company that, last really like, mum, ! company that, last year— really like, mum, i company that, last year was cancelled that this has knocked a hole in my training, but luckily— has knocked a hole in my training, but luckily he bounced back. amazing to see everybody _ but luckily he bounced back. amazing to see everybody celebrating, - but luckily he bounced back. amazing to see everybody celebrating, one - to see everybody celebrating, one more race to go, the team relay? tam more race to go, the team relay? tom has already — more race to go, the team relay? tom has already turned _ more race to go, the team relay? tom has already turned the individual freestyle — has already turned the individual freestyle relay, the big weapons event _ freestyle relay, the big weapons event for— freestyle relay, the big weapons event for british swimming as the four by— event for british swimming as the four by 200 relay, we have seen the heat at _ four by 200 relay, we have seen the heat at the — four by 200 relay, we have seen the heat at the final is the first thing in the _ heat at the final is the first thing in the morning.— heat at the final is the first thing in the morning. hopeful for another medal, i in the morning. hopeful for another medal. i am — in the morning. hopeful for another medal, i am sure _ in the morning. hopeful for another medal, i am sure they _ in the morning. hopeful for another medal, i am sure they will - in the morning. hopeful for another medal, i am sure they will be - medal, i am sure they will be partying back in the garden if he comes back with another medal. maw; comes back with another medal. many thanks, comes back with another medal. many thanks. eleanor— comes back with another medal. many thanks, eleanor roper. _ a family in scotland has had close encounter of the eight—legged kind. ditte solgaard dunn and her children went for an evening swim
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in south queensferry when they encountered a large red octopus on the shore. sightings of the animal are rare in water north of the english channel, but are becoming more common as sea temperatures warm. ditte's son torin described the moment he found the octopus. it looked fine. it didn't look like it was going to hurt you, but then it started making some weird sounds so we gave it a little bit of space to see what it would do. it wasn't going into the water, it was just staying at shore, so we decided to go and help it with my shoe, try and get it into the... well, my water shoe, try and get it into the water. but it grabbed onto my shoe and almost stole it. time for a look at the weather. here's sarah keith—lucas. the heatwave of last week is a thing of the past, things really changing. we have already had lots of torrential showers and thunderstorms over recent hours, this is the
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mumbles. through the rest of

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