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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 27, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. can they be gold and silver? yes, tom dean is olympic champion of the 200 metres freestyle, and duncan scott's got the silver. more medaljoy for team gb at the olympics — as tom dean and duncan scott pick up gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle. wild cheering. jubilation for tom dean's family and friends back home as they celebrated his gold medal success. georgia taylor—brown also won a silver medal in the women's triathlon — despite a puncture during the cycling. as the prime minister leaves self—isolation, it's anounced workers including refuse collectors and prison staff will be allowed to take daily tests
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if they're identified as a close contact of a postive case. more electronic tagging for burglars, and a pledge to provide a named officerfor every neighbourhood are announced as part of a new crime reduction strategy for england and wales. what do you think about the new proposals and would having a named police officer for your community make a difference to you? do get in touch @annita—mcveigh or use the hashtag bbcyourquestions. mps urge the government to introduce a national register to monitor children in england who are home schooled. and coming up — one family who went paddling off the coast of scotland describe the moment they were joined by an unusual visitor on the beach.
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good morning. team gb is celebrating after winning olympic gold and silver in the men's swimming 200 metres freestyle. tom dean, who had covid last september and again in the new year, won the final, with duncan scott just 0.04 seconds behind his teammate. it's the first time in more than 100 years that two british male swimmers have shared the podium. there was more success in the triathlon, as team gb�*s georgia taylor—brown won silver. shock though for the host nation with naomi osaka out of the women's singles tennis. and a bermudan athlete has made history in tokyo — winning the tiny island's first ever olympic gold. for a full round up of the action at the olympics this morning — let's cross to chetan at the bbc sports centre.
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so much drama and excitement. it has all been happening and what an extraordinary moment in the early hours of this morning as you said, for the first time since 1908 two male british swimmers have finished on the podium. tom dean taking gold. duncan scott silver. it hasn't happened for 113 year, two british swimmers one and two in an olympic final. fortom dean swimmers one and two in an olympic final. for tom dean and duncan scott, this was the race where it all went right. nerves reallyjangling at the start of the men's 200 metres freestyle. as always, tom dean looks really good, closer to us. dean is just 21. he studies mechanical engineering and deferred two years of his course to train for these games. in the last 20 metres, it was worth it. can they be gold and silver? can they be gold and silver?
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yes! tom dean is olympic champion at the 200m freestyle and britain has gone one—two. can you believe that! ? dean beat his team—mate by less than a tenth of a second. for scott it was bittersweet. but for british swimming it was extraordinary. this is dean's first olympics. back home in maidenhead they watched him reach for the wall. cheering. as a child in london, dean watched from the stands. now he was top of the podium. amazing. it's amazing. i've said it before, to have two brits on the podium, going one—two, it shows the dominance in this event and how far british swimming have come. i couldn't have asked for any more. it's amazing. injanuary, dean had severe covid. he struggled to walk up the stairs. now he is the first british man to win freestyle gold since 1908, the same year two gb swimmers last
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shared the podium. british swimming is on course for its best modern games. and in tokyo and in berkshire we saw what it means to win the gold or watch your loved one do it. joe lynskey, bbc news. in the last hour — huge disappointment for britain's bianca walkden in her taekwondo semifinal. she had a two point lead with just three seconds left on the clock but south korea's lee—da—bin was able to land a head kick in the final second to win by a point. walkeden, from liverpoool, can still repeat the bronze she won in rio four years ago but was understandbly devastated after coming so close to the final in the above 67 kilogram category. great britain's first medal of the day came in the women's triathlon, where georgia taylor—brown took silver. she was beaten into gold by more than a minute by bermuda's flora duffy, who made history here —
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winning the island nation's first gold at an olympics and first medal of any kind since a bronze in boxing at the montreal games in 1976. for taylor—brown second was a great achievement too, she revealed afterwards she was on crutches just 12 weeks ago, and spent part of the bike stage of the race with a flat tyre. there's been a shock in the tennis on day four — the home favourite and face of the games naomi osaka suffering a shock exit she was beaten by czech marketa vondrousova in staight sets. osaka, who pulled out of the french open and missed wimbledon to focus on her mental health, admitted afterwards the pressure was a lot. she'll now focus on defening her us open title. andy murray continued his bid for a fourth olympic medal as he and joe salisbury reached
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the quarterfinals of the men's doubles in tokyo. the british duo backed up their impressive opening—round win to beat germany's kevin krawietz and tim puetz 6—2 7—6. that's all the sport for now. you saw a clip of tom dean's family celebrating. if you isn't seen it, i urge you do you watch it. if you isn't seen it, i urge you do you watch it. here's what happened when tom dean's family and friends gathered in his mum's garden to watch the 200m freestyle final. they shout and cheer. commentator: has he gone too early? duncan scott in the centre is looking rally good. is looking rrally good. 50 metres to go...
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they scream and cheer.
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we will have more on the olympics very soon. let us move on to other news. let us move on to other news. an additional 1,200 covid testing sites are to be set up in england, in an expansion of the scheme offering an alternative to self—isolation for workers in critical industries. staff in sectors including waste collection, prisons and defence will be able to take daily tests, if they've been identified as a close contact of a positive case. the new sites are in addition to 800 locations already announced for the food industry, transport workers and police and fire services. it's not known how many have opened so far. our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, is at westminster. hello to you. so the scheme expanding, is that the scheme in its entirety now, or are we going to get more sectors available, able to use these tests instead of self—isolating.
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these tests instead of self-isolating.- these tests instead of self-isolating. these tests instead of self-isolatinu. . , ., ., self-isolating. that is it for now, but i imagine _ self-isolating. that is it for now, but i imagine there _ self-isolating. that is it for now, but i imagine there will - self-isolating. that is it for now, but i imagine there will be - self-isolating. that is it for now, i but i imagine there will be pressure from other sectors experiencing a shortage of workers because of isolation, i am sure there will be pressure on the government to expand it a bit more, but of course it expand in a big way on august 16th, thatis expand in a big way on august 16th, that is when it will apply to everyone in the uk, where if you are pinged by the app or cob tacted by test and trace, and you are fully vaccine fateed then you will be able to do a single test and you will not have to isolate. but what happened yesterday represents a big expansion of the test to release scheme as it is called in two way, you mentioned the first one, which is there are a lot more testing sites, there was initially going to be 800 and now there will be 2 thousand thousands of them and an ex packion of the sectors that can apply to be in it. it is now includes things like refuse collection, people that work in hmrc in the tax office and people working in the space sector, so a
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lot more people are covered by it. and it is quite a labour intensive thing, the way it is being done at the moment it is daily tests with lateral flow so the little sticks we do when we are at home and they have to be supervised bay the regulator say they can only be used for that purpose if you are administered by a train professional. it is not like the nhs test that you pick up the pharmacy, which you do yourself. 0k. let pharmacy, which you do yourself. ok. let us talk more about the prime minister, and the chancellor coming out of self—isolation today. after being a close contact of the health secretary and the prime minister's big announcement for today, this crime reduction strategy, already pretty hefty push back, on that announcement. take us through that. so, this is a bunch of operational stuff for the police, the way it was explained to me the government has done lots of legislative stuff about giving the police new powers and there a big bill going through parliament. this is things that the police do when they are doing the
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police, and there is going to be a big plan released are the home office which we are waiting for the details of but some of it has been trailed in advance, this idea that you will have in england a named police officer in your ward, so the unit of the council of your local authority you will know the name of the police officer in charge there, you will be able to get in touch with them, there will be a change to how people who have been found guilty and serve sentences for what is called acquittive crime, theft or burglary, some will be tagged, so that the police can keep an eye on them when they leave prison, and thatis them when they leave prison, and that is an idea about reducing reoffending. one of the controversial things is reversing some changes to stop and the search introduced when theresa may was home secretary and prime minister, which could see more people being stopped and searched, i think that is the thing that has sparked the most controversy here, but the government convinced that expanding the
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police's powers to stop people is a way to reduce crime, it will be interesting to see what reaction it gets when the plan is published later today. gets when the plan is published later today-— gets when the plan is published later toda . �* ., . ~' , ., later today. 0k, adam, thank you very much — later today. ok, adam, thank you very much for— later today. 0k, adam, thank you very much for that. _ mps are urging the government to introduce a national register to monitor children in england who are being educated at home. the commons' education committee says there's an "astonishing" lack of information about children who aren't in school. the committee has also suggested there should be an assessment in literacy and numeracy for children studying at home. ministers say they're committed to introducing a national register soon. (tx with me is the mp robert halfon, the chair of the commons education committee. why doesn't the government know how many children are home educated? well, it is aston anywhere northern irishing we have had a —— astonishing we have had a liberal regime for many years compared to many other country, across europe,
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some ban home education and many require authorisation assessment or inspection, we have had a liberal regime but the government doesn't know how many there are, there are is no data collected on their outcomes and how they are doing, despite the fact obviously i am sure that many parents are doing a good job for their children, that is why there should be a register, notjust so we can collect the data but also, so we can collect the data but also, so we can direct resources at those families who may be struggling in terms of home education and give more support for those families who have children with special educational needs who may have been forced out of school, let down by the. is and having to educate their children at home. i the. is and having to educate their children at home.— the. is and having to educate their children at home. i mean, this begs a lot of questions _ children at home. i mean, this begs a lot of questions about _ children at home. i mean, this begs a lot of questions about why - children at home. i mean, this begs a lot of questions about why so - children at home. i mean, this begs| a lot of questions about why so many people, and we think there are sizeable numbers of children being home educated why they have chose than route rather than the traditional system for want of a better description. we
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traditional system for want of a better description.— traditional system for want of a better description. we know surveys su: est better description. we know surveys suggest that — better description. we know surveys suggest that there _ better description. we know surveys suggest that there has _ better description. we know surveys suggest that there has been - better description. we know surveys suggest that there has been 3896 - suggest that there has been 38% increase over the past year, up until october 2020, that is around 78,000 children being home educated. 0f 78,000 children being home educated. of course there are parents who just believe it is the right thing to do for their children, we are not trying to stop that, or prevent that in any way, but there are other parents who are forced into it. as i say because they have been let down by the system, there are often too many cases of what is called off rolling which are informal exclusions where parents again are forced into home educating their children. we know that 5% of schools, according to the previous children's commissioner, 5% of schools are responsible for 40% of children withdrawn from school to be home educated, so clearly there is a problem, so we are saying there should be this register, assessment and there also should be a level playing field for exams because if we are saying that children should be assessed once a year if they are
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home educated we should at least fund through the government their ability to do gcses or a—levels or other qualifications because at the moment they have to pay the costs themselves. figs moment they have to pay the costs themselves-— themselves. as you have indicated there may be _ themselves. as you have indicated there may be numerous _ themselves. as you have indicated there may be numerous reasons i there may be numerous reasons children are home educated but there doesn't seem to be a way of assesses, does there, what the attainment levels are, particularly in key skills, and what the outcomes are, beyond school age, so how would this register, if it was set up, how would that give us information because apparently it wouldn't, it would just tell us what children are being home educated.— would just tell us what children are being home educated. well, you are absolutely right, _ being home educated. well, you are absolutely right, the _ being home educated. well, you are absolutely right, the register - being home educated. well, you are absolutely right, the register won't i absolutely right, the register won't necessarily change attain. but it will help local authorities and the government direct resources at struggling parents but what we are calling for in our report, is at least an annual assessment of home educated children, so that they can by a saysed for their numeracy and
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literacy, and the children's commissioner, previous children's childrener said there should be terminally visits, to assess children's progress, but, we think it is a fair, it is fair to say annually, and assess them at least for maths and english, and help them fund exams if they want to do gcses and a—levels or other qualifications. and a-levels or other qualifications.- and a-levels or other qualifications. and a-levels or other aualifications. ~ ., ., and a-levels or other aualifications. ., ., qualifications. what would you say to those parents _ qualifications. what would you say to those parents and _ qualifications. what would you say to those parents and some - qualifications. what would you say to those parents and some are - qualifications. what would you say i to those parents and some are home educating who say we don't want to be on a register, i have word the —— heard the word it is us stigmatising them. what would you say to people who react in that way to the notion of a register i who react in that way to the notion of a registe— of a register i respect those eo - le, of a register i respect those peeple. i — of a register i respect those peeple. i am _ of a register i respect those people, i am sure - of a register i respect those people, i am sure some - of a register i respect those j people, i am sure some are of a register i respect those - people, i am sure some are doing a remarkablejob and there people, i am sure some are doing a remarkable job and there are examples of children who do very well out of home education but the problem is not everyone is s and there are struggling parents, it is,
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we require children at school to be at school and there is a regstster for children at school every day, we require them to be assessed, through sats or examples, most year, it is not wrong to say if children are being home educated there should be some kind of assessment and at least a register, so you can help those families who may, may be struggling. 0k. families who may, may be struggling. ok. robert halfon, thank you very much. robert halfon, thank you very much. alison sauer educated her children at home and runs an advisory service for home educating families. shejoins me now. alison, welcome to you, thank you forjoining us today. so tell our viewers about why you decided to home educate your children? lllrul’eiiii viewers about why you decided to home educate your children? well my children are — home educate your children? well my children are very _ home educate your children? well my children are very very _ home educate your children? well my children are very very different - home educate your children? well my children are very very different and i children are very very different and they were home educated for different reason, my son was born in 1996, and we have a bilingualfamily and he's neurodiverse and we decided
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that school would not suit him, would not wrap round him and he would not wrap round him and he would be deeply unhappy. we wanted to pursue the by ling quality of our household in a full—time way. with my daughter, when she was born nine years later it seemed like a natural progression. my daughter attends a selective grammar school so i have been the parent of home educating children and school educated children. ., children and school educated children. . , , , children. that was because she wanted to _ children. that was because she wanted to learn _ children. that was because she wanted to learn a _ children. that was because she wanted to learn a particular - wanted to learn a particular subject, latin?— wanted to learn a particular subject, latin? yes, yes, yes. it was. on subject, latin? yes, yes, yes. it was- 0n the _ subject, latin? yes, yes, yes. it was. on the idea _ subject, latin? yes, yes, yes. it was. on the idea of _ subject, latin? yes, yes, yes. it was. on the idea of a _ subject, latin? yes, yes, yes. it was. on the idea of a register, | subject, latin? yes, yes, yes. it. was. on the idea of a register, and we know that _ was. on the idea of a register, and we know that more _ was. on the idea of a register, and we know that more and _ was. on the idea of a register, and we know that more and more - was. on the idea of a register, and i we know that more and more children are being home educated, many of those educated now at home because of the pandemic, do you broadly support the idea for register, so we have an idea of how many children are being educated at home and beyond that, some sort of measure of what the attainment levels are? there is an awful lot to unpark in
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that. the register itself is problematic, it doesn't do what it says lit do, we already know more than 90, 9 % of says lit do, we already know more than 90,9 % of the home says lit do, we already know more than 90, 9 % of the home educating families are already known to local authorities, the cost of a register would be along the lines of £500 million plus, to the country, when it is already on its knees following a pandemic, and the effect of it would be minimal. the other part of your question, could you remind of that? that was ways of measuring attainment and progress. yes, yes. so there's a deep understanding and i am very disappointed rob has not listened to anything that has been said to him by the home educators, which by the way made up more than 62% of the responses to his inquiry and none of them were invited to give oral evidence.—
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give oral evidence. obviously we have, we don't _ give oral evidence. obviously we have, we don't have _ give oral evidence. obviously we have, we don't have him - give oral evidence. obviously we have, we don't have him with i give oral evidence. obviously we have, we don't have him with us| give oral evidence. obviously we i have, we don't have him with us now so he can't respond to that but on the question i am asking you, you know, is it a good idea, it would on the face of it seem like a good idea, if people are being educated at home beyond the structures of standard education, eat�*s say, it seems like a good idea to measure how they are getting on. some will get on really well and get good quality teaching but others will not. 50 quality teaching but others will not. , quality teaching but others will not, , ., ., quality teaching but others will not. , ., ., ., ., ., not. so my follow on to that was that the deep — not. so my follow on to that was that the deep misunderstanding| not. so my follow on to that was l that the deep misunderstanding of how home education works people people compare it to school education, home educators have a higher bar to leap over, not the national curriculum, we can't be judged by those standards, because we learn in different way, there is many ways of educating as there are children, and so they don't follow this linear line that, that the school—children do. if i this linear line that, that the school-children do.- school-children do. if i may interrunt. — school-children do. if i may interrupt, and _ school-children do. if i may interrupt, and the - school-children do. if i may interrupt, and the system l school-children do. if i may i interrupt, and the system isn't set up, i doesn't necessarily expect
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that parents, home educators follow the national curriculum but on the core soufnts literacy, and numeracy, specifically, do you think that there should be some way of measures children's attainment, as much for the children who are getting on really well and getting a good education and certainly for the children who aren't, because there will be some who are falling below expected atakement levels for their age. expected atakement levels for their ae, �* , expected atakement levels for their are. �* , , ., expected atakement levels for their are. , ., ,, age. absolutely not, because ex - ected age. absolutely not, because expected attainment - age. absolutely not, because expected attainment levels i age. absolutely not, because i expected attainment levels are attached to the national curriculum. we have a vast number of examples of children who don't learn to read until they are 12, yet the first book they read is the lord of the ring, it does not follow that type of peg goingy that happens within home education. just of peg goingy that happens within home education.— of peg goingy that happens within home education. just a final thought as we are almost _ home education. just a final thought as we are almost out _ home education. just a final thought as we are almost out of _ home education. just a final thought as we are almost out of time, i home education. just a final thought as we are almost out of time, but i as we are almost out of time, but you know, we heard robert halfon talk about children who are being home educateth kated because of formal ex collusion from school, so formal ex collusion from school, so
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for those children and again i amfo cuss on the children who are perhaps falling out of the system, becoming loss lost in testimony, isn't it important there are is some way of keeping track of them and measures how they are getting on, that seems a pretty reasonable idea, doesn't it? ~ , a pretty reasonable idea, doesn't it? ~ y g, a pretty reasonable idea, doesn't it? ., a pretty reasonable idea, doesn't it? ,_ g, a pretty reasonable idea, doesn't it? ., a, a pretty reasonable idea, doesn't it? anybody who has been at school is known to — it? anybody who has been at school is known to the _ it? anybody who has been at school is known to the local _ it? anybody who has been at school is known to the local authority, i is known to the local authority, when they start home educating and it is insulting to bring the problem of off rolling and exclusion to the home educating community when think is a school problem, and not a home educating problem. {lilia is a school problem, and not a home educating problem.— is a school problem, and not a home educating problem. ok, we must leave it there, educating problem. ok, we must leave it there. alison. _ educating problem. ok, we must leave it there, alison, thank _ educating problem. ok, we must leave it there, alison, thank you _ educating problem. ok, we must leave it there, alison, thank you for - it there, alison, thank you for talking to us today. let's speak now to bbc sports reporter kheredine issedane, at the citadel leisure centre in ayr. so much uk is —— success in the games. it is a boost for the sport
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isn't it. it games. it is a boost for the sport isn't it. ., , , , ~ isn't it. it absolutely is. ithink the enormity _ isn't it. it absolutely is. ithink the enormity of— isn't it. it absolutely is. i think the enormity of what - isn't it. it absolutely is. i think the enormity of what tom i isn't it. it absolutely is. i think| the enormity of what tom dean isn't it. it absolutely is. i think- the enormity of what tom dean and duncan scott achieved in the wee small hours is just about starting to sink in now, especially here, the home of the south ayrshire swim team, duncan scott's first club, why don't we speak again to the chief executive of british swimming. first to duncan scotland's first coach mike. give me your take on duncan's swim. ,, . ., ., . mike. give me your take on duncan's swim. ., ., ., , swim. such a fantastic swim this morninu. swim. such a fantastic swim this morning- i _ swim. such a fantastic swim this morning- i am — swim. such a fantastic swim this morning. i am sure _ swim. such a fantastic swim this morning. i am sure he _ swim. such a fantastic swim this| morning. i am sure he regretting morning. iam sure he regretting cultings— morning. lam sure he regretting cuttings his finger nails, could have _ cuttings his finger nails, could have so— cuttings his finger nails, could have so easily been gold silver the other_ have so easily been gold silver the other way— have so easily been gold silver the other way round, that would have been _ other way round, that would have been nice. — other way round, that would have been nice, but, gracious in defeat, as duncan— been nice, but, gracious in defeat, as duncan was, he accepts that you know, _ as duncan was, he accepts that you know, better swimmerwon as duncan was, he accepts that you know, better swimmer won the race, and such_ know, better swimmer won the race, and such a _ know, better swimmer won the race, and such a joy to watch it this morning _ and such a 'oy to watch it this morning.— and such a 'oy to watch it this morning._ and such a 'oy to watch it this morninu. �* ., �* ., morning. afraid i didn't get to watch it life, _ morning. afraid i didn't get to watch it life, just _ morning. afraid i didn't get to watch it life, just couldn't i morning. afraid i didn't get to i watch it life, just couldn't manage to keep my eyes open that long. i had to be up for swimming this
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morning — had to be up for swimming this morninu. ., . , ., had to be up for swimming this mornin. ., ., , ., morning. you are still an active coach, morning. you are still an active coach. taking — morning. you are still an active coach, taking swimming i morning. you are still an active coach, taking swimming this i morning. you are still an active i coach, taking swimming this morning, but, how old was duncan scott when you first coached him and what was he like. he you first coached him and what was he like. ., , you first coached him and what was he like. ., ., he like. he was about eight or nine and a miniature _ he like. he was about eight or nine and a miniature of— he like. he was about eight or nine and a miniature of what _ he like. he was about eight or nine and a miniature of what he - he like. he was about eight or nine and a miniature of what he is i he like. he was about eight or nine and a miniature of what he is now, | and a miniature of what he is now, he was _ and a miniature of what he is now, he wasiust. — and a miniature of what he is now, he wasjust, he has grown up the same _ he wasjust, he has grown up the same way— he wasjust, he has grown up the same way as he was that the age. such— same way as he was that the age. such a _ same way as he was that the age. such a nice — same way as he was that the age. such a nice charming young boy, and always— such a nice charming young boy, and always willing to do exactly what you told — always willing to do exactly what you told him, in the pool, could be, you told him, in the pool, could be, you always — you told him, in the pool, could be, you always few he was having fun but he was _ you always few he was having fun but he was never misbehaved and he gist enjoyed _ he was never misbehaved and he gist enjoyed his _ he was never misbehaved and he gist enjoyed his swimming so much. his sister— enjoyed his swimming so much. his sister was _ enjoyed his swimming so much. his sister was in — enjoyed his swimming so much. his sister was in the same squad, but she was— sister was in the same squad, but she was a — sister was in the same squad, but she was a few lanes further up because — she was a few lanes further up because she is sold older, you would see him _ because she is sold older, you would see him thinking i am going to get you, see him thinking i am going to get you. if— see him thinking i am going to get you. if we — see him thinking i am going to get you, if we set them off at the same time he _ you, if we set them off at the same time he would be trying to make sure he was _ time he would be trying to make sure he was at _ time he would be trying to make sure he was at the other end of the pool before _ he was at the other end of the pool before her~ — he was at the other end of the pool before her. so he was at the other end of the pool before her-—
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before her. so the secret of his success is _ before her. so the secret of his success is sibling _ before her. so the secret of his success is sibling rivalry! i before her. so the secret of his success is sibling rivalry! did i before her. so the secret of his. success is sibling rivalry! did you have any idea he was going to get this good have any idea he was going to get this cool ., . have any idea he was going to get this roo- ., ., ., ., have any idea he was going to get this .00. ., ., ., ., ., , this good you had an idea he was aood and this good you had an idea he was good and within _ this good you had an idea he was good and within a _ this good you had an idea he was good and within a month - this good you had an idea he was good and within a month of i this good you had an idea he was good and within a month of two l this good you had an idea he was| good and within a month of two of him joining — good and within a month of two of him joining the team we had him in a west coast— him joining the team we had him in a west coast mini league team and we swam _ west coast mini league team and we swam as— west coast mini league team and we swam as often as we could, we would swim _ swam as often as we could, we would swim duncan, we knew he would get result, _ swim duncan, we knew he would get result, and. — swim duncan, we knew he would get result, and, you know, you can't tell until— result, and, you know, you can't tell until maybe a wee bit later on they are _ tell until maybe a wee bit later on they are going to be olympian, you could _ they are going to be olympian, you could see _ they are going to be olympian, you could see something in duncan, just from the _ could see something in duncan, just from the word go. let _ from the word go. let us _ from the word go. let us widen it out and bring in the chief executive of british swimming, who has a huge smile on his face. and no wonder what a week for british swimming. tell me, from what you have been hearing what it is like having duncan scott as part of your swimming fraternity and what kind of role model he s mike your swimming fraternity and what kind of role model he 5— your swimming fraternity and what kind of role model he s mike said it really well- — kind of role model he s mike said it really well. sport _ kind of role model he s mike said it really well. sport needs _ kind of role model he s mike said it really well. sport needs role i kind of role model he s mike said it| really well. sport needs role models and these olympians are fabulous
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role model, they are so courageous and humble and grateful, so, that is what we want british swimming to be about, we want our swimmers and our staff and we want a culture built round people like duncan scott, because that is the values of the olympics and leapts them really well, and we need those positive role models and they are aspirational for the kids role models and they are aspirationalfor the kids here and all of us, and i think that is what we have seen this week and that is why the british public have reengaged with the olympics because they have seen genuine story, genuine heroism and a humility about it, which happens at the olympic games. ., ~ it, which happens at the olympic games. . ,, ., , ., . games. talk about the historic nature of what _ games. talk about the historic nature of what many _ games. talk about the historic nature of what many of- games. talk about the historic nature of what many of us i games. talk about the historic i nature of what many of us witnessed, because a gold medal and a silver medal in the same event. two brits on the same podium. that is a proper piece of modern history. 1908 on the same podium. that is a proper piece of modern history.— piece of modern history. 1908 was the last time _ piece of modern history. 1908 was the last time we _ piece of modern history. 1908 was the last time we had _ piece of modern history. 1908 was the last time we had a _ piece of modern history. 1908 was the last time we had a gold i piece of modern history. 1908 was the last time we had a gold and i the last time we had a gold and silver in swimming, and a lot has changed since then, so it is a
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phenomenal achievement. this will be one of those races that we replay, you know, year in, year out, it will, when duncan and tom are old, they will still have that race and it will crop up on whatever the next thing after youtube is and people will talk about it, so, it is a piece of history and it is something that will come back and talk about time and time again, and will inspire another generation too, which is why these moments are so great. and with adam peaty reinventing his event and now with these two young superstars in the freestyle, what does this do for british swimming, for british sport? we does this do for british swimming, for british sport?— does this do for british swimming, for british sport? we want a squad, we talk about _ for british sport? we want a squad, we talk about one _ for british sport? we want a squad, we talk about one team, _ for british sport? we want a squad, we talk about one team, winning i we talk about one team, winning well, in water and that is what we want. we want one team, winning well in water and so we want the, we want to grow a squad, so we, i mean adam is amazing and, but we don't want it just to be adam, we want duncan, and
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tom, and freya and cathy, so we want to build a squad so that it feels as if british swimming is kind of aspirational sport, that inspires the nation. i don't think we have quite had that before but i think we can start moving towards that, we are not there yet but this week has been a big step forward for that. the young man's not quite finished yet. there could be more success? i think there is some golds to come at the end of the week, in the individual 200 individual or relay medley or the freestyle relay and i am pretty sure we will see a lot more swimming from duncan and the rest of the squad. i think it is true that jack was saying there, it is one team, and you can see that, you know, there is no, there is no national rivalry, it is, you know, you are in my team and i will work my hardest for you and that is just what has been happening this week.
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thank you very much indeed. there is a promise of more to come in the pool a promise of more to come in the pool, more golds, says that man to my left, that is it though for here. we for this morning are done. more burglars and thieves will be made to wear electronic tags on their release from prison, under a new strategy set out by the government to reduce crime in england and wales. borisjohnson will launch the programme on his first day out of isolation. the measures include making it easier for police to stop and search suspects. the plan has been criticised by the police federation and labour say the government is trying to fix problems it's created itself. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. the government says its beating crime plan is about increasing public trust in the criminaljustice system. ambitiously, the prime minister claimed it would lead to less crime, fewer victims and a safer country.
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one eye—catching policy is to allow everyone in england and wales to be able to look up a named and contactable police officer responsible for their area. there are also plans to expand project adder, which tackles drug dealers and improves services for people with addictions. another proposal is to do more 24—hour monitoring of burglars and robbers after they are released from prison, using tags with satellite technology. this way their movements can be mapped against new crimes being investigated by police. the police federation, which represents rank and file officers, and is furious about a proposed pay freeze, said it didn't need gimmicks but genuine investment. in a report also published today, thejustice committee of mps has warned that cuts to legal aid have hollowed out key parts of the justice system and this is putting fairness at risk. daniel sandford, bbc news. kit malthouse is the minister of state for crime and policing.
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on announcing the new strategy, he described the breakdown of relations between police officers in england and wales and the home secretary as unfortunate. i'm quite surprised by the police federation, because they sit on the national policing board talking about these issues with us as as focusing on serious crimes, the decision on pay was a tough one. very hard to balance the welfare of the private sector against supporting the public sector. these are very difficult decisions. the police had a settlement of the year before which was good. i hope we can return to normality in the future, albeit i realise the anger and disappointment that we can get on with the key mission of fighting crime together. i'm joined now by iain stainton, senior lecturer in criminology and policing at the university
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of cumbria and a former police officer. thank you very much forjoining us today. so, what, broadly, your thoughts on this beating crime plan? i think there is some very good and useful elements to that. i would say that they are not innovative, the ability to know which officers are responsible for your local area was introduced in 2011. that is accessible on the police web page. i checked mine again last night, and thatis checked mine again last night, and that is still up to date. again, that is still up to date. again, thatis that is still up to date. again, that is nothing new. testing of people for controlled drugs after arrest, that was introduced, section 63 of the police and criminal evidence act 2003. if you look back to the introduction of that, it talks about locally funded drugs testing, which raises the question of where the funding will come from
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for that. as we are with policing in the current times, it is the service of the first resort and of the last resort. even looking at something such as the beating crime plan, we are talking about officers being involved in true and ten, which is helpful because that is one of the first signs of vulnerability. we then talk about officers being involved in the most serious violent crime and terrorism related acts. so, the remit of the police officer is absolutely vast. ok. so, the remit of the police officer is absolutely vast.— is absolutely vast. ok, so some useful elements _ is absolutely vast. ok, so some useful elements in _ is absolutely vast. ok, so some useful elements in this, - is absolutely vast. ok, so some i useful elements in this, although some of the key points are not new? let's break this down a little bit and ask where is the funding for all of this, and are there enough police officers for all of this? ila. of this, and are there enough police officers for all of this?— officers for all of this? no, i don't feel— officers for all of this? no, i don't feel there _ officers for all of this? no, i don't feel there are - officers for all of this? no, i don't feel there are enough| officers for all of this? no, i i don't feel there are enough police officers. there are a finite number officers. there are a finite number of police officers. the stresses and strains of the increased workload
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and increased demands are putting on the officers, they are starting to come to fruition now. yes, we are getting 9000 new officers from the figures. but the figures i looked up very recently, 8700 officers left in 2018-19. so, that very recently, 8700 officers left in 2018—19. so, that makes sense of those figures. we are looking at a police strength across the uk similar to that of 2013, the current time. if we add to that, yes, i think it is great that people can contact their local offices and know who their local offices are. that is what contradicts the fact that we have closed so many police front desks. ., . ~' have closed so many police front desks. ., ., ,, ., . desks. you talk about policing numbers. _ desks. you talk about policing numbers, and _ desks. you talk about policing numbers, and this _ desks. you talk about policing numbers, and this plan i desks. you talk about policing numbers, and this plan talks i desks. you talk about policing i numbers, and this plan talks about an additional 9000 officers towards that promised in 2023. those posts were cut during the time of that
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government. i wonder in terms of the relationship between police and the government right now, police and the home secretary, how you think rank—and—file officers are going to react to this. this rank-and-file officers are going to react to this-— react to this. as well as the pay, and that is _ react to this. as well as the pay, and that is one _ react to this. as well as the pay, and that is one of _ react to this. as well as the pay, and that is one of the _ react to this. as well as the pay, and that is one of the main i react to this. as well as the pay, i and that is one of the main drivers behind that issue, the police, within the pandemic, they have been like the front of house staff for governing decisions. people have been confused and frustrated. the communication, in a very fast moving environment, was perhaps lacking at times as to what people should and shouldn't do, and could and couldn't do. the police represented the front of house staff, they were taking the brunt of that as well. that doesn't seem to have been recognised at the moment. jufit seem to have been recognised at the moment. , , , ., i, seem to have been recognised at the moment. , , , ., ,, ., ., moment. just before you go, i want to ask about — moment. just before you go, i want to ask about one _ moment. just before you go, i want to ask about one more _ moment. just before you go, i want to ask about one more specific - to ask about one more specific element of this plan. that is around stop and search. clearly, a very controversial policy. is there
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evidence that increasing stop and search actually makes a real difference to levels of crime? i think we have to be careful of displacing elements of crime as well. one of the things we look at, with stop and search, on the section 1 with stop and search, on the section i of that, there has to be elements of belief and suspicion. with section 60, anybody who is in a particular area at a particular time can be subjected to a search, which takes that element of suspicion away. i think that this concept of discretion is one of the unique elements of british policing, which has placed it where it is in the realms of policing worldwide. and i'm nervous that is being taken away to a certain degree.— to a certain degree. thank you very much for your— to a certain degree. thank you very much for your thoughts _ to a certain degree. thank you very much for your thoughts on - to a certain degree. thank you very much for your thoughts on that. - to a certain degree. thank you very| much for your thoughts on that. and thank you for sending in your thoughts on that story. let me read out a couple of tweets. sue watson
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asks, are there enough police officers to be allocated to each neighbourhood? how will this work? seven day a week provision? riley taylor says it is a good idea to have these electronic tagging as we will know who committed what crime. the new proposals are good. it is returning to a strategy that existed over a0 years ago, says another viewer, with 11,000 officers fewer than they were ten yes ago, he says it is nothing but tokenism. keep your thoughts coming in, because i would like to read out more of your comments. you can do that on twitter and use the hashtag. let's return to sport. there is a lot to catch up on. tea m team gb have done it again. this time, for the first time since 1908, two male british swimmers are finished on the podium together. as tom dean took gold and duncan scott silver in the 200metres freestyle final.
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in a thrilling finish, dean touched home in one minute aa.22 seconds, securing a british record on his debut games. scott finished just 0.0a seconds behind his team—mate, with fernando scheffer of brazil taking bronze. it might have been the early hours of the morning — but that wasn't going to stop tom dean's family back in maidenhead from inviting friends, family and neighbours over. around 70 in their garden cheering dean all the way to gold! fantastic fa ntastic stuff. fantastic stuff. great celebrations. but huge disappointment this morning for britain's bianca walkden in her taekwondo semifinal. she had a two point lead with just three seconds left on the clock but south korea's lee—da—bin was able to land a head kick in the final second to win by a point. walkeden, from liverpoool, can still repeat the bronze she won in rio four years ago but was understandbly devastated
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after coming so close to the final in the above 67 kilogram category. great britain's first medal of the day came in the women's triathlon, where georgia taylor—brown took silver. she was beaten into gold by more than a minute by bermuda's flora duffy. who made history here — winning the island nation's first gold at an olympics and first medal of any kind since a bronze in boxing at the montreal games in 1976. for taylor—brown second was a great achievement too, she revealed afterwards she was on crutches just 12 weeks ago, and spent part of the bike stage of the race with a flat tyre. still, powering through to finish second. there's been a shock in the tennis on day four — the home favourite and face of the games naomi osaka has been knocked out in the fourth round by the world number a2 and former french open finalist marketa vondrousova. osaka made history by becoming the first tennis player to light the olympic cauldron at an opening ceremony, she'd won 25 of her previous 26 matches on a hard court but was beaten in straight
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sets in little over an hour. but andy murray goes on in the men's double, he and his partnerjoe salisbury are through to the quarterfinals of the men's doubles in tokyo. they backed up their impressive opening—round win to beat germany's kevin krawietz and tim putz 6—2 7—6. away from the olympics, there was a thrilling finish in the hundred — as the trent rockets made it two wins from two. they beat the northern superchargers — who batted first. rashid khan and marchant de lange with three wickets each — as the superchargers with ben stokes in their ranks were bowled out for 132. but despite that, the rockets struggled — losing wickets regularly. alex hales though thumped david willey for a towering six to seal the win with six balls to spare, sending a large trent bridge crowd wild.
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in the same fixture in the women's tournament, it was the northern supercharges who came out on top. they set the rockets 150 to win and they fell 28 runs short — meaning the superchargers go to the top of the table with two wins from two. a bit of football transfer news to end with and manchester united look set to continue their summer spending by completing the signing of real madrid defender raphael varane. an initialfee of around £3a million has been agreed — potentially rising to a2 million with add ons. varane won four champions league titles with real along with the world cup with france in 2018. united looking strong and doing the most big business after securing the signing of jadon sancho last week. that's all the sport for now.
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health leaders are warning that the nhs is as stretched now as it was at the peak of the pandemic injanuary, as hospitals in england deal with the backlog in non—urgent surgery, record demand for emergency care and increasing numbers of covid patients. in a letter to boris johnson and other senior ministers, nhs providers — which represents trusts — says they now need the "right funding" to ensure they can continue to provide the quality of care people expect. chris hopson is the chief executive of nhs providers. good morning to you. thank you very much for your time today. tell us more about what you're saying in this letter, and what you mean by the right funding. what we know is that the nhs is now under huge amounts of pressure. we are going full pelt to recover those backlogs of care. we have got a record demand for urgent care, we have a growing number of covid cases, 5000 yesterday, a lot less than the 3a,000 we had injanuary, but
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growing. we know we have lost about 15,000 beds out of the normal 100,000, because we need to have proper infection control to keep patients safe. we have large numbers of staff self isolating. we have unfortunately got growing numbers of stuff off with stress and mental health conditions. we have now hit peak summer leave, where we know there are large amounts of time off that were left over from previous waves. if you a metaphorical pressure metre, lots of chief executives were saying last week that it feels like, although the shape of the pressure is very different, compared to january, it feels like the overall level of pressure is the same that it was in january, when we know that the nhs came under probably the biggest pressure for a generation. and then i think what the chief executives are doing are looking forward and basically saying, look, we got a very busy autumn with the vaccination campaign, a very difficult winter. so it's really important when the government makes its decision about what the second
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half of the year's budget is going to be for the nhs, and we have split it in half this year because of covid uncertainty, it is very important that when the government makes the budget should be, it takes full account of the precious, otherwise patient care is going to suffer. to come back to the second part of the first question, what is the right funding? we if you remember, under the theresa may government we had an allocation to the nhs which has been topped up over the last 18 months by extra covid costs. what a government is now saying, or some in whitehall are saying, is that now it is time to basically get quotes back to normal, and reimpose financial discipline on the nhs stop so, effectively take away all of those extra covid costs. i think the problem that we've got is that we've got the leftover care backlog that we have got to go through. we know we have got to
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learn to live with covid long term. we know we are going to have to have an effective test and trace operation in place. we also know that we have got record amounts of urgent and emergency care. that is why these discussions that are going on at the moment between the nhs and the government on the funding for the government on the funding for the second half of the year are so crucial. we can't provide us trusts the right quality of care if we are not properly funded to do it. i want to ask ou not properly funded to do it. i want to ask you about _ not properly funded to do it. i want to ask you about an _ not properly funded to do it. i want to ask you about an article - not properly funded to do it. i want to ask you about an article in - not properly funded to do it. i want to ask you about an article in the i to ask you about an article in the telegraph today which says that more than 50% of patients who are registered as being in hospital because of covid only tested positive after admission. in other words, they came in for other issues, may be a broken leg, for argument�*s sake, and then in routine testing it was picked up that they actually had covid. it is suggesting that the daily statistics we are seeing may overstate the level of pressure on the nhs. now, the nhs pressure on the nhs. now, the nhs pressure from covid. i wonder if you
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have any information on that and if the figures are an accurate reflection of who is in hospital because of covid?— reflection of who is in hospital because of covid? there are three thins because of covid? there are three thin . s to because of covid? there are three things to say- _ because of covid? there are three things to say. we _ because of covid? there are three things to say. we know _ because of covid? there are three things to say. we know that - because of covid? there are three things to say. we know that you i because of covid? there are three i things to say. we know that you can be asymptomatic with covid—19. so when you come into hospital on admission, you may not test positive, but it is perfectly possible you could test positive three days later. that is the reason as to why there might be a disparity in terms of people testing later. the second issue, the reason why you might test positive later, is that we know there is a very significant risk to people catching covid in health care settings, which is why we have been working so hard to prevent that. and exactly why, as i was saying earlier, that we have lost 15,000 out of the ordinary 100,000 beds of the nhs precisely because we are trying to do infection control. the debt that mystifies me, to be frank, about the daily telegraph article, is that i can't see how saying just because you may have a different definition
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of where the infection came from that means the pressure has changed. because if you have... that means the pressure has changed. because if you have. . ._ because if you have... pressure is pressure? — because if you have... pressure is pressure? if— because if you have... pressure is pressure? if you _ because if you have... pressure is pressure? if you have _ because if you have... pressure is pressure? if you have a _ because if you have... pressure is pressure? if you have a patient i because if you have... pressure is pressure? if you have a patient in| because if you have... pressure is. pressure? if you have a patient in a bed, ou pressure? if you have a patient in a bed. you can't _ pressure? if you have a patient in a bed, you can't use _ pressure? if you have a patient in a bed, you can't use it, _ pressure? if you have a patient in a bed, you can't use it, and - pressure? if you have a patient in a bed, you can't use it, and if- pressure? if you have a patient in a bed, you can't use it, and if it- pressure? if you have a patient in a bed, you can't use it, and if it is- bed, you can't use it, and if it is a covid patient, you can't use it for an emergency admission or elective surgery recovery. the pressure is going to be there. also, by the way, just to make the point, if you have to put a covid patient on a ward, you have to take all of the other beds out of commission for non—covid patients. pressure is pressure, is pressure, irrespective of where the source of the infection is. , ., , , , . . ., is. chris hobbs, chief executive of nhs qatar — is. chris hobbs, chief executive of nhs qatar providers, _ is. chris hobbs, chief executive of nhs qatar providers, thank - is. chris hobbs, chief executive of nhs qatar providers, thank you i is. chris hobbs, chief executive of i nhs qatar providers, thank you very much. —— nhs providers. the headlines on bbc news... more middlejoy for more middle joy for team gb more middlejoy for team gb in the other pics. jubilation for tom dean's family and friends back home
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as they celebrate his success. georgia taylor—brown also won a silver medal in the women's triathlon, despite a puncture in the cycling. the trial begins at the vatican today of a roman catholic cardinal who used to be a close ally of pope francis. cardinal angelo becciu faces accusations including using church money to buy a multi—million dollar property in london. he denies any wrongdoing. let's take you to rome and speak to the bbc�*s mark lowen. good morning. tell us more about the trial and the charges faced by cardinal becciu? b, trial and the charges faced by cardinal becciu?— trial and the charges faced by cardinal becciu? ~ ., ., ., . ., cardinal becciu? a tale of financial scandal and _ cardinal becciu? a tale of financial scandal and extortion _ cardinal becciu? a tale of financial scandal and extortion at _ cardinal becciu? a tale of financial scandal and extortion at the - scandal and extortion at the vatican, that would be worthy of the juiciest crime writer. but it is being heard today in court inside the walls of vatican city, which has just started. and cardinal becciu is
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facing several counts of embezzlement, and abuse of office, relating partly to a botched property deal some years ago, when he was a very senior figure in the vatican hierarchy. he is charged with investing some 350 million euros of church money that prosecutors allege was intended, in fact, for church charitable work. he ploughed that money into a property deal in london to buy up a property on sloane avenue, chelsea, that used to belong to harrods and was to be converted into a luxury block of flats. the deal was done through two italian financiers based in london, who are charged with extortion and trying to abuse their office as well. they are also on trial. cardinal becciu denies all charges and says he is the victim of a dark plot. there are other charges relating to alleged funnelling of church money to a charity run by his
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brother in sardinia, and to a woman who allegedly used tens of thousands of euros of church money to buy designer shoes and bags. bbc three's critically—acclaimed and award—winning comedy, jerk, is back. after a successful first series, the black comedy will continue to follow the character tim, a man who uses the fact he has cerebral palsy to try and get away with anything. i'm joined now by the starring actor, writer and comedian tim renkow, who plays the lead, which i am assured is a character, joins us now. good to have you with us. we often wonder how much of a right there is a character. is tame and completely separate from you?— separate from you? well, i don't think any character _ separate from you? well, i don't think any character is _ separate from you? well, i don'tj think any character is completely separate from the writer. but i like
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to think i'm nicer than he is. because tim likes to make other people uncomfortable, doesn't he? yes. well, that part is me, yes. that part is you? ok. we will explore that more in a second. for viewers who haven't seen jerk, explore that more in a second. for viewers who haven't seenjerk, tell them a little bit about the premise of the show. them a little bit about the premise of the show— of the show. what is it... so, jerk is 'ust of the show. what is it... so, jerk is just about _ of the show. what is it... so, jerk isiust about a _ of the show. what is it... so, jerk isjust about a guy... _ of the show. what is it... so, jerk isjust about a guy... i _ of the show. what is it... so, jerk isjust about a guy... i guess - of the show. what is it... so, jerk isjust about a guy... i guess he i of the show. what is it... so, jerkj isjust about a guy... i guess he is a scamp with cerebral palsy, who just spends his whole time working very hard to try to not work hard. and how does that work out for him?
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if he thought about it, he would realise if he actually did what he is supposed to do, it would make his life so much easier. bud is supposed to do, it would make his life so much easier.— life so much easier. and where you taken aback — life so much easier. and where you taken aback by _ life so much easier. and where you taken aback by the _ life so much easier. and where you taken aback by the success - life so much easier. and where you taken aback by the success of - life so much easier. and where you taken aback by the success of the l taken aback by the success of the first series? did you have any idea it was going to be to hit it was at the critical acclaim that it did? no, it was a nice surprise. because it was the first tv thing i'd ever done. so i didn't know what i was doing! done. so i didn't know what i was doinu! ., ., done. so i didn't know what i was doinu! ., , doing! for somebody who says they didn't know — doing! for somebody who says they didn't know what _ doing! for somebody who says they didn't know what they _ doing! for somebody who says they didn't know what they were - doing! for somebody who says they didn't know what they were doing, l didn't know what they were doing, you clearly did it very, very well. ijust you clearly did it very, very well. i just wonder, you clearly did it very, very well. ijust wonder, did it feel easier than being a stand—up comedian?
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that's an interesting question. i had to say it is kind of the difference between being a long—distance runner and a sprinter. so, stand—up is easier, but you need to do it for longer. i don't know if that makes any sense. but writing tv, there is a very short window of very insane activity. bud tv, there is a very short window of very insane activity.— very insane activity. and i wonder to what extent _ very insane activity. and i wonder to what extent you _ very insane activity. and i wonder to what extent you are _ very insane activity. and i wonder to what extent you are trying - very insane activity. and i wonder to what extent you are trying to l to what extent you are trying to make a political statement with this show about inclusivity, disability and so on? b,
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show about inclusivity, disability and so on?— show about inclusivity, disability andsoon?~ ,., and so on? a political statement... the statement _ and so on? a political statement... the statement i _ and so on? a political statement... the statement i was _ and so on? a political statement... the statement i was trying - and so on? a political statement... the statement i was trying to - and so on? a political statement... j the statement i was trying to make is that disabled people don't have to be sad. you know? we can be as... sorry, i'm trying not to swear on bbc news. sorry, i'm trying not to swear on bbc news-— sorry, i'm trying not to swear on bbc news. ., ., , ., , , . ., bbc news. that would be appreciated, because then — bbc news. that would be appreciated, because then i — bbc news. that would be appreciated, because then i have _ bbc news. that would be appreciated, because then i have to _ bbc news. that would be appreciated, because then i have to apologise. - bbc news. that would be appreciated, because then i have to apologise. we l because then i have to apologise. we can because then i have to apologise. , can be normal in both the good ways and bad ways as anyone else, i guess is how i would say that. bind and bad ways as anyone else, i guess is how i would say that.— is how i would say that. and jerk is back on bbc _ is how i would say that. and jerk is back on bbc iplayer _ is how i would say that. and jerk is back on bbc iplayer on _ is how i would say that. and jerk is back on bbc iplayer on sunday - is how i would say that. and jerk is back on bbc iplayer on sunday the | back on bbc iplayer on sunday the 1st of august, and also on bbc one on monday the 2nd of august. i think i have got those dates right? i believe you! i am _ i have got those dates right? i believe you! i am very - i have got those dates right? i believe you! i am very glad . i have got those dates right? i | believe you! i am very glad you believe you! i am very glad you believe me- — believe you! i am very glad you
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believe me. i— believe you! i am very glad you believe me. ithink— believe you! i am very glad you believe me. ithink i _ believe you! i am very glad you believe me. i think! have - believe you! i am very glad you believe me. i think! have got l believe you! i am very glad you - believe me. i think i have got them right. it's been really good to speak to you. good luck with the next series. speak to you. good luck with the next series-— speak to you. good luck with the next series. with schools out for the summer and beach holidays abroad difficult, many families are rediscovering the coasts around britain and the wildlife that inhabits them. but even frequent beach—goers would be surprised to find an octopusjoining them on the shore. that's what happened to one family paddling at south queensferry near edinburgh — and the photos they took have gone viral on social media. they told the bbc of their remarkable experience. hi, my name's torin, i'm 11 years old and i live in south queensferry. and i am ditte solgaard dunn. i'm torin's mum, and the other night, when we went swimming, we found an octopus in the sea by the harbour. it was quite extraordinary. we really weren't expecting it. we were just coming out of the sea, thinking about heading back. and suddenly torin shouted,
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there's an octopus! so, we'd never seen anything like that around than ever before. it was, like, fine. it didn't look like it was going to hurt you. but then it started making some weird sounds, so we gave it a little bit of space, to see what it would do. it wasn't going into the water, it was just staying at shore. so, we decided to help it with my shoe, well, my water shoe, try and get it into the water. it grabbed onto my show and almost stole it. he did a little swim along the coast and changed colour while doing it. and it was just fantastic to see. i mean, an octopus up on the beach, it's not a rare occurrence. they do come up onto beaches if they get caught up by the tide, or if they are actually hunting for food. octopus have hundreds of suckers on their arms, and they can actually taste sound when they are moving around.
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so, this octopus was probably up on the beach, tasting and seeing if there was anything dug into the sand. you can see the mantle that they have behind their eyes. that actually enables them to suck sea water into the mantle, hold it in, and they can survive holding that water in and using that to breathe. so these guys can probably go ten, 20 minutes, 30 minutes out of the water, looking for food. or if they are moving between rock pools, it helps them moving around. when we came back from having gone for the swim, we were so deliriously happy, because we'd seen this fella. and ijust wanted to share it. and it was so nice to see that everyone else clearly loved him just as much as we did. so, yes, it's been curious. my phone has been pinging nonstop now for quite some time. now it's time for a look at the weather with carole hello again. already today we have seen heavy and thundery showers. we are going to continue in that vein as we go through the rest of today.
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some of them moving across england and wales, and further showers developing this afternoon across northern ireland, northern england and scotland. some of those will not just be heavy, they will be thundering with the risk of flash flooding in some places. temperatures down on yesterday, looking at 15 to about 2a degrees. as we head through the evening and overnight, some of the showers will fade but we will hang onto quite a lot, particularly in the north. and in scotland they are going to merge with another system coming from the west. so, again, some heavy downpours for you. but it is not going to be cold. our overnight lows are 12—15. tomorrow we start off with their showers. again, merging to give longer periods of rain. slow moving up that as well. and thundery. in northern ireland, england and wales, further heavy downpours which could also be thundering. and our top temperature,
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21. this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. more medaljoy for team gb at the olympics as tom dean and duncan scott pick up a historic gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle, and georgia taylor—brown wins silver in the women's triathlon. i'm lucy hockings live in tokyo, and i'll be bringing you all the latest sporting action and medal wins. there's a shock defeat for the hosts, as japan's naomi osaka who [it the olympic torch at the opening ceremony is knocked out of the tennis in the third round. our other headlines. as borisjohson leaves self—isolation, it's anounced workers in england, including refuse collectors and prison staff, will be allowed to take daily tests if they're identified as a close contact of a postive case.

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