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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 27, 2021 6:00am-8:59am BST

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this is bbc news for viewers in the uk and around the globe. i'm ben boulus. our top stories... day four at the olympics and the medals keep coming for team gb — they've picked up a gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle. earlier, there was a first ever gold for bermuda — flora duffy winning the women's triathlon. heavy rain, wind and high waves expected injapan, prompting organisers to bring the surfing finals forward by 2a hours. north and south korea restore a communications hotline following an exchange of letters between the two leaders. and pledging to unite a diverse country — canada's first indigenous governor—general is sworn into office.
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hello and welcome. team gb is celebrating after winning olympic gold and silver in the men's swimming 200 metres freestyle. tom dean, who contracted covid—19 twice, won the final, with duncan scott completing the one—two. it's the first time since 1908 that two british male swimmers have shared the podium. and a bermudan athlete has made history in tokyo, winning the tiny island's first ever olympic gold medal. the bbc�*s sarah mulkerrins is in tokyo. it is going so well, isn't it, ben,
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for team gb in the pool. we had the gold yesterday for adam peaty. a phenomenal performance from the duo of tom dean and duncan scott in the 200 metres freestyle today. a wonderful result for them. as you mentioned, tom dean, he won gold. he was a surprise gold medal winner in that because he finished off, he had been second to duncan scott for most of the season because duncan scott came in as the favourite. he has been the fastest man over the distance in that. however it was his team—mate, tom dean who pipped him, just touched a fraction early to the wall to win the gold. you can see his face afterwards. he couldn't quite believe it when he saw his name up on the scoreboard, in first for him. as you mentioned the struggles he has gone through in the last year or so. he caught covid twice in the build—up to these games. he didn't know whether
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he would be able to perform at the level he felt he could. at times he felt he struggled to walk the stairs. he physically felt the impacts of having covid—19 but there was a wonderful result for him today and the first time for great britain to have two medallists in gold and silver, as you say, on the podium since 1908. but it was a wonderful morning session at the pool. there were three other medals awarded, there was an olympic record in the women's 100 metres backstroke, lots of people were looking forward to this race, and it went the way of kylie mcewan, she was the world record holder coming into this. however there was regan smith from the usa, he had been the fastest qualifier. but it was the australian who won that with an olympic record. and then there was the 100 metres breaststroke for women, which was also really exciting, a total surprise resulting —— result in that because we had a 17—year—old from alaska, the first ever gold medal in the pool in the olympics and went to lydia jacoby,
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who hit the favourite south african, who had been setting all the good times in qualifying, tatjana schoenmaker, to the gold. so a wonderful result. speaking of moments in history, sarah, there was one for bermuda as well. absolutely, in the triathlon this morning. you know there's a little bit of a tropical storm here. the triathlon for women was delayed this morning by about 15 minutes or so. they got into the water today, they did the 1500 metre swim. you could see the impact of the rain on the roads, it was very slippy. we saw an awful lot of surface water on the roads when they were on the a0 kilometre bike ride, which laura duffy managed it really well. when she got into her run, which is ten kilometres, around the streets in tokyo, she was able to pull clear. she's a wonderful story. she was world champion twice back in 2016 in 2016 and 2017. she's been a dominant force. many expected her to win gold back in rio. she's never won an olympic medal before.
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she was able to do it this time and she pulled well clear of the field. you could just see the joy on her face when she crossed the finish line and she was able to get that win. earlier we spoke to bill, who is with the royal gazette in bermuda, no doubt very busy at the moment. i asked him how the mood was in bermuda. celebrations have been going on since flora crossed the line and her family had a big gathering at one of the local pubs with several hundred people that. they certainly were celebrating. i think they will be celebrating long into the night. i think there is a week of celebrations planned, isn't there? i suspect. tell us the journey she has been on. she has really come through a lot of adversity. she first started competing as a triathlete in beijing in 2008. did not finish in the event, actually gave up triathlon for a number of months at that point
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and then came back to it and decided this is what she really wanted to do. competed at london and had problems with her bike and ended well in rio and came eighth, which for a country this size is absolutely exceptional. from then on she became the world champion, a commonwealth games gold medallist, and obviousy coming into tokyo as one of the favourites. i think probably everyone sort of didn't quite believe that it might actually happen and we might actually win a medal, a gold medal of any kind of medal again for the first time since 1976. so it isjust an extraordinary achievement for a community of this size, just 60,000 of us on a 20 square mile island. it is an incredible thing and we are all unbelievably proud of her. yes, absolutely. she has done so much as well for the sport on the island as well.
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she has brought events to there. she brought— she has brought events to there. she brought an _ she has brought events to there. she brought an itu world triathlon here in 2018. _ brought an itu world triathlon here in 2018, competed in and won it to enormous — in 2018, competed in and won it to enormous crowds and support and it has been _ enormous crowds and support and it has been back since. she has also started _ has been back since. she has also started something called the flora fund, _ started something called the flora fund, aimed at helping other athletes _ fund, aimed at helping other athletes to compete at a world—class tevet _ athletes to compete at a world—class tevet that _ athletes to compete at a world—class level. that will grow and grow after this event — level. that will grow and grow after this event. she will be an inspiration to bermudian is and also particularly — inspiration to bermudian is and also particularly to girls and women all around _ particularly to girls and women all around the — particularly to girls and women all around the world that you can fight through— around the world that you can fight through adversity and injury and so forth and _ through adversity and injury and so forth and come out, you know, on top of the _ forth and come out, you know, on top of the world _ forth and come out, you know, on top of the world quite literally. that was bill zool, an editor at the bermuda royal gazette speaking to the bbc�*s sarah mulkerrins in tokyo. some breaking news: japan's naomi osaka hasjust been knocked out in the olympics
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tennis third round. that's just coming into us in the last few minutes. also following events for us there, our correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes. he's at choshi beach near tokyo. all eyes today have been on the weather, rupert? from where you are, we can certainly see why. that's right, ben. the last few days in tokyo, particularly sunday and monday, everybody was talking about the heat and how it was affecting tennis players and triathletes in particular, he were really suffering. now we are talking about something completely different, that is a tropical storm. typhoon number eight has been downgraded to a tropical storm. as you can see from where i am standing it is very windy. it has picked up in the last couple of hours. the storm is tracking north. it has
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affected some events. particularly the sad thing. the final was meant to be tomorrow and has been brought forward to today. when you think of japan, you do not think of surfing, it is not the first thing that comes to mind. as we had been finding out, japan has a huge surfing culture. this is the pacific coast of japan, an hour and a half's drive is of tokyo. this is popular with local surfers. the waves is unlikely because we have a typhoon going in. many think of surfing, you probably think of the north shore of hawaii, the gold coast, may be barley but not japan. the gold coast, may be barley but notjapan. surfing is really popular injapan. it is estimated 2 million japanese regularly get on to a surfboard. this group of young surfers left home in tokyo at four o'clock this morning in order to be in the water by six. the ways are
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best early in the morning before it gets too windy. —— the waves. this beachis gets too windy. —— the waves. this beach is to kilometres from where the olympic surfing competition is being held. how did they feel about not being able to go along and watch? . , not being able to go along and watch?_ it - not being able to go along and watch?_ it doesn't l not being able to go along and i watch?_ it doesn't feel watch? really sad. it doesn't feel ri . ht watch? really sad. it doesn't feel riaht not watch? really sad. it doesn't feel right not to _ watch? really sad. it doesn't feel right not to be — watch? really sad. it doesn't feel right not to be able _ watch? really sad. it doesn't feel right not to be able to _ watch? really sad. it doesn't feel right not to be able to go - watch? really sad. it doesn't feel right not to be able to go and - watch? really sad. it doesn't feel. right not to be able to go and watch ourselves he says. others say it is not that it had spectators at surfing when other sports do not have spectators. behind me is where the olympic surfing competition is taking place right now. this was supposed to be a huge festival of surfing, a huge celebration of the olympics. despite the fact we are outside, no spectators. this is as close as we can get. down this beach is the eldest surfing shop in town. so close that he and his staff are.
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watch the action on television. his father was one of the first to develop surfing, learning from american sailors based injapan. that is one of the origins of surfing japanese. there is a lot of sadness and frustration here but also hope the world will see japan is notjust about see and judy but it has a very cool surfing scene as well.
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in terms of the trajectory of the storm, the severe weather, what to we know about the outlook? there is aood we know about the outlook? there is good news — we know about the outlook? there is good news he _ we know about the outlook? there is good news. he would _ we know about the outlook? there is good news. he would not _ we know about the outlook? there is good news. he would not know- we know about the outlook? there is good news. he would not know it - we know about the outlook? there is i good news. he would not know it from where i am standing on the coast because the wind is really picking up. according to the meteorological office, the storm centre is about 200 nautical miles off the coast. the good news for tokyo is it is dragging due north along the coast and it will mess tokyo. it has brought torrential rains and has affected some events this morning. it will head north and hit the post. that is when some of the football, the socket events are taking place. that could be affected. it looks like tokyo has dodged the bullet. one good thing to come out of it is it has brought temperatures down. a lot of athletes will be relieved they will get relief from the
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searing heat of the last few days. thank you very much for that. stay with us on bbc news. still to come... pledging to unite a diverse country — canada's first indigenous governor general is sworn into office.
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this is bbc news — the latest headlines. day four at the olympics, and the medals keep coming for team gb — they've picked up a gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle. earlier, there was a first ever gold for bermuda — flora duffy winning the women's triathlon. north and south korea have restored a communications hotline, following an exchange of letters between the two leaders. the hotline was cut off by pyongyang more than a year ago.
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north korea has suffered increasing hardships, including a shortage of food, since closing its borders in response to the pandemic. its leader, kimjong—un, admitted last month that the situation was becoming tense. pyongyang said the hotline represents a big stride towards restoring mutual trust. our correspondent, laura bicker, joins us from seoul. laura, in an era where we have e—mail, whatsapp, even video calling, what is the significance this hotline?— calling, what is the significance this hotline? , ., , this hotline? these hotlines were set u - , this hotline? these hotlines were set op. there _ this hotline? these hotlines were set up, there are _ this hotline? these hotlines were set up, there are actually - this hotline? these hotlines were set up, there are actually 48 - this hotline? these hotlines were set up, there are actually 48 of i set up, there are actually 48 of them. they were set up back in 1971. north and south korea make calls each day, they make a call at nine o'clock and five o'clock. there are several lines between the military, between various aspects of border
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communication. it is that as a check—in, it is a three—minute call each day. the sister of kim jong—un and asked all communication with the south would be severed and all of a sudden there's hotlines went quiet. not long afterwards we saw the office that was setup to allow talks between the north and to take place, it was blown to smithereens buy north korea. it seems some letters between the two leaders have gone backin between the two leaders have gone back in full since april and they had agreed to start these communication hotlines once more. these are baby steps, it is a glimmer of hope in relations, the first we have seen fulsome time. north korea turned its back on the south after talks with washington also fell through as the two could
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not come to a nuclear deal. north korea is in dire straits, it is very difficult to get any information at all north korea right now. the information we are getting is not good. state media yesterday even talked about drought conditions. we are suffering a heatwave which is affecting crops. could this have something to do with north korea restoring ties? it is baby steps but summer reading into it right now. what reaction has there been into all of this where you are now? obviously, south koreans, when it comes to the president's administration, dacey this is a way to try and restore into korean trust and respect. it wasjoint statements. north korea state media
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put out a joint statement. it comes on and a suspicious day, this day is the anniversary of the signing of the anniversary of the signing of the armistice agreement. the war between the north and the south did not end but a peace agreement, an armistice agreement was signed on this day. that is when they announced it. when you look at what this might mean, south koreans might say this might be an opening. that is what the administration here will be hoping. is what the administration here will be hoina. . ~ is what the administration here will be hoina. ., ,, i. is what the administration here will behoina. ., , is what the administration here will behoina. . , . ., be hoping. thank you very much for that. as the delta variant begins to take hold in the united states, some states are beginning to worry about the impact it will have on the unvaccinated. in california, one of the most vaccinated states, masks are now once again required to be worn in all indoor public places. our north america correspondent, sophie long, reports.
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here is the truth, if you are fully vaccinated you are safer with a higher degree of protection but if you are not vaccinated, you are not protected. and now, what we have now is a pandemic of the unvaccinated. the message from the president is clear. covid cases are climbing and it is causing deep concern. taste clear. covid cases are climbing and it is causing deep concern.- it is causing deep concern. we are auoin in it is causing deep concern. we are going in the _ it is causing deep concern. we are going in the wrong _ it is causing deep concern. we are going in the wrong direction. - it is causing deep concern. we are going in the wrong direction. if. it is causing deep concern. we are | going in the wrong direction. if you look at the inflection of the curve in new places, and in the running to this interview, it is among the and vaccinated. since we have 50% of the country not fully vaccinated, that is a problem. in country not fully vaccinated, that is a problem-— country not fully vaccinated, that is a problem. in some states like alabama, — is a problem. in some states like alabama. the — is a problem. in some states like alabama, the vaccination - is a problem. in some states like alabama, the vaccination rates i is a problem. in some states like i alabama, the vaccination rates are much lower, fuelling fears intensive care units could reach capacity once more. the new cases in covid because
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of unvaccinated folk. _ more. the new cases in covid because of unvaccinated folk. unvaccinated - of unvaccinated folk. unvaccinated folk. the deaths are certainly a pairing with unvaccinated folk. these folk are choosing a horrible lifestyle of self—inflicted pain. from the east coast to the west, officials are redoubling efforts to push people to act responsibly. anybody who is hospitalised or in an icy year with covid right now is there by choice, is there because they did not make the effort to get vaccinated. that is what we need to fix. , , ., ., fix. this is the land of the free. in california's _ fix. this is the land of the free. in california's orange _ fix. this is the land of the free. in california's orange county, | fix. this is the land of the free. - in california's orange county, where hospitalisations are surging, even the seriously ill remain reluctant to have the injection save lives. it to have the injection save lives. it is an individual decision. a lot of actors are going into it, there is politics involved. —— a lot of
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factors. politics involved. -- a lot of factors. , politics involved. -- a lot of factors— politics involved. -- a lot of factors. , ., ., , , factors. due to the latest search been driven _ factors. due to the latest search been driven by _ factors. due to the latest search been driven by the _ factors. due to the latest search been driven by the highly - been driven by the highly transmissible down to variant, the indoor wearing mask mandate has been reinstated even with those who have been vaccinated. officials in the states could soon follow suit. let's get some of the day's other news. miami dade county officials have confirmed the final death toll from last months building collapse is 98. the round the clock search for victims was ended last friday and the remains of the final victim, 54 year old estelle hedaya have now been positively identified after being recovered onjuly 20th. najib mikati is the latest person to be tasked by lebanese lawmakers to try and form a government. the telecommunications businessman, who has served in the position twice before, urged his country's people to support him as he took what he called a difficult step.
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but it could take months for the 65—year—old to assemble a government. hundreds of cuban americans marched on the us capital on monday to call on president biden to take tougher action against the island's regime. cuba's government has cracked down on anti—communist demonstrations this month. the us imposed sanctions on the cuban defense minister last week. president biden said that was just the beginning of measures against the communist party. the inuit rights advocate, mary simon, has become canada's first indigenous governor general. at her swearing in ceremony in ottawa, she pledged to build bridges across the diverse backgrounds and cultures in canada, at a time when the country is reckoning with its past. courtney bembridge reports. do you swear you will well and truly serve her majesty, queen second, in the office of keeper of the great seal of canada? i the office of keeper of the great
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seal of canada?— the office of keeper of the great seal of canada? ., . .,, ., seal of canada? i do. with those two sim - le seal of canada? i do. with those two simple words — seal of canada? i do. with those two simple words my _ seal of canada? i do. with those two simple words my history _ seal of canada? i do. with those two simple words my history was - seal of canada? i do. with those two simple words my history was made l seal of canada? i do. with those two i simple words my history was made and mary simon became canada's first indigenous governor general. tudor; indigenous governor general. today is an important _ indigenous governor general. today is an important and _ indigenous governor general. today is an important and historic - indigenous governor general. today is an important and historic day - indigenous governor general. tm— is an important and historic day for canada. my story to these chambers began very far from here. i was canada. my story to these chambers began very farfrom here. i was born mary cheney may in quebec. prime minister, my inuit name is bossi lady. minister, my inuit name is bossi lad . ,, , minister, my inuit name is bossi lad. , lady. she will serve as the official representative _ lady. she will serve as the official representative or _ lady. she will serve as the official representative or queen - lady. she will serve as the official representative or queen is, - lady. she will serve as the official. representative or queen is, canada's head of state. she has already had a virtual audience with the monarch. her performance comes at a time when the state is —— the country is grappling with its colonial past. graves were found at schools where indigenous children were taken after
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being forcibly separated from families. often places of neglect and abuse, the schools are run by the catholic church and part of a colonial policy to raise indigenous language and culture. more than a dozen churches have been banned across canada and statues toppled of queen as and queen victoria, he reigned across the country when the first residential schools were openedin first residential schools were opened in the late 1800s. mary simon says her appointment marks an important step forward on the long path towards reconciliation. to meet this moment — path towards reconciliation. to meet this moment as _ path towards reconciliation. to meet this moment as governor— path towards reconciliation. to meet this moment as governor general, i | this moment as governor general, i will strive to hold together the attention of the past with the promise of the future. she was nominated _ promise of the future. she was nominated by _ promise of the future. she was nominated by prime _ promise of the future. she was nominated by prime minister i promise of the future. she was - nominated by prime ministerjustin trudeau after the sudden resignation of her predecessor and mid bullying allegations. this of her predecessor and mid bullying alleuations. , , ., , of her predecessor and mid bullying
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alleuations. , , allegations. this is a big place. this is a diverse _ allegations. this is a big place. this is a diverse place. - and before we go, a bit of good news from a zoo in israel. two weeks ago, �*tanna' the orang—utan welcomed a baby girl. the animal is one of the most endangered great apes in the world, and the zoo had gone a decade without a new birth. for days, the baby was hidden under mum's fur, so this is our first look at her. the baby orangutan has yet to be named, but zoo keepers want something that starts with a t, just like mum.
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you can reach me on twitter — i'm @ ben m boulos. good morning. the weather over the next few days remains unsettled. some torrential banjo examples leading to the potential for flash flooding. in between there will be sense any spouse. also gusty winds at times. after a bright start in the is you can see cloud piling in from the west producing heavy and boundary downpours in parts of southern england. low pressure firmly in charge any showers we catch today will be slow—moving. the showers will develop further and more widely through the afternoon
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from the north midlands, north wales onwards. some of them could be heavy and boundary. in scotland there is the chance of localised flooding. temperatures ranging from 15 to 22, 23 quid down a touch on the 26,27 we saw yesterday in places. some of the showers overnight will fade. as the showers overnight will fade. as the showers overnight will fade. as the showers continue across scotland, emerging —— merging with the new system on the west, back had produced torrential downpours. not cold across the board. tomorrow low pressure is still firmly in charge. not much wind in the centre of the lead. any torrential downpours will be slow—moving. in scotland the risk of flash flooding. in northern ireland there will be heavy showers with sunshine in between. a windier day than it has been. these bright circles represent the average wind
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speed. the gas around the showers will be 30, 40 miles speed. the gas around the showers will be 30,40 miles an hour speed. the gas around the showers will be 30, 40 miles an hour with temperatures disappointing for this stage injuly. low pressure starts to push towards the north sea. the wind will ration from the north—west as we go through the course of the latter part of the day. still some rain in scotland, northern england and northern ireland. the rest of england and wales, a drier day. in the south west more men coming our way as the new area of low pressure looks like it will arrive in the south of the country. —— more rain coming our way.
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this is bbc news broadcasting to the uk and around the globe. i'm ben boulos. our top business stories. tesla hits the accelerator on its electric dreams, as the car maker delivers a record 200,000 cars to customers in the second quarter. more volatility for bitcoin, after amazon issues a statement denying it will be accepting the cryptocurrency as payment after it surges to a six—week high. and we're off to the races — glorious goodwood returns with a full capacity crowd. we take a look at some of the hurdles the horse racing industry has faced over the past year.
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hello and a very warm welcome to the programme. let's start with tesla, because the electric car maker has shown no signs of being hitting by the pandemic blues. tesla reported it sales rose to $12 billion for the three months to the end ofjune, up from $6 billion a year ago. despite shortages of semiconductor chips and congestion at ports hampering production, the firm delivered a record 200,000 cars to customers in the quarter. however, the firm did make a $23 million loss on its bitcoin investments, although it recently signalled it might accept it again as a payment in future. daniel ives is the managing director of wedbush securities. i asked him what he made of the results. this is a strong quarter, especially
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amid a chip shortage, 200,000 deliveries and the more profitability we are starting to see, that is the key here. tesla is leading the charge despite some stumbles on china this quarter. you mention china. _ stumbles on china this quarter. you mention china. that is such an important market for all car makers, but especially those in the electric vehicles sector. did we get much detail on that from this set of results? ., ., , ., ., , results? yeah, for tesla that is the heart of the _ results? yeah, for tesla that is the heart of the growth _ results? yeah, for tesla that is the heart of the growth story. - results? yeah, for tesla that is the heart of the growth story. you - heart of the growth story. you talked about china looking to be strong second half of the year. i think there was definitely optimism. i think it is something investors, it is really about the china growth story continuing to play out. there was a feather in the cap for elon musk looking forward in terms of
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china. it musk looking forward in terms of china. , ,., musk looking forward in terms of china. , ., ,, ., china. it is something we talk about uuite a lot china. it is something we talk about quite a lot on _ china. it is something we talk about quite a lot on business _ china. it is something we talk about | quite a lot on business programmes, the shortage of semiconductors, those essential chips that we use in everything from smartphones and tablets, but also in cars that need those on—board computers now to function. did we learn anything about how that is having an impact on tesla, if at all?— on tesla, if at all? yeah, you talk about the — on tesla, if at all? yeah, you talk about the whole _ on tesla, if at all? yeah, you talk about the whole auto _ on tesla, if at all? yeah, you talk about the whole auto sector. - on tesla, if at all? yeah, you talk about the whole auto sector. i - on tesla, if at all? yeah, you talk. about the whole auto sector. i think we are seeing some moderation of the chip shortage, which is a positive. but if you look right now, tesla, every car they are making, they sold in the first half of the year. this is a supply issue rather than a demand issue. that becomes a high—class problem. now it comes down to the second half and hitting some of those target numbers. it is some of those target numbers. it is uuite some of those target numbers. it is quite interesting, they lost they made on the cryptocurrency bitcoin. the investments they made. tesla is
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such a key, i suppose combination of a car—makerand a such a key, i suppose combination of a car—maker and a tech company. it hinted it might accept bitcoin as payment for its cars and trucks. we saw a surge in the price of bitcoin. now it seems to have backtracked a little, especially considering the losses they have endured? yeah, at one oint losses they have endured? yeah, at one point tesla _ losses they have endured? yeah, at one point tesla was _ losses they have endured? yeah, at one point tesla was dealing - losses they have endured? yeah, at one point tesla was dealing more i losses they have endured? yeah, at one point tesla was dealing more in bitcoin than selling electric vehicles last year. there has been a u—turn. less than wall street was expecting. ultimately this has become a sideshow for tesla. it has been a bit of an overhang on the stock. investors will look forward to them playing that down a little bit and focusing on electric vehicles. because that is the key of the tesla story. bitcoin's price surged again monday, after speculation that amazon may be entering the cryptocurrency sector after it posted a job seeking a "digital currency and blockchain
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product lead." bitcoin was trading at a six—week high of over 40,000 until the online retail giant squashed rumours that it would accept the cryptocurreny as a form of payment. so is amazon interested in bitcoin or not? dan kemp — the chief investment officer of morningstar investment management — explained what is going on. the cryptocurrency roller—coaster continues with this latest twist that we have had from amazon first with their advert overnight, then the denial that came as well. and so i think the first thing to remember is we are going to see a lot more of these twists and turns in the cryptocurrency story. now the reason why this is important for people is because cryptocurrency is not like a traditional asset. when you buy a traditional asset. when you buy a traditional asset, you are expecting some form of return, whether that is
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dividends from shareholdings or interest from bonds, or rent from property. but of course with cryptocurrencies you don't get that stream of returns. and so it is not possible to estimate a real value for assets like cryptocurrency. that is why we are seeing these huge swings in the prices because it depends on how people feel about these cryptocurrencies at any given point in time. sometimes they are really enthusiastic and sometimes they are down in the dumps. we have seen more examples of that. ltrul’heh they are down in the dumps. we have seen more examples of that.- seen more examples of that. when it comes to the — seen more examples of that. when it comes to the impact _ seen more examples of that. when it comes to the impact on _ comes to the impact on cryptocurrencies, viability etc, how important is the buy in from big firms like amazon and tesla? how much of a difference does that make? well, we have seen it makes a huge difference to the sentiment of those involved in bitcoin. and it's not really surprising that big companies are looking at cryptocurrencies, and
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more importantly, looking at the blockchain, the technology behind many of these cryptocurrencies, to see whether there is a future for that type of technology in their own businesses and even, potentially, the use of cryptocurrencies. but of course for companies like amazon that are retailing, selling goods they have paid hard currency for, typically, then they are going to need some kind of stability before they can start accepting cryptocurrencies. and we don't see that in many of these cryptocurrencies. it's difficult to tell from the outside whether they are more focused on the future of cryptocurrencies orjust are more focused on the future of cryptocurrencies or just at the blockchain that lies behind it. but certainly, we would expect a long lead time, and more stability, before these companies start using cryptocurrencies to a greater extent. germany has listed spain as a "high—incidence area," due to concerns about a spike in covid infections.
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so from today most people arriving back into germany who aren't fully vaccinated will have to go into quarantine. could it have a negative effect on future bookings in spain at a delicate time for europe's travel sector? earlier i spoke to eric dresin the secretary general of the european travel agents' and tour operators' associations. he had this to say about germany's decision. this is a sad decision, if i may say like that. there's already about 200, 250,000 like that. there's already about 200,250,000 german people in spain today. so first of all, this is a keyissue today. so first of all, this is a key issue for them to consider how they can travel back. now, of course, you have a lot of people who planned their holidays for spain. and for sure, there will be changes in their plan. maybe not massively, depending of course whether they are fully vaccinated. but for sure many
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people will consider their destination. in people will consider their destination.— people will consider their destination. , ., , destination. in terms of bookings, are ou destination. in terms of bookings, are you saying _ destination. in terms of bookings, are you saying that _ destination. in terms of bookings, are you saying that people - destination. in terms of bookings, are you saying that people are - are you saying that people are reluctant to go to destinations like spain, for example, if it involves having to quarantine on their return, or does the fact that people who are fully vaccinated can come in many cases, not have to quarantine, does that make a difference and encourage people to go ahead anyway? fully vaccinated people can travel safely and easily, i would say, considering the context, in europe. your question is very difficult because it is a fragmented decision about the member states about travel restrictions in the european union. there are increasing bookings very recently, injune and there are increasing bookings very recently, in june and july, there are increasing bookings very recently, injune and july, and people want to travel. so they are trying to find out the best
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destination. looking at some health indicators before making the decision, on top of prices and interest. but it's difficult to say exactly who is going where, because all the countries, or each country, is on travel restrictions. so that will be important to you, let's say, to look at all the parameters before making a choice. find to look at all the parameters before making a choice.— to look at all the parameters before making a choice. and when it comes to the rules. — making a choice. and when it comes to the rules, you _ making a choice. and when it comes to the rules, you mentioned - making a choice. and when it comes to the rules, you mentioned the - to the rules, you mentioned the fragmented decision—making, how is the travel industry responding to that? often these decisions are made by either individual member states in europe, or outside europe, for example uk, and it can be a fairly short notice at times?— example uk, and it can be a fairly short notice at times? yes, that is the worst case _ short notice at times? yes, that is the worst case scenario _ short notice at times? yes, that is the worst case scenario in - short notice at times? yes, that is the worst case scenario in the - short notice at times? yes, that is i the worst case scenario in the whole industry, not only tour operators
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are demanding, the whole industry is demanding coordination. that is the most important thing. there is an increasing bookings. destinations vary from the restrictions from the member states, for instance, you have a euro ban map, which is very popular in the press in europe. but this is not the one used by the member states, who apply their own restrictions. so the demand is there. people want to travel. they are booking. but let's say the decision... it is difficult to know which destination is the most popular. stay with us on bbc news. still to come. glorious goodwood returns today, with a full capacity crowd. we take a look at some of the hurdles the horse racing industry has faced over
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the past year. the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in the uk has fallen for a sixth day in a row. the latest figures show that almost 25,000 new cases were recorded yesterday — down from around 47,000 a week ago. professor peter openshaw is a member of nervtag, which advises the government on respiratory viruses. he says it's too early to draw firm conclusions yet. well, i do hope it is due to a genuine drop in infection and not just a change in the testing or reporting. we need to be cautious. we need these figures reflected in hospitalisations. and so far the reports from the front lines in hospitals are that a lot of cases are among those who have not been vaccinated. a group of mps is urging
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the government to introduce a national register to monitor children who are home schooled in england. a new report by the education select committee says the government is only able to make a "best guess" about the standard of education for children who are currently taught at home. ministers say they're committed to introducing a national register soon. a man whose wife and son died in loch lomond at the weekend, has told how he desperately tried to save them, despite being unable to swim. waris ali's wife, edina olahova, their son, rana haris ali, and family friend, muhammad asim riaz, all died in the incident at ardlui on saturday. this is bbc news. the latest headlines. day four at the olympics, and the medals keep coming for team gb — they've picked up a gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle. earlier, there was a first ever gold for bermuda — flora duffy winning
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the women's triathlon. south korea's economy expanded at the fastest annual pace in a decade in the second quarter, boosted by a pick up in private consumption. however, a resurgence of covid—19 infections has cast some doubt over the outlook for growth for the rest of the year. katie silver is in our asia business hub of singapore. she has more details on the latest figures from korea. so they more or less hit expectations. from april tojune we saw growth of almost 6%. this was a big jump from the previous quarter, where there was a 2% growth. one of the reasons for this is the low base effect. april tojune, back in 2020, we can all remember, almost all of the world was in lockdown, including south korea. therefore, it came off a low base. as you mentioned, there was a pick—up in consumption. people were going out and spending and
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government expenditure went up. as economies around the world are basically reopening, particularly south korea's major trading partners. that is meant a big resurgence when it comes to exports and imports which have helped south korea. this won't come any surprise to the bank of korea, which has previously warned about inflation. we may see south korea beef, the first south asian country to raise interest rates. that may happen as soon as next month. but there are those fears going forward that you mentioned, particularly when it comes to covid. the currently having its worst outbreak in all of the pandemic and facing its toughest restrictions. that is likely to really impact consumption, the confidence going forward. there is also the ongoing conflict when it comes to the chip shortage for south korea. it is a huge export but it also needed in many of its products. that is likely to impact growth. analysts say they are cutting their growth forecasts as a result this
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year despite this 6%. katie silver. let's get some of the day's other news the department store chain selfridges group has been put up for sale by canada's weston family for 4 billion pounds according to several media reports. credit suisse has been appointed to start looking for a buyer. selfridges cut 450 jobs a year ago after sales slumped during england's nationwide lockdown. jeff bezos has offered to cover 2 billion dollars of nasa costs in order to be reconsidered for a key contract to build a moon landing vehicle. in april, the space agency awarded the 2—point—9 billion contract to elon musk, rejecting a bid from bezos' company blue origin. lavender is nature's cure for anxiety and insomnia. it also used to be an economic mainstay for the tiny east european republic of moldova during communist times. now, after 30 years in the doldrums, moldova's lavender industry is growing again. it is giving the country
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some much—needed export earnings, and a new type of tourist attraction.
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those fields make for some good social media photos. glorious goodwood, one of the highlights of the british horse racing calendar, is set to start today. it hopes to be one of the first major sporting events to welcome
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a full capacity crowd back in 2021. but this has been a difficult time for racecourses on a commercial level — the pandemic is thought to have cost racecourses £400 million. adam waterworth is the events managing director for the whole goodwood group. i asked him if there was appetite for people to return to these large crowd events. our ticket sales, since the prime minister made his announcement three weeks ago now, how to sales have been really strong and, thankfully, there does seem to be, yes. for those watching _ there does seem to be, yes. for those watching or attending, will be racing look or feel as those watching or attending, will be racing look orfeel as it those watching or attending, will be racing look or feel as it always has done, orwill there racing look or feel as it always has done, or will there be differences? i hope so. i mean, obviously, there will still be a number of things in place that is our way of being careful, effectively. so there will still be masks being worn in inside
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areas. and i think the way that people behave, i will be interested to see how they behave and how they interact on the racecourse. frankly, ijust interact on the racecourse. frankly, i just don't know. interact on the racecourse. frankly, ijust don't know. but i think certainly, once the racing starts, and in terms of those shots that people watching from home will see, i think it will look like a family —— but fairly normal goodwood. ltraihgt -- but fairly normal goodwood. what sort of a state _ -- but fairly normal goodwood. what sort of a state is _ -- but fairly normal goodwood. what sort of a state is the _ -- but fairly normal goodwood. what sort of a state is the horse _ —— but fairly normal goodwood. what sort of a state is the horse racing industry looked at? a pandemic or not, the horses have to be looked after, people have to be paid to look after them. they must have been some fairly heavy cost involved without the income?— some fairly heavy cost involved without the income? yeah, it's been very difficult- _ without the income? yeah, it's been very difficult. it's _ without the income? yeah, it's been very difficult. it's been _ without the income? yeah, it's been very difficult. it's been very - very difficult. it's been very difficult for everyone. at least with horse racing we were able to get back racing behind closed doors. so although we were closed and from the middle of march last year until the middle of march last year until the beginning ofjune, from june last year we have at least been able to race behind closed doors. so that
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has kept the wheel turning. prize—money levels were down for obvious reasons. for the racecourses, especially the larger racecourses, especially the larger racecourses like goodwood, not having a crowd is obviously a huge impact on our businesses. haifa having a crowd is obviously a huge impact on our businesses. now we say aoodb e to impact on our businesses. now we say goodbye to our — impact on our businesses. now we say goodbye to our viewers _ impact on our businesses. now we say goodbye to our viewers and _ impact on our businesses. now we say goodbye to our viewers and bbc - impact on our businesses. now we say goodbye to our viewers and bbc world j goodbye to our viewers and bbc world news. i will be back with world business report in just under an hour. thank you for watching. three thousand car workers at the honda plant in swindon have begun their last week at work. it's a huge week for all involved — as our business correspondent dave harvey reports. when they announced it, we were an apprenticeship as well. it was just like my world had collapsed. it apprenticeship as well. it was 'ust like my world had collapsed. it was a hue like my world had collapsed. it was a huge shock- _ like my world had collapsed. it was a huge shock. for— like my world had collapsed. it was a huge shock. for me _ like my world had collapsed. it was a huge shock. for me personally, l like my world had collapsed. it was a huge shock. for me personally, i | a huge shock. for me personally, i felt i _ a huge shock. for me personally, i felt i had _ a huge shock. for me personally, i felt i had got my foot on the ladder in terms _ felt i had got my foot on the ladder in terms of— felt i had got my foot on the ladder in terms of a career i was really interested — in terms of a career i was really interested in. it in terms of a career i was really interested in.—
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in terms of a career i was really interested in. it has been a long three years _ interested in. it has been a long three years for _ interested in. it has been a long three years for thousands - interested in. it has been a long three years for thousands of - interested in. it has been a long i three years for thousands of honda workers trying to find work. midway through their apprenticeships they have now been taken on by a new firm making cutting edge recycling machines. eagerto making cutting edge recycling machines. eager to snap up staff with the honda track record. the cu s are with the honda track record. the guys are really — with the honda track record. tie: guys are really great, really enthusiastic, always willing to be hands on. it enthusiastic, always willing to be hands on. , , , , hands on. it is completely different to hyundai- — hands on. it is completely different to hyundai. for— hands on. it is completely different to hyundai. for example, - hands on. it is completely different to hyundai. for example, on - hands on. it is completely different i to hyundai. for example, on monday hands on. it is completely different. to hyundai. for example, on monday i was at _ to hyundai. for example, on monday i was at the _ to hyundai. for example, on monday i was at the university of birmingham setting _ was at the university of birmingham setting up— was at the university of birmingham setting up a research rate. it is a completely— setting up a research rate. it is a completely different job. setting up a research rate. it is a completely differentjob. | setting up a research rate. it is a completely differentjob.- setting up a research rate. it is a completely different job. completely different “ob. i think i am in a laugh completely different “ob. i think i am in a better place _ completely different job. i think i am in a better place now. - completely different job. i think i am in a better place now. the . am in a better place now. the promise of further training and even degree level qualifications, i am really happy, honestly. for degree level qualifications, i am really happy, honestly.- really happy, honestly. for the other 3000 — really happy, honestly. for the other 3000 workers _ really happy, honestly. for the other 3000 workers in - really happy, honestly. for the other 3000 workers in this - really happy, honestly. for the| other 3000 workers in this vast factory, theirfortunes other 3000 workers in this vast factory, their fortunes lay with the union. negotiating redundancy packages to keep them going why they look for work. it packages to keep them going why they look for work-— look for work. it equates to about six and a half _ look for work. it equates to about six and a half weeks _ look for work. it equates to about six and a half weeks for _ look for work. it equates to about six and a half weeks for every - look for work. it equates to about | six and a half weeks for every year itself. it is uncapped, unlike the
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statutory minimum. and there are additional bonuses wrapped up within that. they will walk out with very lucrative redundancy packages. honda at swindon is — lucrative redundancy packages. honda at swindon is surrounded _ lucrative redundancy packages. honda at swindon is surrounded by _ lucrative redundancy packages. honda at swindon is surrounded by trading estates. soon, thousands of former car workers will be here looking for work. , , . ., ., work. the biggest challenge for these guys _ work. the biggest challenge for these guys is — work. the biggest challenge for these guys is going _ work. the biggest challenge for these guys is going to - work. the biggest challenge for these guys is going to be - work. the biggest challenge for these guys is going to be their. these guys is going to be their salary— these guys is going to be their salary expectations. a production operative — salary expectations. a production operative worked there for more than 20 years. _ operative worked there for more than 20 years, and he was on more than £20 an— 20 years, and he was on more than £20 an hour — 20 years, and he was on more than £20 an hour. he is probably looking realistically at anything from minimum wage to up to £10 an hour. for michael— minimum wage to up to £10 an hour. for michael and jim, minimum wage to up to £10 an hour. formichaelandjim, a minimum wage to up to £10 an hour. for michael and jim, a bright future. for michaelandjim, a bright future. but they have hundreds of friends are still searching for jobs. dave harvey reporting. it's the shortest race at the olympics, it's over in a flash, but there's no doubt the 100 metres is one of sports most iconic event. anthony koffi, an experienced athletics winning coach from ivory coast, tells us what it takes to run a 100 metres race.
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yeah, fighting spirit and plenty of training. that is it from me for the moment. ., ., good morning. the weather in the next few days remains unsettled. some torrential thundery downpours leading to the potential for flash flooding. in between there will be some sunny spells. frequent gusty winds at times as well. that is the forecast for today. after a bright start in the east you can see all of this cloud planning in from the west. it has produced thundery downpours in parts of southern england this morning. low pressure is firmly in charge. not much of an eye in the chart. any showers we do catch will be slow moving. for many it is a dry start with a few showers. the heaviest moving across southern england into parts of the midlands. the showers will develop more widely into the afternoon for
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the north midlands, north wales and northwards. some could be heavy and thundery. in scotland, the chance of localised flooding. temperatures ranging from 15 to maybe 22 or 23. down a touch on the 26 and 27 we saw yesterday in places. this evening and overnight some of the showers in the south will fade but we will see more coming in from the west. the showers continue across scotland, eventually merging with the new system from the west. that combination again could produce some torrential downpours. it is not going to be called across the board. into tomorrow, low pressure still firmly in charge. a few more isobars in the chart. not much wind in the centre of this low. any of those torrential downpours will be slow—moving. again in scotland there is the risk of some flash flooding. for england, wales and northern ireland, heavy showers, sunshine in between. some showers will be thundery. a windier day than it has been. these white circles represent the average wind speed. it would be
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more like 30 to 40 mph in the showers. temperatures disappointing for the stage injuly. as we move from wednesday into thursday, more isobars, the wind will fraction from the north—west as we go through the course of the latter part of the day. and you could see what is happening on thursday. we still have some rain in scotland, northern england and northern ireland. for the rest of england and wales, a drier day. you can see what is happening in the south—west. more rain coming ourway. happening in the south—west. more rain coming our way. it will also turn that bit windier.
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this is bbc world news, i'm samantha simmonds. our top stories... day four at the olympics — and the medals keep coming for team gb — they've picked up a gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle. but some shock news forjapan, as naomi osaka has is knocked out of the tennis in the third round. borisjohnson promised to build a "safer society," as he publishes what the uk government calls its "beating crime plan. " north and south korea restore a communications hotline, following an exchange of letters between the two leaders. and another billionaire space race, asjeff bezos offers nasa a $2 billion discount to try and undercut rival elon musk�*s contract to build a moon lander.
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hello and welcome to bbc world news. team gb is celebrating after winning olympic gold and silver in the men's swimming 200 metres freestyle. tom dean, who contracted covid—19 twice, won the final, with duncan scott completing the one—two. it's the first time since 1908 that two british male swimmers have shared the podium. and a bermudan athlete has made history in tokyo — winning the tiny island's first ever olympic gold medal. and in the past half an hour, in the women's tennis competition, localfavourite naomi osaka has been knocked out in the third round. chetan partak is waiting to tell us more about that but first, the bbc�*s sarah mulkerrins is in tokyo. what a morning it was in tokyo
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for the island nation of bermuda! a first olympic gold medal for them as florida duffy won the women's triathlon. the tropical storm that hit tokyo was no problem for her. they had a delayed start but once she got in and got through her swim and navigated the slippery roads on the bike around tokyo, she was the one who was able to pull clear on her10 km run to win olympic gold. such a good result for her. she has two world titles already. she had been a dominant force in the sport but she has been struggling with injury, she stepped away from the sport. she didn't quite know whether this olympic dream would happen for her. when she crossed the line and held her hands aloft and celebrated, you could see the joy and the relief etched on her face. meanwhile it has been a brilliant morning in the swimming pool as well. we had fourfinals, a great morning for great britain. tom dean winning gold in the men's 200 metres freestyle and his compatriot duncan scott
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coming second, just a short margin behind him. duncan scott was the fastest man in the world this year going into the final but it was tom dean, with a look of complete shock afterwards, won gold. interestingly, he caught covid twice in the build—up to this and he was wondering how it would affect him as he struggled physically at times with it. a great morning for him. then two really good results in the women's. kaylee mckeown from australia, she set an olympic record as she won the 100 metres backstroke and then what a story! the 17—year—old from alaska, lydia jacoby, she was the surprise winner in the women's100 metres breaststroke, that is the first time that a swimmer from alaska has won olympic gold. let's cross to the bbc sports centre and speak to chethan pa rthak. welcome. a bit of a shock for osaka.
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she had the weight of the nation on her shoulders, she has been the face of the games, knocked out in the fourth round. we had not seen osaka play since the french open. she pulled out of that. she was not at wimbledon and wanted to focus on her mental health. she has spoken a lot about her depression and anxiety. she did not want to do the media conferences and was preparing for the hard—core season. this was a huge target for her. at the opening ceremony she was the first tennis player to light the olympic waldron. she looked really good in the opening rounds but she was beaten in straight sets in a little over an hour. windy conditions but still conditions you would fancy osaka in.
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her opponent is not a player to be taken lightly. she lost to ash barty in an open final. we have seen shock after shock in the women's side of the jaw so far. the world number one ash barty is now out. naomi osaka. it has been happening at the grand slams. tough for osaka to take. the face of the games and so much expectation. she will be hugely disappointed. to go out in the way she did in straight sets. teiiii disappointed. to go out in the way she did in straight sets.— she did in straight sets. tell us about team — she did in straight sets. tell us about team gb. _ she did in straight sets. tell us about team gb. it _ she did in straight sets. tell us about team gb. it has - she did in straight sets. tell us about team gb. it has been i she did in straight sets. tell us about team gb. it has been al she did in straight sets. tell us - about team gb. it has been a good few hours for them. history was made in the pool. the first time since 1908 we had a one and two for gb. what was great about the story is
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you are talking about friends. tom dean, gold on his debian. duncan scott finishing just behind his friend. a really great story for tom dean. i was listening to his mother coming into work, talking about her pride. she has five children. as baby she had them all in the pool early on. she is not the only one who has promised. there were seven of them in the garden, cheering him on on the big screen. not expecting him to get the gold medal. as sarah was telling you, he had carried a virus twice. on one occasion he was struggling to get up the stairs. —— coronavirus twice. a fantastic story for him. not often we are talking
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about gold and silver in the same race for team gb. what a magical moment that was. especially on the back of what adam peaty was able to do on monday. the media, the tiny nation celebrating its first gold. this is a nation with round about 60,000 in terms of population, their least populous nation to win an olympic gold. bermuda's laura duffy getting thejob done. i olympic gold. bermuda's laura duffy getting the job done. i talked about the conditions in the tennis being windy. these are brutal conditions in the triathlon as well. for laura duffy, such a recurring story, he knows what would have happened had the game is being held last year? she had fitness issues. she had any problem as well. she was surprised to be able to manage the race and
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finished a minute ahead of the brits, georgia taylor brown. remarkable from her. she had a puncture on her back tyre. she rode with the flat and ended up getting a silver medal. just a mention on kt, the us athlete winning bronze. the 2019 world champion. herfather died suddenly in april and she talked about how she was struggling to get her head together in the olympic games. history made for laura duffy and the media. that games. history made for laura duffy and the media-— and the media. that is what the ol m - ics and the media. that is what the olympics is _ and the media. that is what the olympics is all— and the media. that is what the olympics is all about. _ and the media. that is what the olympics is all about. thank- and the media. that is what the | olympics is all about. thank you and the media. that is what the - olympics is all about. thank you so much. see you later. here in the uk, prime minister borisjohnson has promised to build a "safer society" with "fewer victims" as he published what the government calls its "beating crime plan." the document — published while parliament is in recess — outlines a strategy which — among other things —
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expands programmes to tackle drug misuse and increases satellite monitoring of recently—released burglars and robbers. but the police federation said the system needs funding not gimmicks. the bbc�*s home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. the government says its beating crime plan is about increasing public trust in the criminaljustice system. ambitiously, the prime minister claimed it would lead to less crime, fewer victims and a safer country. one eye—catching policy is to allow everyone in england and wales to be able to look up a named and contactable police officer responsible for their area. there are also plans to expand project adder, which tackles drug dealers and improves services for people with addictions. another proposal is to do more 24—hour monitoring of burglars and robbers after they are released from prison, using tags with satellite technology. this way their movements can be mapped against new crimes being investigated by police.
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the police federation, which represents rank and file officers, and is furious about a proposed pay freeze, said it didn't need gimmicks but genuine investment. in a report also published today, thejustice committee of mps has warned that cuts to legal aid have hollowed out key parts of the justice system and this is putting fairness at risk. daniel sandford, bbc news. the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in the uk has fallen for a sixth day in a row. the latest figures show that almost 25,000 new cases were recorded on monday — down from around 47,000 a week ago. staying in the uk for a moment, and the prime minister and chancellor are out of isolation having spent more than a week working remotely. borisjohnson and rishi sunak both went into self—isolation onjuly 18th — the day before most covid rules were lifted in england — after they came into contact with health secretary sajid javid,
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who tested positive for coronavirus. north and south korea have restored a communications hotline between them which was cut off by pyongyang more than a year ago. a statement issued by the government in the south said the move followed an exchange of numerous letters between the leaders of the two countries. let's speak to our correspondent, laura bicker, who's in seoul. welcome to you. explain to us about the hotline, how it works and why the hotline, how it works and why the restoration of it is so important. the restoration of it is so important-— the restoration of it is so imortant. ., , ., important. there are several hotlines. _ important. there are several hotlines, 48 _ important. there are several hotlines, 48 in _ important. there are several hotlines, 48 in total- important. there are several| hotlines, 48 in total actually. important. there are several- hotlines, 48 in total actually. the main ones are between the military and across the border. they are bad to avoid any kind of tension, they are bad to avoid conflict. they were set off —— is up back in 1971. these countries are still officially at war. when the fighting ended it endedin
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war. when the fighting ended it ended in armistice, not a peace treaty. this today is the anniversary of the armistice signing. on the anniversary communication lines have been reopened. last year, lastjune, north korea turned its back on the south. it had communication lines and blew up the inter—korean liaison office. this office was built at the border specifically for the two sides to talk. having turned its back on the south and it happened after the relationship between pyongyang and washington, remember all the hope when kim jong—un pyongyang and washington, remember all the hope when kimjong—un met donald trump and the hope of a deal, all of that fell through and so did north and south relations. in the last year there has been very little contact between the two countries. we understand since april there had been a number of letters between the south korean and north korean leaders. we understand those letters have been about coronavirus response
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and also about re—establishing communication lines. a short conversation was had between the person manning the south korean line and the person manning the north korean line. the person in the south said it was good to be talking once again to the person in the north. let's head back to the olympics — amd in the next few hours we will find out who the first ever olympic surfing gold medallists are. the sport has made its debut at the games this year. tropical storms close to tokyo have made getting to the final difficult task though. let's speak to jessi miley—dyer who is the head of compeition with the world surf league. the league is the governing body for professional surfers. welcome to you. thank you for being with us. how does it feel this taking part in the olympics were surfing about to get its first gold medal? it surfing about to get its first gold medal? , . , surfing about to get its first gold medal? , ., , _, ., surfing about to get its first gold medal? , ., , ., ., medal? it is really cool. to have something _ medal? it is really cool. to have something on — medal? it is really cool. to have something on such _ medal? it is really cool. to have something on such a _ medal? it is really cool. to have something on such a big - medal? it is really cool. to have something on such a big stage i medal? it is really cool. to have i something on such a big stage like the olympics is great for the athletes. it is great for the sport
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to be there. athletes. it is great for the sport to be there-— athletes. it is great for the sport to be there. ., ., ., , to be there. how have the athletes tackle this, — to be there. how have the athletes tackle this, especially _ to be there. how have the athletes tackle this, especially in _ tackle this, especially in coronavirus times? it tackle this, especially in coronavirus times? ., , , coronavirus times? it has definitely been different _ coronavirus times? it has definitely been different preparation - coronavirus times? it has definitely been different preparation for- coronavirus times? it has definitely been different preparation for the l been different preparation for the athletes, for sure, particularly in athletes, for sure, particularly in a pandemic year. everyone has had an extra year off to prepare. to finally be there, you know, it has been a long road for the athletes to have qualified and everyone is relishing the experience and trying to win medals. haifa relishing the experience and trying to win medals.— to win medals. how has it been seeing- -- _ to win medals. how has it been seeing... many _ to win medals. how has it been seeing... many might - to win medals. how has it been seeing... many might not - to win medals. how has it been seeing... many might not know to win medals. how has it been - seeing... many might not know but actually there is a big surfing culture injapan, isn't there? how has it been seeing surfing taking place there? taste has it been seeing surfing taking place there?— has it been seeing surfing taking place there? we had kind of been luc in place there? we had kind of been lucky in that _ place there? we had kind of been lucky in that we _ place there? we had kind of been lucky in that we have _ place there? we had kind of been lucky in that we have this - place there? we had kind of been j lucky in that we have this weather system that is giving us some swell. it is not particularly well groomed and it is tricky, for sure. coming into the gold medal match, we have
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kanoa igarashi from japan, he will definitely be a home favourite to take gold. if he does take gold, it will be a really big moment for the sport injapan. will be a really big moment for the sport in japan-— will be a really big moment for the sport in japan. what about the sport overall? do — sport in japan. what about the sport overall? do think _ sport in japan. what about the sport overall? do think being _ sport in japan. what about the sport overall? do think being included - sport in japan. what about the sport overall? do think being included in l overall? do think being included in the olympics will encourage more people to take an interest in the olympics and maybe more people to take up surfing? i olympics and maybe more people to take op surfing?— take up surfing? i hope so. i have also been — take up surfing? i hope so. i have also been watching _ take up surfing? i hope so. i have| also been watching skateboarding, take up surfing? i hope so. i have i also been watching skateboarding, it has looked really awesome for them as well. there is definitely an element for us as surfers, the sport of surfing in general may be someone watching the olympics who has never really even considered watching the world south lead or considered following them as they go around contest around the world. i think there is something really cool and hopefully we get to have a couple of break—out stars. hopefully we get to have a couple of break-out stars.—
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hopefully we get to have a couple of break-out stars. really good talking to ou. break-out stars. really good talking to you- enjoy _ break-out stars. really good talking to you- enjoy the — break-out stars. really good talking to you. enjoy the semis _ break-out stars. really good talking to you. enjoy the semis and - break-out stars. really good talking to you. enjoy the semis and the - to you. enjoy the semis and the final. stay with us on bbc world news. we'll have more olympics news — from team gb's success in the pool — to the dressage coming up in the next few hours — stay with us. the representatives of 51 countries have been meeting in london, for what the uk government is calling "critical discussions," ahead of a major climate conference in glasgow in november. the minister in charge of the talks believes richer countries need to deliver on their promises to provide funding to help poorer nations deal with climate change. alok sharma has been speaking to the bbc�*s environment correspondentjustin rowlatt. how sure are you that the funding pledged for developing countries will be delivered? in 2009, the developed nations,
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the donor nations said that by the year 2020 they would be putting forward a $100 billion a year to support developing economies cope with the impacts of climate change. the latest figures show certainly back in 2018 we were still some way short. this 100 billion figure, i cannot tell you how much of a totemic figure it is, it is absolutely a matter of trust. we must deliver on the 100 billion now. this is bbc world news, the latest headlines... day four at the olympics — and the medals keep coming for team gb — they've picked up a gold in the men's 200 metres freestyle. let's get more on the olympics. and here in the uk the focus will be on britain's dressage riders as they hope to challenge for medals in the team final. the three—person team, made up of carl hester, charlotte fry and charlotte dujardin
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will be hoping to improve on their silver won in rio. we can speak now to jennie loriston—clarke who competed in the 1972, 1976, 1984 and the 1988 olympic games, and who was one of carl hester�*s first trainers. welcome to you. thank you for being with us. incredible you competed in so many olympic games. how do you look back on your time competing and what memories does it bring back? it has been really wonderful. i am so excited about britain coming up in the dressage world, as we were only known as the hunting, shooting and fishing lot before and everyone laughed at us. now they are sitting back and saying, what have we got to beat a bit? good luck to the british team. i think it will be so exciting. team. i think it will be so exciting-—
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team. i think it will be so excitina. ., ,, ., exciting. he worked with carl hester, exciting. he worked with carl hester. he — exciting. he worked with carl hester, he was _ exciting. he worked with carl hester, he was one - exciting. he worked with carl hester, he was one of - exciting. he worked with carl hester, he was one of the i exciting. he worked with carl - hester, he was one of the dressage riders. ~ . , ~ hester, he was one of the dressage riders. ~ ., , ,, , hester, he was one of the dressage riders. ~ ., , ~ , ., riders. what is he like? he is a wonderful— riders. what is he like? he is a wonderful person. _ riders. what is he like? he is a wonderful person. he - riders. what is he like? he is a wonderful person. he has - riders. what is he like? he is a i wonderful person. he has helped riders. what is he like? he is a - wonderful person. he has helped so many people at the game. he was in a p°ny many people at the game. he was in a pony club. that was a long time ago. now he has —— as he is looked up to by everybody worldwide. he has helped so many people in great britain and worldwide to up their game in dressage. he is really wonderful and great fun to be with and really encouraging to everybody. team gb won silver in rio. what are the chances for gold this time around, do you think? i the chances for gold this time around, do you think?- the chances for gold this time around, do you think? i think it is auoin to around, do you think? i think it is going to be _ around, do you think? i think it is going to be quite _ around, do you think? i think it is going to be quite an _ around, do you think? i think it is going to be quite an uphill- around, do you think? i think it is going to be quite an uphill battle| going to be quite an uphill battle but nothing is impossible in this world. we can all have our good days and bad days, after all you are
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partnering with a horse, and, you know, it is so easy to make a mistake and missed a skip or whatever in dressage. so, you know, i think it is all to go for. i think charlotte has done incredibly well with this young horse, who is only ten years old and i think it is very exciting. lottie fry really set the world alight when she got her great school, 77% plus. it is herfirst olympic games and that is marvellous, it is a wonderful horse. she is really doing as crowd. taste she is really doing as crowd. we ho -e ou she is really doing as crowd. we hope you and the birds we can hear tweeting away behind you enjoy the action. thank you very much.
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tom dean claimed a stunning gold and duncan scott silver to ensure a british one—two in a fast, closely—fought 200m freestyle at the tokyo olympics. dean touched home in one minute 44.22 seconds, securing a british record on his debut games. scott finished just 0.04secs behind his team—mate, with fernando scheffer of brazil taking bronze. it is the first time since 1908 that two male british swimmers have finished on the olympic podium together. let's speak now to bbc sports reporter kheredine issedane, who is is at the citadel leisure centre in ayr — and who is you with? hello from the citadel leisure centre. it is home to the south ayrshire swim team, where it all started for duncan scott. some of the swimmers were hoping for a duncan scott gold. they got duncan scott silver, plus a gold for tom dean. i wonder what it is like to be chief executive of british swimming
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this morning. he is here with me now. tell me how you are feeling on this historic day for british swimming. gold and silver in the olympics, the first time it has happened since the first world war. it is incredible, just amazing. we knew— it is incredible, just amazing. we knew both — it is incredible, just amazing. we knew both duncan and tom were in great _ knew both duncan and tom were in great shape. going into the maze, relatively— great shape. going into the maze, relatively open. we both knew they had a _ relatively open. we both knew they had a great chance. it is the first time _ had a great chance. it is the first time since — had a great chance. it is the first time since1908 we got gold and silver _ time since1908 we got gold and silver so— time since1908 we got gold and silver. so inspirational. what great role models! they will be in the
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silver. so inspirational. what great role models! ' rush vill be in the silver. so inspirational. what great role models! ' rush on be in the silver. so inspirational. what great role models! ' rush on inr in the silver. so inspirational. what great role models! ' rush on in the :he silver. so inspirational. what great role models! ' rush on in the pool bit of a medal rush on in the pool for britain now, do you ink? i am thinking there will be more gold, is there? i thinking there will be more gold, is there? ., ~' thinking there will be more gold, is there? ., ,, ., there? i would like to say we feel we are rising- _ there? i would like to say we feel we are rising. we _ there? i would like to say we feel we are rising. we have _ there? i would like to say we feel we are rising. we have a - there? i would like to say we feel we are rising. we have a great i we are rising. we have a great mantra — we are rising. we have a great mantra that every day is day one click— mantra that every day is day one click restart each day afresh, it is day one _ click restart each day afresh, it is day one and _ click restart each day afresh, it is day one and we go after it with the same _ day one and we go after it with the same level— day one and we go after it with the same level of enthusiasm. we think we had _ same level of enthusiasm. we think we had a _ same level of enthusiasm. we think we had a few more and we definitely encourage _ we had a few more and we definitely encourage everyone to get up tomorrow night and watch it live between — tomorrow night and watch it live between to o'clock and four o'clock in the _ between to o'clock and four o'clock in the morning which we have all been _ in the morning which we have all been doing. it is worth going without— been doing. it is worth going without sleep for a few days. it without sleep for a few days. [it would without sleep for a few days. would be a without sleep for a few days. it would be a sleepless week for all of us given the time of the events over
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there. more to come from the british swimmers and more to come from us in ayrshire this morning.— ayrshire this morning. thank you very much- _ let's get some of the day's other news. miami dade county officials have confirmed the final death toll from last months building collapse is 98. the round the clock search for victims was ended last friday and the remains of the final victim — 54 year old estelle hedaya have now been positively identified after being recovered onjuly 20th najib mikati is the latest person to be tasked by lebanese lawmakers to try and form a government. the telecommunications businessman who has served in the position twice before, urged his country's people to support him as he took what he called a difficult step. but it could take months for the 65 year old to assemble a government the amazon founder, jeff bezos, has offered nasa a $2 billion discount if it will allow his space company blue origin to build a moon landing vehicle. elon musk�*s spacex has already been awarded a contract, but mr bezos says he'll provide
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the extra funds needed to keep his company in the race. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @samanthatvnews. the weather over the next few days remains unsettled with torrential under examples leading to the potential of flash leading. in between there will be sunny spells with gusty winds. after a bright start in the east we can see the plaid piling in from the west already producing heavy and thundery downpours. this front will move eastwards during the day. low pressure is in charge. any showers we catch today will be slow moving. for many a dry start with a few showers. the heaviest in the south of england. the showers will develop more widely in the afternoon. some
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of the showers could be heavy and tangerine. in scotland the chance of localised flooding. temperatures ranging from 15 to 22,23, down a touch on 26, 27 we saw yesterday. some showers will fade. more coming in from the west. as the showers continue across scotland, merging with the new system coming in from the west by that combination could produce torrential downpours. not cold across the board. tomorrow low pressure is firmly in charge. not much wind in the centre of this low. any torrential downpours will be slow moving. again in scotland the risk of flash flooding. it will be a windier day than it has been. these white circles represent an average wind speed, the gusts around the
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showers will be 30, 40 miles an hour. temperatures disappointing for this stage injuly. from wednesday into thursday the low pressure will push into the north sea with more isobars and the windmill fashioned from the north—west as we go into the latter part of the day. on thursday still some rain in scotland, england and northern ireland. forthe scotland, england and northern ireland. for the rest of england and wales, a drier day. in the west more rain coming ourway. wales, a drier day. in the west more rain coming our way. the low pressure looks like it willjoin the south of the country and it will turn a bit windier.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. it's been another good morning for team gb at the tokyo olympics, with another gold medal and two more silvers. the swimmers tom dean and duncan scott came first and second in the 200 metres freestyle. earlier, bermuda's flora duffy won gold in the women's triathlon, finishing well ahead of team gb's georgia taylor—brown. it's bermuda's first ever gold — and they are the smallest nation competing at the games. president biden has said us troops will end their combat mission in iraq by the end of the year. america has about 2,500 forces there to help iraq fight the islamic state group. the inuit rights advocate, mary simon, has become canada's first indigenous woman to hold the post of governor general at her swearing—in ceremony, the official representative of queen elizabeth pledged to strive to build bridges. a group of mps is urging the government to introduce
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a national register to monitor children who are home schooled in england. a new report by the education select committee says the government is only able to make a "best guess" about the standard of education for children who are currently taught at home. ministers say they're committed to introducing a national register soon. the conservative mp robert halfon is chair of the uk's parliamentary education committee, and says more needs to be done. the astonishing thing about all of theseis the astonishing thing about all of these is there is no data, no information properly collected by the department for education in terms of how many home educated children there are, what their outcomes are and what support they need to be given. that is counter—productive because we know that despite the efforts of a number of parents who do a remarkable job for their children in home
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education, we know that many parents are struggling. former health secretary, ken clarke, will give evidence at a public inquiry investigating how more than 4,000 haemophiliacs were treated with contaminated blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. thousands more may have been infected after blood transfusions in what's been described as one of the worse tragedies in nhs history. lord clarke will be the first former health minister who was serving at the time to be questioned. as the delta variant begins to take hold in the united states, some states are beginning to worry about the impact it will have on the unvaccinated. in california, one of the most vaccinated states, masks are now once again required to be worn in all indoor public places. our north america correspondent, sophie long reports. here is the truth. if you are fully vaccinated, you are safer with a higher degree of protection. but if you are not vaccinated, you are not protected.
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cheering. and what we have now is a pandemic of the unvaccinated. the and what we have now is a pandemic of the unvaccinated.— of the unvaccinated. the message from the president _ of the unvaccinated. the message from the president is _ of the unvaccinated. the message from the president is clear. - of the unvaccinated. the message from the president is clear. but i from the president is clear. but covered my cases are climbing and it is causing deep concern. taste covered my cases are climbing and it is causing deep concern.— is causing deep concern. we are auoin in is causing deep concern. we are going in the _ is causing deep concern. we are going in the wrong _ is causing deep concern. we are going in the wrong direction. . is causing deep concern. we are| going in the wrong direction. you is causing deep concern. we are i going in the wrong direction. you if you look— going in the wrong direction. you if you look at— going in the wrong direction. you if you look at the inflection of the curve _ you look at the inflection of the curve of— you look at the inflection of the curve of new cases. as you said in the running — curve of new cases. as you said in the running to this interview, it is among _ the running to this interview, it is among the — the running to this interview, it is among the unvaccinated. and since we have a _ among the unvaccinated. and since we have a 50%_ among the unvaccinated. and since we have a 50% of the country not fully vaccinated. — have a 50% of the country not fully vaccinated, that is a problem. in vaccinated, that is a problem. in some states, like alabama, the vaccination rates are much lower, leading to fears that intensive care units could be a capacity once more. the new cases in covid are because of unvaccinated fault. almost 100% of unvaccinated fault. almost 100% of the new hospitalisations are unvaccinated folks. and the deaths are certainly occurring with unvaccinated folks. these folks are choosing a horrible lifestyle of
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self—inflicted pain. choosing a horrible lifestyle of self-inflicted pain.— choosing a horrible lifestyle of self-inflicted pain. from the east coast to the _ self-inflicted pain. from the east coast to the west, _ self-inflicted pain. from the east coast to the west, officials - self-inflicted pain. from the east coast to the west, officials are i coast to the west, officials are redoubling their efforts to push people to act responsibly. anybody that hospitalised, _ people to act responsibly. anybody that hospitalised, or— people to act responsibly. anybody that hospitalised, or is _ people to act responsibly. anybody that hospitalised, or is in _ people to act responsibly. anybody that hospitalised, or is in an - people to act responsibly. anybody that hospitalised, or is in an icu i that hospitalised, or is in an icu through— that hospitalised, or is in an icu through covid—19 right now, is there by choice _ through covid—19 right now, is there by choice because they didn't make the effort _ by choice because they didn't make the effort to get vaccinated. that is what _ the effort to get vaccinated. that is what we — the effort to get vaccinated. that is what we need to fix. but the effort to get vaccinated. that is what we need to fix.— the effort to get vaccinated. that is what we need to fix. but this is the land of _ is what we need to fix. but this is the land of the _ is what we need to fix. but this is the land of the free. _ is what we need to fix. but this is the land of the free. and - is what we need to fix. but this is the land of the free. and in i the land of the free. and in california's orange county, where hospitalisations are surging, even the seriously ill remain reluctant to have the injection that could save lives. i to have the in'ection that could lives.— save lives. i think it's an individual _ save lives. i think it's an individual decision. i save lives. i think it's an i individual decision. there's a save lives. i think it's an - individual decision. there's a lot of factors going into it. there are politics involved. and there are multiple sides of the equation. due to this latest _ multiple sides of the equation. due to this latest surge being driven by the highly transmissible delta variant, la county have now reinstated its indoor mask wearing
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mandate, even for those who have been vaccinated. officials in other states could soon follow suit. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. us police officers will give first—hand accounts later today of violent clashes with protesters at the capitol building injanuary. hundreds of donald trump supporters stormed the building in washington dc in an attempt to stop congress confirming democratjoe biden's victory in the 2020 presidential election. this afternoon a special committee set up to investigate the incident will hold its first hearing, with officers expected to give evidence. for more than 3,000 car workers at swindon's honda plant, this week is their last at the plant. the japanese car maker has been a vital part of the area's economy for 35 years, but by friday the last vehicle will have rolled of the production line. even though the closure has been two years in the pipeline, many are still looking forjobs that match their skills — and the bbc�*s dave harvey has been hearing from some of them.
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it was just like my world had collapsed. i liked working in hyundai. when they announced it, we were on an apprenticeship as well. it was just like my world had collapsed. for me personally, i felt i had got my foot on the ladder in terms of a career i was really interested in. so it sort of knocked us for six, really~ — so it sort of knocked us for six, really it — so it sort of knocked us for six, really. it was quite a blow. it has been a long three years for thousands of honda workers trying to find work. midway through their apprenticeships they have now been taken on by a new firm making cutting edge recycling machines, eager to snap up staff with the honda track record. the guys are really great, really enthusiastic, always willing to be hands on. it is completely different to honda.
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they crave learning and continuous improvement. it is they crave learning and continuous improvement-— it is completely different to honda. for example, on monday i was at the university of birmingham setting up a research rig. it is a completely different job. it is not even comparable. very ositive, it is not even comparable. very positive, honestly. _ it is not even comparable. very positive, honestly. in— it is not even comparable. very positive, honestly. in fact, i- it is not even comparable. - positive, honestly. in fact, ithink positive, honestly. infact, ithink i am in a better place now than i was. with the promise of further training and even degree level qualifications, i am really happy, honestly. for the other 3000 workers in this vast factory, their fortunes lay with the union, negotiating redundancy packages to keep them going while they look for work. they are unprecedented, in my view. i've not experienced anything like it in this industry or any other industry. it equates to about six and a half weeks for every year itself. it is uncapped, unlike the statutory minimum. and there are additional bonuses wrapped up within that. they will walk out with very
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lucrative redundancy packages. especially if you have been here for a long time. honda at swindon is surrounded by trading estates. soon, thousands of former car workers will be here looking for work. the current conditions of the market. _ the current conditions of the market. i_ the current conditions of the market, i will be honest with you, there _ market, i will be honest with you, there are — market, i will be honest with you, there are more jobs than people. the biggest _ there are more jobs than people. the biggest challenge for these guys is going _ biggest challenge for these guys is going to _ biggest challenge for these guys is going to be their salary expectations. a production operative worked there for more than 20 years, and he was on more than £20 an hour. he is probably looking realistically at anything from minimum wage to up to £10 an hour. sol so i think there will be a bit of a reality— so i think there will be a bit of a reality check for a lot of the honda workers _ for michaelandjim, a bright future. but they have hundreds of friends are still searching forjobs. you try to think there are 3500 people — you try to think there are 3500 people there. they may not always be so lucky _
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the bbc�*s business reporter dave harvey reporting from swindon. world business report is coming up in a moment. but before then, let's head back to the olympics. and it's the shortest race in the games, clocking in at around ten seconds for the men and 11 seconds for the women. it's over in a flash, but there's no doubt the 100m is one of sports most iconic event, seen by hundreds of millions of people around the world. it all seems so simple — you just run fast and that's it. well, anthony koffi, an experienced athletics winning coach from ivory coast, says there's more than meets the eye for athletes hoping to compete in the 100 metres final.
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this it doesn't seem that simple to me. that is it from me for the moment. ben will have the business news in world business report. thank you for watching.
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tesla hits the accelerator on its electric dreams, as the carmaker delivers a record 200,000 cars to customers in the second quarter. german worries about spain's spike in covid infections means yet more uncertainty for european travellers.
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welcome to world business report. let's start with tesla, because the electric carmaker has shown no signs of being hit by the pandemic blues. tesla reported it sales rose to $12 billion for the three months to the end ofjune, up from $6 billion a year ago. despite shortages of semiconductor chips and congestion at ports hampering production, the firm delivered a record 200,000 cars to customers in the quarter. however, the firm did make a $23 million loss on its bitcoin investments, although it recently signalled it might accept it again as a payment in future. daniel ives is the managing director of wedbush securities. i asked him what he made of the results.
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this is a strong quarter, especially with the chip shortage, the 200,000 deliveries and the more profitability we are starting to see. that is the key here. tesla is leading the charge on the green tidal wave despite some stumbles in china this quarter. it’s tidal wave despite some stumbles in china this quarter.— china this quarter. it's interesting ou china this quarter. it's interesting you mention _ china this quarter. it's interesting you mention to — china this quarter. it's interesting you mention to china. _ china this quarter. it's interesting you mention to china. that - china this quarter. it's interesting you mention to china. that is i china this quarter. it's interesting | you mention to china. that is such an important market for all car—makers but especially those in the electric vehicle sector. did we get much detail on that from this set of results?— get much detail on that from this set of results? yes, for tesla that is the heart _ set of results? yes, for tesla that is the heart and _ set of results? yes, for tesla that is the heart and lungs, _ set of results? yes, for tesla that is the heart and lungs, the - set of results? yes, for tesla that| is the heart and lungs, the growth story. you talked about china. it looks to be strong second half of the year. i think it was definitely optimism. investors, when the stock digests, it is the china growth story continuing to play out, that is the key to tesla. it was a feather in the cab four elon musk
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looking forward in terms of china. it is something we talk about quite a lot on the business programmes, the shortage of semiconductors, there essential chips that we use in everything from smartphones and tablets, but also in cars that need those on—board computers now to function. did we learn anything about how that is having an impact on tesla, if at all?— on tesla, if at all? yeah, i think we are seeing — on tesla, if at all? yeah, i think we are seeing some _ on tesla, if at all? yeah, i thinkj we are seeing some moderation on tesla, if at all? yeah, i think. we are seeing some moderation in on tesla, if at all? yeah, i think- we are seeing some moderation in the chip shortage, which is a positive. but if you look right now at a tesla, every car they are making they sold at the first half of the year. this is a supply issue rather than a demand issue. that becomes a higher class problem. now it comes down to second half they really need to start to see some of that alleviate to hit some of those target numbers. it alleviate to hit some of those target numbers.— target numbers. it is quite interesting, _ target numbers. it is quite interesting, the _ target numbers. it is quite interesting, the loss i target numbers. it is quite interesting, the loss they l target numbers. it is quite i interesting, the loss they made target numbers. it is quite - interesting, the loss they made on
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the cryptocurrency bitcoin, the investments they made. because tesla is such a key combination of a car—maker and is such a key combination of a car—makerand a is such a key combination of a car—maker and a tech company. we saw a surge in the price of bitcoin. now it seems to have backtracked from that a little, especially considering the losses they have endured? ., , ., ., considering the losses they have endured? ., ., . ,, considering the losses they have endured? ., i. ., . ,, ., endured? yeah, when you go back at one oint endured? yeah, when you go back at one point tesla _ endured? yeah, when you go back at one point tesla made _ endured? yeah, when you go back at one point tesla made more - endured? yeah, when you go back at one point tesla made more in - endured? yeah, when you go back at one point tesla made more in bitcoin or paper again than from selling all the electrical fields of —— electric vehicles last year. there has been a u—turn there in terms of bitcoin. a $23 million write—down. ultimately this has become a sideshow for tesla. it has been a bit of an overhang in the stock. i think investors are looking forward to them playing that down a bit and focusing on electric vehicles, because that, especially with competition across the board, that is the key to the tesla story. daniel lives there. joining me now is dan kemp, who's
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the chief investment officer of morningstar investment management. good to see you. we saw those results for tesla. what do investors make of the developments on the electric vehicles front from what we have seen? ,., ., electric vehicles front from what we have seen?— electric vehicles front from what we have seen? ,., ., ., �* ., have seen? good morning, ben. you are absolutely _ have seen? good morning, ben. you are absolutely right. _ have seen? good morning, ben. you are absolutely right. there _ have seen? good morning, ben. you are absolutely right. there is - have seen? good morning, ben. you are absolutely right. there is so i are absolutely right. there is so much for investors to chew over italy tesla results the results we have had coming up in the next few weeks. it is really important from an investment perspective to separate the growth story that we have just been hearing about, from the valuation of these electric vehicle companies. because of course it is perfectly possible to turn a great asset, a growing business, into a terrible investment by paying too much. typically investors tend too much. typically investors tend to overestimate the change that we will see, either at company level or at industry level, over the next two years and underestimate what is
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going to happen over the next ten years. that could lead to very wide gyration to migrate the price. we have seen that in the electrical vehicle market over the last year. it is so important to keep a steady head, think about what the story means but more importantly, how much you are paying for that story, whether it is at tesla or any other investment. whether it is at tesla or any other investment-— investment. one of the other interesting — investment. one of the other interesting things _ investment. one of the other interesting things we - investment. one of the other interesting things we learned j investment. one of the other i interesting things we learned was that $23 million loss that tesla made on its investment in bitcoin. bitcoin has been on a bit of a roller—coaster this week, and not just because of tesla. other firms have been having an effect as well. tell us more about that? that is exactly right. again we are seeing a similar dynamic play out in bitcoin as we are in the technology sector in the us, and the electric vehicle sector. people are getting very enthusiastic about the future of this technology from the growth we are seeing a potential adoption. but
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maybe aren't paying as much attention to the price that people are paying for those assets. so we are paying for those assets. so we are seeing wild gyrations. we saw a very strong run up in cryptocurrency prices earlier in the year. then a sharp crash. and just over the last couple of days, we have seen speculation about amazon getting involved in cryptocurrency, which again has led to some enthusiasm. there has been another announcement from amazon. it's so important to understand that if you can't identify a fair value for an asset, what it is really worth, which cup —— which typically comes at looking at what the future returns from an asset will be, whether dividends or interest, it then it is very difficult if you set a realistic price. that is when you get these extreme gyrations. just be careful of thinking about what the real value of any asset is worth, not just what the current price is. ben just what the current price is. dan kem - ,
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just what the current price is. dan kemp. many _ just what the current price is. dan kemp, many thank you. the uk government will this week consider loosening travel restrictions for travellers from the eu and the us. any such move would be a boost to the troubled tourism sector and help to reopen the uk to mass foreign travel. the ft is reporting ministers are separately looking at removing france from the newly created "amber plus" category, which forces travellers from the uk to quarantine on their return. meanwhile, germany has listed spain as a "high—incidence area", due to concerns about a spike in covid infections. so travellers arriving back into germany who aren't fully vaccinated will have quarantine. here's eric dresin, secretary general of the european travel agents' and tour operators' associations, on germany's decision. this is a sad decision, if i may say like that. there is already about
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200, 250,000 like that. there is already about 200,250,000 german people in spain today. so first of all, this is a keyissue today. so first of all, this is a key issue for them, to consider how they can travel back. now, of course, you have a lot of people who planned their holidays for spain. and for sure, there will be changes in their plan. maybe not massively, depending if they are fully vaccinated. but for sure many people will reconsider their destination. let's get some of the day's other news. surging demand for uk houses will last well into 2022, as buyers continue to look for more room after being cooped up during the pandemic, says property website zoopla. a search for space has pushed up the average price of a house by 7.3% over the past year, reaching a new high of £230,000. the department store chain selfridges group has been put up
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for sale by canada's weston family for £4 billion, according to several media reports. credit suisse has been appointed to start looking for a buyer. selfridges cut 450 jobs a year ago after sales slumped during england's nationwide lockdown. jeff bezos has offered to cover £2 billion of nasa costs in order to be reconsidered for a key contract to build a moon landing vehicle. in april, the space agency awarded the 2.9 billion contract to elon musk, rejecting a bid from bezos' company blue origin. let's ta ke let's take a look at how the markets are doing. a mixed picture on the asian markets in the tuesday session. ~ ~ asian markets in the tuesday session. , ., , , session. the nikki up. heavy losses on the hang — session. the nikki up. heavy losses on the hang seng. _
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session. the nikki up. heavy losses on the hang seng. a _ session. the nikki up. heavy losses on the hang seng. a bit _ session. the nikki up. heavy losses on the hang seng. a bit of - session. the nikki up. heavy losses on the hang seng. a bit of a - session. the nikki up. heavy losses i on the hang seng. a bit of a premium after the previous day's cell. investors keeping a wary eye on china after the crackdown we have seen on a range of issues. that is where we will leave world business report. thank see you again soon. bye—bye. good morning. the weather in the next few days remains unsettled. some torrential thundery downpours leading to the potential for flash flooding. in between there will be sunny spells. there will also be gusty winds at times. that is the forecast for today. after a bright start in the east you can see this cloud piling in from the west. it has already produced some heavy, thundery downpours and parts of southern england. this is the weather front which will move eastward through the day. lopressor firmly in charge. not much of an ice about in the chart. any showers we
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do catch will be slow—moving. many it is a dry start with some showers. the heaviest in southern england and parts of the midlands. they will develop further and more widely this afternoon from the north midlands, north wales northwards. some could be heavy and thundery. in scotland there is the chance of localised flooding. temperatures ranging from 15 to 22 or 23. down a touch on the 20 sixes and sevens we saw yesterday. through this evening and overnight at some of the showers in the south will fade but we will see more coming from the west. showers continue across scotland, merging with the new system from the west. that combination again could produce some torrential downpours. it is not going to be called across the board. into tomorrow, low pressure still firmly in charge. a few more isobars in the charts. not much wind in the centre of this low. any of those torrential downpours will be slow—moving. so again in scotland there is the risk of some flash flooding. for england, wales and
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northern ireland there will be some heavy showers. some sunshine in between. some of that will be thundery. a windier day than it has been. this is the average wind speed. the gusts around the showers will be 30 to 40 mph. temperatures disappointing that the state in july. as we move from wednesday to thursday, the low pressure pushes towards the north sea. more isobars. the wind will strengthen from the north—west as we go through the latter part of the day. you can see what is happening on thursday. we still have some rain in scotland, northern england and northern ireland. forthe northern england and northern ireland. for the rest of england and wales, a drier day. more rain coming our way in the south—west. a new area of low pressure joins the south of the country. it will turn windier.
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this is bbc news, broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the globe. i'm samantha simmonds. our top stories... day four at the olympics — and the medals keep coming for team gb — they've picked up a gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle. but some shock news for the hosts, as japan's naomi osaka has is knocked out of the tennis in the third round. a tropical storm, bringing heavy rain, high winds and waves to japan — prompts the organisers to bring forward the surfing finals by 24—hours. in other news... north and south korea restore a communications hotline, after it was cut off by pyongyang more than a year ago. masks make a comeback in california, as cases of the delta variant surge. we go to the us to find out more
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what president biden calls the pandemic of the unvaccinated. hello and welcome. day four of the olympics, and it's been a mix of delight and disappointment. team gb is celebrating after winning olympic gold and silver in the men's swimming 200 metres freestyle. tom dean, who contracted covid—19 twice, won the final, with duncan scott completing the one—two. but for the host nation japan, shock and sadness as naomi osaka crashed out of the tennis in the third round. let's cross to the bbc sports centre and speak to chethan parthak, who's been following all the action. a big shock with naomi osaka knocked out in the fourth round? a major upset. osaka carrying the
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weight of a nation on her shoulder. she made history by becoming the first tennis player to light the cauldron at an olympic opening ceremony. untilthis cauldron at an olympic opening ceremony. until this point in the fourth round she looked like she was dealing with pressure really well. remember naomi osaka had pulled out of the french open and had not gone to wimbledon either, choosing to focus on her mental health. she talked about her anxiety and depression. she lost in straight sets in little over an hour. osaka's record on hard courts is formidable, winning 25 of her last 26 matches on the service. she is a defending australian open winner, defending us open champion. this was unexpected. her opponent is not a player to be taken lightly. she lost to ash barty
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in an open final. she looked to be handling the sense of occasion really well and now the question will be housed she can respond to this going forwards as she aims to defend her us open title. she this going forwards as she aims to defend her us open title.- defend her us open title. she did seak to defend her us open title. she did speak to the _ defend her us open title. she did speak to the media _ defend her us open title. she did speak to the media afterwards. i defend her us open title. she did i speak to the media afterwards. one reason she withdrew from the french open was she did not like doing media conferences. she open was she did not like doing media conferences.— open was she did not like doing media conferences. she was told it would not media conferences. she was told it would rrot be _ media conferences. she was told it would not be acceptable. _ media conferences. she was told it would not be acceptable. she i media conferences. she was told it would not be acceptable. she has i would not be acceptable. she has been speaking in the last hour, saying i definitely feel there was a lot of pressure for this. maybe because i have not played at the olympics before and for the first year it all got a bit much. really honest as soccer always is. she is one of the most likeable tennis players on the tour. still only 23.
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she will look to grow and learn from what happened stop she is the face of the olympics. that is a lot of expectation. she was candidly honest. she said she did not know how to deal with it in the windy conditions. it all came to a head as she was beaten in straight sets. it's been a good day so farfor team gb — more on that from sarah in tokyo in a moment. how are they getting on in the taekwondo? tae kwon do has been mixed so far for team gb. they had come agonisingly close to getting gold medals. we got silver in the end. jadejones went out in the opening round. at the moment, their hopes are on the anchor from liverpool, who is in the semifinals. —— bianca.
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she beat her because e opponent 17-7. -- she beat her because e opponent 17—7. —— her opponent from kazakhstan. she is really confident character. this is already a fantastic game for team gb, ten medals in total so far by day four of the olympics. that is a best for a british team in the history of the games and the highest number of gold medals for britain at that point. i would just add that andy singles champion quite over, he is through to the quarterfinals with his partner. to the quarterfinals with his artner. . ~' , ., sadness for naomi osaka but, for the tiny island of bermuda, huge celebrations as they win their first ever gold medal. with more on that and the rest of the day four action so far, here's the bbc�*s sarah mulkerrins in tokyo. what a morning it was in tokyo
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for the island nation of bermuda! a first olympic gold medal for them as florida duffy won the women's triathlon. —— flora duffy. the tropical storm that hit tokyo was no problem for her. they had a delayed start but once she got in and got through her swim and navigated the slippery roads on the bike around tokyo, she was the one who was able to pull clear on her10 km run to win olympic gold. such a good result for her. she has two world titles already. she had been a dominant force in the sport but she has been struggling with injury, she stepped away from the sport. she didn't quite know whether this olympic dream would happen for her. when she crossed the line and held her hands aloft and celebrated, you could see the joy and the relief etched on her face. meanwhile it has been a brilliant morning in the swimming pool as well. we had fourfinals, a great morning for great britain. tom dean winning gold in the men's 200 metres freestyle
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and his compatriot duncan scott coming second, just a short margin behind him. duncan scott was the fastest man in the world this year going into the final but it was tom dean, with a look of complete shock afterwards, won gold. interestingly, he caught covid twice in the build—up to this and he was wondering how it would affect him as he struggled physically at times with it. a great morning for him. then two really good results in the women's. kaylee mckeown from australia, she set an olympic record as she won the 100 metres backstroke and then what a story! the 17—year—old from alaska, lydia jacoby, she was the surprise winner in the women's100 metres breaststroke, that is the first time that a swimmer from alaska has won olympic gold.
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some olympics events have had to be rescheduled due to the tropical storm bringing strong winds and heavy rain to japan's east coast. the surfing final — which was due to be held on wednesday — has been brought forward to today. other events, including the women's triathlon, have taken place in difficult conditions. of choshi, on the east coast, things could have been worse. you wouldn't necessarily know it from the scene behind me here but this typhoon 8, as it's called here injapan, has actually been downgraded in the last few hours to a tropical storm. it is now tracking northwards along the coast here. it has changed direction quite dramatically in the last few hours. we've been talking about the heat here in tokyo for the last few days. it's been incredibly hot and humid and that's been affecting athletes in things like the men's triathlon and the tennis, in particular. there was worry the heat was then going to be followed by a massive storm hitting the city, causing further disruption. it looks like that now is not going to happen.
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the storm is about 200 nautical miles off the coast here, heading north towards miyagi, and the city of sendai, which is also holding olympic events, so those could be disrupted. some of the events this morning in tokyo have been affected by torrential rain but the city itself is now going to be passed by by the storm and that's good news. the other good news is it has brought the temperature in and around tokyo down by a few degrees and a lot of athletes are going to be very relieved by that. here in the uk, prime minister borisjohnson has promised to build a "safer society" with "fewer victims" as he published what the government calls its "beating crime plan." the document — published while parliament is in recess — outlines a strategy which — among other things —
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expands programmes to tackle drug misuse and increases satellite monitoring of recently—released burglars and robbers. but the police federation said the system needs funding not gimmicks. the bbc�*s home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. the government says its beating crime plan is about increasing public trust in the criminaljustice system. ambitiously, the prime minister claimed it would lead to less crime, fewer victims and a safer country. one eye—catching policy is to allow everyone in england and wales to be able to look up a named and contactable police officer responsible for their area. there are also plans to expand project adder, which tackles drug dealers and improves services for people with addictions. another proposal is to do more 24—hour monitoring of burglars and robbers after they are released from prison, using tags with satellite technology. this way their movements can be mapped against new crimes being investigated by police. the police federation, which represents rank and file officers, and is furious
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about a proposed pay freeze, said it didn't need gimmicks but genuine investment. in a report also published today, thejustice committee of mps has warned that cuts to legal aid have hollowed out key parts of the justice system and this is putting fairness at risk. daniel sandford, bbc news. the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in the uk has fallen for a sixth day in a row. the latest figures show that almost 25,000 new cases were recorded on monday — down from around 47,000 a week ago. staying in the uk for a moment, and the prime minister and chancellor are out of isolation having spent more than a week working remotely. borisjohnson and rishi sunak both went into self—isolation onjuly18th, the day before most covid rules were lifted in england, after they came into contact with health secretary sajid javid, who tested positive for coronavirus. north and south korea have restored
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a communications hotline between them which was cut off by pyongyang more than a year ago. a statement issued by the government in the south said the move followed an exchange of numerous letters between the leaders of the two countries. in total, there are 48 hotlines between north and south korea, but the main one is at the border. our correspondent laura bicker explains what these hotlines are for. they are there to avoid any kind of tension, they are bad to avoid conflict. they were set up back in 1971. remember these two countries are officially still at war. when the fighting ended, it ended an armistice, not a peace treaty. this today is the anniversary of the armistice signing. on the anniversary, those communication lines have been reopened. last year, lastjune, north korea
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turned its back on the south. not only did it cut communication lines, it blew up the inter—korean liaison office. this office was built at the border specifically for the two sides to talk. having turned its back on the south, this happened after the relationship between pyongyang and washington... remember all that hope when kimjong—un met donald trump that there would be a nuclear deal, all of that fell through and so did north and south relations. they began to sour. in the last year, there has been very little contact between the two countries. now we understand that since april there have been a number of letters between seoul's president moon and the north korean leader, kim jong—un. we understand those letters have been about things like covid response but also about re—establishing those communication lines. today, a short conversation was had between the person manning the south korean line and the person manning the north korean line. we hear, the person on the south korean side said
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it was good to be talking to the north once again. stay with us on bbc news. still to come... pledging to unite a diverse country — canada's first indigenous governor—general is sworn into office. now, the representatives of 51 countries have been meeting in london, for what the uk government is calling �*critical discussions', ahead of a major climate conference in glasgow in november. the minister in charge of the talks believes richer countries need to deliver on their promises to provide funding to help poorer nations deal with climate change. alok sharma been speaking to the bbc�*s environment correspondentjustin rowlatt. how sure are you that the funding pledged for developing countries will be delivered? back in 2009, the developed nations, the donor nations said that by the year 2020 they would be putting forward a $100 billion a year to support developing economies cope with the impacts
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of climate change. the latest figures show certainly back in 2018 we were still some way short. this 100 billion figure, i cannot tell you how much of a totemic figure it is, it is absolutely a matter of trust. we must deliver on the 100 billion now. this is bbc news, the latest headlines... day four at the olympics — and the medals keep coming for team gb. they've picked up a gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle. north and south korea have announced that they've restored a cross—border hotline, a year after pyongyang severed ties. the trial begins at the vatican today of a roman catholic cardinal, who used to be a close ally of pope francis. cardinal angelo becciu faces accusations including using church money to buy a multi—million dollar property in london. he denies any wrongdoing.
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let's take you to rome and speak to the bbc�*s mark lowen. welcome to you. tell us about the case. it welcome to you. tell us about the case. . , welcome to you. tell us about the case, . , ., ., welcome to you. tell us about the case. . , ., ., ., , case. it centres around a very murky deal case. it centres around a very murky deal. the vatican _ case. it centres around a very murky deal. the vatican invested _ case. it centres around a very murky deal. the vatican invested 350 i deal. the vatican invested 350 million euros several years ago in a property in sloane avenue in chelsea in london. it used to be a harrods warehouse and was to be converted into a luxury block of flats. that was funnelled through two italian financiers, also part of this trial. it was managed by a cardinal who was effectively chief of staff to pope francis, he had a year of the pope. in the financial misdeeds and alleged crimes came to the four last year, he was unceremoniously sacked.
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he denies all wrongdoing and said the money invested was not, as prosecutors allege, money that was intended for church charitable work and he says there will be secretaries of state in the vatican that were informed of all the investments that were done in the land and property. there is another part of the trial which is that he is also charged with funnelling money to a charity run by his brother in sardinia and to a woman who allegedly sent tens of euros on designer shoes and bags. —— allegedly spent. designer shoes and bags. -- allegedly spent.— designer shoes and bags. -- allegedly spent. designer shoes and bags. -- alleuedl sent. ~ ., ., allegedly spent. what reaction has there been in _ allegedly spent. what reaction has there been in the _ allegedly spent. what reaction has there been in the vatican - allegedly spent. what reaction has there been in the vatican and i allegedly spent. what reaction has l there been in the vatican and among there been in the vatican and among the wider public? this: there been in the vatican and among the wider public?— the wider public? this is an attempt to show that — the wider public? this is an attempt to show that no _ the wider public? this is an attempt to show that no member— the wider public? this is an attempt to show that no member of - the wider public? this is an attempt to show that no member of the - the wider public? this is an attempt i to show that no member of the clergy is above the law, that the vatican finances long seen as murky and corrupt and scandal ridden our finally being cleared out and that pope francis is getting to grips
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with the vatican's financial institution. the symbolism is huge. he is the most senior clerical figure in the vatican to in modern times go on trial. trial for financial crimes. they could all face prison terms if they are found guilty. he denies all wrongdoing and says he is the victim of a dark plot, as he calls it.— says he is the victim of a dark plot, as he calls it. thank you for the undate- _ tom dean claimed a stunning gold and duncan scott silver to ensure a british one—two in a fast, closely—fought 200m freestyle at the tokyo olympics. dean touched home in one minute a422 seconds, securing a british record on his debut games. scott finished just 0.04 seconds behind his team—mate, with fernando scheffer of brazil taking bronze. it is the first time since 1908 that two male british swimmers have finished
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on the olympic podium together. let's speak now to bbc sports reporter kheredine issedane, who is is at the citadel leisure centre in ayr. welcome to you. hello. this has been uuite a welcome to you. hello. this has been quite a day. — welcome to you. hello. this has been quite a day. hasn't — welcome to you. hello. this has been quite a day, hasn't it, _ welcome to you. hello. this has been quite a day, hasn't it, for— welcome to you. hello. this has been quite a day, hasn't it, for the - quite a day, hasn't it, for the british swim team? here in south ayrshire, home of the south ayrshire swim team which is where it all started for a certain duncan scott was a better speak to the national performance director, who was urging him on, duncan scott. he was so close to the gold medal. give me your take on the race by gold and silverfor gb, maybe not in the order we ought but what an amazing achievement!— achievement! what a result! what a performance — achievement! what a result! what a performance by _ achievement! what a result! what a performance by the _ achievement! what a result! what a performance by the two _ achievement! what a result! what a performance by the two british - achievement! what a result! what a | performance by the two british lads, neck and _ performance by the two british lads, neck and neck through the race. the medal— neck and neck through the race. the medal could — neck and neck through the race. the medal could have come from anywhere in the _
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medal could have come from anywhere in the pool— medal could have come from anywhere in the pool and the two british lads in the pool and the two british [ads were strong at the end. just a fingertip— were strong at the end. just a fingertip finish 300s also in the end _ fingertip finish 300s also in the end an — fingertip finish 300s also in the end. an excellent first and second to go— end. an excellent first and second to go with — end. an excellent first and second to go with an absolute top performance by the two british lads. what a _ performance by the two british lads. what a performance by duncan scott! still events to come and still a chance of getting gold. duncan has other events _ chance of getting gold. duncan has other events through _ chance of getting gold. duncan has other events through the _ chance of getting gold. duncan has other events through the week, . chance of getting gold. duncan has other events through the week, he j other events through the week, he has the _ other events through the week, he has the four by 200 freestyle race with the _ has the four by 200 freestyle race with the finals tomorrow. for duncan. _ with the finals tomorrow. for duncan. it— with the finals tomorrow. for duncan, it is not overnight success. 15 years— duncan, it is not overnight success. 15 years of— duncan, it is not overnight success. 15 years of development starting here in— 15 years of development starting here in ayrshire and then progressing through swimming clubs with the _ progressing through swimming clubs with the number of different coaches as well, _ with the number of different coaches as well, onto the university of stirling — as well, onto the university of stirling. quite a journey for him but an— stirling. quite a journey for him but an outstanding result this
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morning _ but an outstanding result this morninu. . , . , , but an outstanding result this morninu. ., , ., , , ., morning. finally and briefly for the whole of british _ morning. finally and briefly for the whole of british swimming, - morning. finally and briefly for the whole of british swimming, a - morning. finally and briefly for the whole of british swimming, a gold | whole of british swimming, a gold and silver one, two, what to 7a kids swimming up and down the length and breadth of the uk?— breadth of the uk? duncan is the scottish swimming _ breadth of the uk? duncan is the scottish swimming learn - breadth of the uk? duncan is the scottish swimming learn to - breadth of the uk? duncan is the scottish swimming learn to swim| scottish swimming learn to swim ambassador. we're hoping there are parents _ ambassador. we're hoping there are parents and — ambassador. we're hoping there are parents and kids out there who see their success duncan has had today and jenny— their success duncan has had today and jenny he has been on and hopefutty_ and jenny he has been on and hopefully he is inspiring kids all over_ hopefully he is inspiring kids all over scotland and great written to -et over scotland and great written to get into _ over scotland and great written to get into the pool, get swimming and joining _ get into the pool, get swimming and joining local swimming clubs and taking _ joining local swimming clubs and taking something forwards. a fantastic— taking something forwards. a fantastic result and hopefully more british— fantastic result and hopefully more british performances later on in the week— british performances later on in the week as _ british performances later on in the week as well. british performances later on in the week as well-— week as well. rank you very much indeed. week as well. rank you very much indeed- more _ week as well. rank you very much indeed. more to _ week as well. rank you very much indeed. more to come _ week as well. rank you very much indeed. more to come in - week as well. rank you very much indeed. more to come in the - week as well. rank you very much indeed. more to come in the pool| week as well. rank you very much i indeed. more to come in the pool no doubt from team gb. more to come from south ayrshire as well before the morning is up.— the inuit rights advocate, mary simon, has become canada's first indigenous governor—general. at her swearing in ceremony
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in ottawa, she pledged to build bridges across the diverse backgrounds and cultures in canada... at a time when the country is reckoning with its past. courtney bembridge reports. do you swear that you will well and truly serve her majesty queen elizabeth ii in the office of keeper of the great seal of canada? i do. with those two simple words, history was made and mary simon became canada's first indigenous governor—general. today is an important and historic day for canada. but my story to these chambers began very far from here. i was born maryjeannie may in arctic quebec, now known as nunavut. my inuit name is ningiukudluk and, prime minister, it means �*bossy little old lady'.
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she will serve as the official representative of queen elizabeth, canada's head of state. she's already had a virtual appointment with the monarch, but he appointment comes at a time when the country is grappling with its colonial past. this year, hundreds of unmarked graves have been found at former residential schools where indigenous children were taken after being forcibly separated from theirfamilies. the schools, often places of neglect and abuse, were run by the catholic church and part of a larger colonial policy to erase indigenous language and culture. in recent weeks, more than a dozen churches have been burned across canada, and statues toppled of queen elizabeth and queen victoria, who reigned over the country when the first residential schools were opened in the late 1800s. mary simon was a student at a day school similar to the residential schools, and says her appointment marks an important step forward on the long part path towards reconciliation. to meet this moment
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as governor—general, i will strive to hold together the attention of the past i will strive to hold together the —— tension of the past with the promise of the future. she was nominated by prime ministerjustin trudeau after the sudden resignation of her predecessor amid bullying allegations. this is a big place, this is the diverse place. and so we need people like ms simon. because we need people who build bridges and bring us together. a message of unity from the prime minister, but his minority government is increasingly butting heads with opposition parties, so one of mary simon's first official tasks may be to dissolve parliament and trigger snap elections as early as september. courtney bembridge, bbc news. the amazon founder, jeff bezos, has offered nasa a two—billion dollar discount if it will allow his space company blue origin to build a moon landing vehicle. elon musk�*s spacex has already
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been awarded a contract, but mr bezos says he'll provide the extra funds needed to keep his company in the race. the space agency wants to have a craft capable of carrying astronauts to the lunar surface as early as 202a. and before we go, a bit of good news from a zoo in israel. two weeks ago, �*tanna' the orang—utan welcomed a baby girl. the animal is one of the most endangered great apes in the world, and the zoo had gone a decade without a new birth. for days the baby was hidden under mum's fur, so this is our first look at her. the baby orangutan has yet to be named, but zoo keepers want something that starts with a t, just like mum. answers on a postcard, i guess. gorgeous pictures. plenty more coming up will stop you can keep up—to—date on the latest olympic news on the website and follow all the links. lots of exciting action
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to come still today on day four from tokyo. i will be back shortly. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @samanthatvnews. good morning. the weather over the next few days remains unsettled. torrential thundery downpours leading to the potential of flash flooding. in between will be sunny spells and gusty wins. that is the forecast for today. after a bright start in the east you can see cloud piling in from the west stop it is this where the front which will move eastwards during the day. low pressure is in charge. any showers we do catch today will be slow—moving. for many a choice start with a few showers. the heaviest meeting across southern england and parts the midlands. showers will develop more widely in the
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afternoon. some of them could be heavy and thundery. in scotland the chance of localised flooding. temperatures ranging from 15 to 22, 23. down a touch on 26, 27 we saw yesterday in places. some showers will fade. more coming in from the west. as the showers continue across scotland merging with the new system coming in from the west by that combination could produce torrential downpours. not cold across the board. tomorrow low pressure is firmly in charge. the isobars and not much wind in the centre of this below. any torrential downpours will below. any torrential downpours will be slow—moving. again in scotland the risk of flash flooding. for england, wales and northern ireland some heavy showers around the ten shown in between. some of them will be an injury. windier than it has been. these white circles represent
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the average wind speed. the gusts around the showers are be 30, a0 miles an hour. temperatures disappointing for this stage in july. on wednesday into thursday the low pressure starts to push from the north into the north sea. the wind will freshen as we go into the course of the latter part of the day. on thursday we still have some rain in scotland, northern england and northern ireland. for the rest of england and wales, a drier day. you can see what is happening in the south—west with more rain. it will also turn that bit windier.
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this is bbc news. the headlines.
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it's been another good morning for team gb at the tokyo olympics, with another gold medal and two more silvers. the swimmers tom dean and duncan scott came first and second in the 200 metres freestyle. earlier, bermuda's flora duffy won gold in the women's triathlon, finishing well ahead of team gb's georgia taylor—brown. it's bermuda's first ever gold — and they are the smallest nation competing at the games. a communications hotline between north and south korea which was cut off by pyonyang more than a year ago has been re—established. the north said it represented a big stride towards restoring mutual trust. the inuit rights advocate, mary simon, has become canada's first indigenous woman to hold the post of governor general. at her swearing—in ceremony, the official representative of queen elizabeth pledged to strive to build bridges. sport now, and for a full round—up,
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from the bbc sport centre, here's chetan pathak. thank you. we are going to start with the pool and history made for great britain. for the first time since 1908, two male british swimmers have finished on the podium together. tom dean took gold and duncan scott silver in the 200 metres freestyle final. joe lynskey reports. it hasn't happened for 113 years. two british swimmers, one and two in an olympic final. for tom dean and duncan scott this was the race where it all went right.— it all went right. nerves really “anaalin it all went right. nerves really iangling at — it all went right. nerves really iangling at the _ it all went right. nerves really jangling at the start _ it all went right. nerves really jangling at the start of- it all went right. nerves really jangling at the start of that i it all went right. nerves really i jangling at the start of that 200 metres freestyle. tom dean looks really good. metres freestyle. tom dean looks really good-— really good. dean is 'ust 21. he studies mechanical _ really good. dean isjust 21. he| studies mechanical engineering really good. dean isjust 21. he - studies mechanical engineering and deferred two years of his course to train for the games. in the last 20 metres it was worth it. can
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train for the games. in the last 20 metres it was worth it.— train for the games. in the last 20 metres it was worth it. can they be old and metres it was worth it. can they be gold and silver? _ metres it was worth it. can they be gold and silver? can _ metres it was worth it. can they be gold and silver? can they - metres it was worth it. can they be gold and silver? can they be - metres it was worth it. can they be gold and silver? can they be gold l gold and silver? can they be gold and silver? yes! tom dean is olympic champion. britain has gone i—2. can champion. britain has gone 1-2. can ou champion. britain has gone 1-2. can you believe — champion. britain has gone 1—2. can you believe that! dean beat his team—mate by less than a tenth of a second. for scott it was bittersweet. but for british swimming it was extraordinary. this is dean's first olympics. back home in maidenhead they watched him reach for the wall. cheering. as a child in london, dean watched from the stands. now he was top of the podium. from the stands. now he was top of the podium-— the podium. amazing. it's amazing. i've said it before. _ the podium. amazing. it's amazing. i've said it before. it _ the podium. amazing. it's amazing. i've said it before. it shows - the podium. amazing. it's amazing. i've said it before. it shows the - i've said it before. it shows the confidence in this event and how five team gb have come. i couldn't have asked for anything more. it’s have asked for anything more. it's amazinu. have asked for anything more. it's amazing. injanuary, dean had severe covid. he struggled to walk up the stairs. now he is the first british
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man to win freestyle gold since 1908. the same year two gigabytes swimmers last shared the podium. british swimming is on course for its best modern games. and in tokyo and in berkshire we saw what it means to win the gold or watch your loved one do it. joe lynskey, bbc news. great britain's first medal of the day came in the women's triathlon, where georgia taylor—brown took silver. she was beaten into gold by more than a minute by bermuda's flora duffy, who made history here, winning the island nation's first gold at an olympics, and first medal of any kind since a bronze in boxing at the montreal games in 1976. for taylor—brown, second was a great achievement too. she revealed afterwards she was on crutches just 12 weeks ago, and spent part of the bike stage of the race with a flat tyre. she still managed to cross the line in second. in the last 15 minutes, huge disappointment for britain's bianca walkden in the taekwondo.
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she's lost her semi final in the above 67 kilogram category to south korea's lee dabin. walkden, from liverpool, was a second away from the final before a kick to the head. she still has a chance to win bronze. it's similar to what happened to bradley sinden and lauren williams in theirfinals, where they were seconds away from gold. agony for bianca walkden. so close but not to be. that is all your support for now. andy murray and joe salisbury are through to the quarterfinals of the men's doubles in the tennis. back to you. thank you. a group of mps is urging the government to introduce a national register to monitor children who are home schooled in england. a new report by the education select committee says the government is only able to make a "best guess" about the standard of education for children who are currently taught at home. ministers say they're committed to introducing a national register soon. the conservative mp robert halfon is chair of the uk's parliamentary education committee, and says more needs to be done.
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the astonishing thing about all this is that there is no data, no information properly collected by the department for education in terms of how many home educated children there are, what their outcomes are and what support they need to be given. that is counter—productive because we know that despite the efforts of a number of parents who do a remarkable job for their children in home education, we know that many parents are struggling. the average uk house price has reached a new high of 230,700, according to property website zoopla. the record which is 30% more than the 2007 peak, is said to be driven by a shortage of houses coming onto the market, with the number of homes for sale down a quarter in the first half of the year compared to 2020. we can speak now to grainne gilmore, head of research at the housing website zoopla.
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good morning. is thisjust good morning. is this just about shortages? good morning. is this 'ust about shonagesafi good morning. is this 'ust about shortaues? ~ ., , ., , shortages? well, there was have been created by the — shortages? well, there was have been created by the demand _ shortages? well, there was have been created by the demand we _ shortages? well, there was have been created by the demand we have - shortages? well, there was have been created by the demand we have seen i created by the demand we have seen as a result of the pandemic. we could see the demand for people wanting to buy homes starting to rise during the first lockdown. the housing industry is one of the first industries to open up last year. since then we have seen high levels of demand. add into that the stamp duty holiday with savings of up to £15,000 on offer for people who completed a sale before the end of june, and you can see why demand levels have been so high. that has eroded the supply and put pressure on pricing. eroded the supply and put pressure on ricina. ~ . eroded the supply and put pressure on ricin~.~ ., ., eroded the supply and put pressure on ”ricin_ . ., ., ., ., on pricing. what about regional variations? _ on pricing. what about regional variations? wales _ on pricing. what about regional variations? wales lead - on pricing. what about regional variations? wales lead from - on pricing. what about regional| variations? wales lead from the front with growth _ variations? wales lead from the front with growth of _ variations? wales lead from the front with growth of more - variations? wales lead from the front with growth of more than l variations? wales lead from the i front with growth of more than 7%. london is lagging. probably it's been doing that for six or seven months. about 2.3% growth in london. it is really those markets where household income needed to buy a home is lower. so the midlands, the
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north is where we have seen the greatest levels of growth. i5 north is where we have seen the greatest levels of growth. is it also people — greatest levels of growth. is it also people wanted to get out of cities with covid? are you seeing that? ., , ., . ., ., cities with covid? are you seeing that? ., , ., _, ., ., that? there have been a cohort of bu ers, that? there have been a cohort of buyers. and _ that? there have been a cohort of buyers, and some _ that? there have been a cohort of buyers, and some of _ that? there have been a cohort of buyers, and some of them - that? there have been a cohort of buyers, and some of them may i that? there have been a cohort of i buyers, and some of them may have had no intention of moving at the beginning of last year, and just through subsequent lockdowns have decided they want to be somewhere else, but also that they might want more space. they may not move very far but they want an extra bedroom or outside space or a garden. that is where we have seen a particularly erosion of family houses for sale. they are hot property in the market at the moment. share they are hot property in the market at the moment.— they are hot property in the market at the moment. are you seeing a lot of --eole at the moment. are you seeing a lot of people being _ at the moment. are you seeing a lot of people being priced _ at the moment. are you seeing a lot of people being priced out _ at the moment. are you seeing a lot of people being priced out because l of people being priced out because the prices are going up so much? it will depend on people's individual circumstances what they are able to borrow. you saw the dog might step in and create the 95% mortgage guarantee earlier this year. —— you saw the government. that means there is a wider range of property for those with smaller deposits. that gives them the opportunity to climb on the ladder. i’m
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gives them the opportunity to climb on the ladder-— on the ladder. i'm sure you are asked this _ on the ladder. i'm sure you are asked this all _ on the ladder. i'm sure you are asked this all the _ on the ladder. i'm sure you are asked this all the time, - on the ladder. i'm sure you are asked this all the time, what . on the ladder. i'm sure you are | asked this all the time, what do on the ladder. i'm sure you are - asked this all the time, what do you see coming —— what happening in the coming months? ladle see coming -- what happening in the coming months?— coming months? we still see quite hiuh levels coming months? we still see quite high levels of _ coming months? we still see quite high levels of activity. _ coming months? we still see quite high levels of activity. it _ coming months? we still see quite high levels of activity. it is - coming months? we still see quite high levels of activity. it is the - high levels of activity. it is the summertime now. typically a quieter time on the market. we are still seeing elevated levels of buyer demand. we expect this year to see around 1.5 million transactions in the housing market, up from a million last year. price rise we think there is further to run, maybe up think there is further to run, maybe up to 6% by the end of the summer and may be down to a% to 5% by the end of the year. and may be down to a% to 596 by the end of the year-— and may be down to 496 to 596 by the end of the year-— end of the year. thank you for 'oinin: end of the year. thank you for joining us- _ former health secretary ken clarke will give evidence at a public inquiry investigating how more than a,000 haemophiliacs were treated with contaminated blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. thousands more may have been infected after blood transfusions in what's been described as one of the worse tragedies in nhs history. lord clarke will be the first former health minister who was serving at the time to be questioned.
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for more than 3,000 car workers at swindon's honda plant, this week is their last at the plant. the japanese car maker has been a vital part of the area's economy for 35 years, but by friday the last vehicle will have rolled of the production line. even though the closure has been two years in the pipeline, many are still looking forjobs that match their skills, and the bbc�*s dave harvey has been hearing from some of them. it felt like my world had just collapsed. i like working at honda. when they announced it, we were on an apprenticeship as well. it was just like my world had collapsed. it was a huge shock. for me personally, i felt i had got my foot on the ladder in terms of a career i was really interested in. so it sort of knocked us for six, really — so it sort of knocked us for six, really it — so it sort of knocked us for six, really. it was quite a blow.
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it has been a long three years for thousands of honda workers trying to find work. midway through their apprenticeships they have now been taken on by a new firm making cutting edge recycling machines, eager to snap up staff with the honda track record. the guys are really great, really enthusiastic, always willing to be hands on. always wanting to be learning things, training. they crave learning and continuous improvement. it's fantastic. it is completely different to honda. for example, on monday i was at the university of birmingham setting up a research rate. it is a completely different job. it is not even comparable. very ositive, it is not even comparable. very positive, honestly. _ i think i am in a better place now. with the promise of further training and even degree level qualifications, i am really happy, honestly. for the other 3000 workers in this vast factory, their fortunes lay with the union, negotiating redundancy packages to keep them
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going while they look for work. they are unprecedented in my view. i've not experienced anything like it in this industry or any other industry. it equates to about six and a half weeks for every year itself. it is uncapped, unlike the statutory minimum. and there are additional bonuses wrapped up within that. they will walk out with very lucrative redundancy packages. especially if you have been here for a long time. honda at swindon is surrounded by trading estates. small factories and several big warehouse operations. soon, thousands of former car workers will be here looking for work. the current conditions in the market. _ the current conditions in the market, there are more jobs than people _ the biggest challenge for these guys is going to be their salary expectations. we had a conversation with we had a conversation a production operative worked
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there for more than 20 years, and he was on more than £20 an hour. he is probably looking realistically at anything from minimum wage to up to £10 an hour. so soi so i think there will be a bit of a reality— so i think there will be a bit of a reality check for a lot of the hyundai _ reality check for a lot of the hyundai workers. for michaelandjim, a bright future. but they have hundreds of friends are still searching forjobs. dave harvey reporting. there are 3500 people there. they may not _ there are 3500 people there. they may not all— there are 3500 people there. they may not all be so lucky. the bbc�*s business reporter dave harvey reporting from swindon. as the delta variant begins to take hold in the united states, some states are beginning to worry about the impact it will have on the unvaccinated. in california, one of the most vaccinated states, masks are now once again required to be worn in all indoor public places. our north america correspondent, sophie long reports. here is the truth. if you are fully vaccinated, you are safer with their higher degree of protection. but if you are not vaccinated, you are not
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protected. you are not vaccinated, you are not rotected. , you are not vaccinated, you are not protected-_ and - you are not vaccinated, you are not protected._ and what. you are not vaccinated, you are notj protected._ and what we protected. cheering. and what we have now is — protected. cheering. and what we have now is a _ protected. cheering. and what we have now is a pandemic— protected. cheering. and what we have now is a pandemic of- protected. cheering. and what we have now is a pandemic of the - have now is a pandemic of the unvaccinated.— have now is a pandemic of the unvaccinated. , ,., ., unvaccinated. the message from the resident is unvaccinated. the message from the president is clear. _ unvaccinated. the message from the president is clear. but _ unvaccinated. the message from the president is clear. but covid - unvaccinated. the message from the president is clear. but covid cases i president is clear. but covid cases are climbing and it is causing deep concern. ladle are climbing and it is causing deep concern. ~ ., ., ., concern. we are going in the wrong direction. concern. we are going in the wrong direction- if — concern. we are going in the wrong direction. if you _ concern. we are going in the wrong direction. if you look _ concern. we are going in the wrong direction. if you look at _ concern. we are going in the wrong direction. if you look at the - direction. if you look at the inflection of the curves of new cases— inflection of the curves of new cases command as you said in the run into this _ cases command as you said in the run into this interview, that it is among _ into this interview, that it is among the unvaccinated. and since we have 50%_ among the unvaccinated. and since we have 50% of— among the unvaccinated. and since we have 50% of the country not fully vaccinated, that is a problem. in vaccinated, that is a problem. in some vaccinated, that is a problem. some states vaccinated, that is a problem. in some states like alabama, the vaccination rates are much lower, leading to fears intensive care units could reach capacity once more. .., , , ., units could reach capacity once more. , , ., ., more. the new cases in covid are because of— more. the new cases in covid are because of unvaccinated - more. the new cases in covid are because of unvaccinated folks. i because of unvaccinated folks. almost 100% of the new hospitalisations are with unvaccinated folks. and the deaths, certainly, are occurring with
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unvaccinated folks. these folks are choosing a horrible lifestyle of self—inflicted pain. choosing a horrible lifestyle of self-inflicted pain.— choosing a horrible lifestyle of self-inflicted pain. from the east coast to the _ self-inflicted pain. from the east coast to the west, _ self-inflicted pain. from the east coast to the west, officials - self-inflicted pain. from the east coast to the west, officials are i coast to the west, officials are redoubling their efforts to push people to act responsibly. anybody that's hospitalised _ people to act responsibly. anybody that's hospitalised or— people to act responsibly. anybody that's hospitalised or is _ people to act responsibly. anybody that's hospitalised or is in - people to act responsibly. anybody that's hospitalised or is in an icu i that's hospitalised or is in an icu from covid right now, is there by choice. they are there because they didn't make the effort to get vaccinated. and that's what we need to fix. �* , , ., ., to fix. but this is the land of the fra . to fix. but this is the land of the fray- and _ to fix. but this is the land of the fray- and in _ to fix. but this is the land of the fray. and in california's - to fix. but this is the land of the fray. and in california's orange | fray. and in california's orange county, where hospitalisations are surging, even the seriously ill remain reluctant to have the injection that could save lives. i think it is an individual decision. there's a lot of factors that are going into it. there are politics involved. and there are multiple sides of the equation. due involved. and there are multiple sides of the equation.— involved. and there are multiple sides of the equation. due to this latest surge _ sides of the equation. due to this latest surge being _ sides of the equation. due to this latest surge being driven - sides of the equation. due to this latest surge being driven by i sides of the equation. due to this latest surge being driven by the l latest surge being driven by the highly transmissible delta variant, la county have now reinstated their
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indoor mask wearing mandate, even for those who have been vaccinated. officials in other states could soon follow suit. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. president biden has said us troops will end their combat mission in iraq by the end of the year. america has about 2,500 forces there, to help iraq fight the islamic state group. this comes as us forces are ending their mission in afghanistan too, and mr biden tries to wind down the wars that were launched after the 9/11 attacks. iraq's prime minister was at the white house on monday, as mr biden explained the role of us troops in the future. they will continue to be available, they will continue to train, assist and deal with isis as it arrives. but we are not going to be there in a combat mission. more burglars and thieves will be made to wear electronic tags on their release from prison, under a new strategy set out by the government to reduce crime in england and wales.
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borisjohnson will launch the programme on his first day out of isolation. the measures include making it easier for police to stop and search suspects. the plan has been criticised by the police federation and labour say the government is trying to fix problems it's created itself. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. the government says its beating crime plan is about increasing public trust in the criminaljustice system. ambitiously, the prime minister claimed it would lead to less crime, fewer victims and a safer country. one eye—catching policy is to allow everyone in england and wales to be able to look up a named and contactable police officer responsible for their area. there are also plans to expand project adder, which tackles drug dealers and improves services for people with addictions. another proposal is to do more 2a—hour monitoring of burglars and robbers after they are released from prison, using tags with satellite technology.
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this way their movements can be mapped against new crimes being investigated by police. the police federation, which represents rank and file officers, and is furious about a proposed pay freeze, said it didn't need gimmicks but genuine investment. in a report also published today, thejustice committee of mps has warned that cuts to legal aid have hollowed out key parts of the justice system and this is putting fairness at risk. daniel sandford, bbc news. i'm joined now by kit malthouse, minister of state for crime and policing. welcome to you. thank you for being with us. i think lots of people will be interested in these league tables for their local police force, to see how well they are doing. what repercussions will there be for that force if they are not doing well? well, obviously the local police and crime commissioner has to answer once every four years to the local
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electorate how performances in their force on crime, and also the customer service basis. we want to put out there some comparative information about response times and quality of response, notjust on 999 but on nonemergency 101. we know very often that one or one number is the start of a victim journey. we absolutely have to get it right to make sure they have confidence in the system. we also want to make sure they answer the phone with quality information. that they keep victims in particular informed about cases. and we think by putting forces and performance side by side, we will have a healthy element of competition and that forces will all rise to the standards of the best. did you consult the police federation on your plans? well, now. obviously the — federation on your plans? well, now. obviously the police _ federation on your plans? well, now. obviously the police federation i federation on your plans? well, now. obviously the police federation are i obviously the police federation are effectively a trade union. they are a representative of the workforce. while we do have very close conversation with them and we talk
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to them constantly about their concerns, and indeed raise things with them as well, we didn't consult and particularly on that issue. not least because it is a matter for police and crime commissioners and for chief constables about how the forces performing, and ourjob is to hold them to for performance. the police federation, who represent the rank and file, they are not very impressed with these ideas. they say they need genuine investment. how much genuine investment, new money, is going into these plans?— is going into these plans? obviously the last two — is going into these plans? obviously the last two years _ is going into these plans? obviously the last two years have _ is going into these plans? obviously the last two years have seen - is going into these plans? obviously the last two years have seen very i the last two years have seen very significant financial settlements. increases in money for the police. not least to raise the number of police officers. we are touching now nearly halfway through our 20,000 extra police officers that we are recruiting over the base figure back in 2019, which is great news. and alongside that there is significant investment and support mechanisms around the police. we are also seeing a rising police staff that support them as well. we hope it is
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a re—energising, if you like, of the policing mission, as well as command i'm quite surprised by the police federation, because they sit on the national policing board talking about these issues with us as as focusing on serious crimes, where we have sadly seen a rise in recent years, but we are winning on the mission and we want to go further. so there's lots going on. there is big growth, big so there's lots going on. there is big qi’owth, big investment, so there's lots going on. there is big growth, big investment, big settlements that have come through. we hope that will result in, as you said in your package, fewer victims, less crime and a safer country. lanthem less crime and a safer country. when ou sa less crime and a safer country. when you say there's _ less crime and a safer country. when you say there's going _ less crime and a safer country. when you say there's going to _ less crime and a safer country. when you say there's going to be _ less crime and a safer country. when you say there's going to be big growth in police numbers, and you just replacing the 20,000 police officers that have been cut over the years, and you are not even going to replace those. the numbers are going to be 9000 extra police officers. there is still going to be a massive shortfall and where they were. and as you say, that is directly responsible for the rising crime that we have seen? i responsible for the rising crime that we have seen?— responsible for the rising crime that we have seen? i don't think it is directly responsible. _ that we have seen? i don't think it is directly responsible. and - that we have seen? i don't think it is directly responsible. and you'vej is directly responsible. and you've got to remember that back in 2010 we
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were policing an entirely different economic circumstances. straight after the worst price the country had seen since the second world war. crime was falling significantly. and even then there wasn't a direct connection between the two. i was deputy mayor for london in 2008, when police officer numbers were at an all—time high, yet knife crime was going through the roof. so the correlation might be there but the causation isn't necessarily so. now crime has changed over the last few years. the prime minister believes there aren't enough police on the streets, which is why we are recruiting a hell of a lot more to get back to where we were. a number of forces will be above where they were in 2010. look, the key thing from our point of view is we have to respond in an agile way to changes in crime. and it does change. it adapts, it moves, we see new phenomenon appearing. over the past ten or 12 years, for example, we have seen a big growth in online crime, for child sexual abuse,
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fraud, cyber. we are signalling that in the plan today. as well as focusing on some of those crimes that assail our neighbourhoods, burglary, robbery, car crime, and murderand burglary, robbery, car crime, and murder and county lines, where we are seeing significant success already. we are trying to illustrate to everybody there is big investment going on, masses of activity. we are pushing hard on this because we know it is a priority for british people. how concerned are you by the relationship between the home secretary, priti patel, and the police force? the police federation delivered a vote of no confidence in her a few days ago. are you worried about that? it is her a few days ago. are you worried about that?— about that? it is obviously unfortunate. _ about that? it is obviously unfortunate. i'm - about that? it is obviously j unfortunate. i'm surprised about that? it is obviously i unfortunate. i'm surprised the police federation went as far as they did. thus far we have had a very good and constructive relationship. just a week before i was sitting around the table on the police and on board with the home secretary and representatives of the police federation and other associations talking about what more we can do on police well—being. but we can do on police well-being. but it we can do on police well—being. but it suggests a fundamental breakdown, the relationship, between the home office, the home secretary and the police, doesn't it?—
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police, doesn't it? well, i hope not. the decision _ police, doesn't it? well, i hope not. the decision on _ police, doesn't it? well, i hope not. the decision on pay - police, doesn't it? well, i hope not. the decision on pay was i police, doesn't it? well, i hope not. the decision on pay was a | police, doesn't it? well, i hope i not. the decision on pay was a tough one. very hard to balance the welfare of the private sector against supporting a public sector. these are very difficult decisions. these are very difficult decisions. the police had a settlement of the year before, which was good. i hope we can return to normality in the future, albeit i realise the anger and disappointment, that we can get on with the key mission of fighting crime together. kit on with the key mission of fighting crime together.— on with the key mission of fighting crime together. kit malthouse, thank ou for crime together. kit malthouse, thank you for your — crime together. kit malthouse, thank you for your time. _ it's the shortest race at the olympics, clocking in at around 10 seconds for the men and 11 seconds for the women. it's over in a flash, but there's no doubt the 100m is one of sports most iconic event, seen by hundreds of millions of people around the world. it all seems so simple; you just run fast, right? anthony koffi, an experienced athletics winning coach from ivory coast tells us what it takes to run a 100m race.
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always a great watch. now the weather with carol kirkwood. good morning. the weather in the next few days remains unsettled. some torrential thundery downpours leading to the potential for flash flooding. in between, some sunny spells. also some gusty winds at times. that is certainly the forecast for today. after a bright start in the east you can see this cloud polling and from the west. it has already produced heavy and thundery downpours and parts of southern england. this front will move east through the day. low pressure firmly in charge. not many isobars the chart. any showers will be slow moving. for many it is a dry start with a few showers. the heaviest moving across southern england and parts of the midlands. they will develop further and more widely through the afternoon for the north midlands, north wales and northwards. some could be heavy and thundery. in scotland there is the
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chance of some localised flooding. temperatures ranging from about 15 to maybe 22 or 23. down a touch on the 20 sixes and 27s we saw yesterday. this evening and overnight some of the showers will fade in the south. more will come in from the west. as they continue across scotland, eventually merging with the new system coming in from the west, that combination again should produce some torrential downpours. it will not be called across the board. into tomorrow, low pressure still firmly in charge. a few more isobars in the chart. not much wind in the centre of this low. any of those torrential downpours will be slow—moving. again in scotland, there is the risk of some flash flooding. for england, wales and northern ireland they will be some heavy showers. some sunshine in between. it is going to be a windier day than it has been. these white circles represent the average wind speed. gusts around the showers will be 30 to a0 mph. temperatures disappointing for the stage injuly.
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as we move from wednesday into thursday, the low pressure starts to push towards the north sea. there are more isobars. the wind will present from the north as we go through the course of the latter part of the day. you can see what is happening on thursday. we still have some rain in scotland, northern england and northern ireland. for the rest of england and wales, a drier day. you can see what is happening in the south—west. more rain. a new area of low pressure looks like it's going to join the south of the country and it will also turn a bit when you're. —— bit windier.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. can they be gold and silver? yes, tom dean is olympic champion of the 200 metres freestyle, and duncan scott's got the silver. more medaljoy for team gb at the olympics — as tom dean and duncan scott pick up gold and silver in the men's 200 metres freestyle. wild cheering. jubilation for tom dean's family and friends back home as they celebrated his gold medal success. georgia taylor—brown also won a silver medal in the women's triathlon — despite a puncture during the cycling. as the prime minister leaves self—isolation, it's anounced workers including refuse collectors and prison staff will be allowed to take daily tests if they're identified as a close

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