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tv   Newsday  BBC News  July 27, 2021 1:00am-1:31am BST

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: day four of the olympics and we have our first gold — bermuda's flora duffy wins the women's triathlon. i'm sarah mulkerrins, live in tokyo, where i'll bring you the latest, as the surfing finals have been moved forward due to the weather. first afghanistan, now iraq — president biden says the us combat mission will be over by the end of the year. as parts of australia continue to live under lockdown, the country's former prime minister tells us the lack of vaccines is to blame.
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it was a colossal failure and the problem is you cannot bind the problem is you cannot bind the clock back and fix what should have been done last year. and calls for calm in tunisia, after the country's president sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament. live from our studio in singapore, this is bbc news. it is newsday. welcome to newsday, it's 8am in here singapore, and 9am in tokyo where the first medal of day four has just been won by bermuda. their first ever gold medal. flora duffy came first in the women's triathlon — that's the first of 22 medals to be won today —
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an increase caused by the rescheduling of the surfing competition because of the weather. she finished a minute ahead of the second competitor. here's how the overall medal tally looks at the start of day 4 — japan leads with 8 golds, one more than the us and two ahead of china. i'm joined now by sports presenter sarah mulkerrins who's in tokyo. sarah, what a win for bermuda, the least populated nation ever to win gold in the summer olympics — what a moment! such a moment and we love these stories around the olympics. we had the news of the philippines winning theirfirst had the news of the philippines winning their first gold, had the news of the philippines winning theirfirst gold, in the weightlifting, and now a
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moment to celebrate for flora duffy and bermuda. in 2015 she was a dominant figure in the triathlon. she did not win a medal at the 2016 olympics. an awful lot of pressure on her. they had the delay to the start because of the weather. there was an awful lot of surface water on the road, there were crashes and spills that she did well. when she got into her run, she was able to put the after bonus on and able to pull clear. she raced and raced towards victory. she was able towards victory. she was able to celebrate before she got to the finish line and nothing would stop her. you could see what it meant to her, the emotion all over herface what it meant to her, the emotion all over her face and she collapsed and enjoyed that moment. brilliant for flora
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duffy and brilliant for bermuda.— duffy and brilliant for bermuda. ., , bermuda. you can see the exhilaration _ bermuda. you can see the exhilaration on _ bermuda. you can see the exhilaration on her - bermuda. you can see the exhilaration on her face. l what's happening with the surfing? surfing is one of the new spots. we had skateboarding get under way in the last couple of days. it has been interesting to see how surfing takes place. it is taking place around 1.5 hours from tokyo, at ichinomiya. they were hoping for this tropical storm to come in because they were not sure they would get big enough ways. this tropical storm has brought on a bit of a swell and they have brought the finals forward to today. let again somebody who has been following all the action here. we can now speak to surf journalist michael ciaramella, who joins us from new york.
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what have you made of the conditions and the fact that we had this swell whipping up these bigger waves, do you think the surfers would be enjoying that? think the surfers would be en'o in: that? ~ , , en'oying that? absolutely. this is enjoying that? absolutely. this is the biggest _ enjoying that? absolutely. this is the biggest swell— enjoying that? absolutely. this is the biggest swell in - enjoying that? absolutely. this is the biggest swell in may - enjoying that? absolutely. this is the biggest swell in may be i is the biggest swell in may be about a month. they got really lucky. it looks really fun and surfer any, lucky. it looks really fun and surferany, pro lucky. it looks really fun and surfer any, pro or amateur would be having a good time. we are at would be having a good time. - are at the quarter—final stage. the men are under way and then the women and then all the way through to the finals. he was impressed you in the men's event and when you think the medals will come from? i have been saying — medals will come from? i have been saying for— medals will come from? i have been saying for months - medals will come from? i have been saying for months that i i been saying for months that i think the two male brazilian contenders gabriel medina and
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italo ferreira will most likely win gold and silver. they are the most complete surface at the most complete surface at the moment. surfer,. gabriel medina is a two—time world champion he has made five of the six top finals. nobody can really touch them. if the six top finals. nobody can really touch them.— really touch them. if we look at the women, _ really touch them. if we look at the women, shock - really touch them. if we look at the women, shock exit - at the women, shock exit yesterday. is it going to be somebody like carissa moore we can potentially medal for the usa? , ., , , can potentially medal for the usa? , ., _ ., can potentially medal for the usa? ,., _ usa? obviously losing a seven time world _ usa? obviously losing a seven time world champion - usa? obviously losing a seven time world champion like - time world champion like stephanie gilmore on paper seems like an upset but i would actually say that steph's ability not withstanding, her skills are not as it was this type of competition. they are more for nice reef breaks and
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log breaks. a sofa like caroline marks from the us, she is probably the most well adapted sofa to beach breaks, shock conditions because that is what she has grown up with in florida. my eyes are on caroline marks.— in florida. my eyes are on caroline marks. before we let ou no, caroline marks. before we let you go. what _ caroline marks. before we let you go, what have _ caroline marks. before we let you go, what have you - caroline marks. before we let you go, what have you made| caroline marks. before we let i you go, what have you made of the format of surfing into the olympics. has it worked for you, what sort of improvements could they make?— could they make? yes, festival, there was _ could they make? yes, festival, there was a _ could they make? yes, festival, there was a lot _ could they make? yes, festival, there was a lot of _ could they make? yes, festival, there was a lot of discussion - there was a lot of discussion around whether they should run this event into the ocean or a wave pool. alternate we ended up wave pool. alternate we ended up in the ocean and it is good for a lot of reasons. as far as the actual form it goes, they started with 20 people which is not a common number in surfing. it meant that they had to create a totally different
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format that we have never seen. overall, we're getting the cream rising to the top and thatis cream rising to the top and that is what we're looking for in surfing events and i think is working well.— is working well. michael, lovely to _ is working well. michael, lovely to get _ is working well. michael, lovely to get your - is working well. michael, l lovely to get your thoughts is working well. michael, - lovely to get your thoughts on that. we will have medals later in surfer. also a medal in the gymnastics. surfer. also a medal in the gymnastics-— surfer. also a medal in the gymnastics. the eyes of the world on — gymnastics. the eyes of the world on simone _ gymnastics. the eyes of the world on simone biles - gymnastics. the eyes of the j world on simone biles when gymnastics. the eyes of the - world on simone biles when she takes to the gymnastics arena with her usa teammates. a little bit shaky in modifying but no doubt they will be bringing their a game. before i let ou bringing their a game. before i let you go. _ bringing their a game. before i let you go. i — bringing their a game. before i let you go, i have _ bringing their a game. before i let you go, i have to _ bringing their a game. before i let you go, i have to ask- bringing their a game. before i let you go, i have to ask you i let you go, i have to ask you about this heartwarming story. it really touch me, 46—year—old gymnast from uzbekistan, oksana chusovitina, landed herfinal chusovitina, landed her final volt chusovitina, landed herfinal volt of her career and i heard she actually stayed in the
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olympics, kept competing to pay for her son's medical bills? yes, it is such an interesting story. in fact she actually won the gold as part of the team event back in 1992 in barcelona and that was five years before simone biles was born. she has come through all the various years of wonderful gymnastics competition we have seen at the olympics. she has competed in her eighth olympics. she says it is now going to be her last. she has such a story. she did actually change her nationality for a while to compete. when she won silver back in beijing in 2008, she moved to germany, as you say, to help out with the medical conditions for her son. she won silver for germany back then. she is now back representing uzbekistan and she has been a phenomenalforce in gymnastics especially when you
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consider the fact we see an awful lot of e—mail gymnastics competing at a very young age and not really having longevity in that spot. she is a real inspiration. 46 years old, eight olympics. she said she would retire after the london games and then came back because she says she has such a passion for sport but i she says finally, at 46 years old, this is it. she thinks this might be. she has not yet made the vaults final. she might be. she has not yet made the vaults final.— the vaults final. she is a real model for — the vaults final. she is a real model for all _ the vaults final. she is a real model for all of _ the vaults final. she is a real model for all of us. - the vaults final. she is a real model for all of us. great. the vaults final. she is a real model for all of us. great to | model for all of us. great to have you on the programme. thank you so much. still have you on the programme. thank you so much.- thank you so much. still to come, thank you so much. still to come. we _ thank you so much. still to come, we will _ thank you so much. still to come, we will look - thank you so much. still to come, we will look in - thank you so much. still to come, we will look in more detail at the surfing competition and the sports history injapan. president biden has said us troops will end their combat
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mission in iraq by the end of the year. america has about 2,500 forces there, to help iraq fight the islamic state group. this comes as us forces are ending their mission in afghanistan too, and mr biden tries to wind down the wars that were launched after the 9/11 attacks. iraq's prime minister was at the white house on monday, as mr biden explained the role of us troops in the future. it's just to be available, to continue to train, to assist, to help and to deal with isis as it arises. but we're not going to be by the end of the year in a combat mission. our correspondent barbara plett usher is following the story at the white house. president biden didn't actually talk about a troop withdrawal. he talked about ending the combat mission. and so it looks as if this is really a redefining of what the americans are doing. they're defining it as a mission to assist and train iraqi troops to fight islamic state militants. and in actualfact,
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on the ground, that is what they are basically already doing. they don't conduct combat missions unless they themselves are attacked. so, it does seem to be more of a rebranding than a reducing. in fact, a former us ambassador to iraq called it a "game of appearances over substantive change". you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme: hanging ten in tokyo — we'll give you the lowdown on the latest olympic sport. mission control: we see - you coming down the ladder now. neil armstrong: that's one small step for man, i one giant leap for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire is being blamed tonight. for the first crash - in the 30—year history of concorde, the world's only
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supersonic airliner. _ it was one of the most vivid symbols of the violence and hatred that tore apart the state of yugoslavia. but now, a decade later, it's been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again today. there's been a 50% decrease in sperm quantity and an increase in malfunctioning sperm unable to swim properly. crowd: seven, six, five, four, three... i thousands of households across the country are suspiciously- quiet this lunchtime - as children bury their noses in the final instalment of harry potter. - this is newsday on the bbc. our headlines: day four of the olympics, and we have our first gold bermuda's flora duffy wins
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the women's triathlon. first afghanistan, now iraq — president biden says the us combat mission will be over by the end of the year. to australia where anger is growing as millions of people are locked down across several states. many are unable to work or keep their businesses open. stay—at—home orders are now in place in south australia, victoria and parts of new south wales. frustration is running high over yet another lockdown 18 months into the pandemic, compounding the pressure on the australian government, as the uk and the us reopen. people have been protesting in sydney against lockdowns. hundreds of fines have been issued and two men have been charged with animal cruelty for allegedly striking a police horse. australia's low vaccination rate could mean continued covid restrictions,
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just 38% of australians over the age of 16 have had one vaccination dose and only 16% have had two doses and are fully vaccinated. the big mistake was made last year when not enough vaccines were bought. the reality is, apart from astrazeneca, we don't have a plentiful supply of any vaccines, and the astrazeneca vaccines, and the astrazeneca vaccine was recommended only for people over 60. that recommendation has changed, in sydney in particular because of the delta variant spread here in the city, which is very strong. but nonetheless, there is a lot of vaccine hesitancy
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about the astrazeneca vaccine. the problem is, we don't have the alternatives. the government last year, that is the federal government, the national government, chose do not buy enough visor, let alone any moderna, so they failed. —— pfizer. it is the biggest public administration i can recall, you know the mission... . they have been anti— vaccine protests over the weekend. you can see the strength of emotion against them, but how else do you keep numbers and check if you keep numbers and check if you don't have vaccinations that you need? i agree with the lockdown. the people who are protesting are a french group who believe in conspiracy theories. you see at around the world, particularly in the usa, and they are opposed to vaccines. they are anti—vaxxers. in australia, i should say, we have always had
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a very strong approach to vaccines. i mean, before covid, most vaccines were administered to kids, and we have had no backs, no play, sorry, no jab, no play, no jab no pay rules, which basically mean if you have a child and they aren't vaccinated, you can't take it to childcare, let alone get child care benefits, so we have always been pretty strong on vaccines here, and i think that the vaccine. sorry to interrupt, but what is a realistic timeline for the opening of australia's borders? look, i think probably not before the first quarter of next year. you know, that is to say the march quarter of 2022, and the reason is we cannot — we simply will not have enough of the mrna vaccines until, you know, october — november, in
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orderto know, october — november, in order to get a large portion of the population vaccinated, the same level that you have in the uk or most parts of the uk, or indeedin uk or most parts of the uk, or indeed in singapore. you know, the reason we are locked down, which is so frustrating and so many other parts of the world are opening up, it is simply because our government failed to buy enough vaccines. it was a colossal failure and the problem is you can't wind the clock back and fix what should have been done last year. a former mp says during her time in parliament she was subjected to a culture of misogyny and sexism. this was during your time as my minister. where you aware of the treatment that she and other female ministers faced? i was certainly aware that the culture in parliament was
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disrespectful to women, was sexist. i used to say that it reminded me of the corporate culture in australia and the 19705 culture in australia and the 1970s or 1980s, and i actually changed the ministerial code, the code that applies to all ministers. in this regard, i made it very clear that respect for women and for colleagues and public servants, and so forth, was critical, and i actually made it an offence for ministers to have sexual relations with their staff, because i am afraid you say that most of them seem to think that most of them seem to think that that was completely ok. it was said that a cabinet minister touched her inappropriately and parliament. do you know who she is referring to and if so, have you spoken to this person? i do know who she is talking about, but i was not aware of the incident while i was prime minister. julia told me about
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it after i had ceased to be pm, but she has chosen do not identify the minister, and that is her prerogative. malcolm turnbull they are. there've beeen international calls for calm in tunisia, after the country's president sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament. kais saied has been accused of staging a coup, though he insists that he acted in line with the nation's constitution. the political unrest followed sunday's violent protests over the govenrment�*s handling of the covid outbreak. marina daras has the latest. a young democracy plunge into a constitutional crisis. after a day of protests on sunday against the mismanagement of the pandemic, president kais saied suspended parliamentary activities for 30 days before dismissing hichem mechichi, the head of government and interim interior minister.
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translation: first decision, freezing the functions - of the parliament. the constitution does not allow its dissolution, but it allows the freezing of its activities. second decision, the lifting of the parliamentary immunity of all deputies. third decision, the president of the republic will take charge of the executive power with the help of the government, which will be headed by a new leader appointed by the president of the republic. some tunisians support the decisions, but others strongly criticise them. heading this pushback is the speaker of parliament, rached ghannouchi, leader of the islamist—inspired party ennahda, the main parliamentary party. rached ghannouchi denounced the coup d'etat against the revolution and against the constitution. it is a violation of the constitution. it is a serious threat to tunisia's democracy and all the gains that have been made over the last ten years. a political tug—of—war between the two men, dormant since the last elections in 2019, is now fully engaged.
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and on monday morning, ghannouchi's supporters were clashing with president saied's supporters in front of parliament. this political turmoil stems from he health crisis. tunisia is plagued by a steep rise in cases of covid—19, and with almost 18,000 deaths for 12 million inhabitants, the country has one of the worst mortality rates in the world. tunisians are exhausted by the power struggles and the political and economic situation of the country. but the deterioration of the social and health situation shows the road ahead remains uncertain. marina daras, bbc news. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. we have a new olympic newcomer — surfing. the action began
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early on at ichinomiya. the finals have been moved forward. this is the pacific coast ofjapan, about an hour and a half drive east of tokyo. this place is called ichinomiya, and it's really popular with the local surfers. you can see today the waves are pretty lively. that's because we've got a typhoon living in. when you think of surfing, probably think of the north shore of hawaii or the gold coast of australia or maybe bali, notjapan. but actually surfing is really, really popular here injapan. it's estimated around 2 millionjapanese regularly get on a surfboard. this group of young surfers left home in tokyo before 4am this morning in order to be in the water before 6am. the waves here are best early in the morning, before it gets too windy. this beach isjust 2km from where the olympic surfing competition is being held. so how do they feel about not being able to go along and watch?
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translation: it does not feel right not to be able to go - and watch ourselves. other people may say it's not fair to have spectators at surfing when other sports don't have spectators. that over there behind me, that's where the olympic surfing competition is taking place right now. this was supposed to be a huge festival of surfing. the first time it's ever been in the olympics. despite the fact we are outside, there's lots of wind, there are still no spectators. this is as close as we can get. just on the beaches, the oldest surf shop in town. run by shingo nakamura. so close but shingo and his staff are forced to watch the action on television. shingo's father was one of the first to develop surfing here, learning from american sailors based in japan.
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my dad is one of the original, surfing, japanese. i think this photo was when i was a baby. standing on the board, sitting up on the board. my board, sitting up on the board. my dad, he had a story, lots of armies from the usa, they enjoyed surfing on the beach, the surfing. my dad said, what is that? there's a lot of sadness and frustration here, but also hope that the world will see that japan is not just about sumo orjudo, but that it has a very cool surfing scene, too. bermuda has won its first ever gold during the summer olympics. flora duffy won the
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women's triathlon. to stay with us on news for all of the glory, drama, action and tears the olympics. that is it from me. i am the olympics. that is it from me. iam karishma the olympics. that is it from me. i am karishma vaswani. hello. the forecast for the next few days is looking quite turbulent and at times very wet indeed, with some torrential, heavy, thundery downpours, albeit with some sunny spells in between. now, let's take a look at the recent satellite picture because you can see all of these areas of cloud just rotating around, circulating on top of the uk, and this pattern continues with low pressure firmly in charge. close to the centre of the low, particularly, we are going to see some really intense downpours and thunderstorms popping up during tuesday. so, some cloud and some showery rain from the word go across western and southern parts, a bit more sunshine further east. but through the day, the showers will pop up quite widely, and some of them will be very heavy and thundery, especially across parts of north wales, the north midlands, northern
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england and scotland. and with very light winds, those showers will be very slow—moving, so in one or two places, we could see an awful lot of rain, giving rise to localised flash flooding. temperatures not doing too badly in the sunshine between the showers, as high as 23—24 degrees. some of those big showers and storms will rumble on through tuesday evening into the early hours of wednesday, and we start to see some more persistent rain developing across parts of scotland. so, low pressure still very much with us for the middle part of the week. in the centre of the low, an area of rainfall is going to become very slow—moving across scotland, so that could well cause some flooding issues. see, the rain will just continue here throughout the day. for northern ireland, england and wales, it's sunshine and showers again, some of the showers heavy and thundery. some really squally, gusty winds, but the winds generally will be a bit stronger on wednesday. so, at least that means the showers, where they do turn up, should move through a little more quickly. temperatures will be lower on wednesday, though. quite cool for the time of year
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actually, 14—20 degrees. as we move out of wednesday into thursday, the rain across scotland will only slowly pivot and start to move southwards. so, before this rain finishes, some places across scotland could see 100 millimetres or more, hence the potential for flooding. some of that rain drifting southwards into northern ireland and northern england through the day. some sunshine further south, chance of one or two showers, but we could well see another area of wet and blustery weather pushing into the far south west later in the day. and temperature still a little disappointing, 17—21 degrees. and are fully vaccinated.
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this is bbc news. the headlines and all the main stories after this programme. hello. this might sound like the plot of a hollywood spy movie, and indeed in the future it might get made into one, but this week, something called the pegasus project is news. a group of news outlets from ten countries has banded together to expose the alleged use of phone hacking to spy on leading journalists, politicians and human rights activists across the world.

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