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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 26, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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�*welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. first afghanistan, now iraq, as president biden says the us combat mission will be over by the end of the year, as anger grows in australia with millions of people locked down indefinitely across several states — we'll get reaction from former prime minister malcolm turnbull. winning hearts and minds, as the gold medals mount up. howjapan�*s olympic victories are changing opinions in the host nation. and, the surf�*s up in tokyo — as the watersport makes its debut at the olympics for the first time.
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welcome to bbc news, broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the world. it's six in the morning in singapore and six in the evening in washington, where president biden has said us troops will end their combat mission in iraq by the end of the year. america has about two thousand five hundred forces there, to help iraq fight the islamic state group. this comes as us forces are ending their mission in afghanistan too, and mr biden tries to wind down the wars that were launched after the 9/11 attacks. iraq's prime minister was at the white house on monday, as mr biden explained the role of us troops in the future.
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it's just to be available to continue to train, to assist, to help and to deal with isis as it arrives. but we're not going to be here on combat mission. let's speak now to our north america correspondent peter bowes agreed to have you with us on the programme. how straightforward this is going to be? it’s programme. how straightforward this is going to be?— is going to be? it's not as straightforward _ is going to be? it's not as straightforward as - is going to be? it's not as straightforward as it - is going to be? it's not as i straightforward as it sounds, is going to be? it's not as - straightforward as it sounds, it is not a withdrawal of those two and a half thousand troops that have been in iraq for quite a number of years, this is more like a rebranding, and changing of the role of the servicemen and women in the country from the united states into more of a training and advisory role with the military. and it's been set for next month for withdrawing and
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that's been all but complete. the strips will stay in the country but play very different role. it would not be a combat role, but very much an important counterterrorism role. and they have acknowledged is needed. as they've said in the coming weeks, is not necessarily neededin coming weeks, is not necessarily needed in a combat role. this coming weeks, is not necessarily needed in a combat role. this been a lot of criticism _ needed in a combat role. this been a lot of criticism about _ needed in a combat role. this been a lot of criticism about the _ needed in a combat role. this been a lot of criticism about the us - lot of criticism about the us pull—out from afghanistan, is it going be similar to that, leaving but not really leaving?— but not really leaving? well, i think the two _ but not really leaving? well, i think the two situations - but not really leaving? well, i think the two situations are i but not really leaving? well, i i think the two situations are quite different in a think as far as a rock is concerned. quite a lot of local politics coming into play, especially from militia groups, groups that been putting pressure on the prime minister there for the removal of all us troops. now, that clearly is going to happen, but the
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role has been changed and could be seen as lesser. by troops, that's not going to happen for the foreseeable future.- not going to happen for the foreseeable future. there is some anal sis foreseeable future. there is some analysis that _ foreseeable future. there is some analysis that this _ foreseeable future. there is some analysis that this move _ foreseeable future. there is some analysis that this move by - foreseeable future. there is some analysis that this move by the - analysis that this move by the us could help bolster iran possible to influence the region, what are you hearing about that? that influence the region, what are you hearing about that?— influence the region, what are you hearing about that? that is possible ofthe hearing about that? that is possible of the influence _ hearing about that? that is possible of the influence of _ hearing about that? that is possible of the influence of iran _ hearing about that? that is possible of the influence of iran in _ hearing about that? that is possible of the influence of iran in the - hearing about that? that is possible of the influence of iran in the iraq i of the influence of iran in the iraq group status on the aligned with groups in iran and they could be asserting their influence and their pressure on the iraqi government to an extent that might not be at some point in the future acceptable to the united states. at the moment, it seems thatjoe biden, the american president is happy with the situation and continue to support a large way, and the military since, iraq is a very close relationship between the two countries and economic and on health issues as
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well. and certainly the counterterrorism role that us troops in iraq continue to be important and it seems that will continue. and a reminder that you can find much more about the us role in iraq on our website and what this latest move by washington means for the region. just go to bbc—dot—com—slash—news and follow the links. but first. let's take a look at some of the stories making the headlines in the uk. there's been another fall in the daily number of coronavirus cases in the uk. new infections have more than halved since a recent peak 9 days ago. possible factors are thought to be the schools breaking up for the holidays, the end of the euros football tournament, and the warmer weather. what's not yet clear is the impact of lifting england's restrictions last monday. the representatives of 51 nations met in london on monday
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for what the uk government is calling "critical discussions" ahead of the climate conference in glasgow in november. the minister in charge of the talks believes richer countries need to deliver on their promises to provide funding to help poorer nations deal with climate change. the developed nations said that by the year 2020, they would be putting forward $100 billion a year and i cannot tell you how much of a figure it is, it's absolutely a matter of trust. we must deliver on this now. urgent calls have been made for water patrols and safety warnings on loch lomond after six people drowned during hot weather in scotland. a man whose wife and nine—year—old son died in the lake at the weekend has said he desperately tried to save them despite being unable to swim.
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let's go to tokyo now, where japanese fans are waking up to see their country on top of the olympic medal tally after a flurry of medals on day three. the host nation's athletes stood on top of the podium in table tennis and skateboarding, while the men's gymnastics team snatched silver in the team event. here's how the overall medal tally looks at the start of day four. japan leads with eight golds, one more than the us and two ahead of china. 0ur sports presenter sarah mulkerrins is there in tokyo. it certainly feels of the hopes of the government and the organisers are paying off this weekend because the sporting action has certainly taken over the front pages of the newspapers. all those eight gold medals, all those winners have been on the front pages. and the build—up to this, it has all been around the controversy over hosting these games in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic with cases still rising here in tokyo. however, you do sense a change in the mood.
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we've had people out in the streets watching the cycling and the triathlon in the last couple of days, and also people queuing outside to get their photo with the olympic rings. so, definitely i think the more success comes, the more the tougher headlines may well fade away. so excitement growing injapan. but organisers and athletes will have one eye on the weather and the approaching typhoon nepartak, which already delayed the start of the women's triathlon. the centre of the storm is forecast to make landfall across northen parts of honshu and then move on towards hokkaido where it could cause some flash flooding. tokyo is likely to be spared the worst of the storm, but is already experiencing some heavy rainfall and winds. but it could be good news for surfing, as it makes its olympic debut, with big waves expected all day today. and a little later on this programme, we'll have a report from our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes on one
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of the 0lympic�*s new sports. but first to australia, where anger is growing as millions of people are locked down across several states. many are unable to work or keep their businesses open. stay—at—home orders are now in place in south australia, victoria and parts of new south wales. frustration is running high over yet another lockdown 18 months into the pandemic, compounding the pressure on the australian government as the uk and the us reopen. people have been protesting in sydney against lockdowns, which led to clashes between protestors and the police. hundreds of fines have been issued and two men have been charged with animal cruelty for allegedly striking a police horse. australia's low vaccination rate could mean continued covid restrictions. just 38% of australians over the age of 16 have had one vaccination dose, and only 16% have had two doses
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and are fully vaccinated. former australian prime minister malcolm turnbull has criticised the current government's vaccine rollout as a "phenomenal failure", with not enough doses bought and distributed. mr turnbull isjoining us now live from sydney. what should australia be doing differently? well, the big mistakes were made last year when not in the vaccines were bought. the reality is that apart from astrazeneca, we do not have a plentiful supply of any vaccines in the astrazeneca vaccine was recommended only for people over 60 and that recommendation has changed because the delta variant
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spread here in the city which is very strong but nonetheless, there is a lot of vaccine hesitancy about the vaccine. the problem is we do not have the alternatives. the government last year, the national government last year, the national government tries not to buy another pfizer or modernity. so, they failed. looking at the biggest failure of public administration that i can recall. the mission was very clear. that i can recall. the mission was very clear-— very clear. that have been these antilock down _ very clear. that have been these antilock down protests _ very clear. that have been these antilock down protests but - very clear. that have been these antilock down protests but how. very clear. that have been these i antilock down protests but how do you keep members and check if you do not have the vaccinations you need? i agree with the lockdown. the people who are protesting, they are part of a fringe group of people who believe in conspiracy theories. you
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see around the world, particularly in the usa. and they are opposed to vaccines. an industry or, i should say, we have always had a very strong approach to vaccines. before covid—19, most vaccines were administered to kids. and we've had no jab, no pay, no administered to kids. and we've had nojab, no pay, nojab administered to kids. and we've had no jab, no pay, no jab no play. if you have a child that's not vaccinated, you cannot take them to childcare, let alone get childcare benefits. he been very good on vaccines here.— vaccines here. what are in your views of realistic _ vaccines here. what are in your views of realistic timeline - vaccines here. what are in your views of realistic timeline of. views of realistic timeline of reopening australia's borders? probably not before the first quarter of next year. that is the march quarter of 2022 and the reason
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is, we cannot, we simply won't have enough of the vaccines until october, november, to get a large percentage of the population vaccinated. to get to the same level as the uk or in the usa or singapore. so, the very reason we are lockdown which is so frustrating when there's so many other parts of the world opening up is simply because our government failed to buy enough vaccines. it was a colossal failure in the problem is, you cannot wind the clock back and fix what should've been done last year. another big issue has been sexism in australian politics. aside from the pandemic there, former mp says that during her time pandemic there, former mp says that during hertime in pandemic there, former mp says that during her time in parliament, she was subjected to a culture of misogyny and sexism. this is during
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your times prime minister. were you aware of the treatment and other mps faced? i aware of the treatment and other mps faced? ., , aware of the treatment and other mps faced? . , . ., ., . faced? i was aware that the culture in parliament _ faced? i was aware that the culture in parliament was _ faced? i was aware that the culture in parliament was disrespectful- faced? i was aware that the culture in parliament was disrespectful to l in parliament was disrespectful to women, with sexes. i used to say that it reminded me of the corporate culture in australia in the 1970s or 80s. and actually changed the ministerial code, the code that applies to all ministers in this regard and admitted very clear that respect for women and four colleagues in public servants and so forth, it was critical and actually made it an offence for ministers to have sexual relations with their staff because i'm afraid to say most of them seem to think that is completely 0k. at, of them seem to think that is completely 0k.— of them seem to think that is comletel 0k. �* u, , , completely 0k. a cabinet minister touched completely ok. a cabinet minister touched her— completely 0k. a cabinet minister touched her inappropriately - completely 0k. a cabinet minister touched her inappropriately and i touched her inappropriately and parliament. do you know who she is referring to and have you spoken to
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this person? i do referring to and have you spoken to this person?— this person? i do know who she is talkin: this person? i do know who she is talking about. _ this person? i do know who she is talking about, but _ this person? i do know who she is talking about, but i _ this person? i do know who she is talking about, but i was _ this person? i do know who she is talking about, but i was not - this person? i do know who she is| talking about, but i was not aware of the incident while i was prime minister. julia told me about it after i had ceased to be prime minister, but she has chosen not to identify the minister and so, that is her prerogative.— is her prerogative. thank you so much forjoining _ is her prerogative. thank you so much forjoining us _ is her prerogative. thank you so much forjoining us and - is her prerogative. thank you so much forjoining us and there'sl is her prerogative. thank you so i much forjoining us and there's so much forjoining us and there's so much more would love to talk to you about but we do not have the time. if you want to get in touch with me on any of the things you've heard on the if you want to get in touch with me, i'm on twitter, @bbckarishma. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme, from sumo and judo to surfing, as the tokyo 0lympics bets on a new water sport.
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coming down the ladder now. it's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. at, small step for man, one giant leap for mankind-— small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire was blamed _ for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire was blamed for _ for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire was blamed for the _ for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire was blamed for the first - for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire was blamed for the first crash l fire was blamed for the first crash in the first of concorde, the only supersonic airliner. it in the first of concorde, the only supersonic airliner.— in the first of concorde, the only supersonic airliner. it was on the most vivid _ supersonic airliner. it was on the most vivid symbols _ supersonic airliner. it was on the most vivid symbols of _ supersonic airliner. it was on the most vivid symbols of the - supersonic airliner. it was on the i most vivid symbols of the violence and hatred — most vivid symbols of the violence and hatred that tore apart the state of yugoslavia. and now a decade later, _ of yugoslavia. and now a decade later, it — of yugoslavia. and now a decade later, it has _ of yugoslavia. and now a decade later, it has been painstakingly rebuilt — later, it has been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again today. theres— rebuilt and opens again today. there's been a 50% decrease in quantity— there's been a 50% decrease in quantity and _ there's been a 50% decrease in quantity and malfunctioning - there's been a 50% decrease in - quantity and malfunctioning unable to swim _ quantity and malfunctioning unable to swim pronerly. _ quantity and malfunctioning unable to swim properly-— to swim properly. thousands of households _ to swim properly. thousands of households across _ to swim properly. thousands of households across the - to swim properly. thousands of households across the country | to swim properly. thousands of. households across the country are suspiciously quiet as the children buried their books in the new harry potter suspiciously quiet as the children buried their books in the new harry
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oui’ our headlines. president biden has announced the united states is to end its combat mission in iraq by the end of the year, almost two decades after george w bush ordered the invasion. typhoon nepartak is heading towards japan. it's already disrupted the start of some outdoor events. in afghanistan, high numbers of civilians, many of them children, have been killed or injured in the first half of this year, according to the united nations. as violence escalates, more than 1600 civilian deaths have been recorded, a rise of nearly 50% compared with this time last year. government forces have been fighting taliban insurgents, who now control vast areas of rural territory, following the withdrawal of most international troops.
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0ur correspondent secunder kermani sent this report. fighting has been flaring across afghanistan. as international troops pull out, afghan forces have been trying to hold back an intensifying taliban advance. these brothers lived in ghazni province. when fighting erupted close to their home, their family tried to flee. the taliban stopped us, theirfather told me. they accused my sons of being soldiers. i went to get their id cards to prove they weren't, but by the time i got back, they had already been shot. this year has seen record high numbers of child casualties. this horrendous attack left more than 80 dead, mostly school girls. the un's warning violence could get even worse. unless there is a de—escalation in the conflict, we are very
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concerned that based on what we have seen in the past six months, we will see high levels and perhaps the highest on record number of civilian casualties. so far most of the taliban's advance has been in more rural areas but their focus is increasingly switching to the more densely populated cities. with peace talks largely stalled, that means even more innocent lives are likely to be lost. secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul. there've beeen international calls for calm in tunisia after the country's president sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament. kais saied has been accused of staging a coup, though he insists that he acted in line with the nation's constitution. the political unrest followed sunday's violent protests over the govenrment�*s handling of the covid outbreak. marina daras has the latest. a young democracy plunge into a constitutional crisis. after a day of protests on sunday
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against the mismanagement of the pandemic, president kais saied suspended parliamentary activities for 30 days before dismissing hichem mechichi, the head of government and interim interior minister. translation: first decision, freezing the functions - of the parliament. the constitution does not allow its dissolution, but it allows the freezing of its activities. second decision, the lifting of the parliamentary immunity of all deputies. third decision, the president of the republic will take charge of the executive power with the help of the government, which will be headed by a new leader appointed by the president of the republic. some tunisians support the decisions, but others strongly criticise them. heading this pushback is the speaker of parliament, rached ghannouchi, leader of the islamist—inspired party ennahda, the main parliamentary party. rached ghannouchi denounced the coup d'etat against the revolution and against the constitution.
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it is a violation of the constitution. it is a serious threat to tunisia's democracy and all the gains that have been made over the last ten years. a political tug—of—war between the two men, dormant since the last elections in 2019, is now fully engaged. and on monday morning, ghannouchi's supporters were clashing with president saied's supporters in front of parliament. this political turmoil stems from he health crisis. tunisia is plagued by a steep rise in cases of covid—19, and with almost 18,000 deaths for 12 million inhabitants, the country has one of the worst mortality rates in the world. tunisians are exhausted by the power struggles and the political and economic situation of the country. but the deterioration of the social and health situation shows the road ahead remains uncertain. marina daras, bbc news.
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let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. officials in north—eastern india say at least five police officers have been killed in a territorial dispute between the states of assam and mizoram. the officers who died were from assam. more than 50 people were injured after clashes between police and civilians. tensions have been running high after a group of police officers from assam took over a hilly area of mizoram last month. at least 57 migrants drowned on monday after a boat capsized off the libyan coast near khums. that's according to the un's international organisation for migration. hundreds of thousands have made the crossing in previous years, many fleeing conflict and poverty in africa and the middle east. let's return to tokyo and talk about an olympic newcomer, surfing. the sport made its debut on sunday, with the action beginning early in ichinomiya.
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but due to an approaching tropical storm, the finals have been moved forward to today instead of wednesday. here is our correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes in japan. this is the pacific coast of japan, about an hour and a half drive east of tokyo. this place is called ichinomiya, and it's really popular with the local surfers. you can see today the waves are pretty lively. that's because we've got a typhoon living in. when you think of surfing coming probably think of the north shore of hawaii or the gold coast of australia or maybe bali, notjapan. but actually surfing is really, really popular here injapan. it's estimated around 2 millionjapanese regularly get on a surfboard. this group of young surfers left home in tokyo before 4am this morning in order to be in the water before six a:m. the waves here are best early in the morning, before it gets too windy. this beach isjust two km
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from where the olympic surfing competition is being held. so how do they feel about not being able to go along and watch? translation: it does not feel right not to be able to go and watch - ourselves. other people may say it's not fair to have spectators at surfing when other sports don't have spectators. that over there behind me, that's where the olympic surfing competition is taking place right now. this was supposed to be a huge festival of surfing him of the first time it's ever been in the olympics. it is by the fact we are outside, there's lots of land, their of there are still no spectators. this is as close as we can get. just on the beaches, the oldest surf shop in town. run by this man. so close that he and his staff are forced to watch the action on television.
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his father was one of the first to develop surfing here, learning from american sailors based injapan. there's a lot of sadness and frustration here, but also hope that the world will see that japan is not just about sumo orjudo, but that it has a very cool surfing scene, too. that's all for now — stay with bbc world news.
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hello. the forecast for the next few days is looking quite turbulent and at times very wet indeed, with some torrential, heavy, thundery downpours, albeit with some sunny spells in between. now, let's take a look at the recent satellite picture because you can see all of these areas of cloud just rotating around, circulating on top of the uk, and this pattern continues with low pressure firmly in charge. close to the centre of the low, particularly, we are going to see some really intense downpours and thunderstorms popping up during tuesday. so, some cloud and some showery rain from the word go across western and southern parts, a bit more sunshine further east. but through the day, the showers will pop up quite widely, and some of them will be very heavy and thundery, especially across parts of north wales, the north midlands, northern england and scotland.
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and with very light winds, those showers will be very slow—moving, so in one or two places, we could see an awful lot of rain, giving rise to localised flash flooding. temperatures not doing too badly in the sunshine between the showers, as high as 23—24 degrees. some of those big showers and storms will rumble on through tuesday evening into the early hours of wednesday, and we start to see some more persistent rain developing across parts of scotland. so, low pressure still very much with us for the middle part of the week. in the centre of the low, an area of rainfall is going to become very slow—moving across scotland, so that could well cause some flooding issues. see, the rain willjust continue here throughout the day. for northern ireland, england and wales, it's sunshine and showers again, some of the showers heavy and thundery. some really squally, gusty winds, but the winds generally will be a bit stronger on wednesday. so, at least that means the showers, where they do turn up, should move through a little more quickly. temperatures will be lower
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on wednesday, though. quite cool for the time of year actually, 14—20 degrees. as we move out of wednesday into thursday, the rain across scotland will only slowly pivot and start to move southwards. so, before this rain finishes, some places across scotland could see 100 millimetres or more, hence the potential for flooding. some of that rain drifting southwards into northern ireland and northern england through the day. some sunshine further south, chance of one or two showers, but we could well see another area of wet and blustery weather pushing into the far south west later in the day. and temperature still a little disappointing, 17—21 degrees.
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this is bbc world news. the headlines — japan leads the medals table with eight golds at the tokyo olympics. it was 13 year—old momiji nishiya's victory in the women's street skateboarding which put them ahead. there's a rush of gold for team gb, too. tom daley and matty lee winning in the sychronised diving, one of three british golds on monday. president biden says the us combat mission in iraq will be over by the end of the year. he was speaking during a visit to washington by the iraqi prime minister, mustafa al—kadhimi. the un publishes new data indicating afghanistan has seen a record number of civilians killed in the first half of this year. more than 1600 deaths were reported, a third of them children.

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