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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 26, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — i'm tim willcox — our top stories. president biden announces the us will be ending its military combat mission in iraq by the end of the year following meetings with the country's prime minister. japan tops the medals table at the tokyo olympics after a 13—year—old clinches the women's street skateboarding title. some of the world's leading scientists warn that not enough is being done to tackle climate change, following a series of extreme weather events seen across the globe. plus — if you're fully vaccinated but anxious about a return to normal life, you mightjust have "cave syndrome". we hear from the psychiatrist who coined the term.
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hello and welcome. first afghanistan, now iraq. in the past few hours presidentjoe biden has announced that the us's armed forces will leave iraq by the end of the year. the move was announced during a meeting with iraqi prime minister mustafa al—kadhimi at the white house. he has been urging president biden to withdraw troops who have been a presence in the region since 2003. roughly 2,500 us troops remain in the region but their presence has been harder to justify since the killing of qassim suleimani, iran's top security and intelligence commander, by american drone strike in 2020. after the strike iraq's parliament demanded the government expel us forces, a powerful message for the country's prime minister,
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who's been in power for just two years. but many of the us troops still in iraq, won't actually be leaving. they'll be reclassified as advisers, a non combat role. white house press secretary jenn psaki explained how the us saw their new role in iraq. the real announcement today or real news today, i should say, is about a change of mission. and the numbers will be driven by what is needed for the mission over time. so it is more about moving to a more advising and training capacity from what we've had over the last several years. let's go straight to the white house and speak to the bbc�*s barbara plett usher. this is not necessarily quite what it seems, it's more of a rare branding exercise?- it seems, it's more of a rare branding exercise? yes, i think you could call it — branding exercise? yes, i think you could call it that. _ branding exercise? yes, i think you could call it that. the _ branding exercise? yes, i think you could call it that. the iraq - branding exercise? yes, i think you could call it that. the iraq he - could call it that. the iraq he prime minister had been saying that he no longer needs combat troops in
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iraq because islamic state group, which they have been helping to fight had been defeated as an organised force. and he needed more counterterrorism support for our iraqi troops. so the americans in the iraq use of been talking about how to go about this. essentially what they've done today is officially announced the end of the combat mission by years end. and they will be formally rebranding the machine as a train and assist programme as your hearing there. i think that won't necessarily mean that much difference on the ground. because in effect that is what's happening on the ground. soldiers there do not really carry out combat missions unless they been attacked. but it is something that animal is here anyway see as a move that might help the iraq he prime minister back home with his domestic politics. he is under a lot of pressure from pro—iran factions in parliament and from two from pro—iran militias to expel us troops. but
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from two from pro-iran militias to expel us trom— expel us troops. but will there still be us _ expel us troops. but will there still be us air _ expel us troops. but will there still be us air strikes _ expel us troops. but will there still be us air strikes to - expel us troops. but will there l still be us air strikes to back-up still be us air strikes to back—up iraqi forces, as we seen just in recent days? iraqi forces, as we seen 'ust in recent “mi iraqi forces, as we seen 'ust in recent da s? t . ., recent days? well, we are waiting for the formal _ recent days? well, we are waiting for the formal communique - recent days? well, we are waiting for the formal communique that l recent days? well, we are waiting l for the formal communique that will speu for the formal communique that will spell out the details of what this means. these air strikes have been going on over the past year in that sort of an advisory role. helping the iraqi security forces as they carry out the missions against islamic state group. i think the bigger question is how the iranian, pro—iranian motions will respond? whether this will be enough for them to accept that the us troops are standing down at least in some way. and we had some early response already to the bbc from a spokesman for one of the iraqi militias in which she said, "no, they accepted this, american troops are american troops whether they would do a combat mission or an advisory mission. the americans can be looking closely and worried about is
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whether the attacks on their bases by these militias will continue. thank you very much. let's get some analysis and bring in admiraljames stavridis, retired four—star us naval officer, currently an 0perating executive of the carlyle group. good to have you on the programme, thank you forjoining us. when america says that their forces are needed there now because of the defeat of the islamic state, that's not strictly speaking truth, is a? is only a few days ago that the islamic state suicide bomber killed 35 people. islamic state suicide bomber killed 35 n-eole. , ., islamic state suicide bomber killed 35 n-eole. ., 35 people. indeed, you are absolutely _ 35 people. indeed, you are absolutely correct. - 35 people. indeed, you are absolutely correct. let's i 35 people. indeed, you are | absolutely correct. let's not 35 people. indeed, you are - absolutely correct. let's not forget we've seen this precise movie before. when i was supreme allied commander of nato we had a significant nato training mission in iraq, alongside many, many us troops. we pulled them all out in 2010. by 2014 we are back in iraq because of the rise of the islamic state. what we've got to hope for
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here is that the iraq he is can it really step up to the table with us help, intelligence, logistics and yes, air strikes are going to be necessary. if we don't want to repeat this pattern again. you think there will be _ repeat this pattern again. you think there will be continued _ repeat this pattern again. you think there will be continued air- repeat this pattern again. you think there will be continued air strikes . there will be continued air strikes from usjets? i there will be continued air strikes from usjets?— from us 'ets? i am certain there will be. from us jets? i am certain there will be- at _ from us jets? i am certain there will be- at a _ from us jets? i am certain there will be. at a minimum _ from us jets? i am certain there will be. at a minimum as - from us jets? i am certain there will be. at a minimum as long . from us jets? i am certain there| will be. at a minimum as long as from us jets? i am certain there - will be. at a minimum as long as we have 2500 troops in the country, we know that's a fact, we're going to want the means to defend them. that's going to require air power. i am certain that the air strikes will in fact continue.— in fact continue. have you got a clear idea _ in fact continue. have you got a clear idea of _ in fact continue. have you got a clear idea of joe _ in fact continue. have you got a clear idea of joe biden - in fact continue. have you got a clear idea of joe biden foreign l clear idea ofjoe biden foreign policy? just viewing what's happened in afghanistan as well. he seems to be adopting a lot of rhetoric of previous presidents. afghanistan for example, is that a betrayal in your view of the afghan people by the americans? i view of the afghan people by the americans?— view of the afghan people by the americans? ., �* ., , americans? i wouldn't categorise it as a betrayal- _ americans? iwouldn't categorise it as a betrayal- i— americans? i wouldn't categorise it as a betrayal. i think _ americans? i wouldn't categorise it as a betrayal. i think that _ americans? i wouldn't categorise it as a betrayal. i think that for - americans? i wouldn't categorise it as a betrayal. i think that for 20 - as a betrayal. i think that for 20 years and i commanded that mission
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as a frame allied commander of nato, that wasn't an american mission it was a nato mission, i had 150,000 troops under my command. we maintain the ability to prevent al-qaeda from launching attacks from what previously had been an ungoverned space. the president has made the assessment that the afghans have the capability to defend themselves at this point. whether that's true or not is an open question. in this point. whether that's true or not is an open question.- not is an open question. in your view, that _ not is an open question. in your view, that simply _ not is an open question. in your view, that simply cannot - not is an open question. in your view, that simply cannot be - not is an open question. in your. view, that simply cannot be true, can it was back in my view, it is premature to pull all us troops out of afghanistan.— premature to pull all us troops out of afghanistan. what i would like to see exactly as _ of afghanistan. what i would like to see exactly as it _ of afghanistan. what i would like to see exactly as it is _ of afghanistan. what i would like to see exactly as it is occurring - of afghanistan. what i would like to see exactly as it is occurring in - see exactly as it is occurring in iraq is about 2500 us troops, our allied partners including brave soldiers from your own nation who would continue on in afghanistan. the president has made a different decision, time will tell if that turns out well or not in afghanistan.— turns out well or not in afghanistan. turns out well or not in aft hanistan. . ., afghanistan. the taliban have already taken _ afghanistan. the taliban have already taken kandahar. - afghanistan. the taliban have already taken kandahar. what
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afghanistan. the taliban have - already taken kandahar. what happens if they take abul? the?t already taken kandahar. what happens if they take abul?— if they take abul? they have not taken kandahar, _ if they take abul? they have not taken kandahar, and _ if they take abul? they have not taken kandahar, and less - if they take abul? they have not taken kandahar, and less it's- taken kandahar, and less it's happened in the last hour. when i checked on it they are taking areas outside of kandahar and they are putting pressure on kandahar. forgive me. they are very close to kandahar. , ., . .,, forgive me. they are very close to kandahar. , ., . ., ., ., ., kandahar. they are close to kandahar but it is a very — kandahar. they are close to kandahar but it is a very different _ kandahar. they are close to kandahar but it is a very different thing - kandahar. they are close to kandahar but it is a very different thing to - but it is a very different thing to actually take a city of 600,000. the taliban have never done that in the period since nato forces went into the country. you're correct, there is pressure on these major cities, there will continue to be with that but my own assessment about a one in three chance i would give the afghans are holding on. as long as we provide them resources, conduct over the horizon support, logistics, all of that. i think they have a one and three chance. unfortunately, my assessment would be two and three, the wheels come off.— the wheels come off. finally, on the iran the wheels come off. finally, on the iran nuclear — the wheels come off. finally, on the iran nuclear deal, _ the wheels come off. finally, on the iran nuclear deal, what's _ the wheels come off. finally, on the iran nuclear deal, what's your - iran nuclear deal, what's your position on that vis—a—vis whatjoe
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biden is attempting to do there? i think the president is said during the campaign as he would attempt to come back to the iranian nuclear deal. he said specifically he wants to lengthen and strengthen it. what he meant was increase the time under which the iranians would be foreclosed from a weapon and also to add additional prescriptions on the iranians against ballistic missile technology, adventurism in the region. those negotiations are on on two ongoing. if we end up with an agreement that lengthens and straightened the original and i think that would be a good outcome. if you very much forjoining us on the programme. it's day three of the tokyo olympics, and the host nationjapan have topped the medal table. there've had some amazing moments, including a 13 —year—old skateboarder who's bagged gold for the host nation. lucy hockings is in tokyo with a rundown of the day's events. metals are coming in thick and fast.
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but the other big headline here in tokyo is the weather. because we've had all of this oppressive heat that the athletes have had to be dealing with, the humidity as well. now it seems we have in impending typhoon on the way. feeling mother natures power here in tokyo today. the winds really starting to pick up now and we are just starting to feel those first spots of rain too. that can interfere with some the events tomorrow archery and sailing particulate. the other story here everyone injapan glued to their tvs greens today because their gold rush is continuing. it is japan that is in the lead on the metal tables. the host now have eight gold for that won more than the us and to china. let's take a look at some of the days other highlights, starting with australia's arianna beating the defending champion katie k. in the thrilling contest in the women's for hundred metre resale for suppression of olympic committee
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claimed the first gold many of the gymnastics competition. russia is competing under a mutual banner in tokyo due to their doping suspension. they last won the coveted men's team title back in 1996. and here is the heroin for the philippines. becoming the countries first ever olympic gold medallist winning the women's 55 kilograms category for weightlifting. let's just show you the face that is stealing the hearts of many japanese. momiji nishiya champions in history. she has won the inaugural women skateboarding gold. at the very tender age of 13. she was so calm and collected, very emotional when she finally won but it was an amazing performance from her. let's bring in more on that story. with our correspondent.
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we now have a new star of skateboarding becoming image result for olympic skateboard winner woman five hours ago momiji nishiya skateboard winner woman the youngest athlete ever injapan at the age of 13 to be winning a gold medal. she looked so relaxed but she was asked how heavy her goal mother would not metal was and she said it feels like it weighs a tonne. we're seeing some spectacular performances by thosejudo including siblings bringing the double gold medals last night and were on the front pages of all the newspapers in japan this morning. we also had of course naomi 0saka progressing to the next stage. i should say we can't expect anything less from naomi. in case you are wondering why i am standing in front of this gigantic train, that's because there's a temperature board behind me. even though it has cooled down somewhat in the evening it has been brutally hot. a lot of athletes are complaining about it and japan has now been
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accused of lying and misleading about this heat and the city was bidding to host in the 2020 summer games. it's an issue that's been around ever sense i was a child for that even though i have noticed it's getting a lot harder ——hotter as i came home this time. but that means schools, coaches and teachers have to be extra careful to protect the children. so much for people injapan to celebrate today in terms of the metal table. but in britain people were very happy to with the results today. an emotional victory for daly and lee and the men synchronised ten metre platform diving and swimmer at her and petey underlining his underlining his ——adam dominance in the men's 100 metre breaststroke. a huge win for him because he was defending his title, he won the same event back in it real. ——rio. he was under a lot of pressure. let's look at some of the day's other news... beijing has launched a blistering attack on the united states,
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accusing washington of turning china into an "imagined enemy" to cover up us problems. the state department said discussions between the chinese vice—foreign minister and the us deputy secretary of state had been frank and open. relations between the two superpowers have become extremely fraught over the last few months. the lebanese parliament has voted for the billionaire businessman nijab mikati to become the next prime minister. lebanon is in a deep economic and financial crisis following last year's beirut port explosion and has been in political deadlock. the current prime minister hassan diab has been ruling in a caretaker capacity after his cabinet resigned following the blast. the website ofjailed russian opposition leader, alexei navalny, has been blocked by the country's media regulators. the move comes in the run—up of general elections and is the latest chapter in a long—running crackdown on president putin's most prominent opponent. in addition to mr.
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navalny�*s site, nearly 50 websites belonging to his allies were also blocked. extreme weather is being recorded around the world — from flooding in europe to wildfires in the us and scientists say it's underlined the urgent need for action on climate change. in less than a hundred days, the uk will host a major meeting of world leaders on climate issues. ahead of the cop26 summit in glasgow, representatives from more than 50 countries are meeting in london. 0ur chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt, reports. a fire crew drives through a wall of flame in california, and europe is burning, too. they've been struggling to contain vast fires in sardinia and northern spain. no, no, no, no, no! meanwhile, belgium was hit by deadly floods, just two weeks after more
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than 200 people were killed in the worst flooding to hit germany for decades. and china is being battered by a typhoon. it comes after a year's rain fell in just three days last week in henan province. it is hard to imagine a more ominous backdrop against which to discuss the latest climate science. extreme weather is the new normal. from germany to china to canada or the united states, there is wildfires, floods, extreme heat waves, and it is an ever—growing tragic list. today, researchers began to summarise the latest science. their work for the un will guide world leaders and is being described as a wake—up call. we are heading for more than a three degrees rise.
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we need to change course and urgently and before it's too late. so, will the politicians rise to the challenge? today, representatives of 51 countries met in this london hotel for critical discussions, ahead of the glasgow conference. huge differences remain between countries. they can't agree when to phase out coal, what to do about fossil fuel subsidies, let alone how to raise the $100 billion a year the richer world has agreed to pay the poorer world to help deal with climate change. the hope is the extreme weather the world has experienced over the last few weeks will help focus minds on the need to raise ambition on cutting emissions. justin rowlatt, bbc news. stay with us on news, still to come... tunisia faces a crisis of mounting proportions as the president sacks
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government ministers and suspends parliament with help from the army. a man has been describing how he tried to save his drowning wife in a tragedy which also claimed the lives of his nine—year—old son and a family friend. the three of them died after getting into difficulty in the water near pulpit rock at loch lomond on saturday evening. a total of six people drowned at the weekend in scotland's lochs and rivers. widower waris ali paid tribute to his wife and son. he's very good, he's very caring, very nice. he sacrificed everything.
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like she no see, i can't do anything, still shejumped... and your son bore the happy memories of the holiday that you had. he was very happy. there've been international calls for calm in tunisia, after the country's president sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament. kighs saied has been accused of staging a coup, though he insists that he acted in line with the nation's constitution. the political unrest followed sunday's violent protests over the govenrment�*s handling of the covid outbreak. marina daras has the latest. the young democracy plunge into a constitutional crisis. after a protest on sunday against the mismanagement
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of the pandemic the president suspended parliamentary activities has been accused of staging a coup, for 30 days before dismissing the head of government and interim interior minister. translation: first decision, freezing the functions - of the parliament. the constitution does not allow a dissolution, but it allows the freezing of its activities. second decision, the lifting of the parliamentary immunity of all deputies. third decision, the president of the republic will take charge of the executive power with the help of the government which will be headed by a new leader appointed by the president of the republic. some tunisians support the decisions but others strongly criticise them. heading this pushback is the speaker of parliament leader of the islamist inspired party, the main parliamentary party. he denounced a coup d'etat against the revolution and against the constitution. a violation of the constitution, it is a serious three to ten easy
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as democracy and all the gains that have been made over the last ——tunisia ten years was is facing challenges and difficulties, economic difficulties, political crisis, the pandemic however none of this justifies such in an attempt to suspend tunisia democracy and take us back to dictatorship. the political tug—of—war between two men dormant since the last elections in 2019 is now fully engaged. on monday morning supporters were clashing with presidential supporters in front of parliament. since last night, he with several mps as well as representatives of his goal of action opposition have tried to enter the parliament in order to defend the constitution according to their words. but the military and supporters prevented them from doing so. we will not accept what he would say we are not giving up. this political tour milk extends from a health
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crisis. tunisia has a steep rise in covid—19 and almost 18,000 that's fertile million inhabitants. the country has one of the worst mortality rates in the world. tunisians are exhausted by the power struggles and the political and economic situation of the country. but the deterioration of the social and health situation shows the road ahead remains uncertain. how do you feel about returning to normal life as the pandemic cools down? perhaps you're double vaccinated but are still anxious about the prospect of heading out. if so, you're not alone, and might be experiencing cave syndrome. it's not an official medical term, but intended as a way to describe that very feeling of hesitancy that our next guest says is happening in people of all ages. dr arthur bregman is a psychiatrist and joins us now from coral gables in florida.
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how many people have got this? just take us through the symptoms and also, how do you treat a? fiifi take us through the symptoms and also, how do you treat a? 0k, well, thank you for— also, how do you treat a? 0k, well, thank you for having _ also, how do you treat a? 0k, well, thank you for having me _ also, how do you treat a? 0k, well, thank you for having me on - also, how do you treat a? 0k, well, thank you for having me on and - thank you for having me on and raising awareness about a syndrome that i coined the term, cave syndrome. basically what's happened here is that people are afraid to reenter. although there is a relative safety that they're going to be ok. and people have all kinds of degrees of symptoms. from people who are just afraid to go back to work, people who are afraid to get groceries, people afraid to go out with her friends and family. and they stay isolated in their home although there isn't any rational reason for it.— although there isn't any rational reason for it. ok. just looking at our reason for it. ok. just looking at your analysis. — reason for it. ok. just looking at your analysis. i _ reason for it. ok. just looking at your analysis, i think _ reason for it. ok. just looking at your analysis, i think 49% - reason for it. ok. just looking at your analysis, i think 49% of - your analysis, i think 49% of people who were surveyed said they felt
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uneasy about going back. that's presumably because of all the restrictions that the pandemic is caused them over the last 18 months or so, which they had to learn. can tehran learn those restrictions through treatment, through adeno, some sort of perhaps talking to a counsellor? i some sort of perhaps talking to a counsellor?— counsellor? i think it's a really tood counsellor? i think it's a really good question. _ counsellor? i think it's a really good question. i _ counsellor? i think it's a really good question. i think- counsellor? i think it's a really good question. i think it's - counsellor? i think it's a really good question. i think it's kind counsellor? i think it's a really i good question. i think it's kind of a spectrum disorder. there are a lot of people who could have a good companion and get out there and kind of a graded fashion. going from less difficult to more ethical things to do. that's what first has to happen. i think we have to raise awareness, have people reach out to people they see that archers home and refusing to go out and try to help them go out. there are people who have spectrum anxiety disorder issues
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which are more severe. these people really may need some professional help. i think these are the people that you reach out to professionals. it's a sort of agoraphobia? filth. it's a sort of agoraphobia? 0h, absolutely- _ it's a sort of agoraphobia? 0h, absolutely. a _ it's a sort of agoraphobia? 0h, absolutely. a good _ it's a sort of agoraphobia? oi absolutely. a good term. it's a sort of agoraphobia? ©“i, absolutely. a good term. basically, it's a form of a agoura phobia. when they started the diagnostic manual a few years back on this the agoura phobia had to do with a lot of issues, people were afraid to go into open spaces but they didn't really have pandemics or viruses like this for 100 years. but it is a form of agoraphobi. there is a fear of getting the virus. there form of agoraphobi. there is a fear of getting the virus. are you hoping this will be termed _ of getting the virus. are you hoping this will be termed a _ of getting the virus. are you hoping this will be termed a proper - of getting the virus. are you hoping | this will be termed a proper medical edition? ~ ,,., , this will be termed a proper medical edition? ~ , ,., , ~' edition? absolutely. i think when the powers _ edition? absolutely. i think when the powers that _ edition? absolutely. i think when the powers that be _ edition? absolutely. i think when the powers that be or— edition? absolutely. i think when the powers that be or the - edition? absolutely. i think when the powers that be or the people |
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edition? absolutely. i think when - the powers that be or the people who really head up the diagnostic manual see that maybe they should have included this. it will certainly be included this. it will certainly be in the manual.— included this. it will certainly be in the manual. think of for 'oining us. we are out i in the manual. think of for 'oining us. we are out of h in the manual. think of for 'oining us. we are out of time. _ in the manual. think of forjoining us. we are out of time. bye-bye. | well, it's been a fairly quiet day today, but tomorrow, you might have to run for cover. we've got the big rain clouds on the way. heavy showers are expected to form, downpours in places, thunder and lightning, too, but they are showers. discrete areas of heavy rain with plenty of bright weather around, too, so it won't be raining everywhere. this is the big picture across our part of the world. the jet stream to the south of us, that often means cooler air comes in out of the north atlantic, so it's pushed all the warmth and heat towards the south. we're in this cooler airstream, and it's also a very unstable airstream, which means that shower clouds easily form when we get a bit of sunshine — not, obviously, at night. it's dark, so clear weather across eastern areas, but a weather front is approaching
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western parts of the uk, so there will be some rain around early in the morning in southwestern parts of england, wales, too. and then, very quickly through the day, we'll see those rain clouds forming, bubbling up small cumulus clouds, and then bigger cumulonimbus clouds, all in the centre of this low pressure where the winds are light. light winds is not a good thing necessarily because when these storms form, there's not much wind to push them around, so they rain in the same place for a long period of time, dumping a lot of rainfall, causing flash floods, at least in places. but there's going to be plenty of bright weather around as well, it's just going to be in between these rainstorms. you can see what a rash of showers it is going to be. now, on wednesday, the low pressure moves a little bit further north, and notice the white arrows here — there's more of a breeze to push the showers along, so the thinking is that any showers across more southern parts of the uk won't be as slow—moving. there'll be some rain around, but they'll sort of be
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pushed along the wind, whereas in northern england and scotland in particular, they could be very heavy and thundery, and again, there's a risk of flash flooding in places. but i think in this sort of situation, the areas that fare best, usually around some coastal areas out towards the west and the south of the uk. fairly cool in that airstream from the north atlantic — we're talking about teens in the north, maybe 20 degrees in the south. and in this sort of weather, the apps will be changing a lot, the website, too. these symbols will update day by day as the computers plot new areas of where the showers will be forming. bye— bye.
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you're watching bbc news. our main stories: president biden says the us will end its military combat mission in iraq by the end of the year — the majority of the 2,500 troops will be reclassified as advisers. america's top infectious disease expert warns the us is heading "in the wrong direction", as cases spread among the unvaccinated. a congressional committee into the january 6 capitol riots is gearing up to hear testimony from its first witnesses tomorrow. and "i'll be there for you"? not likely, as a new study reveals shocking details about how our friendships have been impacted by the pandemic.
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hello. in the us, vaccination progress has slowed, despite a rapid start earlier in the year when president biden called on americans to get vaccinated in order to re—start the economy. in the past week, several areas have reimposed mask mandates, and several states with lower vaccination rates are seeing hospitals reach capacity again. many experts suggest that the pandemic is really hitting hard among the unvaccinated. particularly with statistics like this from the cdc — that 99% of recent covid deaths in america were among those who had not had a jab. these numbers are clearly a concern for the biden administration. here's dr anthony fauci speaking to cnn. so i'm not so sure it would be the worst—case scenario, but it's not going to be good.
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we're going in the wrong direction, if you look at the inflection of the curve of new cases, and, as you said in the run—in to this interview, it is among the unvaccinated. and since we have 50% of the country not fully vaccinated, that's a problem. for more on this, i'm joined by dr mati hlatshwayo davis, who is a infectious disease physician in st louis, missouri. where you are, i think the vaccination take up is 46%. why is that? ~ “ �* vaccination take up is 46%. why is that? ~ 4' �* .,. that? well, i think we've reached the natural _ that? well, i think we've reached the natural area _ that? well, i think we've reached the natural area of— that? well, i think we've reached the natural area of the _ that? well, i think we've reached the natural area of the curve - that? well, i think we've reached the natural area of the curve as l that? well, i think we've reached. the natural area of the curve as far as vaccinations go, and that we expected the people who had the highest level of vaccine covenants to take the vaccine, and that have beenin to take the vaccine, and that have been in the earlier months, and we were able to work with those who were able to work with those who were on the fence, now we've reached the most resistant part of the populations, which makes it more
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difficult to keep up with vaccination rates —— vaccine confidence. vaccination rates -- vaccine confidence-— vaccination rates -- vaccine confidence. ., , ., confidence. you couple that with, as ou have confidence. you couple that with, as you have described _ confidence. you couple that with, as you have described to _ confidence. you couple that with, as you have described to viewers, - confidence. you couple that with, as you have described to viewers, a - you have described to viewers, a highly infectious dose variant, and we are really in a place of trouble. forgive me, the guy said 46% of missouri — 41% has been. black and brown people have the lowest rates as well. why is that? that brown people have the lowest rates as well. why is that?— as well. why is that? that is also multifaceted. _ as well. why is that? that is also multifaceted. in _ as well. why is that? that is also multifaceted. in the _ as well. why is that? that is also i multifaceted. in the beginning, we had a big focus on the mistrust, and let me be clear valid mistrust that black and brown folks have for the vaccine, and this is based on centuries of atrocities that have happened in the name of science in the hands of government and scientific institutions that should protect these people, that makes them to be less likely to get involved in clinical trials, to seek
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health care and certainly to feel confident about taking this vaccine. however, what is troubling is as vaccine confidence went up markedly in black and brown communities across the country, access has continued to be an issue because the same disparities that have plagued these communities in other areas of health, whether it be high blood pressure or diabetes, still exists because of social determinants of health barriers that prevent them from being able to access care, so we need to address confidence but access continues to be an issue. fiifi access continues to be an issue. 0k, can that be — access continues to be an issue. 0k, can that be done, _ access continues to be an issue. 0k, can that be done, in terms of addressing confidence, cannot be done politically? does that need more presidential calls for people to go out and get the jab? in all to go out and get the 'ab? in all fairness i believe _ to go out and get the jab? in all fairness i believe that _ to go out and get the jab? in all fairness i believe that this - fairness i believe that this administration has done more than any other to really address vaccine confidence and to try to provide resources for us to really address this issue, especially with that
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access. however, ithink this issue, especially with that access. however, i think what hasn't been paid enough attention is the fact that it cannotjust happen at the highest levels. this has to be supported at the state level and on the way down to local and city health departments, and so even when the president or dr fauci or the cdc get up and make these requests, when they put together resources, states have their own individual autonomy, as you've seen when comes to vaccination in other endeavours, not all states are willing to participate at the degree we need him to. , a. participate at the degree we need him to. , ., , ., him to. 0k, dr mati hlatshwayo davis, him to. 0k, dr mati hlatshwayo davis. thank — him to. 0k, dr mati hlatshwayo davis, thank you _ him to. 0k, dr mati hlatshwayo davis, thank you very _ him to. 0k, dr mati hlatshwayo davis, thank you very much - him to. 0k, dr mati hlatshwayo i davis, thank you very much indeed forjoining us here on bbc news. thank you for having me. more than six months after protestors stormed the us capitol, the house of representatives is set to begin hearing evidence tomorrow into the events surrounding the riot onjanuary 6, the day congress certified president biden as the next president
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of the united states. the road to this moment has not been without controversy and criticism. let's bring in former adviser to president george w bush and bbc analyst ron christie. ron, good to speak to you. just looking at the political makeup of this committee, it is much more partisan now than it was in the immediate aftermath of the storming of the capital. how big a problem is that for both publicans and democrats?— that for both publicans and democrats? , ., ., that for both publicans and democrats? , ,, ,, , democrats? good evening, tim, it is alwa s democrats? good evening, tim, it is always good — democrats? good evening, tim, it is always good to _ democrats? good evening, tim, it is always good to see _ democrats? good evening, tim, it is always good to see you. _ democrats? good evening, tim, it is always good to see you. i _ democrats? good evening, tim, it is always good to see you. i think - democrats? good evening, tim, it is always good to see you. i think this i always good to see you. i think this is a real big problem for speaker pelosi. there are a lot of people around the united states who were appalled with the events that took place on january appalled with the events that took place onjanuary 6, some called it insurrection, some called it a riot at the us capitol, just like after 9/11 here in the states, we had a bipartisan commission with equal number of republicans and democrats, and what you see here is speaker pelosi with a lot of democrats and only a handful of republicans that lead many pelicans or charges as a
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partisan political witchhunt. what partisan political witchhunt. what is nancy pelosi _ partisan political witchhunt. what is nancy pelosi going _ partisan political witchhunt. what is nancy pelosi going to - partisan political witchhunt. what is nancy pelosi going to do about this? . ., , ., , is nancy pelosi going to do about this? . ., , .. ., , , this? what she has done, she is taken the _ this? what she has done, she is taken the outline... _ this? what she has done, she is taken the outline... liz - this? what she has done, she is taken the outline... liz cheney, | this? what she has done, she is. taken the outline... liz cheney, a republican, and adam kinzinger, a republican, and adam kinzinger, a republican from illinois who has been an outspoken critic of president trump, and pelosi has put these two republicans on, try to give balance, and we are going to see is that liz cheney is going go right after the democratic chairman, so close he is trying to elevate the role of one of the republicans to try to give the american people the reassurance that in fact this is not a person witchhunt. fiifi reassurance that in fact this is not a person witchhunt.— a person witchhunt. ok, but that ou've a person witchhunt. ok, but that you've got _ a person witchhunt. ok, but that you've got the — a person witchhunt. ok, but that you've got the midterms - a person witchhunt. ok, but that you've got the midterms next, . a person witchhunt. ok, but that l you've got the midterms next, and a person witchhunt. ok, but that - you've got the midterms next, and a lot of republicans will have their eye on that and try not to offend the base, which of course... this is a perilous — the base, which of course... this is a perilous time for _ a perilous time for many republicans, who want to get to the bottom of a frightful day here in
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the united states capital, but on the united states capital, but on the other hand, and genetically point out, they don't want to antagonize the base. donald trump still controls much of the base of the republican party, and so it is going to be an interesting tight rope that you're going to see a lot of republicans walking in the days, weeks and perhaps months to come, as they get down to work and ultimately issue and release a report detailing what happened on that day, and ultimately, tim, who is responsible for what happened. fiifi ultimately, tim, who is responsible for what happened.— for what happened. 0k, run, that will be fascinating _ for what happened. 0k, run, that will be fascinating to _ for what happened. 0k, run, that will be fascinating to see - for what happened. 0k, run, that will be fascinating to see what - will be fascinating to see what happens. think you very much indeed, ron christie. coronavirus infection rates in the netherlands skyrocketed by more than 500% earlier this month, following the scrapping of almost all remaining lockdown restrictions and the reopening of nightclubs in latejune. the surge in infections prompted an equally swift u—turn, with nightclubs now closed until at least the 13th of august. anna holligan went to meet one band that hoped to have been performing at the weekend. this was meant to be this band's breakthrough year.
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we make dutch electronic synth pop. and it's awesome. but with nightclubs closed, there has been no audience to see them in action. we had, like, 70 shows and they all got cancelled. and that was a big bummer. i already told my girlfriend i was going to pay the rent. many feel as though they are being used as scapegoats by a state that keeps on changing direction. you cannot put this entire weight of responsibility on the youth of today. that's just crazy. if you tell youth that you can go out, and you are going out, and then you are punished for going out, that is very hard on us, on young people, and we shouldn't be in such a position. earlier this month, the infection rate shot up by 500%, the week after the government relaxed the rules, before rapidly reintroducing them. and the dutch government here in the hague has been
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struggling to balance these competing demands. the nightclub owners who want to save their businesses, the people who just want to go dancing again and the vulnerable groups and medical workers who fear it is too soon, any further relaxation could lead to another spike in infections. the dutch health minister was criticised after encouraging young people to get the single—shot janssen vaccine and go partying, with the slogan "dancing with janssen." he admits the rush to restore freedom at home may have resulted in less of it abroad. translation: it is fair to say that increasing infection rates - could have consequences, - for the extent to which we are welcome in other european countries. even the band, desperate to get back to live shows, are urging politicians to move with caution. i think the best thing they could have done
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was just keep it closed, keep it more strict, and notjust throw everything open. so that we could just... when the time was right, we could really start again. really, that live energy, as you can tell... anna holligan, bbc news, the hague. it's quite a different story here in the uk, though, where there's been another fall in the daily number of coronavirus cases for the sixth day in a row. new infections have now more than halved since a recent peak nine days ago — among the possible explanations, schools breaking up for the holidays, the end of the euros football tournament and the warmer weather. what's not clear yet is the impact of lifting england's restrictions last monday. here's our health correspondent sophie hutchinson.
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another vaccines push in london's chinatown today. 88% of adults in the uk have now had at least one shot of the vaccine, and some believe early signs are emerging that the latest wave may be slowing. it was the start of the summer when things began to change. onjune 1, you can see, there were around 3,000 coronavirus infections reported. they continued to rise sharply until mid—july, when there were almost 55,000 infections a day. but since then, you can see something unexpected has happened and cases seem to be falling. it's the first time there's been a sustained fall in infections without a national lockdown. it's thought the warm weather may be contributing to cases reducing. the end of the euros, when football fans gathered to watch the championships, is also thought to have helped. but what's interesting one leading scientist is the speed of the drop in cases, which he believes may mean the pandemic has been significantly weakened because of our growing immunity.
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we are still likely to see an increase in cases come the autumn. but i think what we are seeing is that we are getting on top of this. we are at the point where we can start to look forward to thinking that this epidemic is behind us, but we're not at that point yet, clearly. but hospitals are still under pressure. although admissions are at nowhere near the levels in the first two waves, the number of patients with covid—19 is continuing to rise. here in york, like many hospitals, they're working at full capacity. it's very good news to hear that community numbers may have started falling, but if you look at the hospital
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admission numbers, they're still rising exponentially. so, we're worried. it's difficult to predict what our peak will be this time. we're thinking around 90 patients at the peak, if the predictions are any good, but, yes, we're worried. pressure on hospitals is likely to ease if the drop in infections continues. and as the vaccine is rolled out to more people, today's figures show covid cases have fallen for the sixth day in a row and are now at their lowest level for three weeks. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. the united nations says a record number of civilians — many of them children — have been killed in afghanistan in the first half of this year. the un says this is likely to be the deadliest 12 months yet for ordinary afghans. taliban militants have captured around half the country's territory. the us has now said it's prepared to continue to support the afghan government with air strikes against the taliban. the bbc afghanistan correspondent secunder kermani has this report.
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more than 1600 civilians were killed in the first six months of this year in the first six months of this year in afghanistan, while more than 3500 were injured. it can often be difficult to fully comprehensive numbers, but it means that on average, everyday in afghanistan, more than nine ordinary people lost their lives as a result of the conflict, and that includes a record high number of child casualties and overall it is one the highest numbers since records began in little over a decade ago. fighting has intensified in afghanistan since may — that is when the taliban launched the latest offence of that has led to them capturing around half of all the territory in the country. the united nations report out today said the taliban were once and for more than civilian casualties than any other group. most of the fighting so far has been in more rural areas, but there's real concern, because the taliban now seems to be turning their attention more and more to afghan cities, which are of course more densely populated, so there is a
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real fear that the blotch is only going to increase. the un is warning that if current trains are not reversed, if urgent action is not taken, this year will end up being the most deadly ever recorded for afghan civilians. secunder kermani there. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: how britain's oldest stained glass windows have been hiding in plain sight for 900 years. two 14—year—old boys have been found guilty of murdering 13—year—old olly stephens, who was lured to a park in reading and fatally stabbed last january. a 14—year—old girl pleaded guilty to manslaughter. none of them can be identified for legal reasons. duncan kennedy reports. he was just 13 years old. but, in the words of his dad, olly stephens was "a precious gift", whose death became the stuff of nightmares. this was olly injanuary, walking past a neighbour's door bell camera at 3:34pm.
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by 5pm, he was dead — not at the hands of an adult but by other children. those children, who olly knew, included a 13—year—old girl, who lured him to this park so he could be confronted by two other boys aged 13 and 14. it was, in effect, an ambush. and it was all because olly had simply posted a message on social media. olly was later stabbed during the fight. the girl and the two other boys can't be identified, because they're children. the court was shown this phone footage of the younger boy playing with a knife in his bedroom. the older boy also had pictures of knives. so this is the tree. yeah. praise ndela lives nearby. she saw olly not long before the attack. like other local people, she now comes to this tree to reflect.
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he didn't even enjoy his youthful life, and he's gone now, so it's really sad. every time i come here, i come and pay my respects to olly and ifeel sorry for the parents that lost their son at an early age like this. at olly�*s funeral, his dad said he was loved, nurtured and cherished. the children involved in his death will be sentenced later. duncan kennedy, bbc news, in reading. new research indicates that stained glass windows from canterbury cathedral here in england may be among the oldest in the world. the panels have been re—dated using a new device developed by scientists that can be used on site without damaging the glass. the new dating indicates that the windows would have been in place when the archbishop of the time, thomas becket, was assassinated at the cathedral in 1170.
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our science correspondent pallab ghosh has this report. canterbury cathedral is among the oldest churches in england. inside, its stunning windows depict symbolic religious scenes. this series was thought to have been made in the 13th century, but some of the panels, including this one of the prophet nathan, have now been re—dated. for decades, historians have thought that some of these panels were made earlier than the others because they are different in style. now, using a new technique, scientists have confirmed that not only are they much older, but they may well be among the oldest in the world. it has only come to light now because of this device. it may not look like much, but it was developed by scientists to be used on location without damaging the glass. it shines a beam onto the surface, which causes the material inside to radiate.
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this radiation contains a chemicalfingerprint, from which the researchers worked out its age. we've been working on this detective story for some time, putting all the pieces in place, and then we finally get an answer, something new, that brings together science and art into one story. it's fantastic. these are all stories that were recorded at the time they happened here. the discovery has astonished leonie seliger, who looks after the stained glass windows here. she believes the panels could go back to the mid—1100s, and were in place during major historical event of the cathedral, including the assassination of the then archbishop thomas becket, who features in many of these windows. they would have witnessed the murder of thomas becket. henry ii coming on his knees begging for forgiveness. they would have witnessed the conflagration of the fire that devoured the cathedral in 1174.
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and then they would have witnessed all of british history. the cathedral contains a story of england's history, its artistry and its religious thinking. now a new scientific discovery has given us a fresh perspective on the nation's past. what a great story. take a look around your friends circle — do fewer people come to mind than a few years ago? you're not alone. new studies in the us and in the uk suggest that people have fewer friends than in the past. according to the survey center on american life, 30 years ago, 33% of american adults said they had ten or more close friends, and now only 13% say that. the pandemic does have a part to play in this, but the responses are a part of a wider and longer—term trend with levels of loneliness
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and boredness also rising. daniel cox has been studying friendship trends in the us, and he joins us now from washington. some of the headlines i have read on this over the past few ever saying americans have fewer friends than ever before, is that right? to americans have fewer friends than ever before, is that right?- ever before, is that right? to the best we are _ ever before, is that right? to the best we are able _ ever before, is that right? to the best we are able to _ ever before, is that right? to the best we are able to tell. - ever before, is that right? to the l best we are able to tell. friendship is not a subject that gets pulled an awful lot, so we our results to compared identical questions asked by gallup in the 1990s and found a really sniffing declined, and particular pronounced among men. nhtnd particular pronounced among men. and that's despite friends on social media? , ,., ._ ., ,~' media? yes, so the way we asked about friendships, _ media? yes, so the way we asked about friendships, in _ media? yes, so the way we asked about friendships, in a _ media? yes, so the way we asked about friendships, in a couple - about friendships, in a couple different ways, about how many close friend you had, if you had a best friend, and how often you seek out and engage with your friends, and across all these different measures, we saw the producing of it in
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decline. �* ., ., , , ., decline. and the age groups that were questioned _ decline. and the age groups that were questioned here, _ decline. and the age groups that were questioned here, is - decline. and the age groups that were questioned here, is this - decline. and the age groups that i were questioned here, is this above the age of 18? because i wondered if you would've got different answers with people younger than that? yes, so our survey — with people younger than that? yes, so our survey was _ with people younger than that? ieis, so our survey was american adults, 18 and up, and we know from the american survey and other sources that the time was spent with friends is a lot more when we are younger and it topped out at age 18 and then declines pretty significantly after that. . ,, declines pretty significantly after that. . ., , ., ., that. wonder if it is all negative, thou t h? that. wonder if it is all negative, though? it _ that. wonder if it is all negative, though? it might _ that. wonder if it is all negative, though? it might be _ that. wonder if it is all negative, though? it might be people i that. wonder if it is all negative, though? it might be people or i that. wonder if it is all negative, i though? it might be people or spend more times at work and not socialise with close friends, but one fact that, my eye, that a lot of people, parents are spending a lot more time with their children at the expense of their friends, and with their children at the expense of theirfriends, and is with their children at the expense of their friends, and is that necessarily a bad think was yellow no, i think to the extent that millennials and jenn z coming behind them i millennials and jenn 2 coming behind them ., ., millennials and jenn 2 coming behind them ., ,, ., millennials and jenn 2 coming behind them ., «i ., , ., them i talked to their parents more often, cell phones _ them i talked to their parents more often, cell phones and _ them i talked to their parents more often, cell phones and just - them i talked to their parents more often, cell phones and just having . often, cell phones and just having closer religions with them, is
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undoubtedly a good thing —— closer relationships. we know that parents are not going to be around forever and we do not want these relationships to come in the way of young men and young women developing their own friendships. ihtnd young men and young women developing their own friendships.— their own friendships. and women are better at having _ their own friendships. and women are better at having and _ their own friendships. and women are better at having and keeping - their own friendships. and women are better at having and keeping more i better at having and keeping more friends? ., , ., friends? yeah, so there is a gender difference throughout _ friends? yeah, so there is a gender difference throughout this, - friends? yeah, so there is a gender difference throughout this, and i friends? yeah, so there is a gender difference throughout this, and one of things we see that is really stark and you see it across a lot of different social science research is that young women seem better able to establish emotional, intimate connection with their friends, and that pays releasing evident dividends, because people who have these close emotional connections with their friends are less likely to experience depression, anxiety or to experience depression, anxiety or to feel lonely. mil to experience depression, anxiety or to feel lonely-— to feel lonely. all right, it is actually fascinating. - to feel lonely. all right, it is actually fascinating. daniell to feel lonely. all right, it is i actually fascinating. daniel cox, thank you very much indeed. from me,
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tim willcox, and the team and all our friends from around the world, thatisit our friends from around the world, that is it for now. we will be back a little bit later this evening. hello, thanks for tuning in. time to have a look at the weather for the next few days or so. this week is going to be a very showery week. lots of sunny spells in store, but also some big downpours. now, this is what the atmosphere looks like more or less right now. the jet stream is to the south of us. when the jet stream's south of us, the weather tends to be more unsettled, you can see low pressure heading our way, and the low pressure will be sitting on top of us during the middle part of the week. the problem is within this area of low pressure, the winds are going to be very, very light and we'll see storms forming as well. that means that with light winds, the storms will be moving very slowly, bringing a lot of rainfall. so, what's happening, then? we've got the sunshine. it's a very strong sun this time of the year and it's heating the ground.
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as it heats the ground, we see big storms forming. so, we've got the ground here, hot sunshine warming up the atmosphere. above, there's a lot of cool air and those clouds rise and produce big rainstorms. within this area of low pressure that we're going to have this week, the winds are going to be light, so hence these storms that are going to be slow—moving, bringing torrential rain and some flash floods through the course of the week — not for everybody, but for some of us. so, let's see what's happening this week. well, this is the forecast for the short term, and you can see on tuesday, lots of showers developing, very hit and miss. actually, many of us will miss the showers altogether, but in the centre of this low pressure, that's where the showers will be slow—moving. so, here, that likelihood of a lot of rainfall in the short space of time leading to some flooding. you can see it's fairly cool as well. the jet stream's so far south of us, we're in this slightly fresher atlantic air, and you can see the showers are continuing into tuesday evening and they'll continue into wednesday as well. and some of them could be
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particularly, for example, across scotland and northern england. looks like the south of the uk won't see too many storms. we've had them so far in the south in the southeast in the last fortnight, in fact, with the flooding in london. looks as though on wednesday, the south of the uk actually picks up more of a breeze because this low shifts a bit further north. you can see the wind arrows here, so any showers that do form across the south will be pushed along by that swift breeze, whereas the slow—moving downpours will be concentrated more across northern parts of the uk and into scotland as well and with these thunderstorms as well. and at times, yes, we get hail this time of the year, which is most likely to occur in the hottest time of the year. that's when the storms are tallest and you get that hail forming within those clouds. so, a very showery tuesday and a very showery wednesday on the way as well. how about thursday? well, the low pressure's still with us, but you can see there's a few isobars there — pressure lines. that indicates more of a breeze. and another area of low pressure actually approaches us from the south. this one's a little bit smaller, and exactly where it's going to go — whether it'll be further north or further south of us —
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open to debate. so, i have to say that come thursday, a little bit of an uncertainty here exactly what sort of weather we are going to get. but it looks as though it could well be rainy across southern parts of the uk. in fact, this is the current forecast. you can see thursday night into friday, some quite heavy rain and breezy conditions sweeping across southern parts of the uk. that should be out of the way come friday, and then after that, it looks as though things might settle down just a little bit, so into next week. so, this is the weekend and into next week. it looks as though the thrust of the low pressure should move away. there'll be showers around, but notice the wind is coming in from the north, so that means things will be a little bit cooler.
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tonight at ten — it's been a magic monday for team gb at the olympic games injapan. tom daley and matty lee narrowly beat the chinese to win the synchronised 10 metre platform event. for lee, it was olympic success at his first visit. for daley, it was gold at his fourth attempt, an emotional day for both. that moment, stood behind that rostrum over there and about to be announced as olympic champions. and then to hear the national anthem play. i was gone, i couldn't even sing! among the other winners was adam peaty — the first british swimmer to successfully defend
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an olympic title.

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