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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 26, 2021 7:00pm-8:00pm BST

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hello, i'm kasia madera. this is outside source. japan tops the medal table at the tokyo olympics. the host nation won three golds on monday, and success too for british diver tom daley, who was finally crowned an olympic champion. in other news, tunisia faces its worst crisis since the arab spring, after the president sacks the prime minister and suspends parliament. america's top infectious disease expert warns the us is heading �*in the wrong direction�* as cases surge among the unvaccinated. and in the uk, there's been another fall in the daily number of coronavirus cases for the sixth day in a row.
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hello and welcome. a huge success forjapan, which has topped the table for the country with the most gold medals in its olympic games. it's one of the most controversial. but after today the mood may have changed. japan has now won eight gold medals, which put it ahead of the us and china. momiji nishiya made history by winning the first—ever olympic gold medal in women's street skateboarding, atjust 13 years old. japan defeated china to win gold in the mixed doubles table tennis final, and defeated georgia in the men's 73 kilojudo final. our correspondent mariko oi,
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is in shimbashi, tokyo. we now have a new star, momiji nishiya becoming the youngest athletes ever at the age of 13 in japan to be winning a gold medal. she looked so relaxed, when she was asked how heavy her gold medal was, and she said it feels like it weighs and she said it feels like it weighs a tonne. meanwhile, we havejudo bringing us the seventh gold medal, and we've seen spectacular performances by those judo class, including the siblings, bringing the double gold medals, who are on the front pages of all the newspapers in japan this morning. we also had no naomi osaka for a ghosting —— naomi osaka progressing to the next stage. we'll have more from mariko in a moment, but let's reflect on japan's success
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with robin kietlinski. you're an expert injapanese sporting history at the city university of new york. you are author of japanese you are author ofjapanese women in sport, so i want to ask you about momiji nishiya. she's absolutely smashed it, hasn't she?- smashed it, hasn't she? yeah, absolutely- _ smashed it, hasn't she? yeah, absolutely. thank _ smashed it, hasn't she? yeah, absolutely. thank you - smashed it, hasn't she? yeah, absolutely. thank you for - smashed it, hasn't she? yeah, i absolutely. thank you for having smashed it, hasn't she? yeah, - absolutely. thank you for having me. i think people around the world enjoy seeing young athletes be successful, but certainly injapan, the country behind her, i'm sure this was a very big moment for her and japanese fans as well. women's skateboarding. _ and japanese fans as well. women's skateboarding, just _ and japanese fans as well. women's skateboarding, just how _ and japanese fans as well. women's skateboarding, just how significant i skateboarding, just how significant is it that we're even seeing this feature in this olympics? i guess it's one of _ feature in this olympics? i guess it's one of the _ feature in this olympics? i guess it's one of the few _ feature in this olympics? i guess it's one of the few new _ feature in this olympics? i guess it's one of the few new sports . feature in this olympics? i guess . it's one of the few new sports added along with rock climbing and
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surfing. ithink along with rock climbing and surfing. i think they add these new events for various reasons, whether it's because it's popular in the country or globally popular, and i think in this case, both. what country or globally popular, and i think in this case, both. what was the feeling _ think in this case, both. what was the feeling about _ think in this case, both. what was the feeling about this _ think in this case, both. what was the feeling about this particular. the feeling about this particular sport in the beginning? i read that the japanese were feeling that it was very dangerous that they were a little bit concerned about this particular sport itself. now we have this 13—year—old who's won gold, it's just mind blowing. this 13—year—old who's won gold, it'sjust mind blowing. £3711 this 13-year-old who's won gold, it'sjust mind blowing.— it'sjust mind blowing. off and there's concern _ it'sjust mind blowing. off and there's concern and _ it'sjust mind blowing. off and there's concern and criticism l there's concern and criticism beforehand, and often times, people forget when they're in the heat of celebration for their country. so, hopefully there are no injuries. i think many of the sports at the olympics have some element of risk on danger, and when you have young participants perhaps and eliz
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elevated sense of concern. certainly looking forward to, i don't think they were so concerned about the risk of the sport.— risk of the sport. that's a really aood risk of the sport. that's a really good point- _ risk of the sport. that's a really good point- i— risk of the sport. that's a really good point. i touched _ risk of the sport. that's a really good point. i touched upon - risk of the sport. that's a reallyj good point. i touched upon that there was a lot of concern about the olympic �*s going ahead. do you feel the mood is changing? it’s olympic 's going ahead. do you feel the mood is changing?— the mood is changing? it's hard to sa . the mood is changing? it's hard to say- there's _ the mood is changing? it's hard to say- there's no — the mood is changing? it's hard to say. there's no real— the mood is changing? it's hard to say. there's no real data - the mood is changing? it's hard to say. there's no real data to - the mood is changing? it's hard to l say. there's no real data to support it yet. i imagine those who are tuning in and interested will certainly feel a lot ofjoy tuning in and interested will certainly feel a lot of joy and excitement overseeing that japanese flag go up at the ceremony. on the other hand, you do have these parallel narratives going along with the games where the covid... both within the olympic village and the population at large injapan, so i think the critics will continue to be critical and the fans will continue to be fans.- be critical and the fans will continue to be fans. that's a really aood continue to be fans. that's a really good point- _ stay there, robin, for a moment.
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it's notjust the competition that's proving a challenge for the athletes. they're also having to face serious heat and humidity, which has already forced some events to be postponed. temperatures on sunday reached 32 degrees celsius. olympics organisers postponed two days of rowing that were due to take place today. that's now been moved to the weekend. tennis has also been affected — the international tennis federation activated its policy once temperatures went above 30.1 degrees celsius. that policy means players are given a ten—minute break between second and third sets, and the men's triathlon was moved to the the early hours of the morning to avoid the worst of the heat. water temperatures over the weekend reached 30 degrees celsius. our correspondent mariko oi is in shimbashi, tokyo. under the scorching summer, girls from different high schools carry on
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with their extracurricular activities. but every year, around 3000 children suffer from activities. but every year, around 3000 children sufferfrom heat stroke during club activities like this. they have even been deaths in the past. this man has been the tennis coach for 17 years, and he says the hottest summers mean they have to be extra careful. translation: we measured the stress index every hour to make sure it's safe to practice. we have been gathering at 7:15am or practising in the late afternoon, where the temperature isn't too high. it’s afternoon, where the temperature isn't too high-— isn't too high. it's under this heat that the world's _ isn't too high. it's under this heat that the world's top _ isn't too high. it's under this heat that the world's top athletes - isn't too high. it's under this heat that the world's top athletes are l that the world's top athletes are competing for gold. the conditions mean we're less likely to see a quality of world records tumbling. just by being in heat exposure, your heart _ just by being in heat exposure, your heart system has to work harder to maintain _ heart system has to work harder to maintain your performance, and also the body's _ maintain your performance, and also the body's ability to maintain your
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body _ the body's ability to maintain your body temperature. that will also be impacted _ body temperature. that will also be impacted greatly. the body temperature. that will also be impacted greatly-— impacted greatly. the last time ja an had impacted greatly. the last time japan had held _ impacted greatly. the last time japan had held summer- impacted greatly. the last time japan had held summer games| impacted greatly. the last time - japan had held summer games was in 1964. it was in october when the weather was cooler, so having the games here now has raised concerns that the intense heat and humidity of the tokyo summer could pose a serious risk to athletes. but when the games are held, all have to do with the global sport calendar. these are the measure of events, and there's a gap between latejuly to august. broadcasters around the world pay billions of dollars for the rights to show the olympics. they need to show it at the right time of year in the right they need to show it at the right time of year in the right time they need to show it at the right time of year in the right time of day. time of year in the right time of da. �* time of year in the right time of day. broadcasting is one of the most siunificant day. broadcasting is one of the most significant revenues, _ day. broadcasting is one of the most significant revenues, so _ day. broadcasting is one of the most significant revenues, so the - day. broadcasting is one of the most significant revenues, so the ioc - day. broadcasting is one of the most significant revenues, so the ioc is i significant revenues, so the ioc is going _ significant revenues, so the ioc is going to _ significant revenues, so the ioc is going to want _ significant revenues, so the ioc is going to want to _ significant revenues, so the ioc is going to want to keep _ significant revenues, so the ioc is going to want to keep its - significant revenues, so the ioc is| going to want to keep its sponsors and broadcasters _ going to want to keep its sponsors and broadcasters as _ going to want to keep its sponsors and broadcasters as happy- going to want to keep its sponsors and broadcasters as happy as - going to want to keep its sponsors i and broadcasters as happy as can be. and that _ and broadcasters as happy as can be. and that means — and broadcasters as happy as can be. and that means some _ and broadcasters as happy as can be. and that means some events - and broadcasters as happy as can be. and that means some events like - and that means some events like marathon and race walking have been
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moved where it's cooler, while others are taking place in the early morning or in the evening. but increasingly, it's notjust a battle for a medal. it's also a battle against the heat. on top of the extreme heat, a tropical storm is expected to hit japan on tuesday. here's mariko oi again. —— ben rich. -- ben rich. you can see itjust -- ben rich. you can see it 'ust here on our earlier i -- ben rich. you can see it 'ust here on our earlier satelliteh -- ben rich. you can see itjust- here on our earlier satellite image, but the centre of the storm is forecast to make landfall across northern parts and move on. it could cause some flash flooding here, but tokyois cause some flash flooding here, but tokyo is likely to be spared the worst. the outer rain bands could bring some pretty wet weather in tokyo during tuesday, but nothing expected to cause any real disruption for the olympics. once those showers move through during tooth tuesday, the rest of the week looks drier and brighter, and it should stay quite hot and humid with
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highs of 32 degrees. the heat�*s not only affecting sports like rowing and running, but archery and shooting as well. professor mike tipton has studied the effects of extreme environments on athletes and helped prepare the team gb. it's notjust the direct effects of temperature on the tissues, it also indirect effects through becoming dehydrated, it's also indirect effects through becoming dehydrated, which then increases your problems controlling blood pressure. so, this is notjust a problem for those people who are generating lots of heat. just having high environmental temperatures can impair performance and to be a challenge to blood pressure regulation, for example, in events like archery. let's go back to robin klietlinski. you know japan really well. you knowjapan really well. just talk us you know japan really well. just talk us through what the temperatures... are we seeing something much higher than usual? the organisers said it was the
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perfect climate for the olympics to take place. perfect climate for the olympics to take lace. ., perfect climate for the olympics to take lace. . ., , ., take place. yeah, there have been a lot of criticisms _ take place. yeah, there have been a lot of criticisms of _ take place. yeah, there have been a lot of criticisms of what _ lot of criticisms of what the organisers said ranging from the safety of the plant to the nice temperature in tokyo. i think many people understood all along that was in the full truth. certainly a somebody who has had many a summer in tokyo, it's surprising. the humidity is incredibly oppressive and there are very few events held through july and there are very few events held throuthuly and and there are very few events held through july and august. and there are very few events held throuthuly and august. so, i think those who know the climate well, they knew all along there would be heat issues. of course, the marathon was something that happened before the pandemic. one of these kind of issues that arose with the planning
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process. issues that arose with the planning rocess. ., ~ ., ., process. you know what the conditions _ process. you know what the conditions are _ process. you know what the conditions are like, - process. you know what the conditions are like, you - process. you know what the conditions are like, you run| conditions are like, you run yourself, but the organisers are between a rock and a hard place. they have to go when there are windows in which to do these kind of olympics because of all the advertising and the broadcasters who demand them to fall between various different sporting events. they can't win. the other option was to potentially not hold it, and again, that was a huge conversation going on in the country. i that was a huge conversation going on in the country.— on in the country. i think they have done what — on in the country. i think they have done what they _ on in the country. i think they have done what they can _ on in the country. i think they have done what they can to _ on in the country. i think they have done what they can to mitigate - on in the country. i think they have done what they can to mitigate the j done what they can to mitigate the heat, so i know they set up misting stations where you can stand under and get a cool mist, and are encouraging everybody to stay hydrated. i think they were planning for a much larger crowd, so they have many opportunities for hydration. but hopefully the athletes stay safe and they also know they can be weather delays. some of these take place outdoors,
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so they have to plan for possible weather events. hopefully whether it's covid or the heat, the athletes remain safe. it's covid or the heat, the athletes remain safe-— remain safe. yes, specialist in ja an, remain safe. yes, specialist in japan. thank _ remain safe. yes, specialist in japan. thank you _ remain safe. yes, specialist in japan, thank you so _ remain safe. yes, specialist in japan, thank you so much - remain safe. yes, specialist in japan, thank you so much forl remain safe. yes, specialist in - japan, thank you so much for your time. ., ~ japan, thank you so much for your time. . ~' i. japan, thank you so much for your time. ., ,, i. ., ., iraq's prime minister is in washington meeting president biden, tunisia is facing a period of major upheaval after its president dismissed the country's prime minister and suspended the parliament, following violent protests over the government's handling of a massive spike in covid cases. the northwest african nation is seen by some as a rare success story of the arab spring revolutions a decade ago. but its fledgling democracy is now facing a serious challenge. injust the in just the last few hours, the president ordered a curfew as he
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tries to establish calm. here's the president late on sunday. translation: first decision, freezing the functions - of the parliament. the constitution does not allow its dissolution, but it allows the freezing of its activities. the president of the republic will take charge of the executive power with the help of the government, which will be headed by a new leader appointed by the president of the republic. after the announcement that he would be taking over, large crowds of the president's supporters spilled onto the streets to celebrate. this was the capital tunis which was filled with people waving flags, letting off fireworks and honking car horns. here's what one supporter of the decision had to say. translation: it's the first time i in my life i've heard of a head i of state take a correct decision. we have taken back our country. this is the first time i've gone out to the streets to celebrate. - the risky political move comes after violent protests were seen across the country. this was tunisia earlier on sunday when protesters clashed with police.
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this was tunis earlier on sunday when protesters clashed with police. covid is one factor behind the unrest. the country experienced a record number of deaths last week and its vaccination campaign has had many problems, but there are other factors. deep—rooted economic issues which were partly behind the uprising in 2011 have never been resolved. here's what one protester had to say. translation: our main demand is that the ennahda movement, i which ruled for ten years, leave the parliament. as a young man in 2011, i called forjobs, freedom and dignity, and in 2021, i still call forjobs, freedom and dignity. for many tunisians, this moment clearly feels like an opportunity, but it's been denounced by the president's opponents. the ennahda party, which wasjust mentioned by the protestor, is a moderate islamist party and it's the biggest in parliament. its supporters hold it up as an example of how a balance can be struck between modernity
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and islam, but its critics claim it puts tunisia's secular tradition at risk. this is the leader of the the party, who is also the speaker of the tunisian parliament, in the early hours of monday. he was blocked from entering the parliament building and responded with a sit—down protest. here's what he had to say about the announcement. translation: today, we were surprised by supreme decisions _ today, we were surprised by supreme decisions that not only surprised ennadha, — decisions that not only surprised ennadha, but also surprised the tunisian — ennadha, but also surprised the tunisian people and the world in a country— tunisian people and the world in a country that is proud of being the first arah— country that is proud of being the first arab democracy. and having the latest _ first arab democracy. and having the latest constitution announcing decisions that are essentially a coup— decisions that are essentially a coup d'etat and has called nothing but a _ coup d'etat and has called nothing but a coup — others are worried that the move could destabilise the country and lead to more unrest. here's what one man had to say. translation: there is a conflict in tunisian society which is dangerous. i this conflict will lead to blood. people are injured and beaten.
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it leads to bloodshed . and violence, for what? and by monday, there were clashes on the street. rival groups threw stones at each other outside the parliament building, which has been barricaded by troops. some view the situation as a brazen power grab, others see it as necessary move to get the country back on track. in the last couple of hours at the white house, the press secretary was asked about the situation. here's her response. we asked about the situation. here's her response-_ asked about the situation. here's her response. we are in touch at a senior level _ her response. we are in touch at a senior level with _ her response. we are in touch at a senior level with tunisian - her response. we are in touch at a senior level with tunisian leadersl senior level with tunisian leaders to learn more about the situation, urge, and support efforts to move forward in line with the principles. as you know, there has been a lot of development even over the last 24 hours. a legal determination about a coup is legal, and we will look to the state to apartment to conduct an analysis.
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the state to apartment to conduct an anal sis. ,, ., , ., analysis. the united states are concerned _ analysis. the united states are concerned about _ analysis. the united states are concerned about the _ analysis. the united states are concerned about the situation. | layli foroudi is a journalist based in tunisia who has written about the latest unrest for the financial times. you've been writing about the latest unrest and you described this as one of the biggest crises faced by the country in a decade. help us to understand what is pushing this through. of course, it's notjust covid that have got people on the streets. ., ~ covid that have got people on the streets. ., ,, ., streets. yeah, i think that the rotests streets. yeah, i think that the protests that _ streets. yeah, i think that the protests that we _ streets. yeah, i think that the protests that we saw - streets. yeah, i think that the protests that we saw on - streets. yeah, i think that the i protests that we saw on sunday, covid was the... the crisis has been handled catastrophically here, but it's also a general situation of people feeling that they are fed up and they need change, and then this decision which surprised everyone, but people were happy because they saw it. that was because we've seen a possible change in exit out of
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this, out of that previous situation. but there was also wariness and people saying it's good, it's change, but it's also scary because it's a step into the unknown. the fact that power has been taken in this way and that it's not clear where it's going to lead. tell us a little bit about the president. you described him as a populist and a political outsider, so how was he viewed? this decision to do this, how is this being seen? so, he was voted in a landslide victory in the 2019 election. he was a political outsider and he didn't have a political party or campaigning machine. we didn't have
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money behind his campaign, he wasn't part of the political elites with the connections. that was something that appealed to people because at that appealed to people because at that time, people were feeling fed up that time, people were feeling fed up with the politicians that were governing the country. they felt things hadn't improved in the years since the revolution, so a number of different politicians that were seen as outsiders were voted into parliament, and kais saied is kind of the ultimate outsider with his rejection of even the political party structures. he always claimed he was completely independent and not part of another group. i was 'ust not part of another group. i was just going _ not part of another group. i was just going to — not part of another group. i was just going to say _ not part of another group. i was just going to say now _ not part of another group. i was just going to say now given - not part of another group. i was just going to say now given that you've got the situation, i wonder how concerned people are in terms of
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the curfew as well going forward, because of course, this is being described as a step into the unknown. just briefly, how are people feeling about the future of this country, which was the birth of the arrow movement? i this country, which was the birth of the arrow movement?— the arrow movement? i think it's really mixed- _ the arrow movement? i think it's really mixed. -- _ the arrow movement? i think it's really mixed. -- arab _ the arrow movement? i think it's| really mixed. -- arab movement. the arrow movement? i think it's - really mixed. -- arab movement. what really mixed. —— arab movement. what we saw yesterday was people feeling a mixture of excited and wary. and every event, there is so much that changing. the president said he's going to issue a number of decrees over the next period, so what you mentioned with the curfew is one. we're also hearing about new teams the president is holding with the union —— about meetings. in particular in overcoming crises
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before, so there's lots of different things that are happening. in particular on the curfew point, when i heard about that, he's putting in measures which are in this context serving to bring home to this turbulent situation —— bring home. tunisia has been living with the curfew for a last year with the covid crisis. the government has, while not putting in many measures to actually stop the spread of the virus, which led to tunisia reaching one of the highest rates of death per capita in the world. but a curfew has been something that's been quite constant, so that's not too much change.— too much change. added to a difficult situation. _ too much change. added to a difficult situation. thanks - too much change. added to a difficult situation. thanks so |
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too much change. added to a - difficult situation. thanks so much forjoining us. flash floods, wildfires, drought and landslides — just some of the extreme weather events in recent days across parts of the globe. now a group of some of the world's most prominent scientists, gathering to discuss climate change ahead of a landmark summit in glasgow in november, are warning global leaders that they are still not doing enough action to tackle climate change. our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt, reports. a fire truck drives through a wall of flame in california, and europe is burning, too. they've been struggling to contain vast fires in sardinia and northern spain. no, no, no, no, no! meanwhile, belgium was hit by deadly floods, just two weeks after more than 200 people were killed in the worst flooding to hit germany for decades. and china is being
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battered by a typhoon. it comes after a year's rain fell in just three days last week in henan province. it is hard to imagine a more ominous backdrop against which to discuss the latest climate science. extreme weather is the new normal. from germany to china to canada or the united states, there is wildfires, floods, extreme heat waves, and it is an ever—growing tragic list. today, researchers began to summarise the latest science. their work for the un will guide world leaders and is being described as a wake—up call. we are heading for more than a three degrees rise. we need to change course and urgently course and urgently and before it's too late.
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so, all the politicians rise to the challenge? today representatives of 51 countries met in this london hotel for critical discussions, ahead of the glasgow conference. huge differences remain between countries. they can't agree went to phase out coal, what did you out coal, what to do about fossil fuel subsidies, let alone how to raise the $100 billion a year the richer world has agreed to pay the poorer world to help deal with climate change. the hope is the extreme weather the world has experienced over the last few weeks will help focus minds on the need to raise ambition on cutting emissions. justin rowlatt, bbc news. we're waiting for details from the white house about the withdrawal of troops from iraq. these are live images. we're waiting for a briefing
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from president biden. meeting with the iraqi prime minister, possibility that they will be withdrawing. well, it's been a fairly quiet day today, but tomorrow, you might have to run for cover. we've got the big rain clouds on the way. heavy showers are expected to form downpours in places, thunder and lightning, too, but they are showers. discrete areas of heavy rain with plenty of bright weather around, too, so it won't be raining everywhere. this is the big picture across our part of the world. the jet stream to the south of us, that often means cooler air comes in out of the north atlantic, so it's pushed all the warmth and heat towards the south. we're in this cooler airstream, and it's also a very unstable airstream, which means that shower clouds easily form when we get a bit of sunshine — not, obviously, at night. it's dark, so clear weather across eastern areas, but a weather front is approaching western parts of the uk, so there will be some rain around early in the morning in southwestern parts of england,
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wales, too. and then, very quickly through the day, we'll see those rain clouds forming, bubbling up small cumulus clouds, and then bigger cumulonimbus clouds, all in the centre of this low pressure where the winds are light. light winds is not a good thing necessarily because when these storms form, there's not much wind to push them around, so they rain in the same place for a long period of time, dumping a lot of rainfall, causing flash floods, at least in places. but there's going to be plenty of bright weather around as well, it's just going to be in between these rainstorms. you can see what a rash of showers it is going to be. now, on wednesday, the low pressure moves a little bit further north, and notice the white arrows here — there's more of a breeze to push the showers along, so the thinking is that any showers across more southern parts of the uk won't be as slow—moving. there'll be some rain around, but they'll sort of be pushed along the wind, whereas in northern england and scotland in particular, they could be
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very heavy and thundery, and again, there's a risk of flash flooding in places. but i think in this sort of situation, the areas that fare best, usually around some coastal areas out towards the west and the south of the uk. fairly cool in that airstream from the north atlantic — we're talking about teens in the north, maybe 20 degrees in the south. and in this sort of weather, the apps will be changing a lot, the website, too. these symbols will update day by day as the computers plot new areas of where the showers will be forming. bye— bye.
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hello, this is outside source. japan tops the metal table at the tokyo olympics. the host nation wins three goals on monday, and success for british diver tom daly who is from the crowd and on big champion. tunisia faces its worst crisis since the arab spring after the president is sacked, the prime minister and suspended parliament. america's top infectious disease expert warns the us is headed in the wrong direction as cases surge among the unvaccinated. and in the uk there has been another fall in the daily
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number of coronavirus cases for the sixth day in a row. we will start with the news about coronavirus here in the uk. new infections have now more than halved since the recent peak 9 days ago — among the possible explanations schools breaking up for the holidays, the end of the euros football tournament and the warmer weather. what's not clear yet is the impact of lifting england's restrictions last monday. here's our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. and other vaccines push in london's chinatown today. 88% of adults in the uk have now had at least one shot of the vaccine, and some believe early signs are emerging that the latest wave may be slowing. it was the start of the summer when things began to change. onjune one, you can see
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there were around 3000 coronavirus infections reported. they continue to rise sharply until mid—july, when there were almost 55,000 infections a day. but, since then you can see something unexpected has happened. and cases seem to be falling. it's the first time there's been a sustained fall in infections without a national lockdown. it's thought the warm weather may be contributing to cases reducing. the end of the euros, when football fans gathered to watch the championships, is also thought to have helped. but what is interesting one leading scientist is the speed of the drop in cases, which he believes may mean the pandemic has been significantly weakened because of our growing immunity. we are still likely to see increases in cases come the autumn. but, i think what we are seeing is that we are getting on top of this.
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we are at the point where we can start to look forward to thinking that this epidemic is behind us, but we're not there, we are at that point yet. but, hospitals are still under pressure, although admissions are at nowhere near the levels in the first two waves, the number of patients with covid—19 is continuing to rise. here in york, like many hospitals, they are working at full capacity. it is very good news to hear that community numbers may have started falling back, if you look at the hospital admission numbers, they are still rising exponentially. so, we are worried. it's difficult to predict what our peak will be this time. we are thinking around 90 patients at the peak, if the predictions are any good, but, yes, we are worried. pressure on hospitals is likely to ease if the drop in infections continues and, as the vaccine is rolled out to more
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people, today's figures show covid cases have fallen for the sixth day in a row and are now at their lowest level for three weeks. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. let's turn to the us now, and take a look at its vaccine roll—out. earlier in the year it was off to a rapid start, with presidentjoe biden leading the push for the country to get vaccinated to get the economy moving. by the end of april, 44% of the population had received at least one dose. but as you can see here, compared to other countries like the uk, canada italy and germany, the vaccination rate has plateaued. as of sunday, 57% have rceived their first dose. in a recent gallup poll of adults
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who have decided not to get vaccinated 78% said they are "unlikely" to change their minds and take a vaccine. including 51% who are "not likely at all" to ever be vaccinated. that's clearly a concern for the administration, here's president biden's chief medical adviser, dr antony fauci, speaking to cnn. since we have 50% of the country not fully vaccinated that's a problem. we have the tools to do this, this is an unnecessary predicament we are putting ourselves in.— putting ourselves in. vexing hesitancy — putting ourselves in. vexing hesitancy is _ putting ourselves in. vexing hesitancy is not _ putting ourselves in. vexing hesitancy is not affecting . putting ourselves in. vexing| hesitancy is not affecting the putting ourselves in. vexing - hesitancy is not affecting the whole of the vaccine hesitancy is not effecting the whole country equally. take a look at this map from the us centre for disease control — the states in the darkest blue shows the states where the most vaccines have been administered. democrat run states like vermont and massachusetts — where more than 75% of the populations have at least one dose. the lighter blue coloured states have administered the least amount — traditionally republican voting states like mississippi,
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louisiana and alabama, where barely 40% have received their first dose. but republican leaders are trying to get their states back on track. here's the republican governor of alabama kay ivey, speaking on thursday. since we have 50% of the country as not fully vaccinated, that's a problem. ...— not fully vaccinated, that's a roblem. ., ., , . problem. not who we expect him to alwa s problem. not who we expect him to always good _ problem. not who we expect him to always good to — problem. not who we expect him to always good to get _ problem. not who we expect him to always good to get doctor - problem. not who we expect him to always good to get doctor fauci's| to always good to get doctor fauci's interpretations there. experts hope the rising cases will help boost vaccination numbers specifically with specifics like the 90 net percent of recent covid deaths in america were among those who had not had a jab. he is the chief medical officer of the association of state and territorial health officials.
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over the last week or so we started to see _ over the last week or so we started to see some — over the last week or so we started to see some slight increases in vaccination participation. we would like to— vaccination participation. we would like to see — vaccination participation. we would like to see much more but would like to see _ like to see much more but would like to see a _ like to see much more but would like to see a trend up and we are hearing from _ to see a trend up and we are hearing from people — to see a trend up and we are hearing from people that this has gotten their attention and i don't think it is the _ their attention and i don't think it is the hard — their attention and i don't think it is the hard and fast people who are determined to not get vaccinated, this is— determined to not get vaccinated, this is more the people who are kind of in the _ this is more the people who are kind of in the balance and this is kind of in the balance and this is kind of pushing — of in the balance and this is kind of pushing them to go ahead and take action _ drjames mcdeavitt — executive vice president and dean of clinical affairs at baylor college of medicine in houston. what is your assessment of why there is this hesitancy that is hampering people wanting to take the vaccine, the second dose at least? $5 the second dose at least? is everybody knows there is a hard—core group of people who are just never going to get a vaccine for whatever reason, i don't think there will be convinced but i think the group in question here of the folks that are
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hesitant whether that's procrastination, fear of side effects, concerns about how quickly the vaccine was developed to me you have heard all of the objections before. i would just point out the evidence becomes overwhelming which will help to convince some people. vermont and alabama are best and worst vaccinated state and the numbers are stunning, we look to alabama over the past week 1300 new cases, in vermont 14 cases. the terms of hospitalisations, hundred and 40 in alabama, in vermont one. and deaths in alabama and no deaths in vermont. evidence like that will start to convince people. increasingly convincing it would have to come from friends and family, not from doctor fauci and people on tv at school and people and tried to talk him into getting vaccinated. and tried to talk him into getting vaccinated-— vaccinated. that's really interesting _ vaccinated. that's really interesting when - vaccinated. that's really interesting when you . vaccinated. that's reallyl interesting when you talk vaccinated. that's really - interesting when you talk about those kinds of stats but when you look at the state of the lowest
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vaccine take—up, texas, florida, missouri, they make up 40% of all cases last week. this kind of information as to a higher case numbers and lower vaccination take—up, is that cutting through, are people really understanding that and being repeated? i are people really understanding that and being repeated?— are people really understanding that and being repeated? i think they are startin: to. and being repeated? i think they are starting to- you _ and being repeated? i think they are starting to. you mentioned - and being repeated? i think they are starting to. you mentioned the - and being repeated? i think they are starting to. you mentioned the 99%| starting to. you mentioned the 99% of the cases being in the unvaccinated and in houston we are seeing about 95% of our hospital admissions and a much younger population coming in. and you will see more and more younger people has sent up to now. ask everybody to do a very quick exercise, sit down with a very quick exercise, sit down with a piece of paper and write down everybody you know that's had a vaccine complication, a serious publication from a wound up in the hospital and not a little bit of soreness or body aches, but really bad convocation. there is nobody on my list and there's probably nobody on your list. that's a down
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everybody you know they had a bad reaction from covid and i've got five people on my list that are either dead or disabled. sift together the exercise of the statistics aside it becomes pretty clear that vaccination is the right answer for that personal health as well as the health of those around you. well as the health of those around ou. ~ , ., , ~ ., you. when you put it like that it sharens you. when you put it like that it sharpens the — you. when you put it like that it sharpens the senses. _ you. when you put it like that it sharpens the senses. the - you. when you put it like that it| sharpens the senses. the states you. when you put it like that it - sharpens the senses. the states are not doing well, traditionally republican, is there the fallout of hesitancy and the right to choose that perhaps is making people concerned about going forward and getting the jabs in? it's been a case of managed to politicise as best we can every single thing about this pandemic at every single opportunity which is very disappointing as a nation. i don't know why- _ disappointing as a nation. i don't know why- i _ disappointing as a nation. i don't know why- i do _ disappointing as a nation. i don't know why. i do know _ disappointing as a nation. i don't know why. i do know that - disappointing as a nation. i don't know why. i do know that the - disappointing as a nation. i don't| know why. i do know that the way forward is not to shout at each other louder but to present people
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with facts and convince them, and as i said not to expect people like me to convince her friends and neighbours but as we see people who look like us and live in our neighbourhoods and work with us getting the vaccine and using that influence to get people vaccinated. that's all we will get to the rest of the population.— that's all we will get to the rest of the --oulation. ., ~ i. . of the population. thank you so much for 'ust of the population. thank you so much forjust talking _ of the population. thank you so much forjust talking us _ of the population. thank you so much forjust talking us through _ of the population. thank you so much forjust talking us through and - forjust talking us through and giving the statistics that hopefully people are listening to. back to great britain has also been performing strongly. the today — an emotional victory for the uk's tom daley and matty lee in the men's synchronised ten metre platform diving. swimmer adam peaty underlined his dominance in the men's 100 metres breastroke.
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tom pidcock won great britain's third olympic gold of the tokyo games with a dominant performance in the men's mountain bike cross—country. silver medals for alex yee in the triathlon and lauren williams in taekwondo. tonia couch is former team gb olympic diver and childhood friend of tom daley and gave us this ecstatic reaction. i was on the edge of my seat with my hands on my face saying they have done it, they have done it! figs hands on my face saying they have done it, they have done it! b5 in done it, they have done it! as in the chinese. _ done it, they have done it! as in the chinese, i _ done it, they have done it! as in the chinese, i thought _ done it, they have done it! as in the chinese, i thought they - done it, they have done it! is “i the chinese, i thought theyjust might have taken it over because their last dive was amazing. but it just was not enough so it was incredible. i was on my feet jumping, screaming, crying all sorts. it was so so good to watch. this is a huge win for him, one that he had his eye on for quite some time. with go her again. it he had his eye on for quite some time. with go her again. it mean the world, of saint _ time. with go her again. it mean the world, of saint my _ time. with go her again. it mean the world, of saint my boyfriend - time. with go her again. it mean the world, of saint my boyfriend that -
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world, of saint my boyfriend that tom has one world championships, world cups, world series, commonwealth games, european but never that olympic gold medal. and we all know he is able to do that but i virtually never got his way, so today it was incredible. incredible for him, so please for him. caroline peaty is adam peaty�*s mum — she, too, was over the moon. we are very proud, very relieved. tired. there's a lot of emotions going through at the moment. doesn't seem real that he is a double champion, olympic champion. i do not even realise that until this morning until somebody had said it. itjust about him getting that water, from a to b and achieving what he wants to achieve. ,, , ., , ., , �* ., , achieve. sports team gb at fit place in a metal table _ achieve. sports team gb at fit place in a metaltable behind japan, - achieve. sports team gb at fit place in a metaltable behind japan, china in a metal table behind japan, china and the russian olympic convention.
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seven medals in total with three gold medals. the united nations says the record number of children have been killed in afghanistan in the first half of this year. and man has been describing how he tried to save his a man has been describing how he tried to save his wife and nine year —year—old son after they got into difficulties in loch lomond. a close friend also died in the tragedy after two families stopped at a beauty spot on their way home from holiday. they were among six people who drowned in scotland's waters in what the fire service has described as one of the worst weekends in memory. alexandra mackenzie reports. the perfect location on a summer's day. but although inviting the water is cold and deep and can be extremely dangerous. on saturday
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evening, two families from glasgow were enjoying the last day of their holiday, three of them drowned here. 29—year—old dena, her nine—year—old son and family friend 39—year—old mohammed. his seven—year—old son was in a critical condition in hospital. this man said he tried in vain to save his family and friends. when i came out from _ save his family and friends. when i came out from the _ save his family and friends. when i came out from the water— save his family and friends. when i came out from the water i - save his family and friends. when i came out from the water i saw- save his family and friends. when i came out from the water i saw my | came out from the water i saw my wife's hand and i tried to pull off my shirt and give it to her if she can catch. someone gave me a phone for emergency services. he can catch. someone gave me a phone for emergency services.— for emergency services. he is now bein: for emergency services. he is now being covered _ for emergency services. he is now being covered it — for emergency services. he is now being covered it at _ for emergency services. he is now being covered it at home - for emergency services. he is now. being covered it at home struggling to come to terms with what happened. you are enjoying the holidays and all of _ you are enjoying the holidays and all of a _ you are enjoying the holidays and all of a sudden this incident happens. and we are all shocked and
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one of— happens. and we are all shocked and one of the _ happens. and we are all shocked and one of the kids still in critical condition— one of the kids still in critical condition in the hospital, you know. the recent— condition in the hospital, you know. the recent warm weather has enticed many of us to the water. across the uk, more than 30 people have drowned in the last two weeks. in scotland, six people lost their lives at the weekend. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story... japan public on the big gold rush is continuing, this is 13—year—old winner in street skateboarding which tookjapan to the top of the gold medals table. the united nations says a record number of civilians have been killed in afghanistan in the first half of this year. injust six months, 1,659 civilians were killed and over 3,000 others were wounded — that's a 47% increase compared with the same
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period last year. in their report they said: "particularly shocking and of deep concern is that women, here's more from fiona frazier, the un human rights chief in afghanistan. we saw record levels of women and children— we saw record levels of women and children killed and injured. we also saw a _ children killed and injured. we also saw a spike — children killed and injured. we also saw a spike which is of particular concern — saw a spike which is of particular concern as— saw a spike which is of particular concern as of may in civilian casualties— concern as of may in civilian casualties when international military— casualties when international military forces began to withdraw and the _ military forces began to withdraw and the taliban started its offensive. we have also seen moves, the fighting _ offensive. we have also seen moves, the fighting moved to an area of particular— the fighting moved to an area of particular concern that if there's more _ particular concern that if there's more conflict in the cities this will cause _
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more conflict in the cities this will cause harm to civilians. in every — will cause harm to civilians. in every really need to see, lester sent— every really need to see, lester sent de—escalation in the conflict where _ sent de—escalation in the conflict where they are concerns that what we've _ where they are concerns that what we've seen — where they are concerns that what we've seen the past six months we have _ we've seen the past six months we have seen— we've seen the past six months we have seen high levels and perhaps potentially the highest on record number— potentially the highest on record number of civilian casualties killed and injured in afghanistan for this year~ _ as fiona frazer mentioned there, recent fighting has largely been in more rural areas — and that's having a particular impact on civilians who can't easily access healthcare facilities. here's a spokesman for the afghan health ministry. well, u nfortu nately well, unfortunately mostly it's from the rural area and its different types of injuries that we are seeing. the injuries during an active the injuries for the
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landmines and as mentioned at the beginning it's more in the rural area. fortunately the cities are not very much involved in these fighting and most of the country, except very few limited cities in from kandahar series come on the periphery of the city but most of the cases is alive forevermore area and it leads to a very huge number of displaced populations across the country which are leaving their districts and homes in the rural area and moving to the urban area where it's a bit safer than their own districts. although the majority of us troops have now left afghanistan, an increased number of airstrikes have taken place in recent days. in particular around the southern city of kandahar which has been almost encircled by taliban militants. and the americans say they'll continue those airstrikes
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in support of afghan troops, for now. we are taking air strikes as we need to take them to support afghan forces in contact with the taliban, so i don't know whether it's too many or too few, i think there's enough. we need to carry out months or years ago here in afghanistan but still carrying them out and could affect in support of afghan forces that are engaged in close fights with the taliban. i would also point out that the afghan air force is actually carrying out a lot of strikes and is having very good success against taliban forces. here's more analysis of those comments from our correspondent in kabul, secunder kermani. he said for the coming weeks the us would _ he said for the coming weeks the us would continue to support the afghan government with these air strikes. refuse _ government with these air strikes. refuse to— government with these air strikes. refuse to answer categorically and repeated _ refuse to answer categorically and repeated questions about whether those _ repeated questions about whether those air— repeated questions about whether those air strikes against the
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taliban— those air strikes against the taliban would continue past the end of august— taliban would continue past the end of august and that's in the us military— of august and that's in the us military mission in afghanistan from the ends _ military mission in afghanistan from the ends. he's previously suggested that they— the ends. he's previously suggested that they will not continue past the end of— that they will not continue past the end of august and that any over the horizon— end of august and that any over the horizon air— end of august and that any over the horizon air strikes lost from altar in the _ horizon air strikes lost from altar in the region against the targets here in— in the region against the targets here in afghanistan would only be focused _ here in afghanistan would only be focused on groups like is, daesh or al-anda _ focused on groups like is, daesh or al-qaeda but there will not include the taliban. the real concern here is how— the taliban. the real concern here is how the — the taliban. the real concern here is how the government welfare after the end _ is how the government welfare after the end of— is how the government welfare after the end of august but i do so to say that the _ the end of august but i do so to say that the afghans have their own air force _ that the afghans have their own air force the — that the afghans have their own air force. the general was praising their— force. the general was praising their capability saying it was the major— their capability saying it was the major advantages they had of the taliban— major advantages they had of the taliban and because of that and taliban— taliban and because of that and taliban military victory is far from inevitable — we are turning to us the trait presence in iraq. in breaking news president biden has spoken about the
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us ending its combat mission there in iraq. he was meeting with the iraqi prime minister at the white house. president biden said that the us role in iraq will shift to a devising and training iraqi forces. around 2500 us troops are in iraq supporting local security forces in their fight against the remnants of their fight against the remnants of the islamic state group. president biden was asked how he expects the relationship with iraq to change and how many us troops will be there by the end of the year. so this is what he had to say. we the end of the year. so this is what he had to say-— he had to say. we will be talking a lot, or he had to say. we will be talking a lot. or for — he had to say. we will be talking a lot, or for ministers, _ he had to say. we will be talking a lot, or for ministers, our - he had to say. we will be talking a lot, or for ministers, our cabinet i lot, orfor ministers, our cabinet ministers— lot, orfor ministers, our cabinet ministers have been talking. we are looking _ ministers have been talking. we are looking forward to seeing election in october. we are working very hard with the _ in october. we are working very hard with the iraqi government to make sure the _ with the iraqi government to make sure the un and the gcc have oversight, that these are full and fair elections. i have been in contact _
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fair elections. i have been in contact with people. at any rate. i think— contact with people. at any rate. i think things are going well. our role in — think things are going well. our role in irag _ think things are going well. our role in iraq will be as dealing with not _ role in iraq will be as dealing with not it's— role in iraq will be as dealing with not it's to— role in iraq will be as dealing with not... it's to be available to continue _ not... it's to be available to continue to train, to assist, to help— continue to train, to assist, to help and — continue to train, to assist, to help and to _ continue to train, to assist, to help and to deal with isis as it arrives — help and to deal with isis as it arrives. but we are not going to be by the _ arrives. but we are not going to be by the end — arrives. but we are not going to be by the end of the year in a combat mission _ new research indicates, that stained glass windows from canterbury cathedral here in england — may be among the oldest in the world. the panels have been re—dated, using a new device developed by scientists. the new dating indicates, that the windows would have been in place when the archbishop of the time, thomas becket was assassinated at the cathedral in 1170. here's our science correspondent, pallab ghosh. canterbury cathedral is among the oldest churches in england. inside, its stunning windows depict symbolic religious scenes. this series was thought to have been made in the 13th century, but some of the panels, including this one of the prophet nathan,
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have now been re—dated. for decades, historians have thought that some of these panels were made earlier than the others because they are different in style. now, using a new technique, scientists have confirmed that not only are they much older, but they may well be among the oldest in the world. it has only come to light now because of this device. it may not look like much, but it was developed by scientists to be used on location without damaging the glass. it shines a beam onto the surface, which causes the material inside to radiate. this radiation contains a chemicalfingerprint, from which the researchers worked out its age. we've been working on this detective story for some time, putting all the pieces in place, and then we finally get an answer, something new, that brings together science and art into one story. it's fantastic. these are all stories that were recorded at the time they happened here.
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the discovery has astonished leonie seliger, who looks after the stained glass windows here. she believes the panels could go back to the mid—1100s, and were in place during major historical event of the cathedral, including the assassination of the then archbishop thomas becket, who features in many of these windows. they would have witnessed the murder of thomas becket. henry ii coming on his knees begging for forgiveness. they would have witnessed the conflagration of the fire that devoured the cathedral in 1174. and then they would have witnessed all of british history. the cathedral contains a story of england's history. its artistry and its religious thinking. now a new scientific discovery has given us a fresh perspective on the nation's past.
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remarkable how much those stained—glass windows have witnessed. i'm back very shortly. well, it's been a fairly quiet day today, but tomorrow, you might have to run for cover. we've got the big rain clouds on the way. heavy showers are expected to form downpours in places, thunder and lightning, too, but they are showers. discrete areas of heavy rain with plenty of bright weather around, too, so it won't be raining everywhere. this is the big picture across our part of the world. the jet stream to the south of us, that often means cooler air comes in out of the north atlantic, so it's pushed all the warmth and heat towards the south. we're in this cooler airstream, and it's also a very unstable airstream, which means that shower clouds easily form when we get a bit of sunshine — not, obviously, at night. it's dark, so clear weather across eastern areas, but a weather front is approaching western parts of the uk, so there will be some rain around early in the morning in southwestern parts of england, wales, too. and then, very quickly through the day, we'll see those rain clouds forming, bubbling up small cumulus clouds, and then bigger cumulonimbus clouds, all
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in the centre of this low pressure where the winds are light. light winds is not a good thing necessarily because when these storms form, there's not much wind to push them around, so they rain in the same place for a long period of time, dumping a lot of rainfall, causing flash floods, at least in places. but there's going to be plenty of bright weather around as well, it's just going to be in between these rainstorms. you can see what a rash of showers it is going to be. now, on wednesday, the low pressure moves a little bit further north, and notice the white arrows here — there's more of a breeze to push the showers along, so the thinking is that any showers across more southern parts of the uk won't be as slow—moving. there'll be some rain around, but they'll sort of be pushed along the wind, whereas in northern england
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and scotland in particular, they could be very heavy and thundery, and again, there's a risk of flash flooding in places. but i think in this sort of situation, the areas that fare best, usually around some coastal areas out towards the west and the south of the uk. fairly cool in that airstream from the north atlantic — we're talking about teens in the north, maybe 20 degrees in the south. and in this sort of weather, the apps will be changing a lot, the website, too. these symbols will update day by day as the computers plot new areas of where the showers will be forming. bye— bye.
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hello, i'm kasia madera. this is outside source. us troops to enter combat mission by the end of the year. mutinous president biden will meet with the formal announcement do to come. glory forjapan who won three gold on monday and success to for the british diver tom daly who was finally crowned an olympic champion along with lee. two knees he faces is worth two wars crisis at the arab spring after the presidents ask the prime minister and suspends parliament. in the uk there's been another fall in the daily number of coronavirus cases, 46 today.

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