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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 26, 2021 10:00am-12:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. adam peaty starts a gold rush for team gb, winning the 100—metre breaststroke title and becoming one of the most successful swimmers of all time. it's olympicjoy for tom daley and matty lee — gold in the men's synchronised 10—metre platform diving. and gb gold in the cycling too — tom pidcock wins the men's mountain bike cross—country event.
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here in tokyo, i'll have all the latest on the action and medals at the olympic games. celebrations in tunisia as the president sacks his prime minister and suspends parliament following a day of protests against the government's handling of the pandemic. there has been a sustained drop in coronavirus cases in the uk, so has britain's third wave hit its peak, only a week after it relaxed most of its restrictions? as more extreme weather is recorded around the world, a gathering of scientists warns of the urgent need for action on climate change. hello and welcome, if you're watching in the uk or around the world.
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it's been a busy day at the tokyo olympics, with exciting action across many different sports. let's go there live and get the latest with lucy hockings. a warm welcome to day three at the tokyo olympics and, as you say, the medals are coming in thick and fast. among the winners today, australia's ariarne titmus beat the defending champion katie ledecky in a thrilling contest in the women's 400 metre freestyle. there was an emotional victory for the uk's tom daley and matty lee, who narrowly beat their chinese rivals in the men's synchronized 10—metre platform diving. it's daley�*s first gold in his fourth games. and team gb notched up another gold when swimmer adam peaty underlined his dominance in the men's 100 metres breastroke by successfully defending the title he won at the rio olympics five years ago. we've just heard from his
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girlfriend in england. i can't even find the words to describe it because i don't think i have felt this kind of pride before. obviously, with george there is a lot of pride, but it's so different, isn't it? he recognises the swimming now, as well, because we all get so excited when it comes on. so he sees the lanes and the blue water and he starts to get excited. then he sees his daddy. not necessarily when he's swimming does he recognise him, but when he's celebrating he definitely saw him, didn't you? if he was here with you now, what would you say to him? first of all i would give him a huge hug, because that is just what i'm dying to do. and then i would tell him that we are so proud of him and we love him so much and that i didn't expect anything less from him. but britain isn't the only country celebrating. let's cross to the bbc sport centre and speakjane dougall,
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who has been watching the action. we are calling it magic monday for team gb. let's go through some of those golds. let's start with adam peaty. it seemed to be a perfectly executed swim. yes it was, but don't forget the enormous amount of pressure on adam peaty. but boy, did he do it! despite all of the issues surrounding these games he felt he had the best preparation of his life. he also had morning finals, and don't like them. they like evening meetings. he said it was about how you adapted, about who was best on the day, he was the most adaptable. he won the first goal for great britain of these games. he has become the first british swimmer to
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defend her olympic title, which is an incredible feat. he blew away the competition to win this 100 metres breaststroke. it was a perfectly executed swim. he finished in a time of 57.3 seconds, six tenths clear of the field. he did admit he cried when he went to hug his coach, melanie marshall, who was in tears and the crowd. no friends or family to cheer them on. he said there was another issue, he missed hearing the roar of the crowd, but it didn't affect him enough to damage his hopes because he brought on that cold. 50 hopes because he brought on that cold. . ., ., ., hopes because he brought on that cold. . ., ., . cold. so much emotion at the pool toda . at cold. so much emotion at the pool today- at the _ cold. so much emotion at the pool today. at the diving _ cold. so much emotion at the pool today. at the diving pool, - cold. so much emotion at the pool today. at the diving pool, too. - cold. so much emotion at the pool. today. at the diving pool, too. more tears, this time _ today. at the diving pool, too. more tears, this time for _ today. at the diving pool, too. more tears, this time for tom _ today. at the diving pool, too. more tears, this time for tom daly. - today. at the diving pool, too. we tears, this time for tom daly. he was on the podium alongside his partner, the tears streaming down his face. tom daly has waited 13 years for this. he has been diving for 20 years. this is his fourth
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olympics and he has won his first gold medal. diving alongside his partner, matty lee. it was his olympic debut, so an old head on young shoulders. they moved to the top of the leaderboard after four dives before handling the pressure in the final two dives. everyone watching as the chinese pair made theirfinal watching as the chinese pair made their final dive. watching as the chinese pair made theirfinal dive. they watching as the chinese pair made their final dive. they were the only ones who could catch the brits, they didn't do it and tom daly and matty lee one by one point in the ten metres synchronised platform. a long time coming for tom daly, but so well deserved. it time coming for tom daly, but so well deserved.— well deserved. it was so nail-biting, _ well deserved. it was so nail-biting, everyone i well deserved. it was so nail-biting, everyone on well deserved. it was so - nail-biting, everyone on the edge well deserved. it was so _ nail-biting, everyone on the edge of nail—biting, everyone on the edge of their seats as the chinese took a final dive. tell us about 21—year—old tom pidcock and historic moment for him today. a£111" 21-year-old tom pidcock and historic moment for him today.— moment for him today. our third called for team _ moment for him today. our third called for team gb. _ moment for him today. our third called for team gb. tom - moment for him today. our third called for team gb. tom pidcock convincingly took the win in the
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cross—country mountain biking. he led the race from midway through. very hot and gb conditions for mountain biking, and known to be a tough course. he navigated it superbly, finishing 20 seconds ahead of the rest of the field. this is the most incredulous part of the story. his win comes two months after tom pidcock broke his collarbone in a collision with a car while dog training. what an incredible recovery, and such a deserved win. he led from the rest of the field and finished 20 seconds ahead of his nearest competitor, so ahead of his nearest competitor, so a really fantastic win and a third code for team gb.— a really fantastic win and a third code for team gb. finally, what about that _ code for team gb. finally, what about that thrilling _ code for team gb. finally, what about that thrilling final - code for team gb. finally, what about that thrilling final to - code for team gb. finally, what about that thrilling final to the l about that thrilling final to the women's 400 metre freestyle? yes. women's 400 metre freestyle? yes, more upsets — women's 400 metre freestyle? yes, more upsets in _ women's 400 metre freestyle? yes, more upsets in the _ women's 400 metre freestyle? yes, more upsets in the pool. _ women's 400 metre freestyle? 133 more upsets in the pool. katie women's 400 metre freestyle? 1&1: more upsets in the pool. katie k has
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dominated the pool for the women over the last five years. back in rio she won four golds and one silver, which is why today? freestyle final saw such an upset. in her first olympics, freestyle final saw such an upset. in herfirst olympics, arianna titmus took her down to win her first ever gold medal. titmus swam the race of her life. it was the best time of her career, three minutes .56. that wasjust best time of her career, three minutes .56. that was just off the world record, which is from the 2016 games. titmus poss makoto is incredibly enthusiastic watching on. if you get the chance to try to see the celebrations of dean boxall, thatis the celebrations of dean boxall, that is the coach. it was incredible. a fantastic win and it is always nice to see an upset in the olympics, keeps everyone interested in everything fresh.
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we can speak now to tonia couch, former team gb olympic diver and childhood friend of tom daley. she joins us now from plymouth in south—west england. ijust want i just want to take you back to that moment, we are all sitting on the edges are perceived watching the chinese and their final dive. it was a great dive. what was going through your heads, and then your reaction when you find out that they had one? well, i was on the edge of my seat with my hands on my face, saying they have done it, they have done it, in other words, the chinese. i thought they had just overtaken them because their last night was amazing, but itjust wasn't enough to stop it was incredible. i was up on my feetjump screaming, crying, all sorts. it was so good to watch.
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you have known tom for so long, what will this mean to him? it you have known tom for so long, what will this mean to him?— will this mean to him? it will mean the world- — will this mean to him? it will mean the world- i — will this mean to him? it will mean the world. i was _ will this mean to him? it will mean the world. i wasjust _ will this mean to him? it will mean the world. i wasjust saying - will this mean to him? it will mean the world. i wasjust saying to - will this mean to him? it will mean the world. i wasjust saying to my l the world. i was just saying to my boyfriend that tom has won world championships, world cups, world series, commonwealth games, europeans, but never that olympic gold medal. we all know he is able to do that, but it is never gone his way, so today was just incredible. incredible for him. so pleased for him. ~ ., ., , incredible for him. so pleased for him. ., , , , him. what about matty lee, his first ol mics. him. what about matty lee, his first olympics- what _ him. what about matty lee, his first olympics. what do _ him. what about matty lee, his first olympics. what do you _ him. what about matty lee, his first olympics. what do you think - him. what about matty lee, his first olympics. what do you think he - olympics. what do you think he brought to the pairing mentally? it is his first olympic games. i was nervous for him because tom has done it many times, he knows what pressure is all about, but for his first olympic games, matty lee, my fingers were crossed for him to hold his nerve. the fact that it is his
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first games, also he is standing there with tom daly, and three the pressure was just unbearable. the fact he got up there, and he looked so calm. i don't know how he did it. hats off to matty lee.— hats off to matty lee. what do you think it will — hats off to matty lee. what do you think it will mean _ hats off to matty lee. what do you think it will mean for _ hats off to matty lee. what do you think it will mean for the _ hats off to matty lee. what do you think it will mean for the rest - hats off to matty lee. what do you think it will mean for the rest of. think it will mean for the rest of the team, this kind of start? yes. the team, this kind of start? yes, it is a very — the team, this kind of start? yes, it is a very good — the team, this kind of start? yes, it is a very good start. _ the team, this kind of start? yes it is a very good start. hopefully it is a very good start. hopefully it will lift everyone's spirits suoply, it will lift everyone's spirits supply, especially because there is no crowd cheering them on. i think this will be something that team gb will be able to thrive off. you this will be something that team gb will be able to thrive off.— will be able to thrive off. you will know that many _ will be able to thrive off. you will know that many people _ will be able to thrive off. you will know that many people may - will be able to thrive off. you willj know that many people may have counted tom out, his fourth olympics, yet he has hung in there, worked so hard. he has talked before about becoming her dad has changed his mind set. how has he changed over the past few years? tell us
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more about his headspace and where he is at at the moment. itoutith more about his headspace and where he is at at the moment.— he is at at the moment. with having a child and being _ he is at at the moment. with having a child and being able _ he is at at the moment. with having a child and being able to _ he is at at the moment. with having a child and being able to dive - he is at at the moment. with having a child and being able to dive all- a child and being able to dive all the time, it is something on the other site where you have your mind taken out of it. when you're training all the time it is very difficult to come home and switch off. now he has a family of his own he is able to do that. i think it is made a lot more calm, not the fact that he doesn't care, that's not the point, but it is notjust his life any more. he has diving and a family, so that it is like, notjust diving. ithink family, so that it is like, notjust diving. i think having his family watching him today has probably made him a little bit more calm going into this. whatever happens today, he still has his family to go home too. i think that is why he nailed it in the competition today. some sadness, though, _ it in the competition today. some sadness, though, that _ it in the competition today. some sadness, though, that they - it in the competition today. some sadness, though, that they weren't here in tokyo at the pool to watch,
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they were at home in front of the tv? ., , . they were at home in front of the tv? yeah, it is cutting for them because imagine _ tv? yeah, it is cutting for them because imagine the _ tv? yeah, it is cutting for them because imagine the crowd - tv? yeah, it is cutting for them l because imagine the crowd when tv? yeah, it is cutting for them - because imagine the crowd when they won that, i wish i was there. they were watching from home. i'm sure they had a nice glass of per cycle cheering for them. i wish i was a fly on their wall, that's for sure. a wonderful moment. so lovely to talk to you. thank you forjoining us. let's get more now from our correspondent mariko oi, who is in shimbashi, tokyo. we have a fantastic new star in the skateboarding. she is so talented, adorable. so many words to describe
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her. , a, , ,~ adorable. so many words to describe her. , , her. yes, momi'i nishiya becoming theyoungest— her. yes, momiji nishiya becoming the youngest japanese _ her. yes, momiji nishiya becoming the youngest japanese athlete - her. yes, momiji nishiya becoming the youngest japanese athlete to l her. yes, momiji nishiya becoming l the youngest japanese athlete to win the youngest japanese athlete to win a medal. i was watching her interview shortly after winning the gold metal and she was asked how happy it was, and she said it feels like it weighs a tonne. what an amazing performance from her. also we had naomi osaka playing today, and of course progressing to the next stage. i guess we shouldn't expect anything less from her, but definitely worth keeping an eye on because the japanese public have been watching her performance very closely. it has been an incredible few days for team japan. momiji nishiya is the second gold medalfor teamjapan, nishiya is the second gold medalfor team japan, seven nishiya is the second gold medalfor teamjapan, seven medals in total, so doing incredibly well. sport headlines overtaken from the scandals, which is what the government has been hoping for.
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after the men's triathlon this morning, there are pictures circulating showing the scene, it was a bit like a battlefield, all the athletes lying collapsed and heaps all over the place. neither is this criticism of the organising committee here injapan that they had misled the public overseas and the athletes about the heat. indeed. in case you're _ the athletes about the heat. indeed. in case you're wondering _ the athletes about the heat. indeed. in case you're wondering why - the athletes about the heat. indeed. in case you're wondering why i - the athletes about the heat. indeed. in case you're wondering why i am i in case you're wondering why i am standing in front of the strain it is because there is the temperature board. in the early evening it is getting slightly cooler, but it has been brutally hot. as you say, some people have started accusing the japanese government of lying because in its bid to host the games it said thatjapan? summer is miles and that athletes would be able to perform in their best, which hasn't exactly
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been the case. i took your summer is nothing new to people who grew up here. it has been an issue ever since i was a child, but i have noticed it has got a lot harsher when i came home this year. that means that schools, coaches have to be extra careful to protect children playing sports outside. under the scorching sun of tokyo, girls from den—en—chofu high school's tennis club carry on with their extracurricular activities, but, every year, around 3,000 children suffer from heatstroke during club activities like this. there have even been deaths in the past. the school's tennis coach of 17 years says the hottest summers mean they have to be extra careful. translation: we measure heat stress indexes every hour to make sure - it is safe to practise. lately, we have gathered early in the morning at 7:15am or the late afternoon when the temperature
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isn't too high. it is under this heat that the world's top athletes are competing for gold during this summer's games. the conditions mean we are less likely to see a volley of world records tumbling. just by being in heat exposure, the cardiovascular — your heart system — has to work harder to maintain your performance and also your body's ability to thermoregulate, maintain your body temperature in a good state — that would also be impacted greatly. the last timejapan held a summer games was 1964. it was in october, when the weather was cooler, so having the games here now has raised concerns that the intense heat and humidity of the tokyo summer could pose a serious risk to athletes, but when the games are held, it all has to do with the global sport calendar. these are the major events. there is a gap between late—july and august. broadcasters around the world paid
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billions of dollars for the rights to show the olympics. they need to show it at the right time of year in the right time of day. broadcasting is one of the two most significant revenue sources for the olympics, so the ioc is going to want to keep sponsors and broadcasters as happy as can be. and that means some events, like marathon and race walking, have been moved to sapporo, where it is cooler, while others take place in the early morning or evening. but increasingly, it is notjust the battle for a medal, it is a battle against the heat. but from one extreme to another, we are expecting a typhoon to hit tokyo in the north—east of japan tomorrow. we are still expecting to go to the
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perfect —— prefecture that was the most hardly heads by the tsunami in 2011. i'm not sure if that will have to be rescheduled. we will keep you updated as we go along. one thing to note when talking about the heat, tom pidcock winning the main's mountain bike and cross country today for team gb, he took the lead very early on, midway through, he held that the whole way. it was a convincing victory for him, but he trained back at home in a heated tent apparently, so he coped with the conditions incredibly well because of their training. it obviously paid off and he was dealing with the intense heat today. supporters of tunisia's president kais saied have taken to the streets to celebrate, after he sacked the country's prime
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minister and suspended parliament. it comes after a day of demonstrations across the country calling for the government to resign over its handling of the coronavirus pandemic. our north africa correspondent rana jawad is in the tunisian capital, tunis. earlier, she gave us more details on how the crisis unfolded. ultimately at the moment, the president, and the army is backing him. he made the announcement after meeting with security officials as well as senior army officials. the unfolding events here however, it is a point to remember, are largely linked to a power struggle that has been ongoing since the beginning of the year between the presidency and the prime minister and the speaker of parliament. what we saw in terms of protests yesterday was again carrying some
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of the regular messages and slogans that we have seen over the last few years. people are very frustrated with the economic downturn of the country, with the mismanagement of institutions, of public services, they are deteriorating. and they want things to improve. and then covid came along and made things even worse. so the protests were a part of that as well. but they were also calling for the dissolution of parliament because there are a number of people in the country who have also grown disillusioned with the parliamentary system and feel that there are just too many politicians around wrangling with each other which is paralysing the country. and then we saw the president's announcement. this announcement he made was based on, as he put it, invoking article 80 of the constitution. technically, he will be rolling with the assistance of the prime minister
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that he will appoint in the interim. and it should not be longer than 30 days. in 30 days' time, you know, there needs to be clarity on what the next step is. i think the worry now is there is a lot of uncertainty as to what the next steps will be. and of course we heard from the speaker of parliament calling the move a coup against the constitution and the revolution of 2011. so it's very tense at the moment in terms of words coming from both sides. some covid restrictions in northern ireland are being relaxed from today. up to 15 people from an unlimited number of households are now able to meet outdoors and close contacts services, like hairdressers, can open without the need for pre—booked appointments. ministers at stormont will meet to decide whether to increase the numbers for indoor gatherings and if theatres and concert halls can re—open. the certification system that
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allows vaccinated people in northern ireland to travel abroad is under "extreme pressure", according to the government. some people applying for a certificate have had trouble obtaining one online, via post and by telephone. dr eddie o'neill is the director for the new covid certification app in northern ireland. just tell us a little bit how the 3pp just tell us a little bit how the app works. essentially, people from northern ireland go to our ni direct website, search for covid certification, they can find details on how to download the app. there is a registration process where they verify their identity. they can then request a qr certificate to appear on their phone. that should happen automatically for the vast majority of people. for those who have some
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problems because there is insufficient data or they have entered data directly, there is a manual team processing in the background to make sure they get their certificates in time for travel. ., ., ., their certificates in time for travel. ., ., , , , travel. have too many people been t in: to travel. have too many people been trying to register — travel. have too many people been trying to register for _ travel. have too many people been trying to register for the _ travel. have too many people been trying to register for the app - travel. have too many people been trying to register for the app at - trying to register for the app at once? . , , , trying to register for the app at once? ., , , , , trying to register for the app at once? , , . ., once? the app itself is functioning fine. we once? the app itself is functioning fine- we had _ once? the app itself is functioning fine. we had a _ once? the app itself is functioning fine. we had a couple _ once? the app itself is functioning fine. we had a couple of— once? the app itself is functioning fine. we had a couple of glitches l fine. we had a couple of glitches over the weekend. the app was brought in four weeks earlier than we had intended originally. that was due to the changes in other countries that make certification mandatory, in some cases. we release the app on friday. we had a couple of minor issues with the app which we have updated with the new release. they have been reviewed by the app stores. if people refresh their app over the next few hours they should have the most up—to—date version. the problem we have had has been at the support helpline. we set “p been at the support helpline. we set
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up the helpline to help people get into the automated process because of data entry issues because they were having a problem uploading the suitable image that would allow the biometric scans to work. people have been getting in touch to ask about foreign office travel information site, which is not what it was set “p site, which is not what it was set up to do. we have had to get out with messaging to stop people overwhelming the helpline so people who have an immediate travel only can get through and get their certification fixed.— can get through and get their certification fixed. there was a re . uest certification fixed. there was a request that — certification fixed. there was a request that only _ certification fixed. there was a request that only people - certification fixed. there was a - request that only people travelling up request that only people travelling up to the end ofjuly get in touch. does that request still remain in place? you're trying to deal with this in chronological order? we thou~ht this in chronological order? we thou . ht it this in chronological order? - thought it was prudent that we would do that. restricted it to the 31st ofjuly we could ensure that the products we have stood up are stable and everything is working ok. then obviously this week we will review the situation in the next couple of
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days and once we are confident we can deal with the likely number of applications we are anticipating, we will give that information out to release further dates or open that “p release further dates or open that up completely without restriction. we ran through the easing of restrictions in northern ireland from today and some further measures, some further opening up that the ministers are considering at stormont later on today. do you think this is the right time for all of this? we saw a couple of trust yesterday in northern ireland put out and it —— put out an appeal for off duty staff to comment because of the pressure caused by the number of covid patients coming in. mr; the pressure caused by the number of covid patients coming in.— covid patients coming in. my public health colleagues _ covid patients coming in. my public health colleagues who _ covid patients coming in. my public health colleagues who would - covid patients coming in. my public health colleagues who would have l covid patients coming in. my public i health colleagues who would have the policy lead in this area to court things into consideration. there is obviously a balance between a balance between allowing the economy to open up and ensuring we maintain a downward pressure on numbers, so i would trust them to make the right judgment calls in that area.- judgment calls in that area. doctor eddie o'neill, _ judgment calls in that area. doctor eddie o'neill, thank _ judgment calls in that area. doctor eddie o'neill, thank you _ judgment calls in that area. doctor eddie o'neill, thank you for - judgment calls in that area. doctor eddie o'neill, thank you for your l eddie o'neill, thank you for your time today.
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senior uk government ministers will decide today whether to expand the scheme which allows fully—vaccinated key workers in england to avoid self—isolation by taking daily covid tests instead. staff working in the food supply chain, frontline emergency services, and transport and freight are already included, and other workers such as council refuse collectors, could be added to the list. the department for environment, food and rural affairs says 500 sites have been identified for daily testing, which will be carried out by employers within the workplace. i spoke to rob hollyman, a director of haulage firm young's transport, and asked him how his business has been affected. much the same as other allied businesses, drivers are using the app at various delivery or collection points. a day or two later they could be pinged because somebody at those premises has
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contracted covid, they then have to self—isolate, which means our company, like any other haulage company, they are then required to leave those drivers at home. don't forget, we have heard stories recently about the shortage of drivers anyway, which is considerable, and it's compounding the problem. you have mentioned that, the underlying staff shortage of freight drivers. how will the new system work, what knowledge do you have already of it? interesting question. very little is the answer to that question. we don't even know if we are included as one of the 500 companies. if we were included, we don't know how the testing will operate, so to be quite honest, we haven't got a clue. this all changed over the weekend about including freight companies or haulage companies, but very little has come
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out from government so there has been a distinct lack of clarity over what the rules and regulations will be. you haven't made any representations to government to say we would like to be one of these companies? we have indeed. the industry body has been campaigning hard, as well. we don't know if we are one of the companies that will be allowed to use this kit, the lateral flow testing kit. we have quite a few of those. we don't know what the procedure is going to be, if we are appointed as a testing centre. have you had any conversations with your drivers to say we think this is how it might work, or how we might envisage we would like to make it work in the absence of official guidance? yeah, we've had those conversations and the drivers are delighted that something may be happening, but i stress maybe, because we don't know anything at the moment. given we are only a few
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weeks away from the 16th of august, when, if people will be properly vaccinated, they will need to self—isolate anyway, presumably you really need this guidance yesterday. you took the words right out of my mouth. we need that information yesterday. will you get in touch with the government to try to find out, or do you just wait to find out if you are included? somewhere in between. we are only minnows as individual companies, but we have a trade body and we have been in touch with them. we are hoping that somewhere around midday, one o'clock today, there will be further news from government. really interesting to hear the situation you're in. the headlines on bbc news: adam peaty starts a �*goldrush' for team gb — winning the 100—metre breaststroke title and becoming one of the most successful
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swimmers of all time olympicjoy for tom daley and matty lee — gold in the men's synchronised ten—metre platform diving and a gb gold in the cycling too — tom pidcock wins the men's mountain bike cross—country event — less than two months after breaking his collarbone in a training crash celebrations in tunisia as the president sacks his prime minister and suspends parliament following a day of protests against the government's handling of the covid pandemic. and — as more extreme weather is recorded around the world — scientists warn of the urgent need for action on climate change some breaking news, the singer, best
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known for being part of the boys and ronan keating is to receive damages over phone hacking. he brought legal action against newspapers last year claiming his voice mail messages had been intercepted byjournalists. at a hearing they said a number of suspicious articles between 1996 and 2011 which contained private information, just hearing in the last few minutes that ronan keating has accepted substantial damages from the publisher of the news of the world over phone hacking. figures from the united nations show there's been a big increase in the number of civilian deaths in afghanistan, since taliban militants launched their offensive against government forces. the insurgents have captured vast swathes of rural territory,
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after foreign troops began their withdrawal from the country. the us has now said it's prepared to continue to support the afghan government with air strikes against the taliban. the bbc�*s secunder kermani is in the capital kabul and has more. very grim figures, unfortunately. more than 1,600 ordinary people killed in the first half of this year, more than 3,500 injured, that includes record high numbers of child casualties and overall is amongst some of the highest figures we have seen for that kind of period since records began a little over a decade ago. the violence really spiked in may and june when the taliban offensive was launched, which has seen them capture half of all territory in the country. the un has warned if current trends continue, then this year is going to be the deadliest since records began for afghan civilians. they are calling for urgent action to be taken to avoid that occurring. they found, according to this report, that the taliban
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were responsible for more civilian casualties than any other group. one thing that is causing a lot of concern is so far a lot of the fighting has been in more rural areas. now it seems to be increasingly focused on urban areas, which are of course more densely populated. so real concern, realfear the bloodshed is going to increase in the coming months. the uk government says it wants to make getting vaccinated against coronavirus as easy a possible, to try to get more young people to take the jab. to help, health services in england are running pop—up walk—in centres at music festivals and shopping centres. it comes amid concerns that some 18 to 40 year olds are not turning up for pre—booked appointments. robert coxwell reports. quick, easy and convenient. that is the idea behind this pop—up vaccination centre in kent. health bosses say they are becoming increasingly important as there are concerns over the number of young people
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who are not turning up to book appointments. it is a really difficult issue. of course, young people want to live their lives, they want to get on with things, they want the whole covid thing to be over. sometimes it might feel like, why bother? cutting the form filling has made people bother. so much more convenient. when you come home from work, you do not want to sit there, go through your phone and find a time. i am already here, let's do it. way easier. you walk in, five - minutes and it's done. another way to increase vaccine taken is to turn community centres into dedicated walk—in clinics. this is quicker and really far away from home, so this is much more efficient. students are showing maturity getting vaccines meant notjust the nightclubs but we understand the importance of getting vaccines. the uk government confirmed being fully vaccinated would be required to enter
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nightclubs from september. that could be extended to other crowded venues in england, giving people another incentive to getjabbed. the number of new covid infections in the uk has fallen for five days lam going i am going to talk about something else _ the number of new covid infections in the uk has fallen for five days in a row for the first time since february. there were just over 29 thousand cases yesterday — compared with more than 48 thousand last week. let's speak now to professor peter openshaw — professor of experimental medicine at imperial college london and also a member of the uk vaccine network — he is also a member of nervtag — one of the groups of scientists advising the uk government on the pandemic but speaking to us in a personal capacity. thank you very much for your time.
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what do you make of these numbers? cases falling for the fifth day in a row. what do you attribute that to? i hope it is a genuine drop in infection and not a change in the testing or a delay in reporting. we need to be cautious, we need to see the figures reflected in hospitalisations and so far, the reports from the front line hospitals are a lot of cases amongst those who have not been vaccinated. i think a little bit of caution, still waiting for confirmation from the office for national statistics, there has been a hold—up in the confirmation, i think it would be wonderful if it is true. we all feel a little flutter of excitement when we see this decline in case numbers and we think, we are past the peak. i would also say that in the academy of medical sciences report from last
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week, we said there would be a peek at the end of this month, a peak in case numbers followed by a drop in hospitalisations after a delay, and then a drop in deaths towards the end of august. maybe we are starting to see that curve is a little bit earlier than we thought it was but i would urge caution at the moment. it is a flutter of hope with a measure of caution alongside it. what do you make of the impact of vaccinations at this point along with people who have caught the virus prior to being vaccinated? is that having an impact on the figures?— on the figures? yes, i am sure it is. the on the figures? yes, i am sure it is- the latest _ on the figures? yes, i am sure it is. the latest figures _ on the figures? yes, i am sure it is. the latest figures that - on the figures? yes, i am sure it is. the latest figures that two i on the figures? yes, i am sure it| is. the latest figures that two out of three people have been fully vaccinated, that is an astonishingly
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good statistic, but we really need to see something in the high 90s. up to see something in the high 90s. up to 98% of people have to be, have to have a measure of immunological resistance if the delta agent is to be contained. the more contagious the strain, the higher the rate of vaccination or immunisation you need, achieved through vaccination or through infection or a combination of the two. the figures showing the climbing number of people who have antibodies, nine out of ten adults, and the delta, the younger population aged between ten and 13, so a lot of infection going on amongst teenagers, and we just don't know how that is going to translate into durable immunity. taste
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translate into durable immunity. we have not discussed the 19th ofjuly and the removal of final restrictions in england although not around the rest of the uk where facemasks are mandatory on public transport for example, what impact is that going to have? we would not see the impact of that yet? we is that going to have? we would not see the impact of that yet?- see the impact of that yet? we will have to wait _ see the impact of that yet? we will have to wait and _ see the impact of that yet? we will have to wait and see. _ see the impact of that yet? we will have to wait and see. so _ see the impact of that yet? we will have to wait and see. so many - have to wait and see. so many different factors as to the weather, the warm weather, may be associated with a drop in transmission, the 19th ofjuly party is that some people have been going to, they throw away all caution, that is going to feed through into a surge in cases which may be balanced against a reduction for other reasons. on average, people are being cautious, most people are being cautious, most people are being very cautious, they are wearing facemasks when they go
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shopping in crowded places, when they are exposed high levels of exhaled breath or sneezing from other people, we are being very cautious, let's hope that is keeping the transmission rate down. lang? thank you very much for your thoughts on all of that to date. a 19—year—old is attempting youngest woman to fly solo around the world. zara rutherford, who's belgian—british, will be circumnavigating the globe, taking in 52 countries along the way. i'm pleased to say we're joined by zara now who's a popham airfield in the city of winchester. very excited to talk to you today. we have heard about incredible feats by teenagers at the olympics today. it is great to talk to you. where did this ambition begin? i’zre it is great to talk to you. where did this ambition begin? i've been fl in: with
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did this ambition begin? i've been flying with my _ did this ambition begin? i've been flying with my family _ did this ambition begin? i've been flying with my family my - did this ambition begin? i've been flying with my family my whole i did this ambition begin? i've been i flying with my family my whole life. my flying with my family my whole life. my mum and dad and my little brother are pilots. flying was a natural thing to do. i had a dream. i had a dream fora thing to do. i had a dream. i had a dream for a long time to fly around the world but it is too crazy, too impossible so i thought, it is a dream, i will see what happens and then suddenly i took a gap year and suddenly i have one year, i spoke to my family, i said i want to do this crazy thing, do you think it is possible? and they were like, yes, we will support you.— we will support you. obviously fl in: is we will support you. obviously flying is in _ we will support you. obviously flying is in the _ we will support you. obviously flying is in the blood. - we will support you. obviously flying is in the blood. you - we will support you. obviously flying is in the blood. you only started formal flying lessons last year, and yourfirst started formal flying lessons last year, and your first licence last year. it is quite an undertaking. can you us about the trip, five
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continents. what are you most excited about and what is most challenging? i’m excited about and what is most challenging?— challenging? i'm really excited about meeting _ challenging? i'm really excited about meeting new— challenging? i'm really excited about meeting new people, i challenging? i'm really excited | about meeting new people, new cultures, the food will be amazing and i will never forget it for the rest of my life. the most challenging will be flying in remote environments, north canada, northern russia, no one really lives there, you know, alaska. it will be challenging, exciting, different, beautiful, everything, really. you are aiming _ beautiful, everything, really. you are aiming to _ beautiful, everything, really. you are aiming to promote flying and opportunities for women? are aiming to promote flying and opportunities forwomen? i are aiming to promote flying and opportunities for women? i never saw women in aviation _ opportunities for women? i never saw women in aviation and _ opportunities for women? i never saw women in aviation and this _ opportunities for women? i never saw women in aviation and this is - women in aviation and this is discouraging, you never see a woman doing something you love. i am
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hoping that me flying around the world will inspire other women to decide that they would love to do this. i decide that they would love to do this. , ., ., , ., this. i smiled when i read that you started of getting _ this. i smiled when i read that you started of getting the _ this. i smiled when i read that you started of getting the funding - started of getting the funding yourself. you have some sponsors but yourself. you have some sponsors but you sold your automobile and you calculated that would take you to five countries. i calculated that would take you to five countries.— calculated that would take you to five countries. i am selling my car, and i am five countries. i am selling my car, and i am really _ five countries. i am selling my car, and i am really excited. _ five countries. i am selling my car, and i am really excited. i— five countries. i am selling my car, and i am really excited. i am - five countries. i am selling my car, and i am really excited. i am all. and i am really excited. i am all in, all the money has gone, and i am very excited and very thankful. in one sentence, what will you need to do to actually break the record? i will have to fly the tropic of cancer according to the guinness world records, and go round the
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world, it's a slightly different route but that is the main thing. we wish you the very best of luck and please come back and tell us about it when you finished. wow, what an incredible young woman, the youngest to fly solo around the world. the headlines on bbc news: gold at the tokyo olympics for divers tom daley and matty lee, with mountain—biker tom pidcock and swimmer adam peaty also securing golds for team gb. celebrations in tunisia as the president sacks his prime minister and suspends parliament after a day of protests against the government's handling of the covid pandemic. as more extreme weather is recorded around the world, a gathering of scientists warns of the urgent need for action on climate change. revenue losses at the uk's heathrow airport have increased to £2.9 billion,
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as the airport saw the same number of passengers in the first six months of 2021 as it did in just 18 days in 2019. heathrow has welcomed changes to the government's traffic light system, but warned passengers were being put off due to expensive testing requirements for travel. john holland—kaye is heathrow airport's chief executive. we are talking about the pcr test here which are required for anyone coming into the uk and the reason we are told we need them is so the government can carry out genomic sequencing tests on them. but the fact is only 2% of those tests are actually genomically sequenced, so it is a huge waste of money for very little benefit. a better way would be to use the cheaper lateral flow tests which have very high levels of accuracy and only if you test positive to then go and have an expensive pcr test and that would just make it easier for all of us to go about our normal business, and this is exactly what we do in our everyday life and what our kids do at schools.
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ministers and officials from more than 50 countries are holding climate talks hosted in london by the president of the cop26 summit, alok sharma. high on the agenda is the demand from poorer countries that the rich world live up to previous commitments to do more to help them fight climate change and develop their economies in a sustainable way. climate finance will be a huge issue in the run—up to cop26, which is taking place in glasgow in november. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here to explain what's at stake. if you think it is going to be hard for rich countries to adjust to the need to remove fossil fuels and carbon from their economies, just think about how hard it is going to be in the developing world, where there's far less money to pay for new infrastructure in the first place, but there's an awful lot of people. it's a challenge which has been recognised for some time. as long ago as 2009, the developed world agreed it would provide $100 billion a year by 2020 to help poorer
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countries deal with the effects of climate change and build greener economies in the future. well, 2020 has come and gone and the target has not been reached, even though a new and more ambitious target is supposed to be set for 2025. for many countries around the world, this is the issue in the run—up to november's cop26 climate summit in glasgow. so how far short are they? it's quite hard to calculate what money should be included because it is a complicated mix of public and some private finance. but the un and the oecd estimate that, by 2018, the total had reached nearly $79 billion and it won't have got to $100 billion by 2020.
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between 2016 and 2018, 43% of the funding went to asia, 25% africa and 17% to the americas — a lot of it spent on green energy or transport infrastructure. within the g7, the united states and italy in particular have been lagging behind their promises, but a big push to increase the overall amount of money provided is certainly on. here's the crucial point — by 2018, about three—quarters of the public money made available for climate action in developing countries was in the form of loans that need to be paid back, rather than grants that don't. the share of grants was higher to the very poorest countries, but still less than half the total. that's a big problem in countries where the covid pandemic has made access to international funds even more pressing. many countries are already heavily in debt and huge loans will make that problem worse.
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so it's a critical issue. the message from the world's poor to rich countries in the run—up to the glasgow summit, if you want ambitious climate targets, you're going to have to pay for them. gurkha veterans are staging a hunger strike in london as part of a campaign for equal pension rights. gurkhas who retired before 1997 are not eligible for a uk armed forces pension and are calling for change. the uk government says it's committed to ensuring the gurkha pension scheme is sustainable and fair alongside other uk public sector pensions. luke hanrahan reports. a hunger strike on the doorstep of downing street, as gurkhas who loyally fought for the british all over the world seek
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equal pension rights. i served in hong kong, brunei, canada and the uk. this man served for 20 years, but like all gurkhas who retired before 1997, is being denied a uk armed forces pension. we want equal pension, proportionally. it is very complicated. and we want a goodwill payment to bring our community, gurkha community, out of great poverty. representatives of gurkha communities who live across london, the south and south—east of england. we have had 207 years of this historical discrimination. we try to raise our voice over 30 years. no one listening. the government says it is committed to ensuring the gurkha pension scheme is sustainable and fair alongside other uk public sector pensions. but these men and women — paid a third less than their british counterparts — are not satisfied, striking for what they see as equality.
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concerns over sustainability in fashion have seen second—hand clothing sales rise. now, in what's thought to be a first in the uk, a permanent fashion �*swap shop' for adults has opened in london. swappers pay a membership fee to visit the store and exchange items they no longer want. jonelle awomoyi went to meet the shop's founder. i'd spend about £300 a month on clothing. one day i had a girls' night at my house, and the girls came around and we were like, let's go out instead of stay in. everybody started moving things around my wardrobe. they were swapping amongst themselves. i saw this happen and thought, if i have all these things in my wardrobe and my friend has all these things in her wardrobe, it means we all have this problem where we have all of these clothes that we are not using that could go to somebody else. montana has opened a shop that runs on the basis of swapping instead of paying for goods. swappers, rather than shoppers, can trade in their clothes for second—hand garments.
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swap nation is thought to be the uk's first permanent fashion swap shop for adults. so i've brought three items, ok? there is a dress. you get a four overall for that. a blouse? it is a designer and it is made out of silk. overall it gets 13. a fast fashion top. it is made out of polyester. two to three tokens. you've got 20. 20. and i can go across this whole shop and choose whatever i'd like? take your time, browse, try them on, swap things in and out. it's up to you. ijust grabbed an amazing vintage top that if you are going to buy it would easily be £60 to £70. i have been able to come here with three items i don't wear and swap them. this is their first - physical permanent store. it's really exciting for me.
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i i wanted to be one of the first. people through the doors today. swapping fashion is a good way of keeping a circular economy and maintaining a very small but kind of personal style wardrobe. you can still update it and things. it's been amazing. sustainable fashion is becoming more and more popular. swap nation is just one example of a company that markets second—hand clothing, saving clothes from landfill and giving them a new life. there are enough clothes on the planet currently to clothe the next six generations of the human race. almost 70% of the clothes we buy today are synthetic. they are made from fossil fuels. clothing has a huge transport cost. most of our clothes are made 5000, 6000 miles away. every piece of clothing we have costs the planet. so, according to patrick, we need to consume less.
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but does swapping have to end with fashion? you could easily swap a lawn mower and then swap that back to somebody else because you've used it. you could do that within your community. that could definitely work as a business. three of britain's biggest conservation charities are calling on the government to do more to protect grasslands and meadows. the bumblebee conservation trust, plantlife international and butterfly conservation, say grasslands offer a natural solution to cutting carbon and should get similar protection to trees. the charities want the government to secure an international commitment to protect grasslands and meadows at this autumn's climate change conference in glasgow. one of europe's most famous streets, the tree—lined paseo del prado in madrid, has been added to unesco's world heritage list. three of britain's biggest conservation charities are calling the un's cultural organisation
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said it was a landscape of arts and sciences, adding that together with its prominent buildings, among them the prado museum, the boulevard had played a key role in the city's history. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello, again. the met office has a yellow weather warning out for some heavy thundery downpours across parts of kent, sussex, as far west as brighton. not all of us will catch one, but low pressure is in charge of our weather so as we go through this week we are looking at cooler conditions with some heavy thundery showers and also some sunny spells. not all of us will catch those heavy downpours, but if you do, you will know all about it. for the rest of the uk we are looking at a fair bit of dry weather, some sunshine, but there will still be some showers knocking around. you could catch one almost anywhere, and if you do, there is the chance that it could be heavy and thundery. our temperature range, 15 in the north to 25 as we push further south. through this evening, many of those showers
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will tend to fade, however, we have got a new system coming in from the west introducing further showers across northern ireland, wales, south—east england and the channel islands. there will be some clear skies as well, but it is not going to be a cold night for most, 12 in the north to 17 in the south will be our overnight lows. so as we go through the course of tuesday, our weather front coming in from the west will slowly drift eastwards, low pressure still firmly in charge of our weather so things are still fairly unsettled. we start off with those showers in the west stretching eastwards through the day, whenever you see yellows or light greens in the charts, it means you can expect something heavier and you can see further heavy showers coming in across scotland. they could also be thundery and may well lead to some localised flooding in places. temperatures tomorrow, down a touch on today, we are looking at a range of 15 to about 23 celsius. as we head on into wednesday, our low pressure still is driving our weather, it is deepening, we've got weather fronts not too far away, we can see the isobars, they are a little bit closer together.
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you will notice more of a wind during the course of wednesday, particularly so around the showers where it will be fairly gusty, gusts of 30, maybe even 40mph around the showers. these showers will be plentiful, heavy and also thundery and we could have some issues with localised flooding. in between them, there will be some sunny skies. these white circles represent the average wind speeds, don't forget, the gusts will be much more than that. temperature wise, well, we are looking at highs in the north, 15 degrees, maybe 21 as we slide down towards norwich. then, for the rest of the week, the outlook remains unsettled.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11... in the aquatic centre. there is the moment... olympicjoy for tom daley and matty lee. they win the men's synchronised ten—metre platform diving, as team gb stage a gold rush in tokyo. adam is the double olympic champion! fantastic— adam is the double olympic champion! fantastic swim for adam team gb. earlier, swimming superstar adam peaty dominated the men's 100—metre breaststroke to successfully defend his olympic title. and there was a third gold for team gb in the men's mountain bike cross—country. victory for tom pidcock, less than two months
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after breaking his collarbone in a training crash. away from the olympics, could more essential workers avoid self—isolation if they've been pinged? ministers are to discuss whether to expand the list of those allowed to take daily tests instead. ministers and officials from more than 50 countries hold climate talks in london, as poorer countries call for more help to fight global warming. and the former boyzone singer ronan keating accepts "substantial damages" from the publisher of the news of the world over phone—hacking. it's been a great day for team gb
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at the tokyo olympics with three gold medals and one silver. in the pool, tom daley and his partner matty lee took the gold with an emotional victory in the men's10—metre synchronised diving. it was third time lucky for 27—year—old tom, after bronze at the last two olympics. there was another gold medal in the men's mountain bike cross—country event. tom pidcock with the victory, just two months after breaking his collarbone. earlier, the swimmer adam peaty won team gb's first gold medal in tokyo, with victory in the 100 metres breast—stroke. the 26—year—old finished in just under 57.4 seconds, the fifth—fastest time in the event's history. he's become the first british swimmer to retain an olympic title. overnight team gb also secured another silver medal, thanks to alex yee in the men's triathlon. but britain isn't the only country celebrating a good day in the games. momiji nishiya made history
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at the age ofjust 13 as she became the first women's olympic street skateboarding champion. for a full round up of the action at the olympics this morning, let's cross to jane dougall at the bbc sports centre. where at the bbc sports centre. do you start? good morning. at the bbc sports centre. tom daley has ended his long wait for an olympic gold medal. alongside matty lee, daley triumphed in a nerve—wracking men's synchronised 10m platform event at tokyo 2020. the pair dived impeccably throughout, moving top of the leaderboard after four dives, before going on to expertly handle nerves and pressure in their final two routines. in a nail—biting finale, the british pair watched on as chinese pair cao yuan and chen aisen made their final dive. daley and lee then broke into wild celebrations when it became clear they had ended china's golden grip
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on the event, dating back to 2000. i have been diving now for 20 years and this is my fourth olympic games and this is my fourth olympic games and lots of people problem would have counted me out at this olympics being the older person but i'm in the best shape physically and mentally. stood behind that over there and about to be announced as olympic champions and then to hear the national anthem play, i was gone. i couldn't even sing. i was halfway singing and i was blubbering. ijust... yeah, i can't believe it. the medals started rolling in in the early hours of this morning with adam peaty winning the 100m breaststroke, becoming the first british swimmer to defend an olympic title. the world record holder blew away the competition to take britain's first gold medal of the tokyo games.
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from start to finish, it was a perfectly executed swim by peaty as he finished in a time of 57.37 seconds, six tenths clear of the field. speaking afterwards, the defending champion said he was relieved. i haven't felt this good since 2016. itjust means the world to me. i didn't have the... i thought i had the best preparation of my life but then in the finals, it goes out the window. that's really what it takes to be an athlete, not who is the best all year round, it's the best on the day, best person on the day who is the most adaptable. team gb's tom pidcock has taken gold in the cross country mountain biking. he led the race from about midway onwards, navigating the tough course superbly. the 21—year—old from leeds finished a clear 20 seconds ahead the rest of the field to take great britain's third gold medal. it comes two months after pidcock
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broke his collarbone in a collision with a car while out training. great britain's alex yee won silver in a difficult men's triathlon as kristian blummenfelt of norway claimed gold. yee had led for much of the 10km run in his debut games, before blummenfelt pushed through to breakaway and take the gold. britain's jonny brownlee came fifth. bit bizarre, really. it's mejust doing this, i'm just a normal guy from south—east london so it's just crazy that dreams really do come true, it's amazing. in training i think my time i did in that race, i knew i could go that little extra bit and unfortunately he was better on the day but i felt as prepared as i could have been and to come second is the best result i could have got on the day.
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one of the new olympic sports skateboarding held it's finals earlier with a remarkable home win for 13 year old momiji nishiya from japan. the average age on the women's podium was 14. a gold and a bronze forjapan, 13 year old momiji nishiya with her impressive win and brazil's rayssa leal, also just 13 years old, getting the silver. third place to funa nakayama who's 16. in olympic tennis, japan's naomi osaka cruised into the third round of the women's singles with a win that only took 65—minutes over viktorija golubic. osaka is the second seed, but also favourite for the gold medal now that ashleigh barty has been knocked out, in the first—round. osaka beat golubic in straight sets 6—3 6—2. it comes after she took an eight—week break in the lead up to the games in order to protect her mental health, dropping out of the french
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open and wimbledon. there was an upset in the women's 400 metres freestyle final with australia's ariarne titmus beating the defending champion katie ledecky to win herfirst—ever gold medal. titmus swam the best time of her career. america's ledecky had dominated the pool over the last five years, winning four golds and one silver in rio. that's all the sport for now. we've been getting some reaction from adam peaty�*s girlfriend and baby son. i can't even find the words to describe it, because i don't think i have felt this kind of pride before. obviously, with george there is a lot of pride, but it's so different, isn't it? he recognises the swimming now, as well, because we all get so excited when it comes on. so he sees the lanes and the blue water and he starts to get excited.
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then he sees his daddy. not necessarily when he's swimming does he recognise him, but when he's celebrating, he definitely saw him, didn't you? if he was here with you now, what would you say to him? first of all, i would give him a huge hug, because that isjust what i'm dying to do. and then i would tell him that we are so proud of him and we love him so much and that i didn't expect anything less from him. and bbc sport's nester mcgregor has been speaking to his parents. there is a lot hanging on this one, he has worked so hard. all the athletes trained for the last year for the olympics and it's another year, his body is another year older so you don't know how he's going to react. i knew he'd put a work in and he was in the best chippy has ever been, but you can never take it as a given, you can't. been, but you can never take it as a given. you can't-— given, you can't. there must have been shouting _ given, you can't. there must have been shouting when _ given, you can't. there must have been shouting when he _ given, you can't. there must have been shouting when he finally - been shouting when he finally touched... been shouting when he finally touched- - -_
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been shouting when he finally touched... ., ~ ., , ., ., touched... thankful it was all over, but about a — touched... thankful it was all over, but about a minute _ touched... thankful it was all over, but about a minute into _ touched... thankful it was all over, but about a minute into it. - touched... thankful it was all over, but about a minute into it. less - but about a minute into it. less than a minute _ but about a minute into it. less than a minute into _ but about a minute into it. less than a minute into it. _ but about a minute into it. less than a minute into it. just - but about a minute into it. less than a minute into it. just after| than a minute into it. just after 57.5 seconds. _ than a minute into it. just after 57.5 seconds. pc— than a minute into it. just after 57.5 seconds. pc was _ than a minute into it. just after- 57.5 seconds. pc was disappointed. he wanted 56 but it's the wrong time of day, they are used to be racing in the evening rather than the morning, so...— in the evening rather than the morning, so... in the evening rather than the mornina, so... ., ., ~ ., morning, so... you talked about the dedication but _ morning, so... you talked about the dedication but this _ morning, so... you talked about the dedication but this started _ morning, so... you talked about the dedication but this started more - dedication but this started more than four or five years ago. was he the kind to stay in the water? he didn't the kind to stay in the water? he: didn't like the water at all, he hated going into the bath and i found it recently it was his brother is telling him the sharks would come through the plughole and mark put him into cold showers because mark never warms the shower up before he gets and so he doesn't think anyone else needs it. anyway, he hated water. , ., . , , else needs it. anyway, he hated water. , , , , water. he used to climb up my shoulder- _
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water. he used to climb up my shoulder. at _ water. he used to climb up my shoulder. at two _ water. he used to climb up my shoulder. at two or _ water. he used to climb up my shoulder. at two or three - water. he used to climb up my i shoulder. at two or three because water. he used to climb up my - shoulder. at two or three because he didntm _ shoulder. at two or three because he didn't... ~ ., ., , ., shoulder. at two or three because he didn't- - -_ it - didn't. .. want to stand in it. it sounds like — didn't. .. want to stand in it. it sounds like a _ didn't. .. want to stand in it. it sounds like a miracle - didn't. .. want to stand in it. it sounds like a miracle he - didn't. .. want to stand in it. it | sounds like a miracle he makes didn't. .. want to stand in it. it i sounds like a miracle he makes a living being in the water? massive chance living being in the water? massive change around _ living being in the water? massive change around and _ living being in the water? massive change around and that's - living being in the water? massive change around and that's because | living being in the water? massive i change around and that's because we forced him to swim because we have a very strong belief that all young children should learn to swim, it's a life—saving scale, so all the children of mine can swim, not to the extent of adam. my friend knew it was stressing me so she took him for a week course and we went from there. it's tom daley�*s first olympic gold at his fourth games. earlier, my colleague lucy hockings spoke to tonia couch, former team gb olympic diver and childhood friend of tom daley. she said she was on the edge of her seat. my hands on my face,
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saying, "they have done it, they have done it," as in the chinese. i thought they had just overtaken them because their last dive was amazing, but itjust wasn't enough, it was incredible. i was up on my feetjump screaming, crying, all sorts. it was so good to watch. you have known tom for so long, what will this mean to him? it will mean the world. i was just saying to my boyfriend that tom has won world championships, world cups, world series, commonwealth games, europeans, but never that olympic gold medal. we all know he is able to do that, but it is never gone his way, so today was just incredible. incredible for him. so pleased for him. what about matty, his first olympics. not nearly as experienced. what do you think he brought to the pairing mentally?
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it is his first olympic games. i was nervous for matty because tom has done it many times, he knows what pressure is all about, but for matty�*s first olympic games, my fingers were crossed for him to hold that nerve. the fact that it is his first games, two, he is standing there with tom daly, and three the pressure was just unbearable. the fact he got up there, and he looked so calm. i don't know how he did it. hats off to matty lee. what do you think it will mean for the rest of the team, this kind of start? yes, it is a very good start. hopefully it will lift everyone's spirits supply, everyone's spirits up high, especially because there is no crowd cheering them on. i really think this will be something that team gb will be able to thrive off. senior ministers will decide today whether to expand the scheme
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which allows fully vaccinated key workers in england to avoid self—isolation by taking daily covid tests instead. staff working in the food supply chain, front line emergency services, and transport and freight are already included and other workers such as council refuse collectors could be added to the list. the department for environment, food and rural affairs says 500 sites have been identified for daily testing, which will be carried out by employers within the workplace. james jamieson, chairs the local government association and says local officials should be trusted to make decisions on self—isolation. hejoins me now. we will pick up on that point in a moment. more broadly, can you give a sense of the impact this is having on council services?— sense of the impact this is having on council services? overall, we are manauuin on council services? overall, we are managing to — on council services? overall, we are managing to prioritise _ on council services? overall, we are managing to prioritise front-line - managing to prioritise front—line
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services but there are some pinch points you mentioned waste earlier, clearly there is a national shortage of hgv drivers and we are finding that in the waste collection system, we are having problems and therefore councils are not prioritising black bean and recycling collection and a number of instances have had to stop collecting garden waste, hopefully a week or two simply because of shortage primarily qualified lorry drivers to drive the beanbags. you mentioned — drivers to drive the beanbags. you mentioned a _ drivers to drive the beanbags. you mentioned a pinch point, what else might they be? that mentioned a pinch point, what else might they be?— mentioned a pinch point, what else might they be? at the moment, there is no other general— might they be? at the moment, there is no other general pinch _ might they be? at the moment, there is no other general pinch point - might they be? at the moment, there is no other general pinch point as - is no other general pinch point as we say. we are seeing pressures in children services and adult social care but we are managing to maintain front line services by reorganising one or two councils have had issues with keeping buildings open because of a shortage of management personnel but again, they managed generally to limit that to one or
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two buildings, the odd library. at the moment, this is about being able to redeploy staff to maintain the front line but we have a concern and i'm very thankful numbers have gone down in the last few days that if this were to get worse, we could have a real issue in some services, hence our request that local councils and we all have a director of public health, be able to determine whose critical worker and watch the appropriate action on our local basis. ., ., ., watch the appropriate action on our local basis-— local basis. how would that work exactly and _ local basis. how would that work exactly and how— local basis. how would that work exactly and how do _ local basis. how would that work exactly and how do you - local basis. how would that work exactly and how do you avoid - exactly and how do you avoid confusion?— exactly and how do you avoid confusion? ., ., ,. , confusion? there are two schemes around at the _ confusion? there are two schemes around at the moment, _ confusion? there are two schemes around at the moment, already . confusion? there are two schemesj around at the moment, already we confusion? there are two schemes - around at the moment, already we can directors of public health, name at individual and they can carry on working after a one—to—one personal risk assessment. that's usually owners and difficult. the scheme whereby we will have testing facilities and you mentioned there will be 500 sites hopefully being
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setup. doing that in critical areas such as refuse collection, would be very helpful and that's what we are discussing with government, whether we can extend that to a broader range of critical workers. most of this is an interim solution because on the 16th of august, those with double vaccination and a test will be able to continue working. what be able to continue working. what have ou be able to continue working. what have you heard — be able to continue working. what have you heard back _ be able to continue working. what have you heard back from government? you said you were talking to them. conversations are ongoing. understandably this is a very fast—moving situation and as your speaker said earlier, it takes time to set up these testing centres. they are engaging with us, taking a positive attitude, it's just the physical, how quickly can we do it, issue? we physical, how quickly can we do it, issue? ~ , ., issue? we must leave it there. thanks for— issue? we must leave it there. thanks for your _ issue? we must leave it there. thanks for your time. - issue? we must leave it there. thanks for your time. thank i issue? we must leave it there. | thanks for your time. thank you issue? we must leave it there. - thanks for your time. thank you very
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much. the labour leader keir starmer has indicated that he would support the use of vaccine passports for mass events, but not to access health care, dentistry, orfood. we can speak to our political correspondent helen catt who is in westminster. this is the issue of vaccine passports, to get into certain places you might need to show a certificate to show you have had two jabs and it has been two weeks since you had the second dose of the vaccine. they have been controversial pretty much since the idea was floated. the government suggested it was not something they were keen to do, domestically. they are in place for international travel. the conversation reignited again because last week, boris johnson said in england by the end of september, ministers planned to introduce them for nightclubs and other large crowded venues. since then we have fed suggestions of other places where that could be
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considered. the government is in talks with the premier league about using them at football matches, certainly consideration being given to requiring them at events for any crowds of more than 20,000 people. it's very much a live discussion., labour have said they were against them for everyday use but earlier keir starmer seem to suggest there might be a place for them when it comes to those sort of large events. we got to be careful that mass events, — we got to be careful that mass events, certainly the principle of double _ events, certainly the principle of double vaccination and testing is one i_ double vaccination and testing is one i would support, that's when i was very— one i would support, that's when i was very happy to sign up to two go and watch _ was very happy to sign up to two go and watch england in the euros. i think_ and watch england in the euros. i think tests — and watch england in the euros. i think tests are more useful than double _ think tests are more useful than double vaccination is, as the health secretary— double vaccination is, as the health secretary has shown, he got covid 'ust secretary has shown, he got covid just about — secretary has shown, he got covid just about ten days ago, i know he is true _ just about ten days ago, i know he is true that— just about ten days ago, i know he is true that now but he had been double _ is true that now but he had been double vaccinated. i actually think double vaccinated. ! actually think tests— double vaccinated. i actually think tests are — double vaccinated. i actually think tests are much more useful and going back to _ tests are much more useful and going back to the _ tests are much more useful and going back to the nhs, the nhs have been doin- back to the nhs, the nhs have been doing testing of their staff three
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times— doing testing of their staff three times a — doing testing of their staff three times a week for the last i don't know_ times a week for the last i don't know how— times a week for the last i don't know how many months as a way of making _ know how many months as a way of making sure — know how many months as a way of making sure they get staff back in. a number— making sure they get staff back in. a number of conservative mps are opposed to any sort of vaccine passports. labour on this would be crucial if it came to any sort of vote in parliament coming back in the autumn. it seems to be the issue of whether tests were involved seems to be a crucial one in this. let’s to be a crucial one in this. let's talk about _ to be a crucial one in this. let's talk about isolation _ to be a crucial one in this. let's talk about isolation exemptions and whether the scheme which allows for the vaccinated key workers in england to avoid self isolation by taking daily cover tests instead were to be extended. can we expect any movement on that today? we know there is what's — any movement on that today? we know there is what's known _ any movement on that today? we know there is what's known as _ any movement on that today? we know there is what's known as a _ any movement on that today? we know there is what's known as a meeting - there is what's known as a meeting of senior ministers. whether anything will change, we have to wait and see. we have seen changes over the course of the last week in response to staff shortages. as you heard just before, talking about these schemes the government already
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runs for allowing isolation exemption, the second scheme which is much widerfrom exemption, the second scheme which is much wider from testing was originally set up for food distribution, that has been expanded to emergency services over the weekend. there are calls for it to be expanded further so we have to wait and see if that happens. there are concerns about that scheme from unions. last week, the gmb said it was set up to driven by resources rather than worker safety. other unions this morning see even if they are exempt workers should not go in, they should isolate. interestingly, they should isolate. interestingly, the labour leader said he did not back that and he wanted the scheme and exemptions to work and if it does work, the nation supports the exemptions that keep these growing. there are voices calling the to stop this sort of system and bring forward that date on the 16th of august when they say fully jab people will not have to isolate.
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there are growing calls, the government seems to stick pretty firm to the exemption system saying that isolation is a key tool in suppressing transmission of the virus. the musician ronan keating has accepted "substantial damages" from the publisher of the news of the world over phone—hacking. the singer, best known for being part of irish boy band boyzone, brought legal action against news group newspapers in april2020, claiming his voicemail messages had been intercepted by its journalists. let's speak now to our correspondent steve holden who's outside the court. ronan keating member of the hugely successful boy band in the 90s, boyzone, also a television and radio host, he brought legal action
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against news group newspapers alleging his phone had been hacked between the years of 1996 and 2011 because he was very suspicious about a lot of articles that revealed personal and private information. at the time he said he did not know how this information was getting out. he became suspicious, the court heard how he had suffered a lot of distress and a lot of distrust amongst his close friends and family. it was a short hearing this morning, he was not here for it and his legal team said ronan keating accepted substantial damages from news group newspapers. we don't know the amount, just that they were substantial and he considers the matter closed.— substantial and he considers the matter closed. what response is their been _ matter closed. what response is their been from _ matter closed. what response is their been from news _ matter closed. what response is their been from news group - their been from news group newspapers? if any? their been from news group newspapers? ifany? ben their been from news group news--aers? ifan ? �* ,, , ., newspapers? if any? ben silverstone representing — newspapers? if any? ben silverstone representing them _ newspapers? if any? ben silverstone representing them said _ newspapers? if any? ben silverstone representing them said the _ newspapers? if any? ben silverstone representing them said the group - representing them said the group offered its sincere apologies to ronan keating for what happened. the
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invasion of his privacy, by individuals working for on behalf of the news of the world. the defendant acknowledges such activity should never have taken place, we have no right to intrude into his private life. through his legal team, ronan keating also released a statement saying he was delighted that news group newspapers had now accepted responsibility for publishing countless articles about his and his family's private life that should have remained private. he said for years, he was suspicious as to how his private information was being obtained. just his private information was being obtained. , , ., his private information was being obtained, , ., his private information was being obtained, , ~ , obtained. just think it might be worth ou obtained. just think it might be worth you giving _ obtained. just think it might be worth you giving background i obtained. just think it might be | worth you giving background on context to this case if you would. the phone hacking scandal has been going on for years and it's almost become a regular occurrence in the last couple of years with high—profile musicians, sports people, people and entertainment,
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the politics world, suing news group newspapers which owns the news of the world which closed down in 2011 because of phone hacking by its journalists and it's the latest in a lonely and of court hearings where news group newspapers have had to give out substantial damages to the cost of millions of pounds over the years. to these high—profile celebrities whose voicemails they alleged have been hacked. articles coming out in a newspaperfrom alleged have been hacked. articles coming out in a newspaper from those voicemails, personal information that they thought was private. they thought they were just talking to friends and families but somebody was listening on at the time and getting that information. ronan keating's case here just one in a long line of cases involving phone hacking. long line of cases involving phone hackinu. ., ., ., long line of cases involving phone hackin.. ., ., ., , ., covid restrictions in northern ireland are being relaxed from today. up to 15 people from an unlimited
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number of households are now able to meet outdoors, and close contacts services like hairdressers can open without the need for pre—booked appointments. ministers at stormont will meet to decide whether to increase the numbers for indoor gatherings and if theatres and concert halls can re—open. dr eddie o'neill is the director for the new covid certification app in northern ireland, he explained a little earlier how it works. essentially, if people from northern ireland go to our website, searching with northern ireland direct covid certification, they can find details of how to download the app. there is an onboarding registration process, once they have verify their identity, they can request a qr code certificate to appear on their phone. that should have an automatic, happen automatically for
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the vast majority of people. if there is not sufficient data or they have entered data incorrectly we have entered data incorrectly we have a manual team processing in the background to make sure people get their certificates in time for travel. from today, fully vaccinated people coming back from an amber list country will no longer need to quarantine on their return in northern ireland. i'm joined now by damien murphy, from the association of northern ireland travel agents. tell us about the impact you think these eased restrictions will have on your industry. for these eased restrictions will have on your industry.— on your industry. for an industry that has been _ on your industry. for an industry that has been closed _ on your industry. for an industry that has been closed march - on your industry. for an industry | that has been closed march 2020 obviously this is a nice step forward. at this minute in time, northern ireland has one flight per week to a green destination, you can see and amber destination represents all of our travel outside the common travel area. we are at least back at the point when we can start engaging
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in meaningful discussions about making travel arrangements and for us, it's a point we can finally start bringing much—needed revenue. but we're not out of the woods yet. we have had setbacks with france going onto the amber watchlist, it has dented the confidence a little bit with people a little bit worried of other countries following. it's a positive, small step but very important and very significant. i wanted to ask how much nervousness you had about policy changes in the run—up and while they are away. we run-up and while they are away. we are run—up and while they are away. - are seeing very little nervousness from people about actually going on holiday. people want to go, but the main point is around the nervousness. what happens if there is a change in the place i am going?
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cani is a change in the place i am going? can i geta is a change in the place i am going? can i get a refund? is a change in the place i am going? can i geta refund? i is a change in the place i am going? can i get a refund? i think more importantly, the question is what happens when i am away if the status changes when i'm away? i have to get home, i can't get home, what happens then. at that point, it could be addressed a little bit more assurance given to people, that would help with peoples fears. what would help with peoples fears. what about a vaccine _ would help with peoples fears. what about a vaccine passport app? what are your thoughts on that? might that help your industry? that are your thoughts on that? might that help your industry?- that help your industry? that will certainly help _ that help your industry? that will certainly help our— that help your industry? that will certainly help our industry - that help your industry? that will certainly help our industry and i l certainly help our industry and i believe that the app has gone we have heard some problems over the past few weeks around the vaccine passport certificate, i will be kind and say that in northern ireland it got off to a rather shaky start. we started with a paper version about three weeks ago, it was launched after about few days it was found the system could not cope with it. people going to spain and the balearics were simply told sorry,
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not available, go and do a pcr test. but it added expense to a trip, i think more importantly here in northern ireland, access to the tests have proved difficult and we have examples of families having to go to different locations at different times to have their tests done and get away. the app was launched this morning, any reports so far add very positive but we need a reliable and safe system going forward that people know is going to be available to them and instill more confidence but yes it well help travel for us. more confidence but yes it well help travel for us— travel for us. thanks for your thoughts- — travel for us. thanks for your thoughts. good _ travel for us. thanks for your thoughts. good to _ travel for us. thanks for your thoughts. good to have - travel for us. thanks for your thoughts. good to have you | travel for us. thanks for your . thoughts. good to have you with travel for us. thanks for your - thoughts. good to have you with us. thank you. two london hospitals have asked patients to stay away after their emergency departments were hit by flooding. east london's whipps cross and newham hospitals urged patients to use other sites for urgent care, and ambulances are being redirected. torrential rain has caused
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severe flooding to homes, roads and stations. the london fire brigade said it took more than 600 flooding—related calls. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. the met office has a yellow weather warning for thunderstorms. it could provide a fair amount thunderstorms. it could provide a fairamount of rain thunderstorms. it could provide a fair amount of rain in a short amount of time for parts of kent and heading towards brighton. for the rest of the uk there is a lot of dry weather with a few showers popping up weather with a few showers popping up here and they could be heavy and thundery but many of us will miss them with temperatures ranging 15 in them with temperatures ranging 15 in the north to 25 further south. more showers come in and across northern ireland, wales and the southwest. some clear skies and it might be a cold night with overnight lows of 14 to 17. we start off with showers in
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the west tomorrow drifting eastwards through the day, some of them heavy and thundery. further showers across scotland with some of those heavy and thundery and the risk of local flooding. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... team gb's swimming superstar adam peaty wins the men's100—metre breaststroke for the first british gold medal at the tokyo olympics. there was olympicjoy too for tom daley and matty lee — gold in the men's synchronised ten—metre platform diving. and the golds keep on coming — tom pidcock wins the men's mountain bike cross—country event — less than two months after breaking his collarbone in a training crash could more essential workers avoid self—isolation if they've been pinged?
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ministers are to discuss whether to expand the list of those allowed to take daily tests instead as more extreme weather is recorded around the world — a call from poorer countries for richer nations to do more to help them tackle climate change. and the former boyzone singer ronan keating accepts �*substantial damages' from the publisher of the news of the world over phone—hacking. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougall. obviously the olympics but lots of other sports as well.— other sports as well. yes, we will come to that _ other sports as well. yes, we will come to that but _ other sports as well. yes, we will come to that but we _ other sports as well. yes, we will come to that but we have - other sports as well. yes, we will come to that but we have to - other sports as well. yes, we will come to that but we have to start other sports as well. yes, we will. come to that but we have to start at the olympics. it was an incredibly emotional moment for tom daley — his fourth olympics, but his first gold medal in the diving. he — along with partner matty lee — won in the men's synchronised
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10m platform, and — after 13 years — it was a long time coming. the pair dived impeccably throughout, moving top of the leaderboard after four dives, before going on to expertly handle the nerves and pressure in their final two routines. in a nail—biting finale, the british pair watched on as the chinese duo made theirfinal dive. daley and lee broke into wild celebrations when it became clear they had ended china's golden grip on the event, dating back to 2000. i have been diving now for 20 years and this is my fourth olympic games and lots of people probably would have counted me out at this olympics being the older person but i'm in the best shape physically and mentally. stood behind that rostum over there and about to be announced as olympic champions and then to hear the national anthem play, i was gone, i couldn't even sing. i was halfway singing and i was blubbering. ijust... yeah, i can't believe it.
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i think ithinka i think a few people at home watching might have had a tear or two in their eye as well. meanwhile, the first of team gb's golds was won in the early hours of the morning. adam peaty successfully defended his 100m breaststroke olympic title, becoming the first british swimmer to do so. the world record holder blew away the competition in a perfectly executed swim. peaty finished in a time of 57.37 seconds, six tenths clear of the field. speaking afterwards, the defending champion said he had gone through a tough time but it had been worth it. i haven't felt this good since 2016. itjust means the world to me. i didn't have the... i thought i had the best preparation of my life but then in the finals, it goes out the window. that's really what it takes to be an athlete, not who is the best all year round, it's the best on the day, best person on the day who is the most adaptable. and the third gold medal came
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from an unexpected source, team gb's tom pidcock convincingly won the cross country mountain biking. in hot and humid conditions, the 21—year—old domminated, leading the race from halfway onwards. the 21—year—old from leeds finished a clear 20 seconds ahead the rest of the field to take great britain's third gold medal. it comes two months after pidcock broke his collarbone in a collision with a car while out training. he says he never expected this. it hasn't been a dream that long but it hasn't been a dream that long but i have worked so hard for it and it has been the end of the path for such a long time. yeah, i can't imagine how it would feel to build up imagine how it would feel to build up four years for this event because it was bloody stressful enough with less than a year! it is unbelievable, really. great britain's alex yee won silver in a difficult men's triathlon as kristian blummenfelt
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of norway claimed gold. yee had led for much of the 10km run in his debut games, before blummenfelt pushed through to breakaway and take the gold. britain's jonny brownlee came fifth. one of the new olympic sports skateboarding held it's finals earlier with a remarkable home win for 13 year old momiji nishiya from japan. the average age on the women's podium was 14. a gold and a bronze forjapan — 13 year old momiji nishiya with her impressive win and brazil's rayssa leal, also just 13 years old, getting the silver. third place to funa nakayama, who's at the grand old age of 16. in olympic tennis, japan's naomi osaka cruised into the third round of the women's singles with a win that only took 65—minutes over viktorija golubic. osaka is the second seed,
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but also favourite for the gold medal now that ashleigh barty has been knocked out, in the first—round. osaka beat golubic in straight sets 6—3 6—2. it comes after she took an eight—week break in the lead up to the games in order to protect her mental health — dropping out of the french open and wimbledon. there was an upset in the women's 400 metres freestyle final with australia's ariarne titmus beating the defending champion katie ledecky to win herfirst—ever gold medal. titmus swam the best time of her career. america's ledecky had dominated the pool over the last five years, winning four golds and one silver in rio. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. it is olympics all the way, jane! thank you for that. ministers and officials from more than 50 countries
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are holding climate talks, hosted in london by the president of the cop—26 summit alok sharma. high on the agenda is the demand from poorer countries that the rich world live up to previous commitments to do more to help them fight climate change, and develop their economies in a sustainable way. climate finance will be a huge issue in the run—up to cop—26, which is taking place in glasgow in november. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here to explain. if you think it is going to be hard for rich countries to adjust to the need to remove fossil fuels and carbon from their economies, just think about how hard it is going to be in the developing world, where there's far less money to pay for new infrastructure in the first place, but there's an awful lot of people. it's a challenge which has been recognised for some time. as long ago as 2009, the developed world agreed it would provide $100 billion a year by 2020 to help poorer countries deal with the effects of climate
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change and build greener economies in the future. well, 2020 has come and gone and the target has not been reached, even though a new and more ambitious target is supposed to be set for 2025. the world committed to $100 billion a year and it is critical that this commitment not only be honoured but that the ambition be increased and major emitters contribute more to its finances. jamaica has great sprinters and we know that a great start does not guarantee a win. in this case, a equitable finance mechanism. for many countries around the world, this is the issue in the run—up to november's cop26 climate summit in glasgow. so how far short are they?
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it's quite hard to calculate what money should be included because it is a complicated mix of public and some private finance. but the un and the oecd estimate that, by 2018, the total had reached nearly $79 billion and it won't have got to $100 billion by 2020. between 2016 and 2018, 43% of the funding went to asia, 25% africa and 17% to the americas — a lot of it spent on green energy or transport infrastructure. within the g7, the united states and italy in particular have been lagging behind their promises, but a big push to increase the overall amount of money provided is certainly on. we provided is certainly on. have had many key discus
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about we have had many key discussions about that in recent days and i have personally spoken to the president about it. president biden has indicated his complete and total commitment to make that happen. let mejust say commitment to make that happen. let me just say that from my point of view if the west of the developed world or whatever you want to call the conglomeration of large economies, if they don't come together and produce that it will be exceedingly hard to get any kind of broad—based agreement. here's the crucial point — by 2018, about three—quarters of the public money made available for climate action in developing countries was in the form of loans that need to be paid back, rather than grants that don't. the share of grants was higher to the very poorest countries, but still less than half the total. that's a big problem in countries where the covid pandemic has made access to international funds even more pressing. many countries are already heavily in debt and huge loans will make that problem worse. so it's a critical issue.
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the message from the world's poor to rich countries in the run—up to the glasgow summit, if you want ambitious climate targets, you're going to have to pay for them. chris, thank you for that. children experiencing poor mental health are three times less likely than their peers to pass five gcses including maths and english, according to a study. researchers warned that pupils are facing a "double hit" to their educational prospects as the covid—19 pandemic has disrupted their learning and affected their mental health. dr neil smith is from national centre for social research which led the study, and hejoins me now. it isa it is a startling headline, children experiencing poor mental health are three times less likely to pass five gcses. how surprised where you buy what you have found?—
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what you have found? initially we were very surprised. _ what you have found? initially we were very surprised. we - what you have found? initially we were very surprised. we know- what you have found? initially we. were very surprised. we know that young people who are from socially disadvantaged backgrounds are more likely to have poor mental health and have lower levels of attainment, that was not surprising, but what was surprising was that when we accounted for those background factors and equalised all young people to have the same level of disadvantage, then we found that even within the same social economic backgrounds, the risk of low attainment if you have poor mental health was the same regardless of social background and that was very surprising. bud social background and that was very surrisinu. �* i. social background and that was very surrisinu. �* ,, ., ~' social background and that was very surrisinu. �* ., ,, ., surprising. and when you talk about mental health, _ surprising. and when you talk about mental health, what _ surprising. and when you talk about mental health, what do _ surprising. and when you talk about mental health, what do you - surprising. and when you talk about mental health, what do you mean i mental health, what do you mean exactly? and was any difference between boys and girls?- between boys and girls? mental health in this _ between boys and girls? mental health in this instance _ between boys and girls? mental health in this instance was - between boys and girls? mental- health in this instance was measured on the strengths and difficulties questionnaire, a well—known scale, it looks at four different areas of mental well—being and mental difficulties. as you say, boys and
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girls both had a relationship with poor mental health and attainments. it was particularly there for those with high levels of hyperactivity who are more likely to have lower attainment if they had hyperactivity disorder. bud attainment if they had hyperactivity disorder. �* ., ~' , attainment if they had hyperactivity disorder. ., ~ , , disorder. and how likely is it in our disorder. and how likely is it in your view _ disorder. and how likely is it in your view that _ disorder. and how likely is it in your view that those _ disorder. and how likely is it in your view that those with - disorder. and how likely is it in i your view that those with mental health problems that were affected by the pandemic will face greater difficulties in making up for lost time now? this double hit we were talking about at the beginning. this articular talking about at the beginning. try 3 particular study did not look at the impact of the pandemic but other studies related to this had. it showed that pre—pandemic was around about 11% of children and young people having a mental disorder, whereas by the summer of 2020 it was 16%. that might not be surprising because the pandemic is an
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extraordinary event where anxiety is potentially a very human response so what we need to do is track carefully over time and keep collecting the data to ensure and to check that those young people whose anxiety levels rose during the pandemic returned to the pre—pandemic levels where we can service their particular needs and meet their mental health requirements.— meet their mental health requirements. meet their mental health reauirements. , , ,, .«r requirements. more broadly speaking, what can be done _ requirements. more broadly speaking, what can be done to _ requirements. more broadly speaking, what can be done to help _ requirements. more broadly speaking, what can be done to help young - what can be done to help young people? that what can be done to help young --eole? �* ., what can be done to help young neale? �* ., ., people? at the moment the government has an ambitious _ people? at the moment the government has an ambitious plan _ people? at the moment the government has an ambitious plan to _ people? at the moment the government has an ambitious plan to roll— people? at the moment the government has an ambitious plan to roll out - has an ambitious plan to roll out mental health support in schools. there is increased funding for the identification of mental health problems to see if young people are getting better with the help provided. with the pandemic this is an opportunity to categorise and boost that funding to schools who are already stretched dealing with other aspects of covid, such as bubbles and sending children home who have come into contact. so this
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is a very important step in the road for truly embedding mental health support and provision within our schools which can be a source of universal support to young people. doctor neil smith from the national centre for social research. thank you so much forjoining us here on bbc news. troops have been deployed in tunisia's capital after clashes between supporters of the country's president, and protesters angered by his dismissal of tunisia's prime minister and suspension of parliament. it follows a day of demonstrations across the country calling for the government to resign over its handling of the coronavirus pandemic. our north africa correspondent rana jawad is in the capital tunis. earlier she gave us more details on how the crisis unfolded. ultimately at the moment, the president, and the army is backing him. he made the announcement after meeting with security officials as well as senior army officials. the unfolding events here however, it is a point to remember,
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are largely linked to a power struggle that has been ongoing since the beginning of the year between the presidency and the prime minister and the speaker of parliament. what we saw in terms of protests yesterday was again carrying some of the regular messages and slogans that we have seen over the last few years. people are very frustrated with the economic downturn of the country, with the mismanagement of institutions, of public services, they are deteriorating. and they want things to improve. and then covid came along and made things even worse. so the protests were a part of that as well. but they were also calling
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for the dissolution of parliament because there are a number of people in the country who have also grown disillusioned with the parliamentary system and feel that there are just too many politicians around wrangling with each other which is paralysing the country. and then we saw the president's announcement. this announcement he made was based on, as he put it, invoking article 80 of the constitution. technically, he will be rolling with the assistance ——ruling with the assistance of the prime minister that he will appoint in the interim. and it should not be longer than 30 days. in 30 days' time, you know, there needs to be clarity on what the next step is. i think the worry now is there is a lot of uncertainty as to what the next steps will be. and of course we heard from the speaker of parliament calling the move a coup against the constitution and the revolution of 2011. so it's very tense at the moment in terms of words coming from both sides.
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new figures have uncovered significant variances in life expectancy and mortality by cause of death between different ethnic groups in england and wales. data from the office for national statistics found white and mixed ethnic groups had lower life expectancy at birth, compared to their counterparts. the report is based on death rates between 2011 and 2014. let's talk about this withjulie stanborough. head of health and life events at the office for national statistics, and jabeer butt, chief executive at the race equality foundation. welcome to you both. good to have you with us. julie, if i can start with you, my understanding is that this is the first report of its kind. tell us a bit more about what you are investigating and what she found. ., .,
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you are investigating and what she found. ., ._ , . you are investigating and what she found. ., , . ., you are investigating and what she found. ., m ., ., ., ., found. today the office for national statistics has _ found. today the office for national statistics has published _ found. today the office for national statistics has published data - found. today the office for national statistics has published data on - found. today the office for national statistics has published data on the | statistics has published data on the differences of life expectancy between different ethnic groups in england and wales. when we talk about life expectancy we mean how long an average of expect people to live for. what we found is that people in the white and mixed ethnic groups had low life expectancy at birth, lowerthan groups had low life expectancy at birth, lower than all the other groups. women in the black african groups. women in the black african group had the highest life expectancy and men in the asian other group, including men from china and asia, had the highest life expectancy. this is the first time we have published these statistics. although lots of research has to be donein although lots of research has to be done in understanding the differences, it has allowed us to see the differences between life expectancy in different ethnic
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groups pre—pandemic. expectancy in different ethnic groups pre-pandemic. jabeer, how sur - rised groups pre-pandemic. jabeer, how surprised are _ groups pre-pandemic. jabeer, how surprised are you _ groups pre-pandemic. jabeer, how surprised are you by _ groups pre-pandemic. jabeer, how surprised are you by the _ groups pre-pandemic. jabeer, how surprised are you by the findings i surprised are you by the findings and what you make of them? the startin: and what you make of them? the starting point _ and what you make of them? the starting point is to welcome the publication. we have had a big struggle — publication. we have had a big struggle with trying to understand how inequality impacts different communities. part of that struggle has been _ communities. part of that struggle has been about not knowing what life expectancy is doing and how it is changing — expectancy is doing and how it is changing i— expectancy is doing and how it is changing. ithink expectancy is doing and how it is changing. i think it is really welcome _ changing. i think it is really welcome that the office for national statistics— welcome that the office for national statistics has done this work. there are some _ statistics has done this work. there are some surprises in here in terms of longer— are some surprises in here in terms of longer life — are some surprises in here in terms of longer life expectancy for some communities and others but i expect the experimental nature of some of this data _ the experimental nature of some of this data would suggest that we need to treat _ this data would suggest that we need to treat that with care. what is clear— to treat that with care. what is clear is— to treat that with care. what is clear is that there does seem to be some _ clear is that there does seem to be some degree of difference between those _ some degree of difference between those communities and this could be important _ those communities and this could be important but needs to be investigated further. julie, why do think— investigated further. julie, why do think there those differences?
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julie, why do think there are those differences? there will be a range of different factors that contribute to different life expectancy but one of the reasons we see higher life expectancy among black african groups and the asian other group could be because more in this group are more recent migrants to england and wales and research and studies have shown that migrants tend to be healthier than the native population. we have also seen different ethnic groups are more or less likely to die from different diseases which could be due to a range of different factors, including their likelihood to drink alcohol or to smoke. so there is a number of different factors which will interrelate with each other and more research needs to be done to explore these differences and why they are occurring. but publishing
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these statistics by the ons today is a really important first step. jabeer, i want to explore one particular issue with you and that is the issue of housing. what role does that play in all of this? we have known _ does that play in all of this? we have known for a number of years that health — have known for a number of years that health is impacted by a range of issues, — that health is impacted by a range of issues, employment, education, but housing— of issues, employment, education, but housing is a key factor. we know that if— but housing is a key factor. we know that if you _ but housing is a key factor. we know that if you live in more deprived areas _ that if you live in more deprived areas where poor housing is you are more _ areas where poor housing is you are more likely— areas where poor housing is you are more likely to have poorer health and poorer— more likely to have poorer health and poorer outlooks over a lifetime. once _ and poorer outlooks over a lifetime. once we _ and poorer outlooks over a lifetime. once we start to look at this by region— once we start to look at this by region and _ once we start to look at this by region and locality will probably start _ region and locality will probably start to — region and locality will probably start to discover there are differences in life expectancy depending on where you live and in the type _ depending on where you live and in the type of— depending on where you live and in the type of housing your live as welt _ the type of housing your live as welt i— the type of housing your live as well. i suspect we will get a clearer— well. i suspect we will get a clearer picture of some of the actions — clearer picture of some of the actions we need to take to address that in_ actions we need to take to address that in the — actions we need to take to address that in the future.—
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that in the future. julie, what are ou that in the future. julie, what are you recommending? _ that in the future. julie, what are you recommending? it— that in the future. julie, what are you recommending? it is- that in the future. julie, what are you recommending? it is the - that in the future. julie, what are j you recommending? it is the role that in the future. julie, what are i you recommending? it is the role of the office for— you recommending? it is the role of the office for national— you recommending? it is the role of the office for national statistics - the office for national statistics to collect data, provide analysis and statistics, to inform government and statistics, to inform government and decision—makers around the country. that is why it is so important we have published these new experimental statistics so that the government can then make those decisions about what needs to be done to even out life expectancy across the ethnic groups. i done to even out life expectancy across the ethnic groups.- across the ethnic groups. i take our across the ethnic groups. i take your point- _ across the ethnic groups. i take your point- you _ across the ethnic groups. i take your point. you provide - across the ethnic groups. i take your point. you provide the - across the ethnic groups. i take | your point. you provide the data across the ethnic groups. i take - your point. you provide the data and thenit your point. you provide the data and then it is for others to make the recommendations. butjabeer, what do you think would help? i recommendations. but jabeer, what do you think would help?— you think would help? i think two thins. you think would help? i think two things- we _ you think would help? i think two things- we do — you think would help? i think two things. we do need _ you think would help? i think two things. we do need more - you think would help? i think two. things. we do need more analysis. you think would help? i think two - things. we do need more analysis. we know from _ things. we do need more analysis. we know from previous work that won't life expectancy may vary, one thing that does— life expectancy may vary, one thing that does vary is poorer health in later— that does vary is poorer health in later life. — that does vary is poorer health in later life, so minority communities have _ later life, so minority communities have longer— later life, so minority communities have longer periods of time where
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they are _ have longer periods of time where they are in — have longer periods of time where they are in poorer health later in life _ they are in poorer health later in life some — they are in poorer health later in life. some of those changes will be brought— life. some of those changes will be brought about by the pandemic and they have _ brought about by the pandemic and they have to be addressed. we know it is likely— they have to be addressed. we know it is likely to have had an impact on life _ it is likely to have had an impact on life expectancy and we know that some _ on life expectancy and we know that some of— on life expectancy and we know that some of the changes the government is about— some of the changes the government is about to _ some of the changes the government is about to implement could well have _ is about to implement could well have done — is about to implement could well have done they have not been doing. the uplifting universal credit is going _ the uplifting universal credit is going to — the uplifting universal credit is going to be stopped and we know that that can _ going to be stopped and we know that that can have a positive impact so one of— that can have a positive impact so one of the — that can have a positive impact so one of the things we have argued for is for— one of the things we have argued for is for that— one of the things we have argued for is for that to — one of the things we have argued for is for that to be maintained so we can get— is for that to be maintained so we can get back to pre—2010 levels in support— can get back to pre—2010 levels in support for— can get back to pre—2010 levels in support for communities. gk, can get back to pre-2010 levels in support for communities. ok, jabeer and julie, support for communities. ok, jabeer and julie. thank— support for communities. ok, jabeer and julie, thank you _ support for communities. ok, jabeer and julie, thank you both. _ now it's time for a look at the weather. hello again. the met office has a yellow weather warning for thunderstorms.
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the rest of the uk is looking for dry weather and sunshine but there will still be showers knocking around. you could catch on almost anywhere and if you do it could be heavy and thundery. a temperature range of 15 in the north to 25 as you go further south. many showers will die out but further showers come into northern ireland in the south end in the channel islands. there will be some clear skies as well but it won't be a cold night for most, 12 in the north to 17 in the south are the overnight lows. as we go into tuesday, a weather front coming into the west slowly drift eastward with low pressure firmly in charge and things fairly unsettled. start off with their showers in the
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west drifting eastward through the day. wherever you see yellow or light green it means you can expect something heavier and you can see further heavy showers coming in across scotland. these could also be thundery and may well lead to localised flooding in places. temperatures tomorrow are down a touch in today and we are looking at a range of 15 to 23. as we had to wednesday, low pressure is driving the weather. weather fronts aren't too far away and isobars are a bit closer together. you will notice more winds over wednesday, particularly around the showers where it will be fairly gusty. it may get up to 40 miles an hour around the showers. showers will be plentiful, heavy and also thundery and we could have some issues with localised flooding. in between them there will be some sunny skies. these white circles represent the average wind speeds. don't forget that gusts will be higher than that.
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we are expecting temperatures up to 21 as you get down towards norwich. then the rest of the week the outlook is unsettled.
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a historic win for adam peaty on day three of the games in tokyo — he becomes the first ever british swimmer to successfully defend an olympic title. adam peaty is the double olympic champion. peaty dominated the men's100m breaststroke to win his second olympic gold. this victory wasn't mine. it was the british swimming team, it was my family, it was my friends. and those people i had to put to the sideline for a moment, because i knew it was going to take absolutely every bit of energy to get to this point. look at that, look at the way...
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