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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 26, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines three team gb golds in tokyo. it's olympicjoy for tom daley and matty lee in the men's synchronised 10—metre platform diving. gb gold in the cycling too — tom pidcock wins the men's mountain bike cross country event adam peaty started the team gb gold rush, defending his 100—metre breaststroke title. could more essential workers be allowed to avoid self—isolation if they've been pinged? ministers meet today to discuss whether to expand the scheme. do you think daily covid tests rather than periods of self—isolation are the
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right way to go? we want to hear your views — get in touch at @annita—mcveigh or #bbcyourquestions. some covid restrictions are relaxed in northern ireland and a decision is due on whether theatres and concert halls could be allowed to re—open. after heavy flooding in london on sunday, two of the city's hospitals have asked patients to stay away after their emergency departments were affected and coming up this hour: afterfive days of falling infection rates, we ask a virologist whether the uk's third wave has already peaked it's been a great day for team gb at the tokyo olympics with three
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gold medals and one silver. in the pool, tom daley took gold when he and his partner matty lee won the men's 10—metre synchronised diving. it was third time lucky for 27—year—old tom, after he had to settle for bronze at the last two olympics. in the last half—an—hour, team gb have claimed their third gold medal — tom pidcock has just won the men's mountain bike cross—country event. earlier, the swimmer adam peaty won team gb�*s first gold medal in tokyo, with victory in the 100 metres breast—stroke. the 26—year—old finished in just under 58 seconds, the fifth fastest time in the event's history. he's become the first british swimmer to retain an olympic title. overnight, team gb also secured another silver medal, thanks to alex yee in the men's triathlon. but britain isn't the only country celebrating a good day at the pool.
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momiji nishiya made history at the age ofjust 13 as she became the first women's olympic street skateboarding champion. for a full round—up of the action at the olympics this morning, let's cross to jane dougall at the bbc sports centre. what at the bbc sports centre. a day so far for team gb behind what a day so far for team gb. behind the team story, great personal stories as well leading up to these competitions. there have been a few tears but plenty of smiles in tokyo. there's been emotional scenes in tokyo as team gb�*s tom daley and his partner, matty lee, have taken gold in the diving. it's daley�*s fourth olympics and, after 13 years, he's got his first olympic gold medal in the syncronised io—metre platform. there was a win in the pool earlier too with great britain's adam peaty taking the 100m breaststroke convincingly. it means he's the first british swimmer to defend an olympic title as jim lumsden reports.
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tom daley and matty lee were trailing in second place in the competition, but they pulled out the stops with their final dive and were able to narrowly beat the reigning champions from china. it is the first olympic gold medal for tom daly, he is at his fourth games. he has taken brunch twice and twice been world champion. the tears of m been world champion. the tears of joy and hugs all round his victory was confirmed. adam peaty is arguably the greatest british swimmer ever. the world record holderfor swimmer ever. the world record holder for the fastest field in history of the hundred metres breaststroke, but left them splattering in his wake. he led from start to finish with fellow briton james will be coming in at fifth. commentator: utterly brilliant. adam peaty is the double olympic champion. fantastic swim by adam peaty of great britain. i champion. fantastic swim by adam peaty of great britain.— peaty of great britain. i had some ressure peaty of great britain. i had some pressure going — peaty of great britain. i had some pressure going into _ peaty of great britain. i had some pressure going into the _ peaty of great britain. i had some
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pressure going into the final, - peaty of great britain. i had some pressure going into the final, but| pressure going into the final, but it was— pressure going into the final, but it was a _ pressure going into the final, but it was a good pressure, i needed an edge _ it was a good pressure, i needed an edge you _ it was a good pressure, i needed an edge. you can do whatever you want in your— edge. you can do whatever you want in your own — edge. you can do whatever you want in your own pool in your own nation, but when _ in your own pool in your own nation, but when it— in your own pool in your own nation, but when it comes out here and not racing _ but when it comes out here and not racing for— but when it comes out here and not racing for a — but when it comes out here and not racing for a time, embracing myself. this has— racing for a time, embracing myself. this has closed a chapter for me. it this has closed a chapter for me. [it was this has closed a chapter for me. it was unfinished business. so adam peaty claimed britain was my first gold of the games, he is unbeaten in seven years. with alistair brownlee having failed to qualify for the triathlon, brotherjohnny was hoping for a first gold, but he would have to settle for fifth. christian blumenfeld proved best equipped to deal with the searing heat, albeit a surprise winner. britain were to take silver, 26—year—old alex he claimed a superb second in his first olympics. in claimed a superb second in his first ol mics. . ~ olympics. in training i thinkl did the time i _ olympics. in training i thinkl did the time i did — olympics. in training i thinkl did the time i did in _ olympics. in training i thinkl did the time i did in that _ olympics. in training i thinkl did the time i did in that race. - olympics. in training i thinkl did the time i did in that race. i - olympics. in training i think i did | the time i did in that race. i knew i could go that little extra beds. unfortunately, he was the better man on the day but i felt as well—prepared as they could have i just had to take that little bit into my soul and ifind enough
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something, it was not enough to catch on, but i got silver and i'm over the moon.— over the moon. the ansel struck twice when _ over the moon. the ansel struck twice when two _ over the moon. the ansel struck twice when two british _ over the moon. the ansel struck twice when two british men's - over the moon. the ansel struck - twice when two british men's hockey team beat canada to make it two wins out of two. they are second in a group of six teams. and another gold for team gb with tom pidcock winning the cross country mountain biking. he led the race from about midway onwards, navigating the tough course superbly. and another gold for team gb with tom pidcock winning the cross the 21—year—old from leeds finished a clear 20 seconds ahead the rest of the field to take great britain's third gold medal. it comes two months after pidcock broke his collarbone in a collision with a car while out training. so that's a round—up covering british success on day 4, but plenty more medals have been won, including a remarkable triumph for 13 year old momiji nishiya from japan in the women's street skateboarding. the average age on the podium was 1a.
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a gold and a bronze forjapan — 13 year old momiji nishiya with her impressive win and brazil's rayssa leal, also just 13—years—old, getting the silver. third place to funa naka—yama, who's 16. in the women's swimming, usa's katie ledecky has dominated the pool over the last five years, winning four golds and a silver in rio, which is why australia's ariarne titmus caused such an upset taking gold in today's aoom freestyle final. ledecky led throughout, until the final 50 metres where titmus made her move, edging ahead and taking gold in her first ever olympics. she swam the best time of her career, 3:56.69, which was just 0.23 seconds off of ledecky�*s world record from the 2016 games.
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japan's naomi osaka cruised into the third round of the women's singles with a win that only took 65—minutes over viktorija golubic. osaka is the second seed, but also favourite for the gold medal now that ashleigh barty has been knocked out in the first—round. osaka beat golubic in straight sets, 6—3 6—2. it comes after she took an eight—week break in the lead—up to the games in order to protect her mental health, dropping out of the french open and wimbledon. that's all the sport for now. the average age in the imperium of that skateboarding competition, just 14! so that skateboarding competition, just 1a! so much to talk about there. what should we be looking out for next? ., , ., ., ., next? coming up a little later on, kee an next? coming up a little later on, keep an eye _
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next? coming up a little later on, keep an eye out _ next? coming up a little later on, keep an eye out for— next? coming up a little later on, keep an eye out for lauren - next? coming up a little later on, i keep an eye out for lauren williams in the tae kwon do because she is through to the final. that was after beating an ivory coast athlete. this means that she is guaranteed at least a silver. the final is later today, around 1:30pm, coverage from one o'clock on the bbc. as we've been hearing, adam peaty secured team gb's first gold medal of the tokyo olympics, defending his title in the 100 metres breast—stroke. this morning we're back where it all began for him in uttoxeter, at the pool where he first learnt to swim. our reporter dan pallett is there. ican imagine i can imagine the excitement there, dan. , ., , i can imagine the excitement there, dan. , . , ., , dan. they have been loving it. this is where it — dan. they have been loving it. this is where it all _ dan. they have been loving it. this is where it all began. _ dan. they have been loving it. this is where it all began. every - dan. they have been loving it. this is where it all began. every story . is where it all began. every story had a beginning and for adam peaty it was here, uttoxeter leisure centre. to be good you need to be motivated, to catch up early in the morning like these kids, and pity our sin,
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morning like these kids, and pity oursin, but you morning like these kids, and pity our sin, but you also need some inspiration. what better inspiration than somebody who has recaptured his olympic medal, something no british swimmer has ever done before. it was so emotional watching adam today. what was it like for you? speechless this morning- _ what was it like for you? speechless this morning. everybody _ what was it like for you? speechless this morning. everybody hope - what was it like for you? speechless this morning. everybody hope that i what was it like for you? speechless | this morning. everybody hope that he would _ this morning. everybody hope that he would do _ this morning. everybody hope that he would do it. _ this morning. everybody hope that he would do it, expected him to do it, but adam, — would do it, expected him to do it, but adam, as usual, let the figures do the _ but adam, as usual, let the figures do the talking. 57.6, i think it was — do the talking. 57.6, i think it was half— do the talking. 57.6, i think it was half a _ do the talking. 57.6, i think it was. half a second in front of the second—place lad. that is unbelievable. i didn't have any trouble — unbelievable. i didn't have any trouble getting anyone here this morning. — trouble getting anyone here this morning, despite the fact some of them _ morning, despite the fact some of them for— morning, despite the fact some of them for up to watch it at 3am. what was he like — them for up to watch it at 3am. what was he like as _ them for up to watch it at 3am. what was he like as a _ them for up to watch it at 3am. twist was he like as a youngster? apparently he wasn't flashy in training, but come race day.
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stopwatch driven. adam carr all arms, _ stopwatch driven. adam carr all arms. or— stopwatch driven. adam carr all arms, or legs, but when the stopwatch came out, that is when adam _ stopwatch came out, that is when adam came alive. it didn't matter what _ adam came alive. it didn't matter what competition it was, could have 'ust what competition it was, could have just been_ what competition it was, could have just been one of our little internal club competitions, it could be a county— club competitions, it could be a county competition or a regional competition, adam came alive and really. _ competition, adam came alive and really, really put his heart and soul— really, really put his heart and soul into — really, really put his heart and soul into it. that is carried on the whole _ soul into it. that is carried on the whole way— soul into it. that is carried on the whole way through.— soul into it. that is carried on the whole way through. mark foster, give me some words _ whole way through. mark foster, give me some words to _ whole way through. mark foster, give me some words to describe _ whole way through. mark foster, give me some words to describe him - whole way through. mark foster, give | me some words to describe him today. outstanding, exceptional, brilliant. any word _ outstanding, exceptional, brilliant. any word you — outstanding, exceptional, brilliant. any word you want _ outstanding, exceptional, brilliant. any word you want to _ outstanding, exceptional, brilliant. any word you want to uses - outstanding, exceptional, brilliant. any word you want to uses of - outstanding, exceptional, brilliant. any word you want to uses of that i any word you want to uses of that ilk. any word you want to uses of that ilk it _ any word you want to uses of that ilk it is _ any word you want to uses of that ilk it is mind— any word you want to uses of that ilk. it is mind blowing _ any word you want to uses of that ilk. it is mind blowing what- any word you want to uses of that ilk. it is mind blowing what he - any word you want to uses of that| ilk. it is mind blowing what he has done _ ilk. it is mind blowing what he has done. ., ., , ., , . ., ilk. it is mind blowing what he has done. ., ., ,. , ., done. how do seated, such a superior techniuue? done. how do seated, such a superior technique? they _ done. how do seated, such a superior technique? they all _ done. how do seated, such a superior technique? they all have _ technique? they all have determination and drive. they all robabl determination and drive. they all probably work— determination and drive. they all probably work as _ determination and drive. they all probably work as hard _ determination and drive. they all probably work as hard at - determination and drive. they all probably work as hard at each - determination and drive. they all i probably work as hard at each other and want _ probably work as hard at each other and want it— probably work as hard at each other and want it as — probably work as hard at each other and want it as much _ probably work as hard at each other and want it as much as _ probably work as hard at each other and want it as much as each - probably work as hard at each other and want it as much as each other. i and want it as much as each other. it and want it as much as each other. it comes— and want it as much as each other. it comes down _ and want it as much as each other. it comes down to _ and want it as much as each other. it comes down to genetics, - it comes down to genetics, physiology. _ it comes down to genetics, physiology, the _ it comes down to genetics, physiology, the way- it comes down to genetics, physiology, the way you i it comes down to genetics, | physiology, the way you are
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it comes down to genetics, - physiology, the way you are taught, your skills — physiology, the way you are taught, your skills the _ physiology, the way you are taught, your skills. the one _ physiology, the way you are taught, your skills. the one thing _ physiology, the way you are taught, your skills. the one thing to- physiology, the way you are taught, your skills. the one thing to make i your skills. the one thing to make saddam _ your skills. the one thing to make saddam different _ your skills. the one thing to make saddam different to _ your skills. the one thing to make saddam different to other - your skills. the one thing to make saddam different to other people, when _ saddam different to other people, when he _ saddam different to other people, when he kicks. _ saddam different to other people, when he kicks, because _ saddam different to other people, when he kicks, because his - saddam different to other people, when he kicks, because his niecel saddam different to other people, i when he kicks, because his niece are a little _ when he kicks, because his niece are a little bit _ when he kicks, because his niece are a little bit hyper— when he kicks, because his niece are a little bit hyper flexed, _ when he kicks, because his niece are a little bit hyper flexed, the - when he kicks, because his niece are a little bit hyper flexed, the way- a little bit hyper flexed, the way he kicks — a little bit hyper flexed, the way he kicks he _ a little bit hyper flexed, the way he kicks he keeps _ a little bit hyper flexed, the way he kicks he keeps his— a little bit hyper flexed, the way he kicks he keeps his kicks- a little bit hyper flexed, the wayj he kicks he keeps his kicks quite tight _ he kicks he keeps his kicks quite tight his — he kicks he keeps his kicks quite tight. his tunnel— he kicks he keeps his kicks quite tight. his tunnel is _ he kicks he keeps his kicks quite tight. his tunnel is very- he kicks he keeps his kicks quite tight. his tunnel is very small i he kicks he keeps his kicks quite. tight. his tunnel is very small and tight. _ tight. his tunnel is very small and tight. so— tight. his tunnel is very small and tight. so he — tight. his tunnel is very small and tight, so he moves— tight. his tunnel is very small and tight, so he moves that _ tight. his tunnel is very small and tight, so he moves that much - tight. his tunnel is very small and i tight, so he moves that much further down _ tight, so he moves that much further down the _ tight, so he moves that much further down the pool— tight, so he moves that much further down the pool on— tight, so he moves that much further down the pool on every— tight, so he moves that much further down the pool on every stroke. - tight, so he moves that much further down the pool on every stroke. he i tight, so he moves that much further down the pool on every stroke. he is| down the pool on every stroke. he is like a _ down the pool on every stroke. he is like a michael— down the pool on every stroke. he is like a michael phelps, _ down the pool on every stroke. he is like a michael phelps, usain- down the pool on every stroke. he is like a michael phelps, usain bolt, i like a michael phelps, usain bolt, somebody— like a michael phelps, usain bolt, somebody he _ like a michael phelps, usain bolt, somebody he is— like a michael phelps, usain bolt, somebody he is rewriting - like a michael phelps, usain bolt, somebody he is rewriting the - like a michael phelps, usain bolt, i somebody he is rewriting the record books _ somebody he is rewriting the record books he _ somebody he is rewriting the record books. . , somebody he is rewriting the record books. ., , ., . somebody he is rewriting the record books. .,, ., . ., , books. he has won it twice, nobody else has done _ books. he has won it twice, nobody else has done that _ books. he has won it twice, nobody else has done that before _ books. he has won it twice, nobody else has done that before from - else has done that before from britain. kitty cat three on his own? he will know the legacy of the sport in the _ he will know the legacy of the sport in the uk _ he will know the legacy of the sport in the uk. britain— he will know the legacy of the sport in the uk. britain has— he will know the legacy of the sport in the uk. britain has some - he will know the legacy of the sport in the uk. britain has some great. in the uk. britain has some great breaststroke _ in the uk. britain has some great breaststroke athletes. _ in the uk. britain has some great breaststroke athletes. for- in the uk. britain has some great breaststroke athletes. for him, i in the uk. britain has some greatj breaststroke athletes. for him, it started _ breaststroke athletes. for him, it started in— breaststroke athletes. for him, it started in a — breaststroke athletes. for him, it started in a poll— breaststroke athletes. for him, it started in a poll like _ breaststroke athletes. for him, it started in a poll like this. - breaststroke athletes. for him, it started in a poll like this. as- breaststroke athletes. for him, it started in a poll like this. as a - started in a poll like this. as a little — started in a poll like this. as a little kid _ started in a poll like this. as a little kid i_ started in a poll like this. as a little kid. idon't_ started in a poll like this. as a little kid. i don't think- started in a poll like this. as a little kid. i don't think he - started in a poll like this. as aj little kid. i don't think he likes and when _ little kid. i don't think he likes and when he _ little kid. i don't think he likes and when he first _ little kid. i don't think he likes and when he first started. - little kid. i don't think he likes
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and when he first started. he i and when he first started. he learned — and when he first started. he learned to— and when he first started. he learned to love _ and when he first started. he learned to love it, _ and when he first started. he learned to love it, then - and when he first started. he learned to love it, then got i learned to love it, then got passionate _ learned to love it, then got passionate about _ learned to love it, then got passionate about it, - learned to love it, then got passionate about it, then i learned to love it, then got passionate about it, then it learned to love it, then got - passionate about it, then it became an obsession — passionate about it, then it became an obsession and _ passionate about it, then it became an obsession and he _ passionate about it, then it became an obsession and he just _ passionate about it, then it became an obsession and he just wanted . passionate about it, then it became an obsession and he just wanted to| an obsession and he just wanted to beat the _ an obsession and he just wanted to beat the clock _ an obsession and he just wanted to beat the clock. every _ an obsession and he just wanted to beat the clock. every kid _ an obsession and he just wanted to beat the clock. every kid has - an obsession and he just wanted to beat the clock. every kid has a - an obsession and he just wanted toj beat the clock. every kid has a best time _ beat the clock. every kid has a best time he _ beat the clock. every kid has a best time he is — beat the clock. every kid has a best time. he is still— beat the clock. every kid has a best time. he is still a _ beat the clock. every kid has a best time. he is stilla big— beat the clock. every kid has a best time. he is stilla big kid. - beat the clock. every kid has a best time. he is stilla big kid. he- beat the clock. every kid has a best time. he is stilla big kid. he is- time. he is stilla big kid. he is 26 years— time. he is stilla big kid. he is 26 years of— time. he is stilla big kid. he is 26 years of age. _ time. he is stilla big kid. he is 26 years of age, but _ time. he is stilla big kid. he is 26 years of age, but every- time. he is stilla big kid. he is| 26 years of age, but every time time. he is stilla big kid. he is. 26 years of age, but every time he steps _ 26 years of age, but every time he steps on _ 26 years of age, but every time he steps on the — 26 years of age, but every time he steps on the block _ 26 years of age, but every time he steps on the block he _ 26 years of age, but every time he steps on the block he wants - 26 years of age, but every time he steps on the block he wants to - 26 years of age, but every time he steps on the block he wants to dol steps on the block he wants to do his best _ steps on the block he wants to do his best time _ steps on the block he wants to do his best time. i— steps on the block he wants to do his best time. ithink— steps on the block he wants to do his best time. i think he - steps on the block he wants to do his best time. i think he will- steps on the block he wants to do his best time. i think he will be i his best time. i think he will be there _ his best time. i think he will be there in— his best time. i think he will be there in los _ his best time. i think he will be there in los angeles _ his best time. i think he will be there in los angeles in - his best time. i think he will be there in los angeles in seven. his best time. i think he will be - there in los angeles in seven years time! _ there in los angeles in seven years time! lihi— there in los angeles in seven years time! .., , , there in los angeles in seven years time! , ,., time! of course, he can carry on winnin: time! of course, he can carry on winning more — time! of course, he can carry on winning more medals _ time! of course, he can carry on winning more medals at - time! of course, he can carry on winning more medals at these i time! of course, he can carry on - winning more medals at these games because there are plenty of relays to come for him.— to come for him. great to get a reaction there _ to come for him. great to get a reaction there from _ to come for him. great to get a reaction there from where - to come for him. great to get a reaction there from where it. to come for him. great to get a reaction there from where it all began for adam peaty. senior ministers will decide today whether to expand the scheme which allows fully—vaccinated key workers in england to avoid self—isolation by taking daily covid tests instead. staff working in the food supply chain, frontline emergency services, and transport and freight are already included, and other workers, such as council refuse collectors, could be added to the list.
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senior ministers will decide today whether to expand the scheme the department for environment, food and rural affairs says 500 sites have been identified for daily testing, which will be carried out by employers within the workplace. we represent distributors of food and drink to hospitals, to schools, to care homes, to prisons, to restaurants, cafes and shops. so, knowing that we are in scope as well is really, really great, because it means that businesses that have been affected by the pandemic can actually plan for any colleagues that go off. whereas previously if somebody had been pinged, they might have had a whole team of people wiped out, which was going to be really, really difficult to plan for the supply of food and drink over the next three weeks. with me now is rob hollyman, he is a director of haulage firm young's transport, which has about 180 trucks. rob, thank you very much, thank you forjoining us. tell us first of all, how has your business been affected by your drivers being
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contacted by the test and trace app? much the same as other allied businesses, drivers are using the app at various delivery or collection points. a day or two later they could be pinged because somebody at those premises has contracted covid, they then have to self—isolate, which means our company, like any other haulage company, like any other haulage company, they are then required to leave those drivers at home. don't forget, we have heard stories recently about the shortage of drivers anyway, which is considerable, and it's compounding the problem. you considerable, and it's compounding the problem-— the problem. you have mentioned that, the underlying _ the problem. you have mentioned that, the underlying staff - the problem. you have mentioned| that, the underlying staff shortage of freight drivers. how will the new system work, what knowledge do you have already operates?— have already operates? interesting ruestion. have already operates? interesting question- very _ have already operates? interesting question. very little _ have already operates? interesting question. very little is _ have already operates? interesting question. very little is the -
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have already operates? interesting question. very little is the answerl question. very little is the answer to that question. we don't even know if we are included as one of the 500 companies. if we were included we don't know how the testing will operate, so to be quite honest, we haven't got a clue. this all changed over the weekend about including freight companies or haulage companies, but very little has come out from government so there has been a distinct lack of clarity over what the rules and regulations will be. ., . �* what the rules and regulations will be. ., ., �* ., ._ be. you haven't made any representations _ be. you haven't made any representations to - be. you haven't made any - representations to government to be. you haven't made any _ representations to government to say we would like to be one of these companies? latte we would like to be one of these companies?— we would like to be one of these companies? we have indeed. the industry body _ companies? we have indeed. the industry body has _ companies? we have indeed. the industry body has been _ companies? we have indeed. the i industry body has been campaigning hard, as well. we don't know if we are one of the companies that will be allowed to use this kit, the lateral flow testing kit. be allowed to use this kit, the lateralflow testing kit. we have quite a few of those. we don't know what the procedure is going to be, if we are appointed as a testing centre. . , ., ., ., ,
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centre. have you had any conversations _ centre. have you had any conversations with - centre. have you had any conversations with your l centre. have you had any - conversations with your drivers to say we think this is how it might work, or how we might envisage we would like to make it work in the absence of official guidance? yeah, we've had those _ absence of official guidance? yeah, we've had those conversations - absence of official guidance? yeah, we've had those conversations and | we've had those conversations and the drivers are delighted that something may be happening, but i stress may be, because we don't know anything at the moment. {shrew stress may be, because we don't know anything at the moment.— anything at the moment. given we are onl afew anything at the moment. given we are only a few weeks _ anything at the moment. given we are only a few weeks away _ anything at the moment. given we are only a few weeks away from _ only a few weeks away from the 16th of august, where if people will be properly vaccinated, they will need to self—isolate anyway, presumably you really need this guidance yesterday. he you really need this guidance yesterday-— you really need this guidance yesterday. you really need this guidance esterda . ., , yesterday. he took the words right out of my mouth. _ yesterday. he took the words right out of my mouth. we _ yesterday. he took the words right out of my mouth. we need - yesterday. he took the words right out of my mouth. we need that. out of my mouth. we need that information yesterday. luntil]! out of my mouth. we need that information yesterday.- out of my mouth. we need that information yesterday. will you get information yesterday. will you get in touch with _ information yesterday. will you get in touch with the _ information yesterday. will you get in touch with the government - information yesterday. will you get in touch with the government to i information yesterday. will you getj in touch with the government to try to find sites, or do you just wait to find sites, or do you just wait to find sites, or do you just wait to find out if you are included? somewhere in between. we are only menus as individual companies, but we have a trade body and we have
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beenin we have a trade body and we have been in touch with them. we are hoping that somewhere around midday, one o'clock today, there will be further news from government. really interestin: further news from government. really interesting to — further news from government. really interesting to hear— further news from government. really interesting to hear the _ further news from government. really interesting to hear the situation you're in. thank you very much for talking to us. the headlines on bbc news: gold at the tokyo olympics for divers tom daley and matty lee — with mountain biker tom pidcock and swimmer adam peaty also securing golds for team gb. could more essential workers be allowed to avoid self—isolation if they've been pinged? ministers meet today to discuss whether to expand the scheme. some covid restrictions are relaxed in northern ireland — and a decision is due on whether theatres and concert halls can re—open. as you just heard, home covid restrictions in northern ireland are being relaxed from today. up to 15 people from an unlimited number of households are now
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able to meet outdoors, and close contacts services like hairdressers can open without the need for pre—booked appointments. ministers at stormont will meet to decide whether to increase the numbers for indoor gatherings and if theatres and concert halls can re—open. to find out how this could impact local businesses, we're joined by clarejohnston, who owns the the railway arms pub in coleraine. good morning to you. thanks for joining us this morning. tell us a little bit about your business and the situation at the moment. i}!(. little bit about your business and the situation at the moment. ok, i'm a wet -o- the situation at the moment. ok, i'm a wet pop hero _ the situation at the moment. ok, i'm a wet pop hero in _ the situation at the moment. ok, i'm a wet pop hero in coleraine. - the situation at the moment. ok, i'm a wet pop hero in coleraine. we - the situation at the moment. ok, i'm a wet pop hero in coleraine. we are l a wet pop hero in coleraine. we are restricted in our numbers —— pub. it is all table service and nobody is allowed to stand at the counter. it has had quite an impact on our business. we were closed for 1h months, as well. these restrictions are making things very difficult for
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the business to be viable. d0 are making things very difficult for the business to be viable.- the business to be viable. do you have an outdoor— the business to be viable. do you have an outdoor area? _ the business to be viable. do you have an outdoor area? a - the business to be viable. do you have an outdoor area? a small i have an outdoor area? a small outdoor area. _ have an outdoor area? a small outdoor area. i— have an outdoor area? a small outdoor area. i have _ have an outdoor area? a small outdoor area. i have tried - have an outdoor area? a small outdoor area. i have tried to i have an outdoor area? a small - outdoor area. i have tried to create more to make things work during these times. 50 more to make things work during these times-— more to make things work during these times. , ., ' , ., , ., these times. so up to 15 people from an unlimited — these times. so up to 15 people from an unlimited number— these times. so up to 15 people from an unlimited number of— these times. so up to 15 people from an unlimited number of households i an unlimited number of households able to meet outside. does an unlimited number of households able to meet outside.— an unlimited number of households able to meet outside. does that help ou able to meet outside. does that help you abates? — able to meet outside. does that help you abates? lt _ able to meet outside. does that help you abates? it will _ able to meet outside. does that help you abates? it will help _ able to meet outside. does that help you abates? it will help some - able to meet outside. does that help you abates? it will help some of - able to meet outside. does that help you abates? it will help some of the | you abates? it will help some of the hospitality venues, might be garden is small so if i go to croydon like that i couldn't have extra people in there, so it certainly doesn't help me at this stage, but it will help other venues. anything really that we can get changed i would be a positive for us.— positive for us. 70% of the adult population _ positive for us. 70% of the adult population in — positive for us. 70% of the adult population in northern - positive for us. 70% of the adult population in northern ireland i positive for us. 70% of the adult j population in northern ireland is vaccinated, the under 30s 56%. we saw a couple of the health trusts yesterday in northern ireland for off duty staff to come into work
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because of the pressure, including what they say is a rapid increase in patients with covid being admitted. all of that being considered, what would you like to hear from investors at stormont today? i hear what you're — investors at stormont today? i hear what you're saying _ investors at stormont today? i hear what you're saying and _ investors at stormont today? i hear what you're saying and we - investors at stormont today? i hear what you're saying and we are - what you're saying and we are dealing with covid here and we are hearing every day that these numbers are going up and we must make sure that we work according to the guidelines and keep everybody safe, so if they can improve things and allow us to let more people into our business and allow more groups together so we can become viable but still keep people safe, that is what we need. ., , ., still keep people safe, that is what we need. ., ., still keep people safe, that is what we need. .,, ., ., .., ., we need. people who are coming into the ub at we need. people who are coming into the pub at the — we need. people who are coming into the pub at the moment, _ we need. people who are coming into the pub at the moment, as _ we need. people who are coming into the pub at the moment, as they - the pub at the moment, as they required to show you anything, proof of vaccination? no. if it would help and allow you to get more people in, would that be something you would be willing to do? it is kind of being the covid police, which nobody wants
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to be. it the covid police, which nobody wants to be. , ' . ., to be. it is difficult... it would be very difficult _ to be. it is difficult... it would be very difficult for— to be. it is difficult... it would| be very difficult for hospitality. it would have to be a general thing on every business, notjust hospitality. there are a lot of younger people who are vaccinated, and it would make it very difficult for us to run our businesses. goad for us to run our businesses. good luck going — for us to run our businesses. good luck going forward. _ for us to run our businesses. good luck going forward. thank - for us to run our businesses. good luck going forward. thank you very much for talking to us today. senior doctors in england are being asked today whether they would be prepared to take industrial action over the government's 3% pay offer. the doctors' union, the bma, previously said strike action would be considered if consultants were not given at least a 5% increase. last week, the government raised its pay rise offer for most nhs staff in england from 1% to 3% following a recommendation from an independent pay review body. back now to tokyo and the olympics, which are going ahead despite the japanese capital being in a state of emergency
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because of the rising numbers of coronavirus cases. we can speak now to dr brian mccloskey, public health adviser to the international olympic committee's medical and scientific commission. thank you very much forjoining us. with the cases on the increase in tokyo generally, what is happening to try to protect the athletes and all of those associated with the games? all of those associated with the names? ~ ., ., , games? well, at the moment it is auoin games? well, at the moment it is going well- _ games? well, at the moment it is going well- we — games? well, at the moment it is going well. we have _ games? well, at the moment it is going well. we have a _ games? well, at the moment it is going well. we have a full- games? well, at the moment it is going well. we have a full range l games? well, at the moment it is| going well. we have a full range of measures in place to reduce the risk of coronavirus here in tokyo, including the standard public health measures of masks, distance and hygiene, but also we have a testing process that will pick up cases very early to make sure they don't become clusters, and i was working well at the moment. clusters, and i was working well at the moment-— the moment. what happens at the buffer between _ the moment. what happens at the buffer between the _ the moment. what happens at the buffer between the olympic- the moment. what happens at the i buffer between the olympic bubble, the larger olympic bubble, and
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outside that bubble, where perhaps there are deliveries coming in to olympic areas? how do you keep control of the sort of contacts? that control of the sort of contacts? git the moment what is happening all the international visitors are tested regularly to make sure we reduce the level of covid as soon as possible. they are tested before they leave their home country, tested at the airport, and tested every day in the village. the local workforce has also tested every day depending on their level of risk. we have for example the athletes who are not allowed to travel in tokyo, they don't use public transport, they don't use public transport, they don't go out of the village, they travel only end olympic cars. they do come into contact with the local population very much at all.- population very much at all. inside the villa . e population very much at all. inside the village at _ population very much at all. inside the village at the _ population very much at all. inside the village at the moment, - population very much at all. inside the village at the moment, are - population very much at all. inside | the village at the moment, are you aware of any further positive cases developing. before the game started a number of athletes had to be ruled out because they tested positive. latte
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out because they tested positive. we ick out because they tested positive. - pick up a few cases those days, but we have done over 200,000 tests across the village in the olympic family and we are getting a very small number of positives, not .02% out of that. if i tested that number of people in the uk at the moment i will probably stay up to 3,000 cases. ~ . will probably stay up to 3,000 cases. . . ., ., cases. we have heard from the organisers _ cases. we have heard from the organisers that _ cases. we have heard from the organisers that they _ cases. we have heard from the organisers that they are - cases. we have heard from the - organisers that they are encouraging competitors and their support team not to hug. i guess it is difficult if you have just one gold not to jump up if you have just one gold not to jump up and down in celebration and hug your team. it is jump up and down in celebration and hug your team-— hug your team. it is difficult and ou can hug your team. it is difficult and you can imagine _ hug your team. it is difficult and you can imagine all— hug your team. it is difficult and you can imagine all the - hug your team. it is difficult and you can imagine all the emotion j you can imagine all the emotion after waiting for a year to get here. i think most people in the last year have become used to these sorts of measures and mostly it is ok. to be honest, if they are hugging people with their own bubble thatis hugging people with their own bubble that is not such a big risk, but we are trying to discourage it. haifa are trying to discourage it. now that the games _ are trying to discourage it. now that the games are _ are trying to discourage it. now that the games are under way, how are you feeling about the prospects for the rest of the games?—
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for the rest of the games? we're feelin: for the rest of the games? we're feeling good _ for the rest of the games? we're feeling good here. _ for the rest of the games? we're feeling good here. the _ for the rest of the games? we're feeling good here. the sport - for the rest of the games? we're feeling good here. the sport has| for the rest of the games? -- feeling good here. the sport has now started, the medals are coming in, the venues are great, the local population is very friendly. it is looking good from the sand, and at the same time we are seeing the covid measures in place and working. at the moment we are comfortable that tents are going to go well, but we still remain alert anything that might happen. we still remain alert anything that might happen-— might happen. good luck, all the ve best might happen. good luck, all the very best with — might happen. good luck, all the very best with a _ might happen. good luck, all the very best with a testing - might happen. good luck, all the . very best with a testing programme. hopefully it continues without too many cases. thank you very much, doctor brian mccluskey. thank you very much, doctor brian mccluskey. one of the major difficulties for the olympic athletes is the extreme heat of a japanese summer. the organisers have done their best to try to protect them from the high temperatures — but it's not proving an easy task. mariko oi reports from tokyo. under the scorching sun of tokyo,
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girls from den—en—chofu high school's tennis club carry on with their extracurricular activities, but, every year, around 3,000 children suffer from heatstroke during club activities like this. there have even been deaths in the past. the school's tennis coach of 17 years says the hottest summers mean they have to be extra careful. translation: we measure heat stress indexes every hour to make sure - it is safe to practise. lately, we have gathered early in the morning at 7:15am or the late afternoon when the temperature isn't too high. it is under this heat that the world's top athletes are competing for gold during this summer's games. the conditions mean we are less likely to see a volley of world records tumbling. just by being in heat exposure, the cardiovascular — your heart system — has to work harder to maintain your performance and also your body's ability to thermoregulate, maintain your body temperature in a good state —
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that would also be impacted greatly. the last timejapan held a summer games was 1964. it was in october, when the weather was cooler, so having the games here now has raised concerns that the intense heat and humidity of the tokyo summer could pose a serious risk to athletes, but when the games are held, it all has to do with the global sport calendar. these are the major events. there is a gap between late—july and august. broadcasters around the world paid billions of dollars for the rights to show the olympics. they need to show it at the right time of year in the right time of day. broadcasting is one of the two most significant revenue sources for the olympics, so the ioc is going to want to keep sponsors and broadcasters as happy as can be. and that means some events, like marathon and race walking, have been moved to sapporo,
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where it is cooler, while others take place in the early morning or evening. but increasingly, it is notjust the battle for a medal, it is a battle against the heat. two london hospitals have asked patients to stay away after their emergency departments were hit by flooding. east london's whipps cross and newham hospitals urged patients to use other sites for urgent care, and ambulances are being redirected. torrential rain has caused severe flooding to homes, roads and stations. the london fire brigade said it took more than 600 flooding—related calls. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello, again. yesterday, parts of suffolk and london had some torrential downpours. today, we are looking at something drier here but not necessarily bone dry, we could catch a shower, we could catch shower almost anywhere, but most of us will miss them
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and have a dry day with a fair bit of sunshine around. temperature wise, we are looking at 15 in the north to 25 in hull, birmingham and also london. through this evening, we should lose most of the showers but we do have another system coming in from the west, and that is going to produce some heavy showers across northern ireland, some of those getting into wales and the south west. it is not going to be a cold night. overnight, temeperatures ranging from 12 in lerwick to about 17 as we push down towards the south—east. tomorrow, then, some of us will start off on a dry note, we'll have the showers pushing west to east, further showers across scotland, some of those will be heavy and thundery and some coming across northern ireland as well as england and wales. temperatures down a touch on today. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: three team gb golds in tokyo — it's olympicjoy for tom daley and matty lee in the men's
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synchronised ten metre platform diving. adam peaty started the team gb gold rush — defending his 100—metre breaststroke title and there's gb gold in the cycling too — tom pidcock wins the men's mountain bike cross country event could more essential workers be allowed to self—isolation if they've been pinged? ministers meet today to discuss whether to expand the scheme. some covid restrictions are relaxed in northern ireland — and a decision is due on whether theatres and concert halls could be allowed to re—open sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougall: tom daley has ended his long wait for an olympic gold medal. alongside matty lee, daley triumphed in a nerve—wracking men's synchronised 10m platform event at tokyo 2020. the pair dived impeccably throughout,
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moving top of the leaderboard afterfour dives, before going on to expertly handle nerves and pressure in their final two routines. in a nail—biting finale, the british pair watched on as chinese pair cao yuan and chen aisen made their final dive. daley and lee then broke into wild celebrations when it became clear they had ended china's golden grip on the event, dating back to 2000. i have been diving for 20 years and it's my fourth olympic games. a lot of people would have dented me out being the older person but i am in the best shape physically and mentally. i stood the best shape physically and mentally. istood behind the best shape physically and mentally. i stood behind that rostrum aren't about to be announced as olympic champions and the national anthem played, iwas as olympic champions and the national anthem played, i was gone, i couldn't even sing, i was crying.
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i couldn't even sing, i was crying. ijust i couldn't even sing, i was crying. i just can't believe i couldn't even sing, i was crying. ijust can't believe it. the great british gold rush started in the early hours of this morning with adam peaty winning the 100m breaststroke — becoming the first british swimmer to defend an olympic title. the world record holder blew away the competition to take britain's first gold medal of the games. from start to finish it was a perfectly executed swim by peaty as he finished in a time of 57.37 seconds, six tenths clear of the field. speaking afterwards, the defending champion peaty said he was relieved. i have not felt this good since 2016. it means the world to me. i had the best preparation in my life, and then it's what it takes to be an athlete, it's not who is the best all year round, it is the best person on the day, who is the most adaptable. team gb's tom pidcock has taken gold in the cross country mountain biking.
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he led the race from about midway onwards, navigating the tough course superbly. the 21—year—old from leeds finished a clear 20 seconds ahead the rest of the field to take great britain's third gold medal. it comes two months after pidcock broke his collarbone in a collision with a car while out training. great britain's alex yee won silver in a difficult men's triathlon as kristian blummenfelt of norway claimed gold. yee had led for much of the led for much of the 10km run in her debut games, before blummenfelt pushed through to breakaway and take the gold. britain's jonny brownlee came fifth. a bit bizarre really that it is me who is doing this. i am a normal person from south—east london. it is crazy. dreams come true. it is amazing. in training i worked harder than i did in that race, i knew i
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could give that extra bit, i was as prepared as i could have been added to come second is the best result i could have got on the day. one of the new olympic sports skateboarding held it's finals earlier with a remarkable home win for 13 year old momiji nishiya from japan. the average age on the women's podium was 11i. a gold and a bronze forjapan — 13 year old momeeji nisheeah with her impressive win and brazil's rayssa leal, also just 13 years old, getting the silver. third place to funa naka—yama who's16. there was an upset in the women's 400 metres freestyle final with australia's ariarne titmus beating the defending champion katie ledecky to win herfirst—ever gold medal. titmus swam the best time of her career. ledecky has dominated the pool over the last five years, winning four golds and one
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silver in rio. there are updates on the bbc sport website. the number of new covid infections has fallen for five days in a row for the first time since february. there were just over 29 thousand cases yesterday — compared to more than 48 thousand last week. i'm joined now by dr deepti gurdasani, a clinical epidemiologist at queen mary university of london. thank you for your time to date. what are your thoughts on what is going on with the figures here? there is a level of inconsistency between these figures and figures from other sources, there is a covid—19 simpson tracker which says there are over 60,000 cases. we need to understand whether this is a change in testing behaviour or a
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backlog intestine, and that should come clear in the next few days to weeks because essentially we usually see a decline in hospitalisation after a decline in cases after about ten days. if we see that, we can be clear that the trend is real. the office for national statistics last week up to the 17th ofjuly told us that until then we know that cases are rising as a national service which does not depend on people coming forward. the trains are not clear. if the trend is real, it could be because of multiple factors, schools closed recently but the trend started before them but we know many children were off school because of isolation, over1 million children and that could be linked, and hot weather, more activity outdoors. it does not seem to be an impact of less activity, because
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there is a trend of increasing mobility, that does not tell us where the activity is happening, but if it is outdoors it is a lower risk, and the end of the euro 2020, it led to a spike in england in young men, but it is unlikely to be the end of the peak or the end of the end of the peak or the end of the pandemic because last week, the office for national statistics said one in 75 people infected which is a very high rate so we must be some signs of encouragement but we want to be sure with more data that the trend as real as you said. you mention various factors, you did not talk about vaccination, is that part of it? i talk about vaccination, is that part of it? ., ., ~' talk about vaccination, is that part of it? ., ., ~ ., of it? i do not think that the level of it? i do not think that the level of vaccination _ of it? i do not think that the level of vaccination increase _ of it? i do not think that the level of vaccination increase and, - of it? i do not think that the level of vaccination increase and, in - of it? i do not think that the level| of vaccination increase and, in the last few weeks, it would not explain this decline which is exponential,
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and the fact that it is declining in syncin and the fact that it is declining in sync in all places and all regions in the uk does not seem in line with a two point increase in percentage of fully vaccinated people in the last few weeks. i do not think that can explain that because countries have higher levels of vaccination as us across the globe, it would be related to other factors if it was real. , . ~ related to other factors if it was real. , ., ,, ., ., real. lets talk about the impact of the easin: real. lets talk about the impact of the easing of— real. lets talk about the impact of the easing of restrictions - real. lets talk about the impact of the easing of restrictions in - the easing of restrictions in england onjuly the easing of restrictions in england on july the the easing of restrictions in england onjuly the 19th. less so in other parts of the uk with regards to wearing facemasks. do you think we are going to see an about turn and that cases will rise again or will those other factors like schools being closed, will be offset any rise caused by the 19th ofjuly? they will offset out but whether that will maintain the art before ——
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map below one, the impact of the 19th will not be felt immediately because when we look at mobility, an idea of activity, they are not sudden changes, it is a gradual change, that will be felt in the coming weeks. in scotland, they do not have the same policies as us, their cases have gone into decline but the impact of level zero is not being fully felt yet. scotland is slightly ahead of us, we should look there to understand our long—term trajectory. at some point in time, particularly when school is open, but if we see an increase over the summer will based on the balance of schools being closed and the level of behavioural change in the population which we do not know what
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that will be yet. population which we do not know what that will be yet-— that will be yet. when schools reo en, that will be yet. when schools reopen. l _ that will be yet. when schools reopen, i wonder _ that will be yet. when schools reopen, i wonder how- that will be yet. when schools reopen, i wonder how much i that will be yet. when schools - reopen, i wonder how much immunity there will be in the population. you are very clear on this, you want to see people getting immunity through vaccination, doing it through infection by an easing of restrictions is a very dangerous route and you have said that before. whether people have been vaccinated or whether they have become infected, do you think there is going to be a rise in the level of general immunity in the population that by the time we get to the start of autumn, cases might be on a downward trajectory? that is what we are hoping. it is downward tra'ectory? that is what we are hoina. , ~ , ., ., are hoping. it is likely, and also in israel are hoping. it is likely, and also in lsrael in _ are hoping. it is likely, and also in israel in -- _ are hoping. it is likely, and also in israel in -- in _ are hoping. it is likely, and also in israel in -- in elderly - are hoping. it is likely, and alsoj in israel in -- in elderly people, in israel in —— in elderly people, to give boosters to people, it is unlikely we will reach herd
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immunity, it is highly transferable, many countries including israel are saying with 100% of the population vaccinated, it is unlikely we will reach a threshold where outbreaks completely stop and the spread stops, because 85% of the population needs to be immune, immune and not vaccinated, even with 100% vaccination because we will not reach because many people are not legible, we will never reach that threshold where transmission stops so we need mitigations alongside vaccination, a long—term plan for ventilation, to continue wearing facemasks and moving outdoors as much as we can because vaccination alone is very unlikely to get us there, with current vaccines i want to see. maybe another level of vaccine might reach that threshold. very interesting to talk to you, thank you very much.
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coronavirus infection rates in the netherlands skyrocketed by more than 500% earlier this month, following the scrapping of almost all remaining lockdown restrictions and the reopening of nightclubs in latejune. the surge in infections prompted an equally swift u—turn, with nightclubs now closed until at least the 13th of august. anna holligan went to meet one band that hoped to have been performing at the weekend. this was meant to be this band's breakthrough year. we make dutch electronic synth pop and it's awesome. but, with nightclubs closed, there is no audience to see them in action. we had, like, 70 shows and they all got cancelled. and that was a big bummer. i already told my girlfriend i was going to pay the rent. many feel as though they are being used as scapegoats by a state that keeps on changing direction.
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you cannot put this entire weight of responsibility on the youth of today. that is just crazy. if you tell youth you can go out, and you are going out, then you are punished for going out... that is very hard on us, on young people, and we shouldn't be in such a position. earlier this month, the infection rate shot up by 500% one week after the government relaxed the rules before rapidly reintroducing them. and the dutch government here in the hague has been struggling to balance these competing demands. the nightclub owners who want to save their businesses, the people who just want to go dancing again, and the vulnerable groups and medical workers who fear it is too soon — any further relaxation could lead to another spike in infections. the dutch health minister was criticised after encouraging young people to get the single—shot janssen vaccine and go partying with the slogan, dancing with janssen. he admits the rush to restore freedom at home may result in less of it abroad.
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translation: it is fair to say that increasing infection rates could have consequences, for the extent to which we are welcome in other european countries. even the band, desperate to get back to live shows, are urging politicians to move with caution. the best thing they could have done would be keep it closed, keep it more strict. notjust throw everything open. so that we could just... when the time is right, really start again. really, that live energy, as you can tell... anna holligan, bbc news, the hague. the headlines on bbc news: gold at the tokyo olympics for divers tom daley and matty lee, with mountain—biker tom pidcock and swimmer adam peaty also
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securing golds for team gb. could more essential workers be allowed to avoid self—isolation if they've been pinged? ministers meet today to discuss whether to expand the scheme some covid restrictions are relaxed in northern ireland and a decision is due on whether theatres and concert halls can reopen. gurkha veterans are staging a hunger strike on whitehall in london as part of a campaign for equal pension rights. a unique unit in the british army, the gurkhas — who have a base in folkestone — are widely regarded as some of the best soldiers in the world. but those who retired before 1997 are not eligible for a uk armed forces pension and are calling for change. the government says it's committed to ensuring the gurkha pension scheme is sustainable and fair alongside other uk public sector pensions. luke hanrahan reports.
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a hunger strike on the doorstep of downing street as gurkhas who loyally fought for the british all over the world seek pension rights. this man served for 20 years but for all gurkhas who retired before 2017, he is asking for a pension. sign me it is very complicated, representative of the two communities across the south south—east of england. lift} communities across the south south-east of england. 270 years of historical discrimination. _ south-east of england. 270 years of historical discrimination. we - south-east of england. 270 years of historical discrimination. we have i historical discrimination. we have tried to raise our voice over 30 years. no one is listening. the
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government — years. no one is listening. the government says _ years. no one is listening. the government says it _ years. no one is listening. the government says it is committed to ensuring that the gurkhas pension is fair. but the gain one third less than their british counterparts, striking for equality. the bbc�*s luke hanrahan reporting. extreme weather is being recorded around the world — from flooding in europe to wildfires in the us — and scientists say it's underlined the urgent need for action on climate change. in less than a hundred days, the uk will host a major meeting of world leaders on climate issues. ahead of the cop26 summit in glasgow, representatives from more than 50 countries are meeting in london. courtney bembridge reports. extreme temperatures and dry conditions are fuelling wildfires in northern california. fire is threatening spain, too. this is the catalonia region and one of the worst fires here in years. there were similar scenes
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on the italian island of sardinia. an out—of—control fire after a heat wave. while no single event can be attributed to climate change, scientists say its impact has never been more clear. no, no, no, no, no, no... no! in belgium, heavy rainfall has caused severe flooding, less than a fortnight after deadly flash floods across western europe. a typhoon is battering china, days after severe flooding killed dozens of people. scientists say these events are becoming more common because warmer temperatures mean the air holds more moisture, which leads to more extreme rainfall. there was flooding in london, too. water streamed into a train station and turned roads into rivers, as representatives from more than 50 countries met to lay the groundwork for november's big climate summit in glasgow.
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this was the message from the british host. we are seeing in every part of the world, on each of our doorsteps, what happens when climate change gets out of control and so what i hope that we have at this meeting is an opportunity for us to shape the vision of the final outcomes from cop26 in glasgow and to build that unity of purpose amongst the ministers to deliver that. world leaders are under pressure to phase out coal power and set more ambitious targets on emissions which may not always win them favour at home. in some ways, they can only commit to, or it doesn't matter what they commit to if they can't get that through their parliaments, so there is a very complex process behind all this. in the meantime, the impact of fires, floods, extreme heat and drought will continue to be felt. with less than 100 days till the glasgow summit, these events may focus minds. courtney bembridge, bbc news.
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team gb's bradly sinden says it will take time to come to terms with missing out on gold after bagging the team's first silver medal at the tokyo olympics in the 68 kilo taekwondo final. the 22 year old from doncaster narrowly missed the top spot in the dying seconds of his fight. russell trott reports. bradly sinden said the gold medal was his to give away in tokyo and in the dramatic final of the 68 kilos taekwondo. there were moments where he looked like he mightjust hang onto it. the 22—year—old from doncaster was leading with seconds left on the clock, but the uzbekistan ulugbev rashitov pulled off a head kick in 34/29. you are here to get gold, it doesn't matter, anything else that comes isn't what we are here to celebrate. my coach always said it is always the first loser, the best loser. but, no, maybe eventually i will get over it, but for now, it's got me that i didn't win gold where i thought it when it was there for me to take. but i'll take away and improve on it and come
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back stronger. he might have been hard on himself, but his family watching at home in doncaster told the bbc they were incredibly proud. i can't believe he's got a silver medal. it's an absolute massive achievement on top of obviously winning the worlds, but i know he went for gold so i know how disappointed he is going to be. despite silver, bradly sinden still adds to team gb's medal hoard so far and promises we will see him again in paris in 2024. concerns over sustainability in fashion have seen second hand clothing sales rise. now — in what's thought to be a first in the uk — a permanent fashion "swap shop" for adults has opened in london. 'swappers' pay a membership fee to visit the store and exchange items they no longer want. jonelle awo—moyi went to meet the shop's founder i'd spend about £300 a month on clothing. one day i had a girls�* night
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at my house, and the girls came around and we were like, let's go out instead of stay in. everybody started moving things around my wardrobe. they were swapping amongst themselves. i saw this happen and thought, if i have all these things in my wardrobe and my friend has all these things in her wardrobe, it means we all have this problem where we have all of these clothes that we are not using that could go to somebody else. montana has opened a shop that runs on the basis of swapping instead of paying for goods. swappers, rather than shoppers, can trade in their clothes for second—hand garments. swap nation is thought to be the uk's first permanent fashion swap shop for adults. so i've brought three items, 0k? there is a dress. you get a four overall for that. a blouse? it is a designer and it is made out of silk. l overall it gets 13. a fast fashion top. it is made out of polyester. two to three tokens.
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you've got 20. 20. and i can go across this whole shop and choose whatever i'd like? take your time, browse, try them on, swap things in and out. _ it's up to you. ijust grabbed an amazing vintage top that if you are going to buy it would easily be £60 to £70. i have been able to come here with three items i don't wear and swap them. this is their first physical permanent store. it's really exciting for me. i wanted to be one of the first people through the doors today. swapping fashion is a good way of keeping a circular economy and maintaining a very small but kind of personal style wardrobe. you can still update it and things. it's been amazing. sustainable fashion is becoming more and more popular. swap nation is just one example of a company that markets second—hand clothing, saving clothes from landfill and giving them a new life.
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there are enough clothes on the planet currently to clothe the next six generations of the human race. almost 70% of the clothes we buy today are synthetic. they are made from fossil fuels. clothing has a huge transport cost. most of our clothes are made 5000, 6000 miles away. every piece of clothing we have costs the planet. so, according to patrick, we need to consume less. but does swapping have to end with fashion? you could easily swap a lawn mower and then swap that back to somebody else because you've used it. you could do that within your community. that could definitely work as a business. now it's time for a look at the weather with carole hello again.
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there are ehave thundery downpours expected. as we go through the week, we are looking at cooler conditions with heavy thundery showers and sunny spells. we will not all catch a heavy downpour, but if you do you will know about it. rest of the uk, dry weather, some sunshine and some showers knocking around. you could catch it anywhere and it could be heavy and thundery. 15 degrees in the north to 25 further south. through this evening, the showers will tend to aid and a new system coming from the west with showers across northern ireland, wales, south—west england and the channel islands. some clear skies but not cold. 12 degrees in the north, 17 and the south. on tuesday, the weather front comes in from the west, slowly drifting eastwards, low
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pressure in charge of our weather so fairly unsettled. the showers in the west drift eastwards through the day, yellow or light rain in the charts means something heavier, further heavy showers across scotland, also thundery and there could be localised flooding. temperatures down, a range of 15 to 23 celsius. wednesday, low pressure is driving the weather, weather fronts not far away, the isobars are closer together, fronts not far away, the isobars are closertogether, more fronts not far away, the isobars are closer together, more of a wind during wednesday around the showers where it will be gusty, 30 mph or even 40 mph. plentiful showers, heavy and thundery and some issues with localised flooding. in between the showers, some sunny skies. the average wind speed is the white
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circle but the dusts will be more. high temperatures 21 degrees as we slide down towards norwich. the rest of the week, the outlook remains unsettled.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. adam peaty starts a gold rush for team gb, winning the 100—metre breaststroke title and becoming one of the most successful swimmers of all time. it's olympicjoy for tom daley and matty lee — gold in the men's synchronised 10—metre platform diving. and gb gold in the cycling too — tom pidcock wins the men's mountain bike cross—country event.
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here in tokyo, i'll have all the latest on the action

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