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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 26, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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this is bbc news for viewers in the uk and around the globe. i'm sally bundock. our top stories. adam peaty wins britain's first gold medal of the tokyo olympics, as he successfully defends his 100 metres breaststroke title. after a farcical false start in the men's triathon, kristian blummenfelt picks up a gold medalfor norway. as more extreme weather is recorded around the world, scientists warn of the urgent need for action on climate change. celebrations in tunisia, as the president sacks his prime minister and suspends parliament, following a day of protests against the government's handling of the covid pandemic.
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and disappointment for band performers in the netherlands, after nightclubs close again due to soaring covid infections. hello and welcome. day three at the tokyo olympics is now well underway, and the medals are coming in thick and fast. team gb have picked up their first gold — adam peaty winning the men's 100 metres breaststroke final. but britain isn't the only country celebrating a good day at the pool. 0ur correspondent sarrah mulkerrins is in tokyo with the latest. it has been a scintillating morning
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with some of the finals it has been a scintillating morning with some of the finals in it has been a scintillating morning with some of the finals in the it has been a scintillating morning with some of the finals in the full here in tokyo. let's start with star man adam pt, defending his 0lympic title. he is so dominant in the 100 metres breaststroke. he is undefeated in seven years. he had so much pressure on him coming into this to try and back—up that when i become the first briton to win back—to—back 0lympic titles in the pool but he looked as cool and calm as he swung his way to victory. he had a very good start, he turned and extended his lead. he has the tattooed on his arms and he roared in celebration as he touched the ball in victory. huge celebrations for him. also a brilliant showdown in the women's four by 400 metres race. everyone had been talking about it in the build—up to the games and it did not disappoint.
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this was the meeting in the middle and the 400 metres. the jackie went out hard and fast. the australian paratoree with the final two lengths to go to steal victory. she is the world champion and olympic champion. if you have been anywhere near social media would you would have seen her coach celebrating in some style in the stands in tokyo. two other medals awarded today, canada got its first of the games with maggie mcneil in a 100 metres butterfly. she won that from 97, the outer lane. a bit of a surprise that american men dominant as always in the freestyle relay they won. let’s
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the freestyle relay they won. let's discuss other _ the freestyle relay they won. let's discuss other swimming _ the freestyle relay they won. let's discuss other swimming news. tunisian media and lots of pan— arab media are celebrating their win. he won the men's 400 metres freestyle, the first gold medal for an arab or african nation in this year's games. the tunisian president faces political problems we will look at later on in the programme can passing on his thanks and that of the nation. their win came as a surprise to much of the media after he only qualified in eighth place for the final. he has got the fifth gold—medal for for the final. he has got the fifth gold—medalfor tunisia in for the final. he has got the fifth gold—medal for tunisia in the history of the games and dedicated history of the games and dedicated his winter will tunisian. did tallis the reaction to that win in tokyo as well. —— do tell us about the reaction. well. -- do tell us about the reaction-— well. -- do tell us about the
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reaction. everybody loves an underdog — reaction. everybody loves an underdog story, _ reaction. everybody loves an underdog story, don't - reaction. everybody loves an underdog story, don't they? | reaction. everybody loves an l underdog story, don't they? in swimming, the outside lanes, i mentioned one of the victories coming from lane seven. their win here came from lane eight. usually the favourites are in lanes for macro and five. he stole through to victory in that race. when he touched the ball he did not believe it himself. he was splashing the water, cheering and shouting. when he came to collect his medal, usually they have special tracksuits to wear and he was there in his to share and tracksuit bottoms. always good to have an underdog story in the olympic games. —— his t—shirt. the semifinals are in the morning in tokyo and that would be a big factor. let's hearfrom michael phelps. he is well used to winning gold with 23 olympic gold medals. he
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was in tokyo watching. he said the shock victory was a great example of how swimming at the tokyo games is likely to have a series of wide open races. pm likely to have a series of wide open races. ~ , ., , , likely to have a series of wide open races. ~ , . , , ~ .,, races. an unbelievable swing. almost 4.5 races. an unbelievable swing. almost 4-5 seconds — races. an unbelievable swing. almost 4-5 seconds off— races. an unbelievable swing. almost 4.5 seconds off his _ races. an unbelievable swing. almost 4.5 seconds off his pb. _ races. an unbelievable swing. almost 4.5 seconds off his pb. -- _ 4.5 seconds off his pb. —— unbelievable swim. the difference in these _ unbelievable swim. the difference in these olympics compared to ones in these olympics compared to ones in the past _ these olympics compared to ones in the past in _ these olympics compared to ones in the past in my opinion is every single — the past in my opinion is every single person in the finals has a chance — single person in the finals has a chance to — single person in the finals has a chance to win a gold medal. it does not matter— chance to win a gold medal. it does not matter if you are in lane one, lane _ not matter if you are in lane one, lane eight. — not matter if you are in lane one, lane eight, lane four, it doesn't matten — lane eight, lane four, it doesn't matter. every single human being in the final_ matter. every single human being in the final is_ matter. every single human being in the final is close. ijust feel like the final is close. ijust feel like the globe — the final is close. ijust feel like the globe as a whole is really starting — the globe as a whole is really starting to step up and swim faster. for me. _ starting to step up and swim faster. for me. it— starting to step up and swim faster. for me. it is— starting to step up and swim faster. for me, it is fun to watch, amazing
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to see _ for me, it is fun to watch, amazing to see kids— for me, it is fun to watch, amazing to see kids standing up and accomplishing their goals and their dreams _ accomplishing their goals and their dreams i — accomplishing their goals and their dreams. , ., ., ._ ., accomplishing their goals and their dreams. , ., ., ., , dreams. i understand norway got its first old dreams. i understand norway got its first gold medal _ dreams. i understand norway got its first gold medal but _ dreams. i understand norway got its first gold medal but it _ dreams. i understand norway got its first gold medal but it was _ dreams. i understand norway got its first gold medal but it was not - first gold medal but it was not without drama for the male triathletes. do tallis about that. that was a very interesting start. —— to tell us. the triathlon got under way in the bay. there is a pontoon where triathletes start their spin. they realised the other half of the field were being blocked by a big, half of the field were being blocked bya big, black half of the field were being blocked by a big, black vote and had to pull all the triathletes back and start again. they did get under way. there is a 1500 metres swim around the bay and then they get on the bikes for 40 kilometres around the roads in tokyo and then on to the ten kilometre run. it was the norwegian who went on to win. there was a trio out in front he broke clear. britain
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finished second and the new zealander took bronze. blumenfeld was a runner earlier on in his career, so he really had the strength in his legs to pull clear at the end. he felt the heat and collapsed afterwards a little better after his celebrations, he was taken away on a wheelchair but he was back, all well and happy when he got his medal. i back, all well and happy when he got his medal. , ., ., , his medal. i understand the heat is a real issue- _ his medal. i understand the heat is a real issue. we _ his medal. i understand the heat is a real issue. we are _ his medal. i understand the heat is a real issue. we are going - his medal. i understand the heat is a real issue. we are going to - his medal. i understand the heat is a real issue. we are going to focus| a real issue. we are going to focus on that later in the programme. what else to be had to look forward to? so much action till it void too. we had the swimming and now the triathlon. now focus will be on man's rugby sevens. fiji won its first olympic gold medal in rio five years ago. i was lucky enough to see them celebrating and see what it meant to win that. they got a
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defence of the title of to a winning start. shaky in the first half. digi came back in to win that one. they are off to a winning start. —— fiji came back. they are going to be looking at naomi osaka to see what they candy. that was sarah mulkerrins. —— they candy. and in the last hour, japan has won another gold medal — and it's yet more success at the skatepark. moshima nishaya won the women's street skateboarding final. she's one of the youngest ever medallists at the grand old age of 13. nishiya finished ahead of rayssa leal of brazil — who is also 13 — and the average age
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of the competitors was 14. new this time of course to the olympics. more on the tokyo olympics later in the programme. for more on the tokyo olympics — go to the bbc news website. you can keep up to date with the schedule, and take a look at the medal table. go to bbc.com/news and follow the links. here in the uk, senior ministers will decide today, whether to further expand the scheme, allowing fully vaccinated key workers in england to avoid self isolation by taking daily covid tests instead. staff working in the food supply chain, front line emergency services, and transport and freight are already included and other workers such as council refuse collectors could also be added to the list. the department for environment, food and rural affairs says 500 sites have been identified for daily testing, which will be carried out by employers within the workplace.
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staying with covid—19, the government here in the uk says it wants to make getting vaccinated against coronavirus as easy as possible, to try and get young people to take the jab. to help, health services in england are running pop—up walk in centres at music festivals and shopping centres. it comes amid concerns that some 18 to 40—year—olds are not turning up for pre—booked appointments. robert coxwell reports. quick, easy and convenient. is the idea behind this pop—up vaccination centre in kent. they are becoming increasingly important as there are concerns over the number of young people who are not turning up to book appointments. it is people who are not turning up to book appointments.— book appointments. it is a really difficult issue. _ book appointments. it is a really difficult issue. young _ book appointments. it is a really difficult issue. young people - book appointments. it is a really l difficult issue. young people want to live their lives, they want to get on with things, they want the
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whole covid thing to be over. sometimes it might feel like, why bother? ., ., , bother? cutting the form filling has made people _ bother? cutting the form filling has made people bother. _ bother? cutting the form filling has made people bother. when - bother? cutting the form filling has made people bother. when you - bother? cutting the form filling has l made people bother. when you come home from work— made people bother. when you come home from work you _ made people bother. when you come home from work you do _ made people bother. when you come home from work you do not - made people bother. when you come home from work you do not want - made people bother. when you come home from work you do not want to l home from work you do not want to sit there. _ home from work you do not want to sit there. go— home from work you do not want to sit there, go through your phone and find a _ sit there, go through your phone and find a time — sit there, go through your phone and find a time i— sit there, go through your phone and find a time. i am already here, lets— find a time. i am already here, let's do— find a time. i am already here, let's do it _ find a time. i am already here, let's do it— find a time. i am already here, let's do it. �* ., ., ., ~ let's do it. amazing. you walk in, five minutes _ let's do it. amazing. you walk in, five minutes and _ let's do it. amazing. you walk in, five minutes and it's _ let's do it. amazing. you walk in, five minutes and it's done. - let's do it. amazing. you walk in, l five minutes and it's done. another wa to five minutes and it's done. another way to increase _ five minutes and it's done. another way to increase vaccine _ five minutes and it's done. another way to increase vaccine taken - five minutes and it's done. another way to increase vaccine taken is - five minutes and it's done. another way to increase vaccine taken is to | way to increase vaccine taken is to turn community centres into dedicated walk—in clinics. this turn community centres into dedicated walk-in clinics. this is . uicker dedicated walk-in clinics. this is quicker and _ dedicated walk-in clinics. this is quicker and really _ dedicated walk-in clinics. this is quicker and really far _ dedicated walk-in clinics. this is quicker and really far away - dedicated walk-in clinics. this is quicker and really far away from | quicker and really far away from home, much more efficient. students are showing — home, much more efficient. students are showing maturity _ home, much more efficient. students are showing maturity getting - are showing maturity getting vaccines _ are showing maturity getting vaccines meant notjust the nightclubs but we understand the importance of getting vaccines. the uk importance of getting vaccines. tie: uk government importance of getting vaccines. tte: uk government confirmed importance of getting vaccines. t"t2 uk government confirmed being importance of getting vaccines. tt2 uk government confirmed being fully vaccinated would be required. that could be extended to other crowded venues in england, giving people another incentive to getjabbed. senior doctors in england
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are being asked today whether they would be prepared to take industrial action over the government's 3% pay offer. the doctors' union, the bma, previously said strike action may be considered, if consultants were not given at least a 5% increase. last week, the government raised its pay offer for most nhs staff in england from 1% to 3%, following a recommendation from an independent pay review body. stay with us on bbc news. still to come... feeling the heat at tokyo 2020 — we'll look at how the extreme heat of the japanese summer is affecting the olympics. (tx breakfiller)
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this is bbc news. our main story this hour. adam peaty has won britain's first gold medal
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of the tokyo olympics, and successfully defended his 100 metres breaststroke title. extreme weather is being recorded around the world, from flooding in europe, to wildfires in the us. and scientists say it's underlined the urgent need for action on climate change. in less than a hundred days, the uk will host a major meeting of world leaders on climate issues. ahead of the cop26 summit in glasgow, representatives from more than 50 countries are meeting in london. courtney bembridge reports. extreme temperatures and dry conditions are fuelling wildfires in northern california. fire is threatening spain, too. this is the catalonia region and one of the worst fires here in years. there were similar scenes on the italian island of sardinia. an out—of—control fire after a heat wave.
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while no single event can be attributed to climate change, scientists say its impact has never been more clear. no, no, no, no, no, no...no! in belgium, heavy rainfall has caused severe flooding, less than a fortnight after deadly flash floods across western europe. a typhoon is battering china, days after severe flooding killed dozens of people. days after severe flooding scientists say these events are becoming more common because warmer temperatures mean the air holds more moisture, which leads to more extreme rainfall. there was flooding in london, too — water streamed into a train station and turned roads into rivers, as representatives from more than 50 countries met to lay the groundwork for november's big climate summit in glasgow. this was the message from the british host. we are seeing in every part of the world, on each
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of our doorsteps, what happens when climate change gets out of control and so what i hope that we have at this meeting is an opportunity for us to shape the vision of the final outcomes from cop26 in glasgow and to build that unity of purpose amongst the ministers to deliver that. world leaders are under pressure to phase out coal power and set more ambitious targets on emissions which may not always win them favour at home. in some ways, they can only commit to, or it doesn't matter what they commit to if they can't get that through their parliaments so there is a very complex process behind all this. in the meantime, the impact of fires, floods and extreme heat may just focus their minds. courtney bembridge, bbc news. supporters of tunisia's president kais saied have taken to the streets to celebrate, after he sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament.
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the president's move came after a day of demonstrations across the country, calling for the government to resign over its handling of the coronavirus pandemic. gail maclellan reports. crowds celebrate in tunis as news of the government's dismissal is announced. president kais saied also froze parliament for 30 days in an escalation of the political crisis in tunisia, much to the delight of his supporters. translation: it is the first time in my life i have heard _ of a head of state take the correct decision. we have taken back our country. this is the first time i have gone out to the streets to celebrate. in his earlier statement, the
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president said the measures were aimed at saving the state. not everyone agrees, the speaker of parliament has accused the presidnet of launching a coup against the revolution and constitution. the president's move followed a day of protests in tunis and other cities on sunday, demanding the government step down after a spike in a covid—19 cases that has aggravated economic troubles. translation: our main demand is that the ennahda movement, l which ruled for ten years, leave the parliament. as a young man in 2011, i called forjobs, freedom and dignity. in 2021, i still call forjobs, freedom and dignity. now, the crowds celebrate as military vehicles glide by. the extent of support for the president's move not yet clear. gail maclellan, bbc news. coronavirus infection rates in the netherlands skyrocketed by more than 500% earlier this month, following the scrapping of almost all remaining lockdown restrictions and the reopening of nightclubs in latejune.
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the surge in infections prompted an equally swift u—turn, with nightclubs now closed until at least the 13th of august. anna holligan went to meet one band that hoped to have been performing at the weekend. this was meant to be this band's breakthrough year. we make dutch electronic synth pop and it's awesome. but, with nightclubs closed, there is no audience to see them in action. we had, like, 70 shows and they all got cancelled. and that was a big bummer. i already told my girlfriend i was going to pay the rent. many feel as though they are being used as scapegoats by a state that keeps on changing direction. you cannot put this entire weight of responsibility on the youth of today. that is just crazy. if you tell youth you can go out,
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and you are going out, then you are punished for going out... that is very hard on us, on young people, and we shouldn't be in such a position. earlier this month, the infection rate shot up by 500% one week after the government relaxed the rules before rapidly reintroducing them. and the dutch government here in the hague has been struggling to balance these competing demands. the nightclub owners who were want to save their businesses, the people who just want to go dancing again, and the vulnerable groups and medical workers who fear it is too soon — any further relaxation could lead to another spike in infections. the dutch health minister was criticised after encouraging young people to get the single—shot janssen vaccine and go partying with the slogan, dancing with janssen. he admits the rush to restore freedom at home may result in less of it abroad. translation: it is fair to say that increasing infection rates - could have consequences,
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for the extent to which we are welcome in other european countries. even the band, desperate to get back to live shows, are urging politicians to move with caution. the best thing they could have done would be keep it closed, keep it more strict. notjust throw everything open. so that we could just... when the time is right, really start again. really, that live energy, as you can tell... anna holligan, bbc news, the hague. more now on the olympics. and we are seeing the effects the extreme heat of a japanese summer can have on the events. the organisers have done their best to try to protect the athletes from the high temperatures,
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but it's not proving an easy task. mariko oi is in tokyo for us. under the scorching sun of tokyo, girls from den—en—chofu high school's tennis club carry on with their extracurricular activities, but, every year, around 3000 children suffer from heatstroke during club activities like this. there have even been deaths in the past. the school's tennis coach of 17 years says the hottest summers mean they have to be extra careful. translation: we measure heat stress indexes every hour- to make sure it is safe to practise. lately, we have gathered early in the morning at 7:15am or the late afternoon when the temperature isn't too high. it is under the seat that the top athletes are competing for gold during these games. —— it is under this heat that the top athletes
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are competing for gold during these games. the conditions mean we are less likely to see a volley of world records tumbling. just by being in heat exposure, the cardiovascular — your heart system — has to work harder to maintain your performance and also your body's ability to thermoregulate, maintain your body temperature in a good state — that would also be impacted greatly. the last timejapan held a summer games was 1964, it was in october, when the weather was cooler, so having the games here now has raised concerns that the intense heat and humidity of the tokyo summer could pose a serious risk to athletes, but when the games are held, it all has to do with the global sport calendar. these are the major events. there is a gap between late—july and august. broadcasters around the world paid billions of dollars for the rights to show the olympics. they need to show it at the right time of year in the right time of day. broadcasting is one of the two most significant revenue sources for the olympics, so the ioc is going to want
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to keep sponsors and broadcasters as happy as can be. and that means some events, like marathon and race walking, have been moved to sapporo, where it is cooler, while others take place in the early morning or evening. but increasingly, it is notjust the battle for a medal, it is a battle against the heat. one of europe's most famous streets, the tree—lined paseo del prado in madrid, has been added to unesco's's world heritage list. the un's cultural organisation said it was a landscape of arts and sciences, adding that together with its prominent buildings, among them the prado museum, the boulevard had played a key role in the city's history. the spanish government highlighted the fact that the paseo had been the first street of its kind to be open to all citizens — previously park—like boulevards were only open to the upper classes.
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you can reach me on twitter. i'm @ sally bundock bbc. stay with us. so much more to come. sunday was a day and extreme. the highest temperature was in northern ireland with 28 degrees. northern ireland, northern england and north—west wales. by contrast, quite a lot of cloud. this was a weather watcher picture sent in from kent, where there was a severe cluster of thunderstorms that developed and it brought some localised flooding as well. you can see the volume of lightning strikes, too, stretching all the way down from east anglia over to the isle of wight. they slowly faded away and the area of low pressure is moving away as we speak. that is going to continue to anchor
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itself up into the far north east for the start of our monday morning. it will bring a fair amount of cloud across eastern scotland and north—east england but it's going to be a relatively quiet start to monday, dry with some sunshine coming through, maybe a few isolated showers lingering for a time but generally a better day. there will be a few showers develop through the afternoon, some of these possibly heavy and thundery. they should be a little more interspersed in comparison to the weekend. temperatures, well, with a little more sunshine, higher in england with 26 degrees, the high. but we will start to see more showers developing from the west, moving into northern ireland, south—west wales and south—west england by the end of the day. it's a weather front that's going to move through and the weather story changes as we go through the week. with low pressure anchored to the north and those winds swinging in a clockwise direction, it will be driving in more moisture, more cloud and certainly more of a breeze on those exposed west—facing coasts. tuesday is really quite a messy picture. there will be a lot of cloud around and showers, some of those showers thundery in nature once again.
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i'm not going to be too clever about it, almost anywhere could catch a shower on tuesday and could they be quite heavy. temperatures, they are going to struggle a little, 15 to 21 celsius. so just going below where they should be now for the time of year. the low pressure doesn't move very far at all throughout the week. we still keep this feed coming in off the atlantic, a cooler source, brisk wind as well. that means it stays rather cool and showery. indications of something a little better though as we head to the weekend. take care.
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this is bbc news, broadcasting to the uk and around the globe. i'm sally bundock. our top business stories. tackling the pingdemic — businesses face disruption to supply chains despite government efforts to free up critical workers. a glass half full for uk wine drinkers, as the government looks to scrap a proposed additional charge on imports. and the winds of change for the cruise industry, as it hopes fully vaccinated passengers will boost the sector after covid—19 dropped anchor on its operations.
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let's start here in the uk, where the country's economy is facing a pingdemic, where workers notified by the nhs track and trace app have to self—isolate due to being in contact with someone who's tested positive for covid. in the week ending on the 14th ofjuly, 600,000 people were sent alerts and asked to self—isolate. supply firms have been complaining they are struggling to keep supermarkets stocked with food. in response on sunday, the department for environment, food and rural affairs said it has identified 500 sites for daily contact testing. and some 10,000 supermarket depot workers in england will be exempt from quarantine rules. this will include forklift drivers and dispatchers, however supermarket workers are not included. shane brennan chief executive of the cold chain federation, explained how its members
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are being affected by the pingdemic. it's been a really, really stressful two or three weeks of building up, day—to—day increase of number of people who are absent. so as we started to see problems with drivers being able to pick up goods, put it on to packing lines and manufacturing plants, exponential growth week by week heading into this weekend. we are hopeful that going into this week we might have seen the worst of it. that is very much the hope sitting here today. whether or not that is the case, we will start to see the few days. and will start to see the few days. and what difference _ will start to see the few days. and what difference does the government changes make to this situation? it will help in some cases. the scheme is still pretty complicated. it only applies to certain facilities, as you said at the top of the news.
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about 500 facilities. there are many thousands of facilities in the chain. so lots will not be able to take advantage. there is complicated protocol you have to put in place which most facilities don't have. a lot of businesses will be having to make a decision over the next 24 to 48 hours about the exemption scheme they want to take part in. that will depend on what they see in terms of absence rates going into this week. in terms of supply chains in the meantime, to what extent are they being affected? it really depends on where you are, doesn't it, as to how it impacted supermarkets are, consumers are, that kind of thing? it is flaring up. different places have different problems. some areas are particularly badly affected. others are very badly affected. it is fertility by facilities. businesses are having to put out a lot of fires across the supply chain. the problem is that has grew and grew over a number of weeks. we
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have started to see some emptiness on the shelves. within that what businesses are trying to do is solve that problem. as they have done at every stage throughout the pandemic, they have been making sure they get product onto the shelves eventually. consumers need to bear with us and understand while we are under huge pressure right now, we are focused on getting the job done. getting product on the shelves. that was shane brennan. now let's talk about a victory for british wine drinkers, after the uk government decided to scrap a planned import levy of around 10 pence on every bottle imported into the country. from 2022, wine shipped to the uk from the eu, was due to require a certificate, which meant it met certain regulations. justin urquhart—stewart, who's the co—founder and ambassador of seven investment management, said it could have pushed up wine prices.
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it's the first example of getting rid of red tape after brexit. it's a very good example. the idea being not eu wine, but wine from all over the world, there was going to be an extra charge port on for making sure there was a quality standard of the wine. it is completely unnecessary. it was seen as an extra tax. it will be around about 10p a bottle. it works out at savings of £100 billion a year. that shows how much wine we drink. nonetheless, it will be a significant saving. considering the amount of tax on a bottle of wine anyway, this is a reasonable saving. the wine and spirit trade association have been exhausted with this issue. it comes as a great relief to them. it is just a bit of post—brexit red tape that we can do without, presumably? yes. post-brexit red tape that we can do without, presumably?— post-brexit red tape that we can do without, presumably? yes, the whole idea was to try _ without, presumably? yes, the whole idea was to try to _ without, presumably? yes, the whole idea was to try to make _ without, presumably? yes, the whole idea was to try to make sure - without, presumably? yes, the whole idea was to try to make sure there - idea was to try to make sure there
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was a standard of quality of wine. most wines have reasonable standard levels on them anyway. itjust looked like an extra level that someone was putting on. now people are saying it is a european issue. i'm not sure that is the case. we were putting on an everybody�*s wine, including the eu. actually by taking it away, yes it does give us direct savings. if you are a wine drinker and are suffering from covid, or you have been pinged, you can celebrate by having a little bit of wine a bit cheaper, but not yet. i by having a little bit of wine a bit cheaper, but not yet.— by having a little bit of wine a bit cheaper, but not yet. i was pinged recently as — cheaper, but not yet. i was pinged recently as well. _ cheaper, but not yet. i was pinged recently as well. quite _ cheaper, but not yet. i was pinged recently as well. quite a _ cheaper, but not yet. i was pinged recently as well. quite a few- cheaper, but not yet. i was pinged recently as well. quite a few of. cheaper, but not yet. i was pinged recently as well. quite a few of us| recently as well. quite a few of us getting pinged at the moment. let's talk about philip morris international, the tobacco giant, making headlines over the weekend. the chief executive speaking to the mail on sunday. it will stop selling cigarettes in britain within the next ten years, they say. that is quite a target to sort of remove the iconic marlboro brand from all the shops around the country? itruieiiii. iconic marlboro brand from all the shops around the country? well, you
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said there and _ shops around the country? well, you said there and say, _ shops around the country? well, you said there and say, hang _ shops around the country? well, you said there and say, hang on, - shops around the country? well, you said there and say, hang on, if- said there and say, hang on, if philip morris aren't going to sell that, what are they going to sell? they are the marlborough brand. if that goes, they go. they have other tobacco products. you have got e—cigarettes, various other items. but nowhere near the scale of marlborough overall. this is all part of the move of environmental social and governance. companies have to show their green credentials and the responsibility to the health and the responsibility to the health and welfare of everybody. whether you are an oil company, you are now an energy management company, or if you are a tobacco company you will have to call yourself something else, this is all towards that move, to make sure there are no socially acceptable. apart from anything else, this will affect their potential share price. increasingly we have had companies like lever and general saying unless these companies are seen to be esg, they won't be invested in. if you still
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want to be invested in by some of the leading institutions, you will have to change your colour? or, your product and the title of what you are doing. cigarettes know more about e—cigarettes and other tobacco related products, whatever they are. whatever they are indeed. let's stay with eating, drinking, dining out. the irish government is allowing indoor hospitality to reopen from monday. it will be limited to those who are fully vaccinated or have recovered from covid—19. outdoor hospitality in the republic has been reopen since the 7th ofjune, with social distancing and restrictions on the number of people who can meet. so will this be enough to give ireland's economy a timely boost? adrian cummins, who's the ceo of restaurant association of ireland, explained how his industry will cope with the new guidelines. restau ra nts, restaurants, pubs and cafes across
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the republic of ireland will reopen for indoor hospitality ads of this morning. it is the first time in 498 days that some businesses will be able to open their business for the first time since last march. our industry has been economically flattened since march of 2020. we are now starting the recovery of our industry, our sector. we are hoping to take back 180,000 employees and workers today as part of this reopening schedule. you workers today as part of this reopening schedule. workers today as part of this reo enin: schedule. ., ., ., ., reopening schedule. you have got to check that those _ reopening schedule. you have got to check that those coming _ reopening schedule. you have got to check that those coming to - reopening schedule. you have got to check that those coming to eat - reopening schedule. you have got to check that those coming to eat and l check that those coming to eat and dine inside have been fully vaccinated or recently recovered from covid—19. how will that work? yes, we have a very strict guidelines we have to adhere to in the republic of ireland. we need to make sure that only patrons or customers that enter hospitality venues are vaccinated or have recovered from covid in the last 180
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days. these measures are very strict. it's important we adhere to the public health guidelines. we now have an opportunity to reopen indoor hospitality in the republic and hopefully we can give our world famous welcome to customers and tourists from all around the world. do you think the guidelines need to be that straight? are you an agreement with this at the restaurant association, and what do members about that?— restaurant association, and what do members about that? there are mixed feelinus and members about that? there are mixed feelings and mixed _ members about that? there are mixed feelings and mixed emotions - members about that? there are mixed feelings and mixed emotions with - feelings and mixed emotions with regard to today. some believe it is too draconian, some believe it is the right thing to do. we have always taken a stance that we will always taken a stance that we will always follow public health advice. this is the public health advice. we hope that this will be only in place for a number of months and that of these restrictions will fall away in possibly two months' time when we get to our 80% to 90% threshold of fully vaccinated population within the republic. we have a long road to
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go yet. what we are there. it is a step in the right direction for the industry. northern ireland has been open since may of this year. so we have two systems on the island here. now we have everybody working together, moving forward in the right direction. find together, moving forward in the right direction.— together, moving forward in the right direction. and how have your members cope? — right direction. and how have your members cope? i— right direction. and how have your members cope? i have _ right direction. and how have your members cope? i have restaurant| members cope? i have restaurant survived in ireland? it members cope? i have restaurant survived in ireland?— survived in ireland? it has been extremely _ survived in ireland? it has been extremely difficult _ survived in ireland? it has been extremely difficult now - survived in ireland? it has been extremely difficult now for - survived in ireland? it has been extremely difficult now for our. extremely difficult now for our industry since march of last year. our government has supported us in financial supports around weight supplement schemes, providing assistance towards the fixed costs of restaurants and hospitality businesses. while it is welcome, it is not enough. so as we start the economic recovery for our industry, we need the old supports in place into next year until we get to next year's tourism season. ireland is so dependent on tourism as part of our
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economic base. that dependent on tourism as part of our economic base.— economic base. that was adrian cummins, _ economic base. that was adrian cummins, chief _ economic base. that was adrian cummins, chief executive - economic base. that was adrian cummins, chief executive of - economic base. that was adrian j cummins, chief executive of the restaurant association of ireland. stay with us on bbc news. still to come... the indian food app zomato had a blockbuster stock market debut on friday. however, some local restaurants are not happy with their success, in a moment we'll tell you why. some more news from the uk. the number of people testing positive for covid—19 in the uk has fallen for the fifth day in a row. just over 29,000 cases were recorded yesterday, down from more than 48,000 last sunday. it is the first time that there's been a sustained drop in cases outside a national lockdown. senior doctors in england are being asked today, whether they would be prepared to take industrial action over the government's 3% pay offer. the doctors' union, the bma,
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previously said strike action may be considered if consultants were not given at least a 5% increase. last week, the government raised its pay offer for most nhs staff in england from 1% to 3%, following a recommendation from an independent pay review body. two london hospitals have asked patients to stay away after their emergency departments were hit by flooding on sunday. east london's whipps cross and newham hospitals urged patients to use other a&es for urgent care, and ambulances are being redirected. torrential rain has caused severe flooding to homes, roads and stations. the london fire brigade said it had taken about 300 flooding—related calls in the space of a few hours. the government says it's investing £48 million to try to improve adoption services in england. that is a look at some of the top
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stories here in the uk today. this is bbc news. the latest headlines. adam peaty has won britain's first gold medal of the tokyo olympics, and successfully defended his 100 metres breaststroke title. celebrations in tunisia, as the president sacks his prime minister and suspends parliament following a day of protests against the government's handling of the covid pandemic. the indian food delivery firm zomato saw its share price surge when it joined the market last friday, pushing up the value of the company to more than $13 billion. it's an auspicious debut for india's burgeoning start—up sector, with plenty of other companies keen to head to market. the bbc�*s arunoday mukharji outlines the expectations and challenges for start—ups in india.
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it isa it is a common sight in indian cities died. for the delivery app zomato is a household name. 12 years since it started linking indian customers to restaurants, the company has become the first major indian digital start—ups to go for an ipo. buoyed bya indian digital start—ups to go for an ipo. buoyed by a huge demand in online orders during the pandemic, zomato's ipo is looking to make a splash at the markets. it sent its launch, zomato is yet to make a profit. now the firm has gone public, the challenge will be to ensure profits. while zomato bets big, their growth has, the cost of restaurant owners, says this man. he used to run five outlets of this rent —— this restaurant. now it is down to only one. he says he is bleeding money because of the high commission rates, two charges businesses.
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commission rates, two charges businesses-— commission rates, two charges businesses. ., ., ., , . businesses. zomato in this pandemic is an unnecessary _ businesses. zomato in this pandemic is an unnecessary evil. _ businesses. zomato in this pandemic is an unnecessary evil. they - businesses. zomato in this pandemic is an unnecessary evil. they are - businesses. zomato in this pandemic is an unnecessary evil. they are not. is an unnecessary evil. they are not concerned with our profitability. and so we have drastically shifted from delivering through zomato, togetting business directly through customers. tiara togetting business directly through customers. ., , ., customers. two days before the ipo o-ened, customers. two days before the ipo opened. the — customers. two days before the ipo opened, the national— customers. two days before the ipo opened, the national restaurant - opened, the national restaurant association of india, representing over 500,000 restaurant in the country, petitioned and reiterated that allegations to authorities asking them to... zomato refused to comment, citing legality constraints eat to the ipo lines. others like them have also seen an opportunity during the pandemic. start—ups in india raised over $12 billion in the first half of this year alone. and it's this scope for growth that is driving other companies to debut in the indian stock market soon. itruihat
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the indian stock market soon. what was exoected _ the indian stock market soon. what was exoected to — the indian stock market soon. transit was expected to happen the indian stock market soon. matt was expected to happen in the indian stock market soon. imr"ngt was expected to happen in a the indian stock market soon. mngt was expected to happen in a matter of years, because of the pandemic got crunched into weeks and months. especially e—commerce. start—ups especially e—commerce. sta rt—ups today especially e—commerce. start—ups today have far deeper markets than even two years ago.— even two years ago. sustaining this will be key- — even two years ago. sustaining this will be key. but— even two years ago. sustaining this will be key. but for— even two years ago. sustaining this will be key. but for now, _ even two years ago. sustaining this will be key. but for now, it - even two years ago. sustaining this will be key. but for now, it is - even two years ago. sustaining this will be key. but for now, it is the i will be key. but for now, it is the food are's ipo that is cooking up a storm. let's get some of the day's other news. china has unveiled a sweeping overhaul of its $100 billion education tech sector, banning companies that teach the school curriculum from making profits, raising capital or going public. beijing on saturday published regulations that together threaten to break—up the sector and jeopardize billions of dollars in foreign investment. ryanair has raised its full year forecast, predicting stronger bookings over the summer despite reporting an after—tax loss of 273 million euros for the three months to the end ofjune.
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the irish airline expects to fly nine million passengers injuly, rising to 10 million in august. let's stay with travel. of all the travel sectors affected by the coronavirus pandemic the global cruise line industry has been one of the hardest hit. after a tough 2020, norwegian cruise line voyages resumed this weekend for fully vaccinated passengers, and the industry is now hoping to start returning at pace. before covid—19, nearly 30 million passengers travelled on cruise ships each year. so how quickly will they return? earlier i talked to andy harmer, who's the managing director of cruise lines international association uk & ireland. it's been a challenging 12 months, but we have used that time to work
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with health authorities and governments around the world, to build the right protocols for east that save restart of cruising. we put health and wellness at the heart of everything we do. cruise restart is an important part of the next step. here in the uk we have had domestic cruising restart from the middle of may. that has been a very successful season so far, sailing the uk waters. globally, cruising has been able to resume in the mediterranean but also in asia and more recently in north america as well. ~ . . more recently in north america as well. . ., , , ., ~ more recently in north america as well. ., , ~' more recently in north america as well. ~ ., , , .,~ ,. . well. what is the uptake like? are ou well. what is the uptake like? are you seeing — well. what is the uptake like? are you seeing bookings? _ well. what is the uptake like? are you seeing bookings? are - well. what is the uptake like? are you seeing bookings? are people| you seeing bookings? are people willing to climb on board? absolutely. the uk season is probably one of our biggest so far. we have about 18 ships sailing around the uk. one of the reasons for that is that guests who have cruised before are very keen to get back on board. we have almost holidays and travel over the past 18 months. this is an opportunity to
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travel and to do that in style. and globally, as you say, 30 million people have cruised per year in the past and we are very much looking forward to mentioning —— welcoming them on board as well as people who want to try something different for the next holiday.— the next holiday. have you had to chance the next holiday. have you had to change the _ the next holiday. have you had to change the cruise _ the next holiday. have you had to change the cruise ships _ the next holiday. have you had to i change the cruise ships themselves to make sure they are even safer than they were prior, ventilation, for example? we all dread the thought of getting stuck on a cruise ship with someone on there with something, whether it be covid or something, whether it be covid or something else? abs something, whether it be covid or something else?— something, whether it be covid or something else? as you say, we have alread had something else? as you say, we have already had some _ something else? as you say, we have already had some strict _ something else? as you say, we have already had some strict regulations i already had some strict regulations and operations in place, even before covid. but since covid we have enhanced our medical facilities on board, for example. you mention vaccinations. we test everybody 100% as they embark. there is a multilayered approach to those protocols. because of course giving people the holiday want but also being able to do that safely really important.
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being able to do that safely really im ortant. " , ., �*, being able to do that safely really imortant. " , ., 2 , ., important. andy harmer. let's show ou important. andy harmer. let's show you financial — important. andy harmer. let's show you financial markets _ important. andy harmer. let's show you financial markets in _ important. andy harmer. let's show you financial markets in asia - important. andy harmer. let's show you financial markets in asia today. | you financial markets in asia today. what has been hitting stocks, particularly in hong kong, you can see down over 3%, is the tech stocks. the reason why we have mentioned this story already, new regulations introduced in china over the weekend that impacts many tech companies, particularly in education and hospitality. japan has managed to buck the trend today. up 1%. that is the latest on the financial markets. concerns over sustainability in fashion have seen second—hand clothing sales rise, and now, what's thought to be a first in the uk, a permanent fashion swap shop for adults has opened in london. swappers pay a membership fee to visit the store and exchange items they no longer want. jonelle awomoyi went to meet the shop's founder. i spend about £300 a month and
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clothing. one day i had a girls night at my house, and the girls came around and we were like, let's go out instead of stay in. everybody started moving things around my wardrobe. they were swapping amongst themselves. i saw this happen and thought, if i have all these things in my wardrobe and my friend has all these things in her wardrobe, it means we all have this problem where we have all of these clothes that we are not using that could go to somebody else.— are not using that could go to somebod else. ., ., ., , ., , ., somebody else. montana has opened a sho that somebody else. montana has opened a shop that runs — somebody else. montana has opened a shop that runs on _ somebody else. montana has opened a shop that runs on the _ somebody else. montana has opened a shop that runs on the basis _ somebody else. montana has opened a shop that runs on the basis of - shop that runs on the basis of swapping instead of paying for goods. swappers, ratherthan goods. swappers, rather than shoppers, goods. swappers, ratherthan shoppers, can trade—in their clothes for second—hand garments. swap nation is thought to be the uk's first permanent fashion swap shop for adults. first permanent fashion swap shop foradults. so first permanent fashion swap shop for adults. so i've brought three items, ok? there is a dress. abs, items, 0k? there is a dress. a psyllium blouse. it is a designer and it— psyllium blouse. it is a designer and it is— psyllium blouse. it is a designer and it is made out of salt. overall it gets _ and it is made out of salt. overall
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it gets 15 — and it is made out of salt. overall it gets 15 h— and it is made out of salt. overall it nets13. " .. and it is made out of salt. overall it nets13. " ., and it is made out of salt. overall it nets13." ., and it is made out of salt. overall it gets 13-— two i it gets 13. a fast fashion top. two to three tokens. _ it gets 13. a fast fashion top. two to three tokens. you've _ it gets 13. a fast fashion top. two to three tokens. you've got - it gets 13. a fast fashion top. two to three tokens. you've got 20. l it gets 13. a fast fashion top. two i to three tokens. you've got 20. 20. and i can to three tokens. you've got 20. 20. and i can go — to three tokens. you've got 20. 20. and i can go across _ to three tokens. you've got 20. 20. and i can go across this _ to three tokens. you've got 20. 20. and i can go across this whole - to three tokens. you've got 20. 20. and i can go across this whole shop| and i can go across this whole shop and choose whatever i'd like. take our and choose whatever i'd like. take your time. — and choose whatever i'd like. take your time, browse, _ and choose whatever i'd like. take your time, browse, try _ and choose whatever i'd like. take yourtime, browse, try them and choose whatever i'd like. take your time, browse, try them on, and choose whatever i'd like. take yourtime, browse, try them on, swap things— yourtime, browse, try them on, swap things in— yourtime, browse, try them on, swap things in and _ yourtime, browse, try them on, swap things in and out. it's up to you. | things in and out. it's up to you. i 'ust things in and out. it's up to you. just grabbed things in and out. it's up to you. i just grabbed an amazing vintage top that if you are going to buy it would easily be £60 to 70 fans. i have been able to come here with three items i don't wear and swap them. . . . three items i don't wear and swap them. ,, , them. this is their first physical permanent _ them. this is their first physical permanent store. _ them. this is their first physical permanent store. it's _ them. this is their first physical permanent store. it's really - permanent store. it's really exciting _ permanent store. it's really exciting for me. i wanted to be one of the _ exciting for me. i wanted to be one of the first— exciting for me. i wanted to be one of the first people through the doors — of the first people through the doors today. swapping fashion is a good _ doors today. swapping fashion is a good way— doors today. swapping fashion is a good way of keeping a circular economy— good way of keeping a circular economy and maintaining a very small but kind _ economy and maintaining a very small but kind of— economy and maintaining a very small but kind of personal style wardrobe. you can _ but kind of personal style wardrobe. you can still updated and things. it's you can still updated and things. it's been — you can still updated and things. it's been amazing. sustainable fashion is becoming more and more popular. swap nation isjust one
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example of a company that markets second—hand clothing, saving clothes from landfill and giving them a new life. ., ., . ., , ., life. there are enough clothes on the planet _ life. there are enough clothes on the planet currently _ life. there are enough clothes on the planet currently to _ life. there are enough clothes on the planet currently to clothe - life. there are enough clothes on the planet currently to clothe the j the planet currently to clothe the next six generations of the human race. almost 70% of the clothes we buy today are synthetic. they are made from fossil fuels. clothing has a huge transport cost. most of our clothes are made 5000, 6000 miles away. every piece of clothing we have cost the planet. 50. away. every piece of clothing we have cost the planet. so, according to patrick. — have cost the planet. so, according to patrick. we _ have cost the planet. so, according to patrick, we need _ have cost the planet. so, according to patrick, we need to _ have cost the planet. so, according to patrick, we need to consume - have cost the planet. so, according l to patrick, we need to consume less. but does swapping have to end with fashion? ., .., but does swapping have to end with fashion? ., _, ., , , but does swapping have to end with fashion? ., _, .,, , , ., , but does swapping have to end with fashion? ., .,, , , ., , ., fashion? you could easily swap a loan more _ fashion? you could easily swap a loan more and _ fashion? you could easily swap a loan more and then _ fashion? you could easily swap a loan more and then swap - fashion? you could easily swap a loan more and then swap that. fashion? you could easily swap a l loan more and then swap that back fashion? you could easily swap a - loan more and then swap that back to somebody— loan more and then swap that back to somebody else because you've used it. somebody else because you've used it you _ somebody else because you've used it. you could do that within your community _ it. you could do that within your community. that could definitely work _ community. that could definitely work as— community. that could definitely work as a — community. that could definitely work as a business. so there you have it, the swap shop idea. i'm sure it will take off elsewhere. thank you for your
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company. you are fully up—to—date on all things business use and feel a bit. now i'm going to hand you over to louise lear with the weather. good morning. sunday was a day of extremes. the highest temperature was in northern ireland with 28 degrees. lots of sunshine for scotland. northern ireland, northern england and north—west wales. by contrast, further south, a lot of cloud. it went downhill after lunchtime. this was a weather watchers picture from kent. a severe cluster of thunderstorms developed. localised flooding. you can see the volume of lightning strikes. stretching all the way down from east anglia over to the isle of wight. they slowly faded away. the area of low pressure is moving away as we speak. that is going to continue to anchor itself into the far north—east for the start of our monday morning. it will bring a fair amount of cloud in eastern scotland and north—eastern england. a relatively quiet start on monday.
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dry with some sunshine. a few isolated showers lingering for a time. generally a better day. a few showers developing in the afternoon. some of them possibly heavy and thundery. they should be more interspersed compared to the weekend. temperatures, with more sunshine, higher in england, with 26 degrees the hive. but we will start to see more showers developing from the west, moving into northern ireland, south—west wales and south—west england by the end of the day. it is a weather front that is going to move through. the weather story changes through the week. low pressure anchored to the north. winds swinging in a clockwise direction driving and more moisture, more cloud and certainly more of a breeze on exposed coasts. tuesday is a messy picture. there will be a lot of cloud. some showers. some of them thundery in nature. i'm not going to be too clever about it. almost any way could catch a shower on tuesday. they could be quite heavy.
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temperatures will struggle. 15 to 21 celsius. just going below where they should be now for the time of the year. low pressure does not move very far at all through the week. we still keep these feed coming in off the atlantic. a cooler source, brisk wind as well. so that means it stays rather cool and showery. indications of something a little better as we head into the weekend. take care.
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this is bbc world news. i'm ben boulos. our top stories... a gold for great britain's adam peaty in the 100m breaststroke. a further easing of lockdown restrictions in the uk. this time northern ireland lifts some of its coronavirus rules celebrations in tunisia as the president sacks his prime minister and suspends parliament following a day of protests against the government's handling of the covid pandemic. as more extreme weather is recorded around the world, scientists warn of the urgent need
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for action on climate change. hello and welcome to bbc world news. day three at the tokyo olympics is now well underway, and the medals are coming in thick and fast. team gb have picked up theirfirst gold, adam peaty winning the men's 100m breaststroke final. but britain isn't the only country celebrating a good day at the pool. our correspondent sarrah mulkerrins is in tokyo with the latest. well, what a morning's action we had in the pool here this monday in tokyo! great britain's adam peaty, he defended his 100 metres breaststroke title. what a result for him! he is unbeaten in seven years in that event. he won in 2016 in rio. all the pressure was on him to pull off a great performance
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and he did in some style. cool, calm and collected, and he touched the wall and raised the hands into the air. he is celebrating another olympic gold. also celebrating is australia's ariarne titmus, because she beat the american sensation, katie ledecky. lots of people looking forward to the 400 metres freestyle, which was going to pit these two up against each other and it was the australian who pulled clear in the final two lengths to enact. —— to win that. elsewhere in the triathlon, that was taking place right down below us here in tokyo bay. there was a false start in the swim. some of the swimmers got in too early and part of the pontoon was being blocked by a boat so others could not start. they all came back, they restarted, did the 1500 metres swim, the cycle around the streets of tokyo and then the 10k run. victory in that went to norway's kristian blummenfelt for the first of the games. also a quick note
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on the men's rugby 7s. fiji won that when it made its debut back in rio in 2016, their first ever olympic gold medal in the got their title defence —— and they got their title defence after a successful start with victory over the hosts, japan. adam peaty has secured team gb's first gold medal of the tokyo olympics, defending his title in the one hundred metres breast—stroke. this morning we're back where it all began in uttoxeter, at the pool where he first learnt to swim. our reporter dan pallett is there. good morning and welcome. lots of swimming training happens early—morning. you need motivation and swimming training happens early—morning. you need motivation and dedication swimming training happens early—morning. you need motivation and dedication and swimming training happens early—morning. you need motivation and dedication and a swimming training happens early—morning. you need motivation and dedication and a little swimming training happens early—morning. you need motivation and dedication and a little splash of inspiration. we have olympic full—size inspiration this morning because of adam peaty. let's be in
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his former coach. wow! == because of adam peaty. let's be in his former coach. wow!— his former coach. wow! -- let's seak. his former coach. wow! -- let's speak. brilliant. _ his former coach. wow! -- let's speak. brilliant. could - his former coach. wow! -- let's speak. brilliant. could not - his former coach. wow! -- let's i speak. brilliant. could not believe it. speak. brilliant. could not believe it always — speak. brilliant. could not believe it. always expected it but could not believe _ it. always expected it but could not believe it — it. always expected it but could not believe it. ., , ., , believe it. people say the anything wron: if believe it. people say the anything wrong if he — believe it. people say the anything wrong if he goes — believe it. people say the anything wrong if he goes into _ believe it. people say the anything wrong if he goes into the - believe it. people say the anything wrong if he goes into the pool - believe it. people say the anything wrong if he goes into the pool too | wrong if he goes into the pool too soon. " wrong if he goes into the pool too soon. ~ , ., wrong if he goes into the pool too soon. " ,, ., wrong if he goes into the pool too soon. ~ ., ., , soon. are you nervous? nervous? yes confident? yes- — soon. are you nervous? nervous? yes confident? yes. he _ soon. are you nervous? nervous? yes confident? yes. he is— soon. are you nervous? nervous? yes confident? yes. he is a _ soon. are you nervous? nervous? yes| confident? yes. he is a commensurate swimmen _ confident? yes. he is a commensurate swimmer. absolutely brilliant. you could _ swimmer. absolutely brilliant. you could see — swimmer. absolutely brilliant. you could see it — swimmer. absolutely brilliant. you could see it in the heats, in the semifinals _ could see it in the heats, in the semifinals. he pulled everything out in the _ semifinals. he pulled everything out in the final. to win the final of the olympics by half a second, absolutely immense. he the olympics by half a second, absolutely immense.— absolutely immense. he is phenomenal. _ absolutely immense. he is phenomenal. could - absolutely immense. he is phenomenal. could you i absolutely immense. he is| phenomenal. could you see absolutely immense. he is. phenomenal. could you see it absolutely immense. he is- phenomenal. could you see it in a small boy?— phenomenal. could you see it in a small bo ? ~ ., ., , small boy? when he “oined me he was like any smu— small boy? when he “oined me he was like any small boy. — small boy? when he joined me he was like any small boy. he _ small boy? when he joined me he was like any small boy. he was _ small boy? when he joined me he was like any small boy. he was eight, - like any small boy. he was eight, nine, _ like any small boy. he was eight, nine. a _ like any small boy. he was eight, nine, a triallist. he was all arms,
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all legs— nine, a triallist. he was all arms, all tags and — nine, a triallist. he was all arms, all legs and boundless energy. it was that— all legs and boundless energy. it was that energy that needed to be moulded _ was that energy that needed to be moulded and made into potential. together— moulded and made into potential. together with the support his family gave. _ together with the support his family gave. and _ together with the support his family gave, and support he got from everybody, combined with his hard work— everybody, combined with his hard work and _ everybody, combined with his hard work and motivation, that is what has driven— work and motivation, that is what has driven him through and made him an absolute _ has driven him through and made him an absolute world champion in every sense _ an absolute world champion in every sense. ~ , ., ., ., ., an absolute world champion in every sense. ~ ., ., ., ., . sense. when you emotional watching him? yes, cannot— sense. when you emotional watching him? yes, cannot believe _ sense. when you emotional watching him? yes, cannot believe it. - sense. when you emotional watching him? yes, cannot believe it. sad - him? yes, cannot believe it. sad that nobody _ him? yes, cannot believe it. sad that nobody could _ him? yes, cannot believe it. sad that nobody could be _ him? yes, cannot believe it. sad that nobody could be bad - him? yes, cannot believe it. sad that nobody could be bad to - him? yes, cannot believe it. sadl that nobody could be bad to watch him perform. he that nobody could be bad to watch him perform-— that nobody could be bad to watch him perform. he could be in paris, he is 26, him perform. he could be in paris, he is 26. only _ him perform. he could be in paris, he is 26, only three _ him perform. he could be in paris, he is 26, only three years - him perform. he could be in paris, he is 26, only three years to - him perform. he could be in paris, he is 26, only three years to go. i he is 26, only three years to go. could he win three straight gold medals? ., , , , , medals? nothing is impossible. it is about his personal— medals? nothing is impossible. it is about his personal desire _ medals? nothing is impossible. it is about his personal desire to - medals? nothing is impossible. it is about his personal desire to do - medals? nothing is impossible. it is about his personal desire to do it. i about his personal desire to do it. will his— about his personal desire to do it. will his body stand up to the incredible work he puts it through?
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will incredible work he puts it through? witt his— incredible work he puts it through? will his motivation be there? he has a young _ will his motivation be there? he has a young family. it is possible. three — a young family. it is possible. three years, much shorter than four, even _ three years, much shorter than four, even five _ three years, much shorter than four, even five since the last olympics. he is— even five since the last olympics. he is an _ even five since the last olympics. he is an incredible talent, adam peaty. the 16 fastest times in history and unbeaten in seven years. wow is the only word i can think of to sum up adam peaty.— wow is the only word i can think of to sum up adam peaty. thank you very much. for more on the tokyo olympics — go to the bbc news website. you can keep up to date with the schedule — and take a look at the medal table. go to bbc.com/news, and follow the links. here in the uk, senior ministers will decide today whether to further expand the scheme, allowing fully vaccinated key workers in england to avoid self isolation by taking daily covid tests instead. staff working in the food supply chain, frontline emergency services,
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and transport and freight are already included and other workers such as council refuse collectors could also be added to the list. the department for environment, food and rural affairs says 500 sites have been identified for daily testing, which will be carried out by employers within the workplace. we represent distributors of food and drink to hospitals, to schools, to care homes, to prisons, to restaurants, cafes and shops. so, knowing that we are in scope as well is really, really great, because it means that businesses that have been affected by the pandemic can actually plan for any colleagues that go off. whereas previously if somebody had been pinged, they might have had a whole team of people wiped out, which was going to be really, really difficult to plan for the supply of food and drink over the next three weeks. senior doctors in england are being asked today whether they would be prepared to take industrial action over the government's 3% pay offer. the doctors' union — the bma — previously said strike action may be considered if consultants were not given at least a 5% increase.
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last week, the government raised its pay offer for most nhs staff in england from 1% to 3%, following a recommendation from an independent pay review body. in the uk, the government says it wants to make getting vaccinated against coronavirus as easy as possible, to try and get young people to take the jab. to help, health services in england are running pop—up walk in centres at music festivals and shopping centres. it comes amid concerns that some 18 to 40 year olds are not turning up for pre—booked appointments. robert coxwell reports. quick, easy and convenient. that is the idea behind this pop—up vaccination centre in kent. health bosses say they are becoming increasingly important as there are concerns over the number of young people who are not turning up
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to book appointments. it is a really difficult issue. of course, young people want to live their lives, they want to get on with things, they want the whole covid thing to be over. sometimes it might feel like, why bother? cutting the form filling has made people bother. so much more convenient. when you come home from work, you do not want to sit there, go through your phone and find a time. i am already here, let's do it. way easier. you walk in, five - minutes and it's done. another way to increase vaccine taken is to turn community centres into dedicated walk—in clinics. this is quicker and really far away from home, so this is much more efficient. students are showing maturity getting vaccines meant notjust the nightclubs but we understand the importance of getting vaccines.
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the uk government confirmed being fully vaccinated would be required to enter nightclubs from september. that could be extended to other crowded venues in england, giving people another incentive to getjabbed. meanwhile, in northern ireland, some restrictions are being relaxed from today. up to 15 people from unlimited households are now able to meet outdoors and close contacts services like hairdressers can open without the need for pre—booked appointments. ministers at stormont will meet to decide whether theatres and concert halls can re—open. teenagers in england with poor mental health are three times more likely not to secure five gcse passes at grades a—c, new research suggests. a study from the national centre for social research found children from disadvantaged backgrounds, and those whose mental health has been affected most by the pandemic, are likely to face the greatest challenges catching up in the classroom. the government says it is "investing millions in training mental health teams who will work with schools and colleges."
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stay with us on bbc news. still to come: feeling the heat at tokyo 2020 — we'll look at how the extreme heat of the japanese summer is affecting the olympics. three of britain's biggest conservation charities are calling on the government to do more to protect grasslands and meadows. the bumblebee conservation trust, plantlife international and butterfly conservation, say grasslands offer a natural solution to cutting carbon and should get similar protection to trees. the charities want the government to secure an international commitment to protect grasslands and meadows at this autumn's climate change conference in glasgow. gill perkins is ceo at the bumblebee conservation trust. species which grasslands are vital for carbon storage and biodiversity, notjust in the uk but globally
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because they currently store 30% of carbon. with protection they could store even more. the moment we are focused on forests as the main natural tool for combating climate change but forest cannot be planted everywhere and plans for reforestation often exclude humans whereas grasslands do not. this is bbc world news, the latest headlines adam peaty has won britain's first gold medal of the tokyo olympics and successfully defended his 100 metres breaststroke title. extreme weather is being recorded around the world — from flooding in europe to wildfires in the us — and scientists say it's underlined the urgent need for action on climate change. in less than 100 days, the uk will host a major meeting of world leaders on climate issues.
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ahead of the cop26 summit in glasgow, representatives from more than 50 countries are meeting in london. courtney bembridge reports. extreme temperatures and dry conditions are fuelling wildfires in northern california. fire is threatening spain, too. this is the catalonia region and one of the worst fires here in years. there were similar scenes on the italian island of sardinia. an out—of—control fire after a heat wave. while no single event can be attributed to climate change, scientists say its impact has never been more clear. no, no, no, no, no, no... no! in belgium, heavy rainfall has caused severe flooding, less than a fortnight after deadly flash floods across western europe. a typhoon is battering china, days after severe flooding killed dozens of people.
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scientists say these events are becoming more common because warmer temperatures mean the air holds more moisture, which leads to more extreme rainfall. there was flooding in london, too. water streamed into a train station and turned roads into rivers, as representatives from more than 50 countries met to lay the groundwork for november's big climate summit in glasgow. this was the message from the british host. we are seeing in every part of the world, on each of our doorsteps, what happens when climate change gets out of control and so what i hope that we have at this meeting is an opportunity for us to shape the vision of the final outcomes from cop26 in glasgow and to build that unity of purpose amongst the ministers to deliver that. world leaders are under pressure to phase out coal power and set more ambitious targets on emissions which may not always win them favour at home.
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in some ways, they can only commit to, or it doesn't matter what they commit to if they can't get that through their parliaments, so there is a very complex process behind all this. in the meantime, the impact of fires, floods, extreme heat and drought will continue to be felt. with less than 100 days till the glasgow summit, these events may focus minds. courtney bembridge, bbc news. let's get more on the news that coronavirus restrictions are being eased in northern ireland — which could see theatres and concert venues being allowed to welcome back audiences. we can now speak tojimmy fay from the lyric theatre in belfast. what are you expecting from the announcement later? well, ithink what are you expecting from the announcement later? well, i think we may have to wait to getjimmy�*s thoughts. it looks like the link has frozen. we will go back tojimmy
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later and get more on the restrictions in northern ireland. let's turn our attention to afghanistan. figures from the united nations show there's been a big increase in the number of civilian deaths in afghanistan, since taliban militants launched their offensive against government forces. the insurgents have captured vast swathes of rural territory, after foreign troops began their withdrawal from the country. the american military has now said it's prepared to continue to support the afghan government with air strikes against the taliban. secunder kermani is in kabul and joins me now. what more do we know about these figures and the reason for this rise? , . rise? very grim figures, unfortunately. - rise? very grim figures, unfortunately. more - rise? very grim figures, l unfortunately. more than rise? very grim figures, - unfortunately. more than 1600 rise? very grim figures, _ unfortunately. more than 1600 people killed in the first half of this year, more than three and a half thousand injured leg record high numbers of child casualties. overall amongst some of the highest figures we have seen for that period since
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records began a little over a decade ago. the violence really spiked in may and june when the taliban offensive was launched which has seen the capture of half of the territory in the country. if current trends continue, this year will be the deadliest ever since records began four afghan civilians. they are calling for urgent action to be taken to avoid that caring. they found the taliban is responsible for more civilian casualties than any other group. one thing that is causing concern in so far a lot of the fighting has been in more rural areas. now it seems to be increasingly focused on urban areas, which are more densely populated. a real concern and fear bloodshed will increase in the coming months. itrai’hat increase in the coming months. what ofthe increase in the coming months. what of the pledge — increase in the coming months. what of the pledge by _ increase in the coming months. what of the pledge by the _ increase in the coming months. what of the pledge by the american military to support the afghan government with air strikes, even after the withdrawal? that
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government with air strikes, even after the withdrawal?— after the withdrawal? that is one thin we after the withdrawal? that is one thing we had _ after the withdrawal? that is one thing we had to _ after the withdrawal? that is one thing we had to clarify. _ after the withdrawal? that is one thing we had to clarify. this - after the withdrawal? that is one thing we had to clarify. this was | thing we had to clarify. this was the us commander visiting kabul in charge of us forces in the region. he was here speaking to reporters, including myself. he said the us has launched a heightened number of air strikes in recent days and weeks in afghanistan because of the taliban push. many of them around the city of kandahar, which has been encircled. concern that it could full to them. he said in the coming weeks the us would continue to support the afghan government with the air strikes. he refused to answer categorically repeated questions about whether air strikes would continue past the end of august. that is when the us military mission formally and is. previously he has suggested they were not continue past the end of august and any over the horizon air strikes danced in the region against targets in afghanistan will only be focused
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on groups not including the taliban. we are concerned about how the government welfare after the end of august. i should government welfare after the end of august. ishould point government welfare after the end of august. i should point out the afghans to have their own air. general mackenzie was praising their capabilities, saying it was one of the major advantages they had over the major advantages they had over the taliban. because of that taliban military victory in afghanistan is far from military victory in afghanistan is farfrom inevitable. that from our correspondent in kabul in afghanistan. many thanks indeed. let's get more on the news that coronavirus restrictions are being eased in northern ireland — which could see theatres and concert venues being allowed to welcome back audiences. we can now speak tojimmy fay from the lyric theatre in belfast. good to see you. what are you hoping for and what are you expecting from the announcement?— the announcement? we're hoping we oen. it the announcement? we're hoping we open- it has— the announcement? we're hoping we open. it has been _ the announcement? we're hoping we open. it has been 16 _ the announcement? we're hoping we open. it has been 16 long _ the announcement? we're hoping we open. it has been 16 long months. i open. it has been 16 long months. cinemas are open, bars are open. i
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hope executive will not use us as an example to say restrictions are still in place and allow as to open and get on with our work. it is important from the point of freelance actors and the entertainment industry that this happens. entertainment industry that this ha - ens. entertainment industry that this ha ens. , . , entertainment industry that this hauens. m , , happens. the difficulty is, as we have seen _ happens. the difficulty is, as we have seen in _ happens. the difficulty is, as we have seen in london's _ happens. the difficulty is, as we have seen in london's west - happens. the difficulty is, as we| have seen in london's west end, happens. the difficulty is, as we i have seen in london's west end, it is one thing for theatres to be allowed to open and another for them to remain open. we have seen high profile shows quite like hairspray, with big fanfares, big audiences and a big cast and after a couple of weeks they have had to close because one member of the cast tested positive on it throughout plans for the next ten days. how much of a problem does that cause? that the next ten days. how much of a problem does that cause?- the next ten days. how much of a problem does that cause? that is a headache, problem does that cause? that is a headache. a _ problem does that cause? that is a headache, a second _ problem does that cause? that is a headache, a second headache. - problem does that cause? that is a headache, a second headache. ourj headache, a second headache. our problem is actually to open. unlike in england, theatres have never been allowed to open since march last year. it does not make any sense i
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can have a cast rehearsing and they may not be allowed to perform in front of an audience next week but they could go to a pub in the audience afterwards. inside it makes no sense. it is a problem i am looking forward to addressing. we have already rehearsed the show back in january have already rehearsed the show back injanuary and have already rehearsed the show back in january and february this year injanuary and february this year that in january and february this year that was broadcast as part of the bbc lights up season. although risk assessments involved with that we follow i think we can do that with this going forward as well. itrai’hat this going forward as well. what would ou this going forward as well. what would you say — this going forward as well. what would you say to _ this going forward as well. what would you say to audiences - this going forward as well. what would you say to audiences who may be reluctant to come back to a venue that has a lot of people in an indoor space? that has a lot of people in an indoorspace? not that has a lot of people in an indoor space? not everyone will feel comfortable in that environment yet. absolutely they will not. it will take time to get audiences back in.
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lyric is about 400 seat venue. we can operate at the moment to about 138 seats. that will work very well. the is a big, spacious area. you can see around here, there is plenty of room in a bar. space. we have hand sanitisers and damaged social distancing their seats. it is a safe space, much safer than other places to come and enjoy a play.— space, much safer than other places to come and enjoy a play. to come and en'oy a play. thank you very much. — to come and enjoy a play. thank you very much. thank _ to come and enjoy a play. thank you very much. thank you. _ more now on the olympics and we are seeing the effects the extreme heat of a japanese summer can have on the events. the organisers have done their best to try to protect the athletes from the high temperatures — but it's not proving an easy task. mariko oi is in tokyo for us. under the scorching sun of tokyo, girls from den—en—chofu high school's tennis club carry on with their
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extracurricular activities, but, every year, around 3000 children suffer from heatstroke during club activities like this. there have even been deaths in the past. the school's tennis coach of 17 years says the hottest summers mean they have to be extra careful. translation: we measure heat stress indexes every hour- to make sure it is safe to practise. lately, we have gathered early in the morning at 7:15am or the late afternoon when the temperature isn't too high. it is under this heat that the world's top athletes are competing for gold during this summer's games. the conditions mean we are less likely to see a volley of world records tumbling. just by being in heat exposure, the cardiovascular — your heart system — has to work harder to maintain your performance and also your body's ability
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to thermoregulate, maintain your body temperature in a good state — that would also be impacted greatly. the last timejapan held a summer games was 1964, it was in october, when the weather was cooler, so having the games here now has raised concerns that the intense heat and humidity of the tokyo summer could pose a serious risk to athletes, but when the games are held, it all has to do with the global sport calendar. these are the major events. there is a gap between late—july and august. broadcasters around the world paid billions of dollars for the rights to show the olympics. they need to show it at the right time of year in the right time of day. broadcasting is one of the two most significant revenue sources for the olympics, so the ioc is going to want to keep sponsors and broadcasters as happy as can be. and that means some events, like marathon and race walking, have been moved to sapporo,
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where it is cooler, while others take place in the early morning or evening. but increasingly, it is notjust the battle for a medal, it is a battle against the heat. one of europe's most famous streets, the tree—lined paseo del prado in madrid, has been added to unesco's's world heritage list. the un's cultural organisation said it was a landscape of arts and sciences, adding that together with its prominent buildings, among them the prado museum, the boulevard had played a key role in the city's history. the spanish government highlighted the fact that the paseo had been the first street of its kind to be open to all citizens — previously park—like boulevards were only open to the upper classes. you can reach me and the team on
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social media. it you can reach me and the team on social media-— social media. if you are following the olympics _ social media. if you are following the olympics you _ social media. if you are following the olympics you will _ social media. if you are following the olympics you will find - social media. if you are following the olympics you will find the - the olympics you will find the latest medal table on the bbc news website. see you soon. last week we had very high temperatures for the time of year. high pressure dominated the weather. this week it has all changed, cooler during the week with heavy showers and for localised flooding. in between there will be semi—spell. this morning we are starting with clear skies in parts of the west. there is a fair bit of cloud around but also missed and fog. all the cloud should tend to break up. there will be a fair bit of sunshine around. it will not be a bone dry day, there will be one or two showers, nothing like the scale we
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saw yesterday, particularly in parts of sapphic and london. temperatures ranging from 16 in the north to 26 as we push down to birmingham. this evening and overnight, many of the daytime showers will tend to fade. a system coming in across the west that will push eastwards during the course of the night and it will bring showers our way. as you can see it is not going to be a cold night with temperatures falling between 13 and 17. this weather front is moving from the west towards the east during the course of monday night into tuesday. we will start off with a view showers. equally many of us will start off with some sunshine but showers will get going as we go through the course of the day. some of them heavy and thundery with the potential for localised flooding. nothing like little on sunday. temperatures coming down a touch 15
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to 20 degrees. on wednesday more showers from the word go. some of them will be heavy and more prolific during the course of the afternoon. some of them will be blowing around quite quickly because we have gusty winds around the showers. again the potential for localised flooding. the temperature range 15 in the north to about 20, 21 as we move down towards the south. as for the rest of the weekend into the weekend were things do remain unsettled. we still have low pressure in charge of the weather stopped it will be a mix of sunshine and showers but the temperature you will notice will be coming down.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. adam peaty has secured team gb's first gold medal of the tokyo olympics, successfully defending his title with victory in the 100 metres breaststroke. the 26—year—old was the only swimmer to finish in under 58 seconds. a further easing of lockdown restrictions in the uk — this time northern ireland lifts some of its coronavirus social social distancing rules, which could see audiences returning to theatres and concert venues. there have been celebrations on the streets of tunisia, after the president sacked his prime minister and suspended parliament, following a day of nationwide protests against the government's mishandling of the coronavirus crisis. the president of the cop26 climate summit in glasgow in november, has told the bbc the impact of global warming can be seen around the world and there is now an urgent need to prevent temperatures rising.
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concerns over sustainability in fashion have seen second—hand clothing sales rise, and now, a first in the uk — a permanent fashion swap shop for adults has opened in london. swappers pay a membership fee to visit the store and exchange items they no longer want. jonelle awomoyi went to meet the shop's founder. i'd spend about £300 a month and clothing. one day i had a girls' night at my house, and the girls came around and we were like, let's go out instead of stay in. everybody started moving things around my wardrobe. they were swapping amongst themselves. i saw this happen and thought, if i have all these things in my wardrobe and my friend has all these things in her wardrobe, it means we all have this problem where we have all of these clothes that we are not using that could go to somebody else. montana has opened a shop that runs on the basis of swapping instead of paying for goods. swappers, rather than shoppers, can trade in their clothes
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for second—hand garments. swap nation is thought to be the uk's first permanent fashion swap shop for adults. so i've brought three items, ok? there is a dress. you get a four overall for that. blouse? it is a designer and it is made out of silk. overall it gets 13. a fast fashion top. it is made out of polyester. two to three tokens. you've got 20. 20. and i can go across this whole shop and choose whatever i'd like? take your time, browse, try them on, swap things in and out. it's up to you. ijust grabbed an amazing vintage top that if you are going to buy it would easily be £60 to 70 fans. i have been able to come here with three items i don't wear and swap them. this is their first
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physical permanent store. it's really exciting for me. i wanted to be one of the first people through the doors today. swapping fashion is a good way of keeping a circular economy and maintaining a very small but kind of personal style wardrobe. you can still update it and things. it's been amazing. sustainable fashion is becoming more and more popular. swap nation is just one example of a company that markets second—hand clothing, saving clothes from landfill and giving them a new life. there are enough clothes on the planet currently to clothe the next six generations of the human race. almost 70% of the clothes we buy today are synthetic. they are made from fossil fuels. clothing has a huge transport cost. most of our clothes are made 5000, 6000 miles away. every piece of clothing we have costs the planet. so, according to patrick,
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we need to consume less. but does swapping have to end with fashion? you could easily swap a lawnmower and then swap that back to somebody else because you've used it. you could do that within your community. that could definitely work as a business. gurkha veterans are staging a hunger strike on whitehall in london as part of a campaign for equal pension rights. a unique unit in the british army, the gurkhas — who have a base in folkestone — are widely regarded as some of the best soldiers in the world. but those who retired before 1997 are not eligible for a uk armed forces pension and are calling for change. the government says it's committed to ensuring the gurkha pension scheme is sustainable and fair alongside other uk public sector pensions. luke hanrahan reports. a hunger strike on the doorstep of downing street, as gurkhas who loyally fought for the british all over the world seek equal
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pension rights. i served in hong kong, brunei, canada and the uk. this man served for 20 years, but like all gurkhas who retired before 1997, is being denied a uk armed forces pension. we want equal pension, proportionally. it is very complicated. and we want a goodwill payment to bring our community, gurkha community, out of great poverty. representatives of gurkha communities who live across london, the south and south—east of england. we have had 207 years of this historical discrimination. we try to raise our voice over 30 years. no—one listening. the government says it is committed to ensuring the gurkha pension scheme is sustainable and fair alongside other uk public sector pensions. but these men women — paid a third less than their british counterparts — are not
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satisfied, striking for what they see as equality. the bbc�*s luke hanrahan reporting. let's turn to india now where a rockslide has killed nine people in himaachul pradesh. the landslide in the northern region sent huge boulders tumbling down the hillside. one of them hit the bridge, causing it to collapse. local officials say another struck a vehicle carrying tourists, causing the fatalities. it comes as the western state of maharashtra has reported more than 130 deaths in the last two days, due to flooding brought about by monsoon rains. mayooresh konnoor reports from a landslide site near mumbai. consistent rain has created havoc. where i am standing right now, once there was a village. it was entirely
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washed out on thursday evening when a landslide occurred because of consistent rains. the soldiers of the national disaster management force have been looking for missing bodies for more than three days now, and the operation is not over until sunday evening. what we have been told is 49 bodies have been recovered so far. and more than 40 are still missing. landslide in some parts in floods and other parts. that is the story of maharashtra. the mountain regions are facing situations like landslides. on another mountain range 12 people lost their lives in another incident of landslide. and here, the rescue operation is still on. let's return to the
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olympic games in tokyo, where we've been taking a deeper look at the host city. to give us some insight into the creative side of tokyo, we met yinka oshiletu — a british—nigerian dancer who's part of a growing afrobeats dance scene injapan's capital. afrobeats in japan afrobeats injapan is getting more popular, but i think the scene is still really small. right now there is no kind of really famous like dancers coming up injapan. if there was i think there would perhaps be more of an explosion of it here. i was born in london. my family are west african, nigerian. i now live in greater tokyo injapan. dance to me is freedom. ijust
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in greater tokyo injapan. dance to me is freedom. i just think in greater tokyo injapan. dance to me is freedom. ijust think it's something that has been with me since as long as i can remember. so it's part of myself. when i'm dancing, like a completely like not worrying about what other people think, it's the time i feel closest to god. it's like a really sacred space for me. i grew up in african churches in london. my family used to ask me to dance and stuff like that. when i was about seven years old i started ballet. i went to this local street dance school. hip—hop, like dance and hip—hop culture injapan, is insanely popular. ifeel as an english speaker at a hip—hop dancer injapan i could not ever be unemployed i don't think. i have my own kind of dance business out here, i guess. i will call it a dance school. i have
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four, five classes a week, ages ranging from four to 14. the kids here are the light of my life. i am so grateful to god that i can combine my two loves witches and dance. —— which is kids and dance. mike springs out here as a british passport holding person injapan is completely different to that of someone with citizenship of an african country. i remember once a few years ago i was in tokyo and i heard footsteps running behind me. so i turned around to step out of the way to let whoever was running go past me, and it wasjust the police chasing me down the street. they wanted my passport. they wanted to see my id. when i showed them my passport, the way their attitude completely changed. they were asking me about peter rabbit and harry
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potter. that was like a real awakening to me. i think they saw me and on principlejust thought, maybe she is here illegally. dance has been like a teacher to me. it's like a journey. been like a teacher to me. it's like ajourney. it been like a teacher to me. it's like a journey. it is something that has challenged me and saved me and broken me all of the same time. scientists in norway are searching for the remains of a meteor which crashed to earth near oslo. it lit up the sky and caused several loud bangs, but didn't cause any damage or injuries. it's thought to be one of the largest meteors ever to fall on the country. stay with us on bbc news. coming up next, world business report.
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ryanair predicts stronger bookings over the summer, despite a tough industry conditions and confusion over travel restrictions. and tackling the pingdemic, businesses face disruption to supply chains despite government efforts to free up critical workers.
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hello and a very warm welcome. this is world business report and i am sally bundock. we start with ryanair. the no—frills carrier has just released its latest earnings. it is predicting it should see stronger bookings over the summer despite the tough industry conditions. europe's biggest budget carrier raised its full year forecast but reported an after—tax loss of 273 million euros for the three months to the end ofjune. the irish airline expects to fly 9 million passengers in the month of july. million passengers in the month of july, and a further 10 million in august. that is down from a recovered peak of 149 million. let's discuss this withjohn grant, director at oag. you have been looking at the ryanair numbers. how are they doing given the challenges? they are doing probably better than anybody else in europe at the
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moment. they have a very simple model, a very low cost base and they have got, literally, hundreds of bases all around europe. so they are completely not vulnerable to one government minister closing a country down again. they are doing better than very many of their competitors. better than very many of their competitors-— better than very many of their competitors. better than very many of their cometitors. " ., . competitors. and also, correct me if i am competitors. and also, correct me if i am wrong. — competitors. and also, correct me if i am wrong. did _ competitors. and also, correct me if i am wrong, did they _ competitors. and also, correct me if i am wrong, did they reduce - competitors. and also, correct me if i am wrong, did they reduce their. i am wrong, did they reduce their fleet quite a bit or not to raise cash? for example, i know easyjet did that. when all the passengers come back again, you need all of your planes?— come back again, you need all of our lanes? ., ., j ., .,, your planes? you do. they've adopted a different strategy _ your planes? you do. they've adopted a different strategy to _ your planes? you do. they've adopted a different strategy to easyjet. - a different strategy to easyjet. they kept most of their fleet flying, although not flying very many hours a day. they have also got the 737 max coming into their fleet. they have a six already in operation. 210 on order. so they've got capacity coming on. and they continue to grow and grow. they are the most resilient airline in
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europe. their results reflect that. they will be the fastest to return to profitability, i have no doubt. michael o'leary, the chief executive, has been very critical of the uk government and its handling of the travel list. it is spearheading a group of leading travel businesses who are launching legal action against the uk government. where is that at at the moment? ~ ., ., , , ., moment? well, that has been thrown out, unfortunately, _ moment? well, that has been thrown out, unfortunately, because- moment? well, that has been thrown out, unfortunately, because quite - out, unfortunately, because quite frankly, the government has been woeful in the united kingdom, lack of leadership, no understanding or empathy with the travel industry, thousands ofjobs at risk, and have yet this is an island economy. we can't all walk on water, like you and i can, sadly, so it is going to be very difficult, and the government is frankly that of the industry down. in government is frankly that of the industry down-— industry down. in terms of the traffic light — industry down. in terms of the traffic light system, _ industry down. in terms of the traffic light system, there - industry down. in terms of the traffic light system, there is i industry down. in terms of the | traffic light system, there is so much anxiety among travellers now. ryanair is saying we could have a decent summer, but actually, do you think they are being over optimistic? i know so many say to
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me, we are not risking going anywhere because the government to change whether it is amber watch or whatever, within days?— whatever, within days? absolutely. the aood whatever, within days? absolutely. the good news _ whatever, within days? absolutely. the good news in _ whatever, within days? absolutely. the good news in the _ whatever, within days? absolutely. the good news in the last - whatever, within days? absolutely. the good news in the last couple i whatever, within days? absolutely. the good news in the last couple of daysis the good news in the last couple of days is that infection rates in the uk have declined significantly, we are travelling to europe. they are increasing in some countries. people have reached a point where it is a calculated gamble. and for many people they are prepared to take that risk. children at home for six weeks during the summer holidays is going to test the nerves of many. i think we will see travel. but we have to have more confidence and clarity. grant shapps, the transport minister, has finally got to become a stronger advocate for aviation. 0k, a stronger advocate for aviation. ok, john, good to talk to you. thank you for your time. john grant. later on the bbc we will be talking to the chief financial officer of ryanair. chief financial officer of rya nair. that chief financial officer of ryanair. that is in about half an hour. if you are interested, do tune in.
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staying with uk news, the country's economy is facing a pingdemic, where workers notified by nhs track and trace at have to self—isolate due to being in contact with somebody who has tested positive for covid. in the week ending on the 14th ofjuly, 600,000 people were sent alerts and asked to self—isolate. supply firms have been complaining they are struggling to keep supermarkets stock with food in response. on sunday, the department for food and rural affairs has identified 500 sites for daily contact testing. some 10,000 supermarket depot workers in england will be exempt from quarantine rules, and this will include forklift drivers and dispatchers. however, supermarket workers are not included. let's talk this through withjustin urquhart—stewart, founder of the urquha rt—stewa rt, founder of the investment urquhart—stewart, founder of the investment firm, regionally. are you
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stuck at home because you are pinged? i stuck at home because you are mined? ., ., , stuck at home because you are pinged? i am. i had my “ab some time aio. you'd pinged? i am. i had my “ab some time ago. you-d thigh pinged? i am. i had my “ab some time ago. you'd think i _ pinged? i am. i had my jab some time ago. you'd think i would _ pinged? i am. i had my jab some time ago. you'd think i would be _ ago. you'd think i would be completely clear. no. i got pinged again. another ten days being locked down. which is incredibly frustrating. you can see why the economy is very severely hampered. all the key elements of logistics is now being stopped. merely by increasing lorry hours and things like that, i'm afraid that is not the answer. i'm afraid this has now turned into a structural emergency which needs more dynamic action by the government.— the government. yes, so many frustrated — the government. yes, so many frustrated by — the government. yes, so many frustrated by this. _ the government. yes, so many frustrated by this. on - the government. yes, so many frustrated by this. on the - the government. yes, so many frustrated by this. on the one i the government. yes, so many - frustrated by this. on the one hand you have got industries calling for workers to be released from these self isolation, but on the other hand you have got unions who are saying for those who are seeing now is exempt, they do have a right to stay at home if they wish to. well,
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the ma stay at home if they wish to. well, they may have _ stay at home if they wish to. well, they may have a — stay at home if they wish to. well, they may have a right _ stay at home if they wish to. well, they may have a right to _ stay at home if they wish to. well, they may have a right to do - stay at home if they wish to. well, they may have a right to do so, - stay at home if they wish to. -ii they may have a right to do so, but also we need an obligation to give the economy going. because otherwise we get hurt that way around. there's an awful balance here. we still don't know the impact, the full impact of the pandemic in terms of actually can we the rest of the country jab to actually can we the rest of the countryjab to property, assuming they're willing to? particularly younger group. we are going through this risk at the moment. the rest of the world is watching us as we release the economy more but now we see the numbers going up, hopefully we will see them come down a bit now, but too early to tell. in the meantime we need to make sure the blood of the economy continues to pump around the body. if you stop doing that, you will end up with a coronary. doing that, you will end up with a corona . g . doing that, you will end up with a corona . . , ., ~ coronary. indeed. just then, thank ou for coronary. indeed. just then, thank you for being _ coronary. indeed. just then, thank you for being on — coronary. indeed. just then, thank you for being on the _ coronary. indeed. just then, thank you for being on the programme. l you for being on the programme. justin urquhart—stewart. now, after thousands turned out for anti—lockdown protest in sydney, australia over the weekend, calls
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have grown louder for more government support for businesses in the city. so far, unions, the opposition party and business leaders have called on the federal government to reintroduce wage subsidies as sydney's lockdown approaches its fifth week. katie silver has more details. we are katie silver has more details. 2 are seeing lockdowns and, restart, then end, then restart. that is making it difficult for businesses. restaurants don't know what to do. we are hearing these calls from far and wide. we heard, for example, from the opposition leader this morning. he said basically the australian prime minister declared mission impossible solved prematurely. australia thought it was through the covid pandemic, ended wage subsidies, and maybe that was too soon. we have heard from the treasurer of the state of new south wales, where sydney is located. he says when new south wales goes well,
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the country goes well. that is because sydney is the country's most popular city, as well as the fact that so many people live within sydney as well as in the greater region. so what was so successful at helping australia weather the storm when it came to the economic impact of covid was a scheme known as job keeper. last year at its height employees could receive in the order of 1500 australian dollars, roughly 1200 us dollars every fortnight. as a result we saw australia virtually continuing its decades of consistent economic growth, basically dipping into every brief technical recession, but that ended. now is the number of covid cases is that about 150 every day in sydney, the situation is not improving, which is putting a strain on businesses. it's a problem all over, the strain businesses are feeling because of the global pandemic. let's bring you some other business stories. china has unveiled a sweeping overhaul of its education tech sector, banning companies from
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going public. and china's state owned nuclear energy company could be blocked from all future power projects in the uk, with ministers understood to be investigating ways to prevent its involvement according to the financial times. the move would exclude china general nuclear from the consortium plan to build the £20 billion sizewell c nuclear plant on the suffolk coast in england. and one of the stories i've just mentioned about education and technology companies that provide education in china facing new regulations, that is what pulled down stocks today in asia. we can see hong kong particularly badly affected. many big tech stocks listed in hong kong saw series declines. japan, slightly insulated
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from that story. 1% at the close. also, mainland china. the blue chip stocks they are down over 2%, their lowest for some ten months because of concern about greater regulation on the part of the chinese authorities on tech companies. you are now up to date on the latest business news. hello again. last week we had high temperatures for the time of the year and a lot of sunshine as high pressure dominated. this week it is all change. low pressure is dominating and it is going to be cooler as we go through the week. we will see some heavy showers, the potential for localised flooding. in between there will be sunny spells. this morning we start with some clear skies in parts of the west. there is a fair bit of cloud around. also some mist and fog. that cloud
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should tend to break up and we should tend to break up and we should lose to the mist and fog. they should be some sunshine around. it will not be a bone dry day. there will be showers but nothing on the scale we saw yesterday, particularly in parts of suffolk and london, where it led to localised flooding. temperatures today ranging from 16 in the north to 26 as we push down towards birmingham. as we head through the evening and overnight period of many of the daytime showers will tend to fade. we have got a little system coming on across the west. that is going to be pushing east through the night. it will bring some showers our way. it will bring some showers our way. it will not be a cold night. temperatures falling to between 13 and 17 degrees. this is the weather front that is moving from the west towards the east during the course of one day and night into tuesday. and we will start off with a few showers. equally many will start with some sunshine. the showers will
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get going through the day. some of them heavy and thundery. again, the potential for localised flooding. nothing like we saw during sunday. temperatures coming down a touch. 15 to 22 degrees. on wednesday, they will be more showers from the word go. some of them will be heavy. they will become more prolific through the afternoon. some of them will be blowing around quite quickly because we do have gusty winds. gusty winds particularly around the showers. some potential for localised flooding. the temperature range 15 in the north to 20 or 21 as we move down towards the south. as for the rest of the week and into the weekend, things do remain unsettled. we still have a low pressure in charge of the weather. it will be a mixture of sunshine and showers, but the temperature will be coming down.
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this is bbc news, broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the globe. i'm ben boulos. our top stories... tom daly and matty lee have just won gold for britain the diving at the tokyo olympics celebrations in tunisia as the president sacks his prime minister and suspends parliament following a day of protests against the government's handling of the covid pandemic. we go live to to tunis. a further easing of lockdown restrictions in the uk — this time northern ireland lifts some of its coronavirus rules. as more extreme weather is recorded around the world, scientists warn of the urgent need
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for action on climate change. hello and welcome. day three at the tokyo olympics is now well underway — and the medals are coming in thick and fast. some breaking news from within the last few minutes — tom daley and matty lee have just won britain's second gold of the games in the diving pool! earlier, adam peaty also won gold for team gb in the men's 100 metres breaststroke final. but britain isn't the only country celebrating a good day at the pool. our correspondent sarrah mulkerrins is in tokyo with the latest. well, what a morning's action we had in the pool here this monday in tokyo! great britain's adam peaty, he defended his 100 metres breaststroke title. what a result for him! he is unbeaten in seven years in that event.
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he won in 2016 in rio. all the pressure was on him to pull off a great performance and he did in some style. cool, calm and collected, and he touched the wall and raised the hands into the air. he is celebrating another olympic gold. also celebrating is australia's ariarne titmus, because she beat the american sensation, katie ledecky. lots of people looking forward to the 400 metres freestyle, which was going to pit these two up against each other and it was the australian who pulled clear in the final two lengths to win that. elsewhere in the triathlon, that was taking place right down below us here in tokyo bay. there was a false start in the swim. some of the swimmers got in too early and part of the pontoon was being blocked by a boat so others could not start. they all came back, they restarted, did the 1500 metres swim, the cycle around the streets of tokyo and then the 10k run. victory in that went to norway's kristian blummenfelt
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for the first of the games. also a quick note on the men's rugby 7s. fiji won that when it made its debut back in rio in 2016, their first ever olympic gold medal and they got their title defence off to a successful start with victory over the hosts, japan. adam peaty has secured team gb's first gold medal of the tokyo olympics, defending his title in the 100 metres breaststroke. this morning we're back where it all began in uttoxeter, at the pool where he first learnt to swim. our reporter dan pallett is there. you would know all about early starts. that is where the hard yards are done for young and older swimmers. these people had been here since seven o'clock. you need motivation, drive and a drop of
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inspiration. that comes with an olympics in full size splash as adam peaty becomes the first briton to successfully defend an olympic title. let's speak to john successfully defend an olympic title. let's speak tojohn plant where he knew adam peaty from the age of eight. emotional for us this morning that what is it like for you? morning that what is it like for ou? " , ,., , morning that what is it like for ou? " , , ., ., morning that what is it like for you? absolutely. could not believe it. you? absolutely. could not believe it- expected _ you? absolutely. could not believe it- expected it _ you? absolutely. could not believe it. expected it but _ you? absolutely. could not believe it. expected it but that _ you? absolutely. could not believe it. expected it but that is _ you? absolutely. could not believe it. expected it but that is not - you? absolutely. could not believe it. expected it but that is not to - it. expected it but that is not to play _ it. expected it but that is not to play it _ it. expected it but that is not to play it down articles that you expect — play it down articles that you expect it _ play it down articles that you expect it every time from adam, and beaten _ expect it every time from adam, and beaten and — expect it every time from adam, and beaten. and years. what an inspiration for all the kids and everybody! i inspiration for all the kids and everybody!— inspiration for all the kids and eve bod ! , ., .., everybody! i understand he came alive when _ everybody! i understand he came alive when they _ everybody! i understand he came alive when they introduced - everybody! i understand he came alive when they introduced the i alive when they introduced the stopwatch and that got him racing. when hejoined he was stopwatch and that got him racing. when he joined he was all arms and all legs _ when he joined he was all arms and all legs. only when the stopwatch came _ all legs. only when the stopwatch came out. — all legs. only when the stopwatch came out, that is when he really came _ came out, that is when he really came alive _ came out, that is when he really came alive. when in competition at whatever— came alive. when in competition at whatever level, that is what he
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loved _ whatever level, that is what he loved and _ whatever level, that is what he loved and drove him on. whether at local club— loved and drove him on. whether at local club level when he got into the counties or the regionals you can see — the counties or the regionals you can see it— the counties or the regionals you can see it in— the counties or the regionals you can see it in what he has done ever since _ can see it in what he has done ever since. against the stopwatch, adam realty— since. against the stopwatch, adam really pulls the stops out. let�*s really pulls the stops out. let's seak really pulls the stops out. let's s - eak to really pulls the stops out. let's speak to a _ really pulls the stops out. let's speak to a former _ really pulls the stops out. let's speak to a former welsh - really pulls the stops out. t2ii�*3 speak to a former welsh champion and multiple international medallist. we ask the question lots of people ask, what is it about adam peaty that has made him so special? it all what is it about adam peaty that has made him so special?— made him so special? it all starts here, made him so special? it all starts here. with _ made him so special? it all starts here, with the _ made him so special? it all starts here, with the water. _ made him so special? it all starts here, with the water. learning i made him so special? it all starts here, with the water. learning to | here, with the water. learning to swim and you need the body. you need to be in the right environment with the right people around him, the right coaching staff is that he needs to want it. we are all arms and legs when we start. all of a sudden he got better and as you say about stopwatch, people are obsessive. he became obsessive and
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passionate and wanted to improve. you have to do what your teacher tells you to do first and foremost. he became european champion, commonwealth champion, olympic champion and five years later i put the around his neck for the second time. i lose words to describe his dominance. he is brilliant. ithihat time. i lose words to describe his dominance. he is brilliant. what is it about great _ dominance. he is brilliant. what is it about great britain _ dominance. he is brilliant. what is it about great britain and - dominance. he is brilliant. what is it about great britain and the - dominance. he is brilliant. what is. it about great britain and the men's 100 metres breaststroke? i do it about great britain and the men's 100 metres breaststroke?— 100 metres breaststroke? i do not know, 100 metres breaststroke? i do not know. maybe _ 100 metres breaststroke? i do not know. maybe we _ 100 metres breaststroke? i do not know, maybe we are _ 100 metres breaststroke? i do not know, maybe we are frogs. - 100 metres breaststroke? i do not know, maybe we are frogs. maybe 100 metres breaststroke? i do not. know, maybe we are frogs. maybe we should be french. when you have got someone, hopefully this will be the effect of adam peaty, people who took up swimming because of him. when you have a role model, you have someone you want to be like. kids grow up wanting to be footballers because they see football on the tv day in and day out. i wish we saw more of adam peaty. so these young
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kids can aspire to be like him. what about paris? why not? paris and la. i say when adam gives up, he will do myjob. he has to continue as long as possible! my job. he has to continue as long as possible!— my job. he has to continue as long as possible! adam peaty “oined this club a . ed as possible! adam peaty “oined this eiub aged eight * as possible! adam peaty “oined this club aged eight and _ as possible! adam peaty “oined this club aged eight and he _ as possible! adam peaty “oined this club aged eight and he is]— as possible! adam peaty joined this club aged eight and he is now - as possible! adam peaty joined this. club aged eight and he is now double olympic champion. thank you very much. let's bring you some breaking news now. britain's tom daley and matty lee have won olympic gold in the synchronised 10m platform diving. they had never dropped out of the top two and took the olympic title one point 23 points ahead of china with the russian olympic team coming
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third. —— 1.2 three. for more on the tokyo olympics, go to the bbc news website. you can keep up to date with the schedule, and take a look at the medal table. go to bbc.com/news and follow the links. here in the uk, senior ministers will decide today whether to further expand the scheme, allowing fully vaccinated key workers in england to avoid self isolation by taking daily covid tests instead. staff working in the food supply chain, frontline emergency services, and transport and freight are already included and other workers such as council refuse collectors could also be added to the list. the department for environment, food and rural affairs says 500 sites have been identified for daily testing, which will be carried out by employers within the workplace. we represent distributors of food and drink to hospitals, to schools, to care homes, to prisons, to restaurants, cafes and shops. so, knowing that we are in scope as well is really, really great, because it means that businesses
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that have been affected by the pandemic can actually plan for any colleagues that go off. whereas previously if somebody had been pinged, they might have had a whole team of people wiped out, which was going to be really, really difficult to plan for the supply of food and drink over the next three weeks. meanwhile, the uk government says it wants to make getting vaccinated against coronavirus as easy a possible, to try and get young people to take the jab. to help, health services in england are running pop—up walk in centres at music festivals and shopping centres. it comes amid concerns that some 18 to 40 year olds are not turning up for pre—booked appointments. robert coxwell reports. quick, easy and convenient. that is the idea behind this pop—up vaccination centre in kent. health bosses say they are becoming increasingly important as there are concerns over the number of young people who are not turning up to book appointments.
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it is a really difficult issue. of course, young people want to live their lives, they want to get on with things, they want the whole covid thing to be over. sometimes it might feel like, why bother? cutting the form filling has made people bother. so much more convenient. when you come home from work, you do not want to sit there, go through your phone and find a time. i am already here, let's do it. way easier. you walk in, five - minutes and it's done. another way to increase vaccine taken is to turn community centres into dedicated walk—in clinics. this is quicker and really far away from home, so this is much more efficient. students are showing maturity getting vaccines meant notjust for the nightclubs but we understand the importance of getting vaccines. the uk government confirmed being fully vaccinated would be required to enter nightclubs from september. it's thought that could be extended
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to other crowded venues in england, giving people another incentive to getjabbed. senior doctors in england are being asked today whether they would be prepared to take industrial action over the government's 3% pay offer. the doctors' union — the bma — previously said strike action may be considered if consultants were not given at least a 5% increase. last week, the government raised its pay offer for most nhs staff in england from 1% to 3%, following a recommendation from an independent pay review body. ryanair has raised its full—year forecast, predicting stronger bookings over the summer despite reporting an after—tax loss of 273 million euros for the three months to the end ofjune. the irish airline expects to fly 9 million passengers injuly, rising to 10 million in august. let's get more on this with ryanair�*s chief financial officer neil sorahan.
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there is that predicted rise in passenger numbers but how has that come about when we see still so much uncertainty and so many restrictions on international travel at the moment?— on international travel at the moment? ., ., moment? ryanair operates 37 countries across _ moment? ryanair operates 37 countries across europe. - moment? ryanair operates 37 l countries across europe. people moment? ryanair operates 37 - countries across europe. people have a huge amount of confidence across europe. we have seen a resurgent bookings over the past number of weeks and in the uk we have seen a large rise in bookings. there is more uncertainty. our objective this year and we have tightened the bar as we carry over 90 million and 100 million customers over the current year. that would be 9 million passenger target injuly and 5 million injune and 10 million in august. million in june and 10 million in au~ust. ~ ., , , august. when we look at the results for the last three _ august. when we look at the results for the last three months, _ august. when we look at the results for the last three months, revenue l for the last three months, revenue has nearly trebled and yet there was
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still a greater loss that was booked. why was that? why did costs go up? we booked. why was that? why did costs i o u . ? 2 , ., , booked. why was that? why did costs to u . ? 2 , 2, , go up? we saw the number of flights increased sevenfold _ go up? we saw the number of flights increased sevenfold during _ go up? we saw the number of flights increased sevenfold during the - increased sevenfold during the course of this quarter compared to the other quarter. there was a time when we were grounded, 8.1 million passengers. a relatively good performance, up 116% as opposed to a 700% increase in capacity. on the revenue side were typically east it would be a strong contributor towards revenue. easter was effectively cancelled this year. —— easter stock i ink it would be great value for customers who want to go on holiday. —— i think. value for customers who want to go on holiday. -- i think.— on holiday. -- i think. ryanair said it wanted to _
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on holiday. -- i think. ryanair said it wanted to hire _ on holiday. -- i think. ryanair said it wanted to hire 2000 _ on holiday. -- i think. ryanair said it wanted to hire 2000 pilots. - on holiday. -- i think. ryanair said it wanted to hire 2000 pilots. is i it wanted to hire 2000 pilots. is that still the case? absolutely. 210 had joined the fleet over the last few years. our fleet will approach 600 aircraft. very excited to take pilots in. we will be promoting from within, from first officers to captains. within, from first officers to captains-— captains. what happens if restrictions _ captains. what happens if restrictions return? - captains. what happens if restrictions return? what| captains. what happens if- restrictions return? what happens captains. what happens if— restrictions return? what happens to all the new staff you take on? we had the all the new staff you take on? 2 had the lowest cost base of any airline in europe. we kept pilots, cabin crew and aircraft current throughout the crisis. we will continue to do so. that enabled us to wrap up quickly into the summer and beyond. itake to wrap up quickly into the summer and beyond. i take huge confidence from the fact the vaccines have proven to be very effective against the various variants of covid. as we get towards the back end of this summer, in september, we are looking
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at potentially other 80% of the european population being fully vaccinated and that will rise as the year goes on. barring a variant of covid which is not immune to the vaccine, we are well set for passenger numbers to continue to rise and there to be a resurgence into the summer of next year. thank ou for into the summer of next year. thank you for speaking _ into the summer of next year. thank you for speaking to _ into the summer of next year. thank you for speaking to us. _ into the summer of next year. thank you for speaking to us. pleasure. - you for speaking to us. pleasure. thank you- _ stay with us on bbc news, still to come: the united nations says a record number of civilians — many of them children — have been killed in afghanistan the first half of this year. this news comes as the us says it is prepared to continue airstrikes against the taliban. we get the latest from kabul. three of britain's biggest conservation charities are calling on the government to do more to protect grasslands and meadows. the bumblebee conservation trust, plantlife international
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and butterfly conservation, say grasslands offer a natural solution to cutting carbon and should get similar protection to trees. the charities want the government to secure an international commitment to protect grasslands and meadows at this autumn's climate change conference in glasgow. species rich grasslands are vital for carbon storage and biodiversity, notjust in the uk but globally because they currently store 30% of carbon. with protection, they could store even more. at the moment cop26 is focused on forests as the main natural tool for combating climate change but forests cannot be planted everywhere and plans for reforestation often exclude humans whereas grasslands do not.
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this is bbc news, the latest headlines... britain's tom daley and matty lee have taken gold at the tokyo olympics in the diving. the tunisian president, kais saied, has sacked the prime minister, hichem mechichi, and suspended parliament following a day of protests against the government's handling of the covid pandemic. supporters of tunisia's president kais saied have taken to the streets to celebrate — after he sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament. this came after a day of demonstrations across the country, calling for the government to resign over its handling of the coronavirus pandemic. our north africa correspondent rana jawad is in tunis and joins us live. who is in charge? it is ultimately the president _ who is in charge? it is ultimately the president and _ who is in charge? it is ultimately the president and the _ who is in charge? it is ultimately the president and the army - who is in charge? it is ultimately the president and the army is . the president and the army is backing him. he made the
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announcement after meeting with security officials, as well as senior army officials. the unfolding events here however, it is important to remember, is linked to a power struggle which has been ongoing between the presidency and the prime minister and the speaker of parliament. what we saw in terms of protests yesterday was again carrying some of the regular slogans and messages we have seen over the last few years, people are very frustrated with the economic downturn of the country, the mismanagement of institutions, of public services deteriorating, and then covid came along and made it even worse. the protests were a part of that as well. they were also
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calling for the dissolution of parliament because there are a number of people in the country who have grown disillusioned with the parliamentary system. there are many politicians around wrangling which other which has stilled the country. the announcement is based on invoking article 80 of the constitution. technically he will be ruling with the assistance of the prime minister, he will appoint in the interim, and it should not be longer than 30 days. in 30 days' time, there needs to be clarity on what the next step is. i think the worry now is there is a lot of uncertainty and what the next steps will be, we had from the speaker of parliament calling them is a coup against the contribution and the revelation of 2011.—
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revelation of 2011. many thanks indeed. figures from the united nations show there's been a big increase in the number of civilian deaths in afghanistan, since taliban militants launched their offensive against government forces. the insurgents have captured vast swathes of rural territory, after foreign troops began their withdrawal from the country. the american military has now said it's prepared to continue to support the afghan government with air strikes against the taliban. the bbc�*s secunder kermani is in the capital kabul and has more. very grim figures, unfortunately. more than 1,600 ordinary people killed in the first half of this year, more than 3,500 injured, that includes a record high numbers of child casualties and overall is amongst some of the highest figures we have seen for that kind of period since records began
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a little over a decade ago. that violence really spiked in may and june when the taliban offensive was launched, which has seen them capture half of all territory in the country. the un has warned if current trends continue then this year is going to be the deadliest since records began four afghan civilians. they are calling for urgent action to be taken to avoid that pairing. —— that occurring. they found, according to this report, that the taliban were responsible for more civilian casualties than any other group. one thing that is causing a lot of concern is so far a lot of the fighting has been in more rural areas. now it seems to be increasingly focused on urban areas, which are of course more densely populated. so real concern, realfear the bloodshed is going to increase in the coming months. what of this pledge by the american military to support the afghan government with as strikes, even after the withdrawal? —— airstrikes. that's one thing we have to clarify.
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the us commander visiting kabul is in charge of us forces in the region. he was here yesterday speaking to reporters, including myself. he said the us has launched a heightened number of air strikes in recent days and weeks in afghanistan because of the taliban push. many of them occurring around the southern city of kandahar, which has kind of been encircled by the taliban recently and real concern at one stage at least it could fall to them. he said, for the coming weeks, the us would continue to support the afghan government with these air strikes but he refused to answer categorically repeated questions about whether those air strikes against the taliban would continue past the end of august and that is when the us military mission in afghanistan formally ends. extreme weather is being recorded around the world — from flooding in europe to wildfires in the us — and scientists say it's underlined the urgent need for action on climate change. in less than a hundred days, the uk will host a major meeting of world leaders on climate issues. ahead of the cop26 summit
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in glasgow, representatives from more than 50 countries are meeting in london. courtney bembridge reports. extreme temperatures and dry conditions are fuelling wildfires in northern california. fire is threatening spain, too. this is the catalonia region and one of the worst fires here in years. there were similar scenes on the italian island of sardinia. an out—of—control fire after a heat wave. while no single event can be attributed to climate change, scientists say its impact has never been more clear. no, no, no, no, no, no... no! in belgium, heavy rainfall has caused severe flooding, less than a fortnight after deadly flash floods across western europe. a typhoon is battering china, days after severe flooding killed dozens of people.
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scientists say these events are becoming more common because warmer temperatures mean the air holds more moisture, which leads to more extreme rainfall. there was flooding in london, too. water streamed into a train station and turned roads into rivers, as representatives from more than 50 countries met to lay the groundwork for november's big climate summit in glasgow. this was the message from the british host. we are seeing in every part of the world, on each of our doorsteps, what happens when climate change gets out of control and so what i hope that we have at this meeting is an opportunity for us to shape the vision of the final outcomes from cop26 in glasgow and to build that unity of purpose amongst the ministers to deliver that. world leaders are under pressure to phase out coal power and set more ambitious targets on emissions which may not always win them favour at home. in some ways, they can
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only commit to, or it doesn't matter what they commit to if they can't get that through their parliaments, so there is a very complex process behind all this. in the meantime, the impact of fires, floods, extreme heat and drought will continue to be felt. with less than 100 days till the glasgow summit, these events may focus minds. courtney bembridge, bbc news. one of europe's most famous streets, the tree—lined paseo del prado in madrid, has been added to unesco's's world heritage list. the un's cultural organisation said it was a landscape of arts and sciences, adding that together with its prominent buildings, among them the prado museum, the boulevard had played a key role in the city's history. the spanish government highlighted the fact that the paseo had been the first street of its kind to be open to all citizens — previously park—like boulevards were only open to the upper classes. you can reach me on twitter —
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i'm @benmboulos. hello. last week we had very high temperatures for the time of year and a lot of sunshine as high pressure dominated the weather. this week all change. low pressure is dominating and it will be cooler as we go through the week. heavy showers and the potential for localised flooding. in between there will be sunny spells. they are starting with clear skies in parts of the west. there is a fair bit of cloud around but also in mist and fog. the cloud should tend to break up fog. the cloud should tend to break up and we should lose the mist and fog. there should be a fair bit of sunshine around. it will not be a bone dry day that are nothing like the scale we saw yesterday,
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particularly in parts of suffolk and london where it led to localised flooding. temperatures ranging from 16 in the north to 26 as we push down towards birmingham. this evening and overnight, many of the daytime showers will tend to fade. we have a little system coming in from the west pushing it was during the course of the night and it will bring showers our way. as you can see it will not be a cold night with temperatures falling to between 13 and 17 degrees. this is the weather front that is moving from the west towards the east during the course of monday night into tuesday. we start off with a view showers and many of us will start off with some sunshine. the showers will get going during the course of the day. some of them heavy and thundery with the potential for localised flooding. nothing like we saw through the course of sunday. temperatures coming down from 15 to 22 degrees.
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on wednesday more showers from the word go. some of them will be heavy and more prolific chewing the course of the afternoon. we have gusty winds, particularly around the showers. again the potentialfor localised flooding. the temperature range, 15 in the north to 20,21 localised flooding. the temperature range, 15 in the north to 20, 21 in the south. for the rest of the weekend into the weekend things remain unsettled. no pressure in charge of the weather. it will be a mix of sunshine and showers but the temperature will be coming down.
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this is bbc news.
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the headlines. tom daley and matty lee have secured team gb's second gold medal of the tokyo olympics. the pair swooped to victory in the synchronised ten metre platform diving, gaining the gold byjust one point. there have been celebrations on the streets of tunisia, after the president sacked his prime minister and suspended parliament, following a day of nationwide protests against the government's mishandling of the coronavirus crisis. new figures from the united nations suggest afghanistan has seen a record number of civilians killed in the first half of this year. the un says this is likely to be the deadliest 12 months yet for ordinary afghans. a further easing of lockdown restrictions in the uk — this time northern ireland lifts some of its coronavirus social distancing rules which could see audiences returning to theatres and concert venues.
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why don't we get a round—up of the latest on the olympics action? jane dougall has all the sport. hello there. as you have been hearing, team gb's tom daley and his partner matty lee have taken gold in the diving. it is tom daley�*s for the diving. it is tom daley�*s for the olympics and after 13 years he has got his first olympic gold medal in the synchronised ten metre platform. there was also a win in the pool area with great britain's adam peaty taking the 100 metres breaststroke convincingly. he is the first british swimmer to defend and an epic title. —— olympic title. tom daley and matty lee were trailing in the competition multifold —— pulled out the stops and were able to beat the remaining champions with their final dive. it is a first olympic gold medalfor tom daley at his fourth games. he has taken bronze
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twice and twice been world champion. there were tears ofjoy and hugs all around as with victory was confirmed. adam peaty is arguably the greatest british swimmer ever. the world record holderfaced the greatest british swimmer ever. the world record holder faced the fastest field in history in the 100 metres breaststroke, but left them spluttering in his wake. he led from start to finish, with james wilby in fifth. , , ., ~ ., ., , fifth. utterly brilliant. adam peaty is the double _ fifth. utterly brilliant. adam peaty is the double olympic _ fifth. utterly brilliant. adam peaty is the double olympic champion. l is the double olympic champion. fantastic swim from adam peaty of great britain. i fantastic swim from adam peaty of great britain.— great britain. i felt a little pressure _ great britain. i felt a little pressure going _ great britain. i felt a little pressure going into - great britain. i felt a little pressure going into the i great britain. i felt a little i pressure going into the final. great britain. i felt a little - pressure going into the final. that was a _ pressure going into the final. that was a good — pressure going into the final. that was a good pressure. i needed to put mysetf— was a good pressure. i needed to put myself on _ was a good pressure. i needed to put myself on edge. i needed to do my fastest _ myself on edge. i needed to do my fastest one. you can do whatever you want in _ fastest one. you can do whatever you want in your— fastest one. you can do whatever you want in your own pool, your own nation — want in your own pool, your own nation. when it comes down to hear i'm nation. when it comes down to hear i'm not— nation. when it comes down to hear i'm not raising for a time, embracing myself. this has closed a chapter— embracing myself. this has closed a chapter for— embracing myself. this has closed a chapter for me. unfinished business. he is— chapter for me. unfinished business. he is unbeaten in seven years. with alistair brownlee having failed to
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qualify for the triathlon, brother jonny brownlee was looking for a first goal. he had to settle for fifth. kristian blummenfelt felt best equipped to cope with the searing heat. the norwegian was a surprise winner. britain took silver, 23—year—old alex lee claiming a superb second in his first olympics. ih claiming a superb second in his first olympics-— first olympics. in training i run harder than — first olympics. in training i run harder than in _ first olympics. in training i run harder than in that _ first olympics. in training i run harder than in that race. i i first olympics. in training i run | harder than in that race. i knew first olympics. in training i run i harder than in that race. i knew i could go that extra bit. unfortunately he was better than i was on the day. i felt as prepared as i could have been. for me ijust had to dig that deep into my soul and ifound a little had to dig that deep into my soul and i found a little something. had to dig that deep into my soul and ifound a little something. it wasn't enough to win gold but it was enough to get silver and i'm over the moon. enough to get silver and i'm over the moon-— the moon. great britain's men's hockey team — the moon. great britain's men's hockey team beat _ the moon. great britain's men's hockey team beat canada - the moon. great britain's men's hockey team beat canada 3-1 i the moon. great britain's men's hockey team beat canada 3-1 to j the moon. great britain's men's i hockey team beat canada 3-1 to make hockey team beat canada 3—1 to make it two wins out of two. they are second in a group of six teams with the top four progressing to the quarterfinals. in the last few minutes team gb has taken another
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gold. tom pidcock has taken the win in the cross—country mountain biking. he led the race from midwe onwards, navigating a tough course superbly. the 21—year—old from leeds finished a clear six seconds ahead of the field to take the gold medal. that is a round—up covering betty —— british success. plenty more medals have been won, including a remarkable triumph for 13—year—old mummy gina tsmyh from japan in the women's street skateboarding. the average age on the podium was 14. a gold and bronze forjapan. third place to funa nakayama, who's 16. us swimmer katie ledecky has dominated the pool over the last five years. in rio, she won four golds and one silver, which is why today's 400m freestyle
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final saw such an upset. in her first olympics, australia's ariarne titmus took down ledecky to win her first ever gold medal. ledecky led throughout, until the final 50 metres where titmus made her move, edging ahead and taking gold. she swam the best time of her career, which was just 0.23 seconds off of ledecky�*s world record from the 2016 games. japan's naomi osaka cruised into the third round of the women's singles with a win that only took 65—minutes over viktorija golubic. osaka is the second seed, but also favourite for the gold medal now that ashleigh barty has been knocked out, in the first round. osaka beat golubic straight sets 6—3 6—2. it comes after she took an eight—week break in the lead—up to the games, in order to protect her mental health, dropping out
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of the french open and wimbledon. that is all the support for now. keep up with all the olympic games on the bbc sport website. jane, thank you. jane dougal at the bbc sport centre. we will stay with the olympics. team gb's bradly sinden takes —— says it will take time to come to terms with missing out on gold after winning silver in the 68 kilos tae kwon do final. the 23—year—old from doncaster narrowly missed at the top spot in the dying seconds of his fight as russell trott reports. bradly sinden said the gold medal was able to give away in tokyo. and in a dramatic final there were moments when he looked like he mightjust hang onto it. the 22—year—old from doncaster was leading with seconds left on the clock, but ulugbek rashitov pulled off a head kick winning 34—29. i’m
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off a head kick winning 34-29. i'm here to get _ off a head kick winning 34—29. i�*"n here to get gold. anything else that comes is not what we are here to celebrate. my coach always said i was the best loser. maybe eventually i will get over it. but gold was there for me to take it. i will take away, improve on it and come back stronger. he away, improve on it and come back stronier. ., , away, improve on it and come back stronier. . , ., ., stronger. he might have been hard on himself. stronger. he might have been hard on himself- his — stronger. he might have been hard on himself. his family _ stronger. he might have been hard on himself. his family in _ stronger. he might have been hard on himself. his family in doncaster i himself. his family in doncaster told the bbc they were incredibly proud. i told the bbc they were incredibly -roud. 22. �* . told the bbc they were incredibly -roud. �* , told the bbc they were incredibly roud. �* , ., told the bbc they were incredibly -roud. , ., ., proud. i can't believe he has got a silver medal. _ proud. i can't believe he has got a silver medal. it _ proud. i can't believe he has got a silver medal. it is _ proud. i can't believe he has got a silver medal. it is an _ proud. i can't believe he has got a silver medal. it is an absolute i silver medal. it is an absolute massive — silver medal. it is an absolute massive achievement on top of winning — massive achievement on top of winning the worlds. i know we went for gold. _ winning the worlds. i know we went for gold. so— winning the worlds. i know we went for gold, so i know how disappointed he wiii— for gold, so i know how disappointed he will be _ for gold, so i know how disappointed he will be. , ,, .,, he will be. despite a silver, he still adds _ he will be. despite a silver, he still adds to _ he will be. despite a silver, he still adds to team _ he will be. despite a silver, he still adds to team gb's - he will be. despite a silver, he still adds to team gb's medal| he will be. despite a silver, he i still adds to team gb's medal haul so far and promises we will see him again in paris in 2024. russell trott, bbc news. gurkha veterans are staging a hunger strike on whitehall in london as part of a campaign for equal pension rights. but those gurkhas who retired before 1997 are not eligible for a uk armed forces pension,
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and are calling for change. the government says it's committed to ensuring the gurkha pension scheme is sustainable and fair alongside other uk public sector pensions. luke hanrahan reports. a hunger strike on the doorstep of downing street, as gurkhas who loyally fought for the british all over the world seek equal pension rights. i served in hong kong, brunei, canada and the uk. this man served for 20 years, but like all gurkhas who retired before 1997, is being denied a uk armed forces pension. we want equal pension, proportionally. it is very complicated. and we want a goodwill payment to bring our community, gurkha community, out of great poverty. representatives of gurkha communities who live across london, the south and south—east of england. we have had 207 years of this
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historical discrimination. we try to raise our voice over 30 years. no—one listening. the government says it is committed to ensuring the gurkha pension scheme is sustainable and fair alongside other uk public sector pensions. but these men women — paid a third less than their british counterparts — are not satisfied, striking for what they see as equality. the bbc�*s luke hanrahan reporting. some covid restrictions in northern ireland will be relaxed from today. up to 15 people from unlimited households are now able to meet outdoors, and close contacts services like hairdressers can open without the need for pre—booked appointments. ministers at stormont will meet to decide whether theatres and concert halls can re—open. earlier i spoke tojimmy fay from the lyric theatre in belfast. he explained how important that decision will be.
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it has been 16 long months. it is about time that we are able to open up about time that we are able to open up theatres again to audiences, particularly as cinemas and bars are open. i am particularly as cinemas and bars are open. iam hoping particularly as cinemas and bars are open. i am hoping the executive won't use us as an example to say there are restrictions in place and they allow us to get on with their work. it's very important when people are work in theatre when this happens... i people are work in theatre when this ha ens... . ,,.,, people are work in theatre when this hauens... . i. , happens... i suppose the difficulty is, as we happens... i suppose the difficulty is. as we have _ happens... i suppose the difficulty is, as we have seen _ happens... i suppose the difficulty is, as we have seen in _ happens... i suppose the difficulty is, as we have seen in the - happens... i suppose the difficulty is, as we have seen in the west i happens... i suppose the difficulty i is, as we have seen in the west end in london, it is one thing for theatres to be allowed to reopen, it is quite another for them to be able to remain open. we have seen some high—profile shows open with a big fanfare, big audiences, big cast, and then after a couple of weeks they had to close because one member of the cast, i think, tested positive. that throughout their plans for the following ten days. how much of a problem does that cause? 2. . 2. how much of a problem does that cause? . , ., ., how much of a problem does that cause? . , . ., , ., cause? that is a headache but that is the second _ cause? that is a headache but that is the second headache. _ cause? that is a headache but that is the second headache. our- cause? that is a headache but that i
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is the second headache. our problem is the second headache. our problem is the second headache. our problem is the first problem, to actually open. as i said, unlike in england, theatres have never been allowed to open since march last year. it doesn't make any sense at the moment that i can have cast rehearsing and they may not be allowed to perform in front of an audience next week. but they could go to a pub and made that audience afterwards inside. it doesn't make any sense. obviously this is something that will have to be dealt with. it is a problem i am looking forward to addressing. we have already rehearsed a show called sadie that we did with the bbc back injanuary and february of this year, in january and february of this year, that was broadcast. and all of our mitigations we followed to a t and we had a very successful production. i think we can do that with this going forward. ithihat production. i think we can do that with this going forward. what would ou sa to with this going forward. what would you say to audiences _ with this going forward. what would you say to audiences that _ with this going forward. what would you say to audiences that may i with this going forward. what would you say to audiences that may be i you say to audiences that may be reluctant to come back to a venue that has a lot of people in an indoor space? that has a lot of people in an indoorspace? not that has a lot of people in an indoor space? not everyone will feel
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comfortable in that environment yet. no, absolutely, they won't. this is part of the reason why we should reopen again. it will take time to get audiences back in. the lyric theatre is a 400 seat venue. we can operate to about 138 seats at the moment. that would work very well. the lyric is a big spacious area. you can see around here. plenty of room in the bar. we have all the mitigations. we have hand sanitiser, we have social distancing between seats. it is a safe space, much safer than a lot of other places would be to, and actually enjoy a play. jimmy fay from the lyric theatre in belfast. revenue losses at heathrow airport from the covid—19 pandemic have increased to £2.9 billion, as the first six months of 2021 saw the same number of passengers as did in just 18 days in 2019.
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changes to government rules around the traffic light system have been welcomed, but the airport's management warns they could see fewer passengers in 2021 than in 2020, because expensive testing requirements for travel is putting travellers off. let's speak now to the boss of heathrow airport, john holland—kaye. john, those extra tests may deter people, they may be costly, they may be inconvenient, but we need them, don't we? brute be inconvenient, but we need them, don't we? 2 2. be inconvenient, but we need them, don't we? 2 . ., ,, ., don't we? we are talking about pcr tests, don't we? we are talking about pcr tests. required _ don't we? we are talking about pcr tests, required for— don't we? we are talking about pcr tests, required for anyone - don't we? we are talking about pcr tests, required for anyone coming l tests, required for anyone coming into the uk. the reason we are told we need them is so the government can carry a genomic sequencing tests. but the fact is only a couple of percent of those tests are gina mcclear sequenced. of percent of those tests are gina mcclearsequenced. it of percent of those tests are gina mcclear sequenced. it is a huge waste of money for very little benefit. a better way would be to use the cheaper lateral flow tests, which are very high levels of accuracy. and only if you test positive, to then go and have an expensive pcr test. that would make it easier for all of us to go about
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our normal business. this is exactly what we do in our everyday life, what we do in our everyday life, what our kids do at school. tbs, lat what we do in our everyday life, what our kids do at school. a lot of it is about — what our kids do at school. a lot of it is about reducing _ what our kids do at school. a lot of it is about reducing risk _ what our kids do at school. a lot of it is about reducing risk as - what our kids do at school. a lot of it is about reducing risk as much i what our kids do at school. a lot ofj it is about reducing risk as much as possible and there were some people arriving back at heathrow over the weekend who saw queues of up to two hours to get through the airport. they are in an indoor space surrounded by lots of other people. how can that happen? how can people be waiting there for up to two hours? and what do you say to those caught it up in it? first hours? and what do you say to those caught it up in it?— caught it up in it? first of all, i would like _ caught it up in it? first of all, i would like to _ caught it up in it? first of all, i would like to apologise - caught it up in it? first of all, i would like to apologise to i caught it up in it? first of all, i i would like to apologise to anyone who was caught or up in any queues coming through immigration. this is something that is relatively unusual. most passengers i have spoken to, and i am in terminalfive at the moment, got through injust spoken to, and i am in terminalfive at the moment, got through in just a couple of minutes. but border force did have an incident on the weekend where they had fewer colleagues coming into manatee desks and their technology failed, so that the gates couldn't work. they were longer queues. i would like to apologise to anybody caught mike up. it is an
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unusual situation. unfortunately, from time to time these things do happen, particularly through the pandemic. we ask people to bear with us while we try to get people through as quickly as we can. it sounds like that was linked to a technological problem. but we are seeing with so many different sectors of the economy the so—called pingdemic having an impact. are you finding within the airport that is affecting the level of service that you are able to provide? it affecting the level of service that you are able to provide?- you are able to provide? it does im act you are able to provide? it does impact sometimes. _ you are able to provide? it does impact sometimes. we - you are able to provide? it does impact sometimes. we are i you are able to provide? it does impact sometimes. we are part| you are able to provide? it does i impact sometimes. we are part of the government's testing scheme, which has been extended to more companies and is a very good scheme for making sure that we can keep the airport going, which is massively important to the uk. we are the uk's biggest port. even we had some incidents. a couple of weeks ago we had a quarter of ourfront line couple of weeks ago we had a quarter of our front line colleagues paint at the same time due to things that had happened in their local communities. even they had to go and be tested before they could start
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work again. that meant that unfortunately we did have queues for a couple of hours insecurity. even with the new scheme these things can happen but they are the exception. we starting to see the levels of pinging coming down. it is a good scheme to have available so people can come back into work and we can keep the airport and the uk economy moving smoothly. you keep the airport and the uk economy moving smoothly.— moving smoothly. you mentioned earlier about _ moving smoothly. you mentioned earlier about the _ moving smoothly. you mentioned earlier about the testing. - moving smoothly. you mentioned earlier about the testing. in i moving smoothly. you mentioned earlier about the testing. in some quarters there is criticism that the added cost and hassle of the pcr testing is putting travellers off and that is having an impact not just on the airport but on airlines as well. but from october, they face an added cost if they arrive by car or taxi, an extra £5 to be dropped off. isn't thatjust going to add another deterrent, another obstacle, to people being able to afford to go on holiday? brute to people being able to afford to go on holida ? 2 2. to people being able to afford to go on holida ? 2 . ., , on holiday? we are the only uk air-ort on holiday? we are the only uk airport that _ on holiday? we are the only uk airport that doesn't _ on holiday? we are the only uk airport that doesn't have - on holiday? we are the only uk airport that doesn't have a i on holiday? we are the only ukj airport that doesn't have a drop on holiday? we are the only uk i airport that doesn't have a drop of
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charge at the moment. this brings us in line with every other uk airport. what we are hoping it will do is it will encourage people to use public transport. we are very well connected by public transport for much of the south east and parts of the uk. and we want to encourage people to do that. but it is important that we make it as easy as possible for people to travel. the pcr testing you talked about can't be over £100 per passenger. that is something we think the government can act on quickly to bring down. and just get the uk economy back up and running again. ok. and just get the uk economy back up and running again.— and running again. ok, thank you very much — and running again. ok, thank you very much for— and running again. ok, thank you very much for your _ and running again. ok, thank you very much for your time. - and running again. ok, thank you very much for your time. thank i and running again. ok, thank you i very much for your time. thank you. later today president duterte is due to deliver the last state of the nation address of his term of office, after leading one of the most controversial administrations in the history of the philippines. his stunning election victory five years ago, following a campaign in which he mixed crudejokes, populist promises and chilling threats, exposed a yearning in millions of filipinos
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for something different. our south east asia correspondent jonathan head looks back at five eventful years under the man they used to call the punisher. he was an entirely new kind of leader. and millions of filipinos loved him for it. unscripted, informal, his speech is peppered with vulgar jokes and informal, his speech is peppered with vulgarjokes and threats of violence. d0 with vulgar 'okes and threats of violence. ,., ., with vulgar 'okes and threats of violence. ., , ,~ , violence. do not destroy my city. i will kill you- _ violence. do not destroy my city. i will kill you. try _ violence. do not destroy my city. i will kill you. try to _ violence. do not destroy my city. i will kill you. try to analyse - violence. do not destroy my city. i will kill you. try to analyse now i will kill you. try to analyse now what is wrong when i say i will kill you because you are destroying my country? he you because you are destroying my count ? , ., , ., , you because you are destroying my count ? , ., ., country? he promised to be a tough law and order _ country? he promised to be a tough law and order president _ country? he promised to be a tough law and order president and - country? he promised to be a tough law and order president and he i country? he promised to be a tough i law and order president and he meant it. within weeks of taking office, the killing of alleged drug users and dealers began. thousands of them
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shot by the police or by unnamed vigilantes. it shot by the police or by unnamed viiilantes. . shot by the police or by unnamed viiilantes. , ., , , , shot by the police or by unnamed viiilantes. , ., , vigilantes. it is really bloody and mess . it vigilantes. it is really bloody and messy. it shocked _ vigilantes. it is really bloody and messy. it shocked the _ vigilantes. it is really bloody and messy. it shocked the rest i vigilantes. it is really bloody and messy. it shocked the rest of i vigilantes. it is really bloody and| messy. it shocked the rest of the world. messy. it shocked the rest of the world- ltut _ messy. it shocked the rest of the world. but five _ messy. it shocked the rest of the world. but five years _ messy. it shocked the rest of the world. but five years on, - messy. it shocked the rest of the world. but five years on, the i world. but five years on, the president's popularity at home has held up not despite but because of his droop —— brutal drug campaign. for the rich were supporting him it is very— for the rich were supporting him it is very powerful because the bridge are wary— is very powerful because the bridge are wary of— is very powerful because the bridge are wary of crime, they want security _ are wary of crime, they want security. forthe are wary of crime, they want security. for the poor, are wary of crime, they want security. forthe poor, in neighbourhoods drug addicts are stigmatised, that can probably explain — stigmatised, that can probably explain why he has so much support i’ilht explain why he has so much support right now _ explain why he has so much support right now. the explain why he has so much support riiht now. , , ., ., right now. the president had other sur-rises right now. the president had other surprises up _ right now. the president had other surprises up his — right now. the president had other surprises up his sleeve. _ right now. the president had other surprises up his sleeve. he - surprises up his sleeve. he questioned the value of the long—standing military alliance with the united states, repeatedly threatening to terminate the us troop presence in the philippines. he expressed his admiration for
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china, saying it was a betterfriend to his country, complicating a territorial dispute where chinese forces have occupied a number of islands claimed by the philippines. his idea of a new approach to the muslim insurgency in the south of the new federal system faded after the new federal system faded after the catastrophic battle four years ago with islamic militants which left most of one city in ruins. there has been some progress in improving the philippines's ramshackle infrastructure and the living standards of the poor. but well short of his election promises. yet unlike his predecessors, his public image seems unaffected by any disappointments filipinos may feel about his achievements. iie disappointments filipinos may feel about his achievements.— disappointments filipinos may feel about his achievements. he does not s-eak in a about his achievements. he does not speak in a technocratic _ about his achievements. he does not speak in a technocratic manner. i about his achievements. he does not speak in a technocratic manner. he l speak in a technocratic manner. he speaks _ speak in a technocratic manner. he speaks like — speak in a technocratic manner. he speaks like a regular guy, such that if i speaks like a regular guy, such that if i were _ speaks like a regular guy, such that if i were an — speaks like a regular guy, such that if i were an ordinary person
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listening _ if i were an ordinary person listening to him, i would feel that this person, this president, relates to me _ this person, this president, relates to me so _ this person, this president, relates to me so well. he relates to my struggle — to me so well. he relates to my stru~ ile. . to me so well. he relates to my stru~ ile. , ., ., . ., to me so well. he relates to my stru. tle_ , ., ., . ., , ., struggle. his dominance of filipino -olitics has struggle. his dominance of filipino politics has allowed _ struggle. his dominance of filipino politics has allowed him _ struggle. his dominance of filipino politics has allowed him to - struggle. his dominance of filipino politics has allowed him to go i struggle. his dominance of filipino | politics has allowed him to go after his critics. a senator investigating his critics. a senator investigating his role in death squads has spent four years in his role in death squads has spent fouryears injail on his role in death squads has spent four years injail on what many claim are false allegations. critical media groups have been shut down or find themselves facing multiple criminal charges. some believe the country's fragile democracy has been irreparably damaged under his rule. yet if he could get around the constitutional ban on a second term, this abrasive and divisive figure would have every chance of being re—elected. jonathan head, bbc news, bangkok. let's return to the olympic games in tokyo, where we've been taking a deeper look at the host city.
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to give us some insight into the creative side of tokyo, we met yinka oshiletu, a british—nigerian dancer who's part of a growing afrobeats dance scene injapan's capital. afrobeats injapan is getting more popular, but i think the scene is still really small. right now there is no kind of really famous like afrobeat dancers coming up injapan. if there was i think there would perhaps be more of an explosion of it here. i was born in london. my family are west african, nigerian. i now live in greater tokyo injapan. dance to me is freedom. i just think it's something that has been with me since as long as i can remember. so it's part of myself. when i'm dancing, like,
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i'm completely like not worrying about what other people think, it's the time i feel closest to god. it's like a really sacred space for me. i grew up in african churches in london. my family used to ask me to dance and stuff like that. when i was about seven years old i started ballet. then i went to this local street dance school. hip—hop, like dance and hip—hop culture injapan, is insanely popular. i feel as an english speaker and a hip—hop dancer injapan i could not ever be unemployed i don't think. i have my own kind of dance business out here, i guess. i will call it a dance school. i have four, five classes a week, ages ranging from four to 14. the kids here are the light of my life.
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i am so grateful to god that i can combine my two loves — kids and dance. my experience here as a british passport—holding person injapan is completely different to that of someone with citizenship of an african country. i remember once a few years ago i was in tokyo and i heard footsteps running behind me. so i turned around to step out of the way to let whoever was running go past me, and it was just the police chasing me down the street. they wanted my passport. they wanted to see my id. when i showed them my passport, the way their attitude completely changed. they were asking me about peter rabbit and harry potter. that was like a real awakening to me. i think they saw me and on principlejust thought, maybe she is here illegally.
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dance has been like a teacher to me. it's like a journey. it is something that has challenged me and saved me and broken me all of the same time. and a reminder of our breaking news this hour. tea m team gb have won three gold medals in six hours at the tokyo olympics. tom daley and matty lee be their chinese rivals byjust one point in the men's synchronised ten metres platform diving. it was third time lucky for 27—year—old tom after he took bronze at the last two olympics. elsewhere, tom pidcock won gold in the mountain bike and swimmer adam peaty took victory in the 100 metres breaststroke.
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you can me —— meet me and most of the team on social media. now the time for the latest weather. here is carol kirkwood. hello again. last week we had a very high temperatures for the time of the year. and a lot of sunshine. high pressure dominated. this week it is all change. low pressure is dominating. it is going to be cooler as we go through the week. heavy showers, the potentialfor as we go through the week. heavy showers, the potential for localised flooding. there will be some sunny spells in between. this morning we start off with some clear skies in parts of the west. there is a fair bit of clout around and mist and fog. that cloud should break up and we should lose the mist and fog. there will be a fair bit of sunshine around. not a there will be a fair bit of sunshine around. nota bone there will be a fair bit of sunshine around. not a bone dry day. there will be some showers. nothing like the scale we saw yesterday, particularly in parts of suffolk and london, where it led to localised
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flooding. temperatures today ranging from 16 in the north to 26 as we push down towards birmingham. as we head through the evening and overnight period, many of the day time showers will fade. we have got a little system coming on across the west. that is going to be putting east through the day —— through the night. it will bring some showers. it will not be a cold night. temperatures falling to between 13 and 17 degrees. this is the weather front that moving from the west towards east during the course of monday night into tuesday. we will start off with a few showers. equally, many of us will start off with some sunshine. the showers will get going through the day. some of them heavy and thundery. the potential for localised flooding. nothing like we saw during the course of sunday. these temperatures coming down a touch, 15 to about 22 degrees. on wednesday, there will be more showers from the word go. some
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will be heavy and more prolific through the course of the afternoon. some of them will be blowing around quite quickly because we do have gusty winds. gusty winds particularly around the service. the potential for localised flooding. temperatures reach 15 in the north to 20 or 21 towards the south. as for the rest of the week and into the weekend, things do remain unsettled. we still have low pressure in charge of our weather. a mixture of sunshine and showers. the temperature will be coming down.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines three team gb golds in tokyo. it's olympicjoy for tom daley and matty lee in the men's synchronised 10—metre platform diving. gb gold in the cycling too — tom pidcock wins the men's mountain bike cross country event adam peaty started the team gb gold rush, defending his 100—metre breaststroke title. could more essential workers be allowed to avoid self—isolation if they've been pinged? ministers meet today to discuss whether to expand the scheme. do you think daily covid tests rather than periods of self—isolation are the right way to go?

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