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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  July 26, 2021 5:00am-5:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm sarah mulkerrins live in tokyo on day three of the olympics. adam peaty wins britain's first gold medal of the tokyo olympics as he successfully defends his 100m breaststroke title. after a farcical false start in the men's triathlon, kristian blummenfelt picks up a gold medalfor norway. i'm sally bundock in london. the rest of the day's headlines: celebrations in tunisia as the president sacks his prime minister and suspends parliament following a day of protests against the government's handling of the covid pandemic. as more extreme weather is recorded around the world, scientists warn of the urgent need for action on climate change.
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and disappointment for band performers in the netherlands after nightclubs close again due to soaring covid infections. hello. a very warm welcome to the programme. day three at the tokyo olympics is now well underway and the medals are coming in thick and fast. team gb have picked up their first gold — adam peaty winning the men's 100m breaststroke final — but britain isn't the only country celebrating a good day at the pool. let's cross live to sarah mulkerrins in tokyo for more. sarah, tell us about what's been happening in terms of action in the pool.—
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action in the pool. good afternoon _ action in the pool. good afternoon from - action in the pool. good afternoon from tokyo. i action in the pool. good| afternoon from tokyo. it action in the pool. good - afternoon from tokyo. it has been a scintillating morning with some of those finals in the pool here in tokyo. let's start with that star adam peaty, defending his olympic title. he is so dominant in the 100 metres breaststroke, he is undefeated in seven years, he had so much pressure coming out on him, coming into this to try and, you know, backup the win and, you know, backup the win and become the first writ went back to back olympic titles in the pool but he looked as cool and as calm as he swung his way to victory and he had a very good start and he extended his lead, he has lions tattooed on his arms and roared in celebration as he touched while victory —— first brit. huge celebrations for him and a brilliant showdown in the women's 400 metres freestyle with everybody talking about this meet up 20 american katie
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ledecky and the australian ariarne titmus in the build up to these games and it did not disappoint. katie ledecky is stronger at the longer distances, ariarne titmus better at the shorter so this was the two of the meeting in the middle of the 400 metres and katie ledecky went out hard and katie ledecky went out hard and fast, trying to pull the sting out of ariarne titmus's legs in it but the australian powered through with a final two lengths to go to steal the victory. she is a world champion and now the olympic champion and now the olympic champion and now the olympic champion and if you've been anywhere near social media you would have seen her coach celebrating in some style in the stands in tokyo and is just a quick note, to other minerals today, canada got theirfirst of the games with maggie mcneil in the 100m butterfly. she no doubt one from lane seven, the outer lane, so a surprise there. and the american men
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dominant is always in the four x100 dominant is always in the four x 100 metre freestyle relay, they won there. x100 metre freestyle relay, they won there.— x100 metre freestyle relay, they won there. 0k, well, let's discuss other _ they won there. 0k, well, let's discuss other swimming - they won there. 0k, well, let's discuss other swimming news i discuss other swimming news now. tunisian media and lots of pan—arab media are celebrating the win of swimmer ahmed hafnaoui. he won the men's 400m freestyle, the first gold medal for an arab or african nation in this year's games. many papers reported tunisian president kais saied — who faces political problems at home — passing on his thanks and that of the nation. hafnaoui's win came as a surprise to much of the media after he only qualified in eighth place for the final. he's won just the fifth gold medalfor tunisia in the history of the games and he dedicated his win to "all tunisians". sarah, what's the reaction been in tokyo?
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it was definitely one of those great shocks we had on sunday in tokyo, everybody loves an underdog story, don't they? in particular in swimming, the outside lanes, i mentioned one of the victor is coming from lane seven, the win for the tunisian came from lane eight and usually the two favourites are in four and five so you can back on the wind is coming from their but he stole through to victory in the race, such a surprise —— the winners. you can see when he hit the ball he did not believe it himself and he splashed the water and cheered and shouted and normally they have special tracksuits to wear on the podium and he was just there in his t—shirt and his tracksuit bottoms so a nice touch for him, and it's good when you have an underdog story in the olympic games and great for a country that does not get many medals at the olympics. one of the interesting points is that the interesting points is that the swimming finals are here in the swimming finals are here in
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the morning in tokyo and that will be a big factor. let's hear from the will be a big factor. let's hearfrom the olympic will be a big factor. let's hear from the olympic gold medal swimmer michael phelps, you know he is well used to winning gold, 23 olympic gold medals himself, he was here in tokyo and watched ahmed hafnaoui swim. he said his shock victory was a great example of how swimming at the tokyo games is likely to have a series of wide—open races. unbelievable swim. he dropped almost — unbelievable swim. he dropped almost 4.5, five seconds of his pv~ _ almost 4.5, five seconds of his pv~ and — almost 4.5, five seconds of his pv. and out of lane one — out of lane — pv. and out of lane one — out of lane eight, excuse me. thars— of lane eight, excuse me. that's what i've been talking about — that's what i've been talking about pretty much all morning. the difference with this, these are olympics compared to the ones — are olympics compared to the ones in — are olympics compared to the ones in the past, in my opinion, _ ones in the past, in my opinion, is every single person in the — opinion, is every single person in the finals has a chance to win— in the finals has a chance to win a — in the finals has a chance to win a medal, right? it doesn't matter— win a medal, right? it doesn't matter if_ win a medal, right? it doesn't matter if you are in they won, lane _ matter if you are in they won, lane eight. _ matter if you are in they won, lane eight, lane four, it doesn't _ lane eight, lane four, it doesn't matter. every single human— doesn't matter. every single human being in the final, it's close. — human being in the final, it's close, right? to make the finals _ close, right? to make the finals was less than one second between — finals was less than one second between first and eighth so i
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feel like _ between first and eighth so i feel like the globe, as a whole. _ feel like the globe, as a whole, is really starting to step — whole, is really starting to step up _ whole, is really starting to step up and swim faster and for me, _ step up and swim faster and for me. it's — step up and swim faster and for me. it's fun_ step up and swim faster and for me, it's fun to watch, it's amazing _ me, it's fun to watch, it's amazing to be able to see kids stand — amazing to be able to see kids stand up— amazing to be able to see kids stand up and accomplish their goals— stand up and accomplish their goals and dreams. and sarah, norway also got their first gold medal today but it wasn't without a bit of drama for the male triathletes. tell us about that. yes, it was a very interesting start, sally. below us here at tokyo bay at the triathlon, it got under way and there is a pontoon where the triathlon start their swim and half of the field jovian, swim a few lengths and realised the other half of the field being blocked by a big, half of the field being blocked bya big, black half of the field being blocked by a big, black boat so they had to pull all of the triathletes back and start again. they did get under way then, there was a 1500 metres swim around the bay and they got on the bike for 40 kilometres around the roads of tokyo and then onto the ten
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kilometre run. it was eventually the norwegian kristian blummenfelt who went on to win with trio out in front who broke clear on the wind. alex yee of britain took silver with hayden wilde of new zealand taking bronze. but blummenfelt was a runner earlier on in his career so he had the strength in his legs to pull clear at the end. he felt the head, though, collapsing afterwards after his celebrations, he was taken away on a wheelchair but he was back and well and happy when he got his medal. i and well and happy when he got his medal. .., and well and happy when he got his medal-— his medal. ican imagine. i understand _ his medal. ican imagine. i understand the _ his medal. ican imagine. i understand the heat - his medal. ican imagine. i understand the heat is - his medal. ican imagine. i understand the heat is an l his medal. ican imagine. i- understand the heat is an issue and we will look at that later in the programme. sarah, what else do we have to look forward to on day three? so much action, isn't there? today we've gone through the swimming and we've had the triathlon and now all of the attention will be focused on the likes of the men's rugby sevens. few will forget fiji's golden
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moment from five years ago. i was lucky enough to be there to see them win and celebrated and you could see how much it meant to their country. they were shaky at first, playing japan, but they came back to win so they are off to a winning start. one really interesting one, one of the new sports we are seeing, skateboarding. the men's street final on sunday, the women's street event is under way and one of the local hopes issue mori is in the middle chance of it and the park event is slightly different. earlier, i spoke to us skateboarder bryce wettstein, who will be making her olympic debut in the women's park category. it will get under way next week. i asked her how excited she was to see skateboarding happening in this year's games.
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i feel so beyond grateful and blissful for everything. to see skateboarding in the olympics, it basically brings all of our origins into this play of such a beautiful land where we can all venture to. i think the olympics is the most incredible place. i can't believe it is really here, you know? have you been watching the street event so far? has that got you a bit more excited for you trip out here when you will compete in the park event? yes, i have been watching the street event. it feels really surreal because you think about it and these people are always around you and you are surrounded by each other when you're skateboarding. you are usually in the same country, your best friends, family, and they already went to tokyo, which seems like such a hologrammic thing back then, to be in tokyo, because it is weird to think that we will be there with them soon. so watching them is — wow!
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it is almost like, wow, you are watching your family compete on this platform that they have been looking towards for more than one year, maybe two years now. for people at home who may not have seen skateboarding — we know it is new to the olympics — explain the difference between the street event and park event, which you partake in. the park event is very transitional. it seems like pretty much every cornerstone of the park sort of leads into each other, like the way rainwater drizzles through a trampoline or something and you you never really know where it is going, but it — somehow loops together. it is on high ground. street is pretty much rails, staircases, kind of like when you take curbs and sidewalks. everything is more common ground, it is not like you are on different elevations as much, but you have more luxury to be on rails or these ledges, and everything kind of like whoa, whoa. it's kind of like the teacup ride at the fair rather than a roller—coaster.
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park would be like the roller—coaster. that is how my mind kind of categorises the two. great to get her thoughts on that and we wish her all the best for when she competes next week. one more line to tell you, the home hosts will be looking fiercely at naomi osaka to see what she can do, the highest ranked seed left in the women's tennis and i can tell you she is through to the next round. she won through today. naomi osaka, the star of the opening ceremony as well. thank you so much, sarah. good to get the latest from you in terms of tokyo and i have to tell you my boys are avid skateboarders and obsessed so they will be watching that closely. stay with us. still to come: mission control: we see - you coming down the ladder now. neil armstrong: that's
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one small step for man, | one giant leap for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire is being blamed tonight. for the first crash - in the 30—year history of concorde, the world's only supersonic airliner. _ it was one of the most vivid symbols of the violence and hatred that tore apart the state of yugoslavia. but now, a decade later, it's been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again today. there's been a 50% decrease in sperm quantity and an increase in malfunctioning sperm unable to swim properly. crowd: seven, six, five, four, three... i thousands of households across the country are suspiciously- quiet this lunchtime - as children bury their noses in the final instalment of harry potter. - this is bbc news. the latest headlines:
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adam peaty has won britain's first gold medal of the tokyo olympics and successfully defended his 100 metres breaststroke title. celebrations in tunisia as the president sacks his prime minister and suspends parliament following a day of protests against the government's handling of the covid pandemic. we will bring you news from tunisia shortly. first, a bit more on the olympics. sarah was mentioning it is extremely hot there. we are seeing the effects of this, the japanese summer on the events in various ways. organisers have done their best to try and protect their best to try and protect the athletes from the high temperatures, but it is not proving an easy task, as our reporter, mariko, can tell us.
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sally, i am sure you can see the temperature board behind me. it is brutally hot. we heard from djokovic and tennis complaining about the head. sarah mentioned naomi osaka is doing extremely well, but still, it is extremely hard, and outside sports, this has been challenging. it has been an issue ever since i was a child, especially if you were playing sports outside, but it has gotten a lot hotter. i have noticed this year, as i came home to do reports, and that basically means that schools, teachers, coaches have to be extra careful to make sure the children are protected. under the scorching sun of tokyo, girls from this tennis club carry on with their extracurricular activities, but, every year, around 3000 children suffer from heatstroke during club activities like this.
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there have even been deaths in the past. the tennis coach has been around for 17 years and says the hottest summers mean they have to be extra careful. translation: we measure heat stress indexes every hour- to make sure it is safe to practise. lately, we have gathered early in the morning at 7:15am and the afternoon when the temperature isn't too high. it is under the seat that the top athletes are competing for gold during these games. the conditions mean we are less likely to see a volley of world records tumbling. just by being in heat exposure, the cardiovascular, your heart. system has to work harder. to maintain your performance and also your body's - ability to thermoregulate, maintain your temperature in a good state — that - would be greatly impacted.
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the last timejapan held a summer games was 1964, october, when the weather was cooler, so having the games here now has raised concerns that the intense heat and humidity of the tokyo summer could pose a serious risk to athletes, but when the games are held, it all has to do with the global sport calendar. these are the major events. there is a gap between late—july and august. broadcasters around the world paid billions of dollars for the rights to show the olympics. they need to show it at the right time of year in the right time of day. broadcasting is one of the two most significant revenue sources for the olympics, so the ioc is going to want to keep sponsors and broadcasters as happy as can be. and that means some events like marathon and race walking have been moved to sapporo where it is cooler, while others take place in the early morning or evening. but increasingly, it is not
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just the battle for a medal, it is a battle against the heat. from one extreme to another, we are expecting a typhoon to hit the north—east of the country tomorrow. we were hoping to go up tomorrow. we were hoping to go up north whether 2011 tsunami was, as they are football matches up there with spectators joining, matches up there with spectatorsjoining, but matches up there with spectators joining, but with a typhoon coming, we are not sure those matches will go ahead, they may be rescheduled. thank you so much, mariko, we will talk to you soon. while talking about extreme weather, let's stay on that topic. extreme weather is being recorded around the world from flooding in europe to wildfires in the us, and scientists say it's underlined the urgent need for action on climate change. in less than 100 days, the uk will host a major meeting of world leaders on climate issues. ahead of the cop—26 summit
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in glasgow, representatives from more than 50 countries are meeting in london. courtney bembridge reports. extreme temperatures and dry conditions are fuelling wildfires in northern california. fire is threatening spain, too. this is the catalonia region and one of the worst fires here in years. there were similar scenes on the italian island of sardinia. an out—of—control fire after a heat wave. while no single event can be attributed to climate change, scientists say its impact has never been more clear. no, no, no, no, no, no...no! in belgium, heavy rainfall has caused severe flooding, less than a fortnight after deadly flash floods across western europe. a typhoon is battering china, days after severe flooding killed dozens of people. scientists say these events are becoming more common because warmer temperatures mean the air holds more moisture, which leads
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to more extreme rainfall. there was flooding in london, too — water streamed into a train station and turned roads into rivers, as representatives from more than 50 countries met to lay the groundwork for november's big climate summit in glasgow. this was the message from the british host. we are seeing in every part of the world, on each of our doorsteps, what happens when climate change gets out of control and so what i hope that we have at this meeting is an opportunity for us to shape the vision of the final outcomes from cop26 in glasgow and to build that unity of purpose amongst the ministers to deliver that. world leaders are under pressure to phase out coal power and set more ambitious targets on emissions which may not always win them favour at home. in some ways, they can only commit to, or it doesn't matter what they commit to if they can't get that through their parliaments
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so there is a very complex process behind all this. the fires, floods and extreme heat may just focus their minds. courtney bembridge, bbc news. supporters of tunisia's president kais saied have taken to the streets to celebrate after he sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament. the president's move came after a day of demonstrations across the country, calling for the government to resign over its handling of the coronavirus pandemic. gail maclellan reports. crowds celebrate in tunis as news of the government's dismissal is announced. president kais saied also froze parliament for 30 days in an escalation of the political crisis in tunisia, much to the delight of his supporters. translation: it is the first time in my life i have heard| of a head of state take the correct decision. we have taken back our country. this is the first time i have
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gone out to the streets to celebrate. the measures, the president said, are aimed at saving the state. not everyone agrees. the speaker of parliament has accused the president of launching a coup against the revolution and constitution. the president's move followed a day of protests in tunis and other cities on sunday, demanding the government step down after a spike in a covid—19 cases that has aggravated economic troubles. translation: our main demand is that the ennahda movement, l which ruled for ten years, leave the parliament. as a young man in 2011, i called forjobs, freedom and dignity. in 2021, i still call forjobs, freedom and dignity. now, the crowds celebrate as military vehicles glide by. the extent for support for the president's move not yet clear. gail maclellan, bbc news.
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coronavirus rates in the netherlands skyrocketed by more than 500% earlier this month, following the scrapping of almost all remaining lockdown restrictions and the reopening of nightclubs in latejune. the surge in infections prompted an equally swift u—turn, with nightclubs now closed until at least the 13th of august. anna holligan went to meet one band that hoped to have been performing at the weekend. this was meant to be a breakthrough year. i make dutch electronics synth p0p- but, with nightclubs closed, there is no audience to see them in action. we had like 70 shows, and they all got cancelled. that was a big bummer. ialready all got cancelled. that was a big bummer. i already told all got cancelled. that was a big bummer. ialready told my girlfriend i was going to pay the rent. many feel as though they are
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being used as scapegoats by a state that keeps on changing direction. ., .., ., state that keeps on changing direction. ., ., , , direction. you cannot put this entire weight _ direction. you cannot put this entire weight of— direction. you cannot put this| entire weight of responsibility on the — entire weight of responsibility on the youth of today. that is just _ on the youth of today. that is just crazy~ _ on the youth of today. that is just crazy. if you tell youth you — just crazy. if you tell youth you can _ just crazy. if you tell youth you can go out, then you are going _ you can go out, then you are going out, — you can go out, then you are going out, then you are punished for going out... that is very— punished for going out... that is very hard _ punished for going out... that is very hard on us, on young people. _ is very hard on us, on young people, and we shouldn't be in such— people, and we shouldn't be in such a — people, and we shouldn't be in such a position. earlier this month, the infection rate shut up by 500% one week after the government relaxed the rules before rapidly reintroducing them. and the dutch government here and at the hague has been struggling to balance these competing demands. the nightclub owners who want to save their businesses, the people who just want to go dancing again, and the vulnerable groups and medical workers who feel it is too soon and further relaxation could lead to another spike in infections. the dutch health minister was criticised after encouraging young people to get the single shot yarns in vaccine and go partying with
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the slogan, dancing with. it is fair to say that this could have consequences, for which we welcome and other european countries. even the band boys desperate to get back to live shows are urging politicians to move with caution. the best thing they could have done would be keep it closed, keep it more strict. so that we could just, when the time is right, really start again. really, that live energy, as you can tell... anna holligan, bbc news, the hague. do stay with us on bbc news. we
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have all of the top business stories coming up next, and if you want to get involved in a conversation, i am on a twitter. see you in a moment. good morning. once again, sunday was a day of extreme. the highest temperature was in northern ireland with 28 celsius, but there was lots of sunshine for scotland, as you can see by this weather watcher picture. northern ireland, northern england, and northwest wales were by contrast further south, there's quite a lot of cloud, and it certainly went downhill, the story, after lunchtime. this is a weather watcher picture sent in from kent, where there was a severe cluster of thunderstorms that developed, and it brought some localised flooding as well. and you can see the volume of lightning strikes too, stretching all the way down from east anglia over to the isle of wight. they slowly faded away and the area of low pressure is moving away as we speak. now, that is going to continue to anchor itself up into the far northeast for the start of our monday morning. it will bring a fair amount of cloud across eastern scotland and northeast england,
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but it's going to be a relatively quiet start to monday. dry with some sunshine coming through, maybe a few isolated showers lingering for a time, but generally a better day. there will be a few showers developing through the afternoon, some of these possibly heavy and thundery, but they should be a little more interspersed in comparison to the weekend. temperatures, well, with a little more sunshine, higher in england, with 26 celsius the high. but we will start to see more showers developing. from the west, moving into northern ireland, southwest wales, southwest england by the end of the day. it's a weather front that's going to move through, and the weather story changes as we go through the week. with low pressure anchored to the north and those winds swinging in a clockwise direction, it will be driving in more moisture, more cloud, and certainly more of a breeze on those exposed west—facing coasts. so tuesday is really quite a messy picture, there will be a lot of cloud around, there will be some showers, and some of those showers thundery in nature once again. i'm not going to be too clever about it, almost anywhere
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could catch a shower on tuesday and it could be quite heavy, and the temperatures — well, they are going struggle, 15—21 celsius, sojust going below where they should be now for the time of year. the low pressure doesn't move very far at all throughout the week. we still keep this feed coming in off the atlantic, a cooler source, brisk wind as well, so that means it stays rather cool and showery. indications of something a little better, though, as we head to the weekend. take care.
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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. tackling the �*pingdemic�*: businesses face disruption to supply chains, despite government efforts to free up critical workers. a glass half full for uk wine drinkers as the government looks to scrap a proposed additional charge on imports. and the winds of change for the cruise industry as it hopes fully vaccinated passengers will boost the sector after covid—19 dropped anchor on its operations.

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