Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 26, 2021 2:00am-2:31am BST

2:00 am
this is bbc news. i'm sarah mulkerrins live in tokyo on day three of the olympics. after a farcical false start in the men's trialthon, kristian blummenfelt picks up a gold medalfor norway. adam peaty hopes to become the first british swimmer to retain an olympic title in the men's 100 metres breaststroke. i'm lewis vaughanjones in london — the rest of the day's headlines. as dozens of deadly wildfires burn across the western united states, scientists warn they are creating their own weather systems. tunisia's president sacks his prime minister and suspends parliament after a day of protests against
2:01 am
the government's handling of the covid pandemic. hello and a warm welcome to the programme. it's day three of the olympics and we have all the latest from japan. sarah mulkerrins is live in tokyo for us, where the first medal of the day has gone to norway. tell us all about it. it certainly _ tell us all about it. it certainly has. welcome to tokyo bay early on monday morning in the japanese capital and the behind me is where the triathlon took place. it is also where we saw that false start occur. what happened is that all triathletes were on the pontoon and ready to dive in, half went in but there was
2:02 am
a big lack boat covering one half of them so they were blocked from entering into the bay here and they had to pull the swimmers already in the water back onto the pontoon and then they finally got under way. they had a 1500 metres swim around the bay here and then on their bikes for a0 kilometres cycle around the streets of tokyo and then they transitioned into that ten kilometre run. and then it became a 3—man race where you had kristian blummenfelt from norway. a former track runner in his youth and that is where his strength paid off as he sprinted clear of alex yee from great britain and hayden wilde from new zealand. he collapsed over the line. heat is a thing here but they have been dealing with it. he was taken away in a wheelchair but he was ok to receive his medal. interestingly as well this was
2:03 am
on the streets of tokyo, lots of locals out lining the streets to watch. they have been discouraged from doing that because we are within the coronavirus pandemic however there were people watching. an there were people watching. an eventful start already. what else is expected on day three? the action is coming thick and fast now. all eyes will be on the swimming pool shortly. the finals are in the morning here in tokyo to coincide with tv rights and deals in the usa so it is interesting to see how swimmers are going there. this morning we are looking at people like adam pt for great britain, not beaten in the 100 metres breaststroke in seven years. a dominant force. one a little closerfor years. a dominant force. one a little closer for the women is the usa superstar katie lee dickie against the australian titmus and the a00 metres. katie lee dickie is normally
2:04 am
dominant but we will follow that one closely. as well we have the rugby sevens under way for the men. fiji won their first ever olympic gold in rio in 2016 when the sport was introduced. they got off to a winning start against the hosts, japan, 2a points— 19 there. we also know that we're to have the women's event of the street skateboarding take place. we saw the men's event yesterday with a local skater winning so the women are now under way. winning so the women are now underway. heats winning so the women are now under way. heats at the moment and then at later on we will have the finals. interesting to see how that new sport will progress and i am delighted to say we can now speak to a us skateboarder, whojoins us now on the programme. you are competing in the park event. we should clarify that there are two skateboarding events. street which is happening now and then park which is
2:05 am
different. bryce, how do you feel at the moment? you will compete next week. are you excited to see skateboarding in the olympics? i excited to see skateboarding in the olympics?— the olympics? i feel so beyond crateful the olympics? i feel so beyond grateful to _ the olympics? i feel so beyond grateful to see _ the olympics? i feel so beyond grateful to see skateboarding l grateful to see skateboarding is in the olympics and, basically it brings all of our origins to play in this beautiful land. i think the limericks are an incredible place and i cannot believe it is here. ., ,, place and i cannot believe it is here. ., , . . is here. have you been watching these street _ is here. have you been watching these street events _ is here. have you been watching these street events so _ is here. have you been watching these street events so far? - these street events so far? does it have you a bit more excited for your trip when you will compete in the park event? i have been watching the street event. it feels a little surreal because you think about it and these people are always around you and you are surrounded by each other when skateboarding and you are usually in the same country with friends and family and they already went to tokyo and it seems like such holographic
2:06 am
thing to be in because it is weird to think we will be there with them soon. so watching them is, wow, it is almost like watching your family complete on this that make compete on this platform the been looking forward for over a year. for --eole forward for over a year. for peeple at — forward for over a year. for people at home _ forward for over a year. for people at home who may not ever have seen any skateboarding, we know it is new to the olympics, explain the difference between the street event and the park event that you take part in. the park event is very transitional. it seems like every cornerstone of the park leads into each other the way rainwater drizzle is, you never really know where it is going but somehow it all fits together. the street is rails and staircases and kind of like curbs and sidewalks and everything is more common. you are not so much on different
2:07 am
elevations but you have more of a luxury to be on rails. everything seems like the teacup ride at the fair versus a rollercoaster of the park. that is how my mind categorises the two. sh. that is how my mind categorises the two. �* ., the two. a wonderful description. - the two. a wonderful description. you - the two. a wonderful. description. you really the two. a wonderful - description. you really get a sense of what goes through your mind when you are competing. thank you so much forjoining us, bryce, as you build up towards taking part. we will watch for you and all the very best. hopefully we will see you compete next week here in japan. that is bryce who will be competing in skateboarding. it's cooler here today with a little more of a breeze. and let's head to mariko. mariko,
2:08 am
we have been talking about and dealing with and in particular regarding this board, has been the heat and the impact of it on athletes in particular in the tennis. we saw complaints about the fact that they have to play in the middle of the day in the very high temperatures and high humidity. that is right, sarah. i don't know if you can see the temperature board here behind me. it is early in the morning but it has been brutally hot. but at least in tokyo a lot of people are excited about japan's gold rush. i managed to grab japan's gold rush. i managed to gmba japan's gold rush. i managed to grab a newspaperfor you. the judo siblings winning their double gold medals for the nation and for their family. as you mentioned, the gold medal for skateboarding went to japan and a first gold in the swimming pool forjapan. we have endurance and outdoor
2:09 am
sports in particular and the heat has been a real issue. it has been an issue ever since i was a child, especially playing sport outside. of course it is getting hotter every year because of climate change and that means that schools and teachers have to be extra careful to protect their children. under the scorching sun of tokyo, girls from this high school carry on with their extracurricular activities, but every year, around 3,000 children suffer from heatstroke during activities like this. there have even been deaths in the past. the school's tennis coach has been in the role for 17 years and says the hottest summers mean they have to be extra careful. translation: we measure heat stress index every hour to make | sure it's safe to practise and lately we've been gathering early in the morning at 7:15am while practising in the late afternoon when the temperature is not too high.
2:10 am
it's under the heat that the world's top athletes are competing for gold during this summer's games. the conditions mean we are less likely to see a volley of world records tumbling. just by getting the heat exposure, it's cardiovascular, so your heart system has to work harder to maintain the performance and also the body's ability to thermo regulate, maintain your body temperature in a good state, that will also be impacted greatly. the last timejapan held the summer games was in 196a. it was in october when the weather was cool, though, so having the games here now has raised concerns that the intense heat and humidity of the tokyo summer could pose a serious risk to athletes. but when the games are held, all have to deal with the global sport calendar. these are the major events and there's a gap between late august.
2:11 am
broadcasters around the world paid billions of dollars for the rights to show the olympics. they need to show it at the right time of year in the right time of day. broadcasting is one of the two most significant revenue sources for the olympic movement. the ioc is going to want to keep its sponsors and broadcasters as happy as can be. and that means some events like marathon and race walking have been moved to sapporo where it is cooler while others are taking place in the early morning or in the evening. but increasingly it's notjust a battle for medals, it is also a battle against the heat. and from one extreme to another we are expect in a typhoon to hit tokyo tomorrow as well as the north—east of the country. we wanted to get there tomorrow to show you the football matches with the spectators, one of the very few events. but we're not sure if they can take
2:12 am
place. we will keep you updated. place. we will keep you undated-— place. we will keep you updated. place. we will keep you udated. ., ~ , . updated. thank you very much, mariko. updated. thank you very much, marika- it _ updated. thank you very much, mariko. it has _ updated. thank you very much, mariko. it has been _ updated. thank you very much, mariko. it has been a _ updated. thank you very much, mariko. it has been a big - mariko. it has been a big talking point here and meet we may well have to change our studio my lovely expose studio high above tokyo bay here but in the middle of the typhoon with plenty of rain and wind we may have to duck indoors. that typhoon is also affecting some of the sport. the rowing has had to reschedule their plans for a few days as well. so much is going on in every respect. stay there, sarah. i want your thoughts on this. tunisian media and lots of pan—arab media are celebrating the win of swimmer ahmed hafnaoui. he won the men's a00 metres freestyle, the first gold medal for an arab or african nation in this year's games. many papers reported tunisian president kais saied, who faces political problems at home, passing on his thanks and that of the nation. hafnaoui's win came as a surprise to much of the media, after he only
2:13 am
qualified in eighth place for the final. he's won just the fifth gold medalfor tunisia in the history of the games and he dedicated his win to "all tunisians". what has been the reaction there? ., , , what has been the reaction there? . , , ., there? there has been a phenomenal— there? there has been a phenomenal amount - there? there has been a phenomenal amount of. there? there has been a . phenomenal amount of love there? there has been a _ phenomenal amount of love shown towards the dignity and. it was a total surprise. as you say he qualified as the slowest qualifier so he was in lane eight. it is rare that you see someone swimming from lane eight who then goes on to win a gold medal. he was even surprised himself. he had a wonderful reaction afterwards, squirming and —— screaming and roaring and usually you have specific tracksuits to wear on the medal podium but he was just in a normal t—shirt and tracksuit autumn so there has been a lot of outpouring ofjoy over it. one interesting point about the swimming finals taking place in the morning,
2:14 am
usually they take place in the evening and many swimmers are struggling with that a little bit. so much so that the legendary 23 time olympic gold—medallist michael felt, himself who has won this event. he watched that swim and he said that his shock victory in the scenario of these morning finals is a great example of how this swimming here at the tokyo games is likely to have a lot of wide—open races for us. it was unbelievable. a.5, five seconds of his personal best. and out of lane eight. that is what i've been talking about. all morning. the difference in these olympics compared to those in the past, in my opinion, is that everything a person in the finals has a chance to win a gold medal. it does not matter if you are in lane one, lane a, lane four, does matter. every human being in that final is close. there
2:15 am
was less than a second between first and eighth to make the finals. so as a whole, the world are starting to step up and swim faster. it is amazing to watch, amazing to see kids stand up and accomplish a goal. that was michael phelps they are enjoying the swimming. i wonder whether we will have more shocks in the coming hours. the swimming isjust about to get under way and we will be bringing you a lot more twists and turns over the coming hours. wonderful to have a full round—up. thank you, sarah. let's get some of the days of the news now. demonstrators were calling for the government in tunisia to resign after the handling of the corona vice and demic. the economy is continuing to suffer
2:16 am
despite the measures taken by officials and covid cases have been rising sharply in recent days. the speaker of the us house of representatives nancy pelosi has appointed over a republican former committee to a special committee investigating the capital write last january. investigating the capital write lastjanuary. adam kinzinger last january. adam kinzinger who lastjanuary. adam kinzinger who voted to impeach mr trump has accepted the appointment despite his party's leadership by cutting the enquiry. —— boycotting. five people, including a police officer, died when hundreds of mr trump's supporters broke into the capitol building. the uk's home secretary priti patel has said she remains "determined" to stop migrants crossing the english channel in small boats after 378 migrants arrived in england today. the french authorities said they'd intercepted a further five boats. so far this year a record 8,500 migrants have made the sea crossing to the uk. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: feeling the beat in tokyo. we meet a british—nigerian
2:17 am
dancer who's part of a growing afro hip—hop dance scene in japan's capital. mission control: we see - you coming down the ladder now. neil armstrong: that's one small step for man, | one giant leap for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire is being blamed tonight. for the first crash - in the 30—year history of concorde, the world's only supersonic airliner. _ it was one of the most vivid symbols of the violence and hatred that tore apart the state of yugoslavia. but now, a decade later, it's been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again today. there's been a 50% decrease in sperm quantity and an increase in malfunctioning sperm unable to swim properly.
2:18 am
crowd: seven, six, five, four, three... i thousands of households across the country are suspiciously- quiet this lunchtime - as children bury their noses in the final instalment of harry potter. - this is bbc news, the latest headlines: day three of the olympics has got underway with a false start in the men's triathlon, but kristian blummenfelt wins a gold medalfor norway. in the united states, there are now 86 large wildfires burning across several states. scientists are concerned because the fires are creating their own weather systems, with lightning storms sparking even more blazes.
2:19 am
check out these pictures filmed of the tamarack fire by firefighters from the university of california, davis, as they were travelling to protect a housing development just north of topaz lake in nevada. the tamarack fire has burned more than 70,000 acres along the california nevada border. nathan trower nicked is fire chief at the university of california, davis and his team shot those amazing pictures. he's at the station in davis, california now. thank you for coming on the programme. we really appreciate your time. programme. we really appreciate yourtime. i programme. we really appreciate your time. i want to start with those amazing pictures that we show just a few seconds those amazing pictures that we showjust a few seconds ago. talk through what is going on. they are heart stopping images, for anybody, even those who aren't familiar with the fire service and the fires here in the united states was not what happens in those images in ——
2:20 am
�*s onjuly 21, our type three fire engine was going to protect a subdivision of houses, off of the highway in nevada. wejust houses, off of the highway in nevada. we just encountered incredible fire conditions was not as you mentioned, these large fires can create their own weather systems and you see right in front of our fire engine what almost look like a cyclone of fire go back and forth in front of it as they drive through to protect our housing development. given your experience. _ housing development. given your experience. you _ housing development. given your experience, you are _ housing development. given your experience, you are seeing - housing development. given your experience, you are seeing the i experience, you are seeing the fires, seeing what is happening, is a situation getting worse over the years? it certainly seems like every year we say that the fire seasonis year we say that the fire season is going to be the worst we have seen all year and people have to stop saying that, they have stopped saying there is a season because it has become a year—round problem, at least here in california. it is something that our crews, this is the
2:21 am
third majorfire that our crews, this is the third major fire that we have been on so far this year, and that doesn't really count all of the smaller fires that are happening in our local jurisdictions on a day—to—day basis. jurisdictions on a day-to-day basis. �* , ., ., jurisdictions on a day-to-day basis. �* ., , ., basis. and when you are sent to these larger _ basis. and when you are sent to these larger fires, _ basis. and when you are sent to these larger fires, what - these larger fires, what exactly are you trying to do? it seems that such an overwhelming task. it really feels that — overwhelming task. it really feels that way _ overwhelming task. it really feels that way a _ overwhelming task. it really feels that way a lot - overwhelming task. it really feels that way a lot of - overwhelming task. it really feels that way a lot of the l feels that way a lot of the time. our primary mission is to protect lives. secondarily is to protect people's property and that is why we've spent so much time trying to reinforce things like defensible space, using fire resistant vegetation near people's homes, making sure that people have a plan, no way out of the neighbourhood and evacuate as early as possible. it helps to keep our firefighters safer but also there are obviously, as you can see from the video, some dangerous situations that just
2:22 am
can't be avoided. dangerous situations that 'ust can't be avoidedi can't be avoided. ok, we will leave it there _ can't be avoided. ok, we will leave it there but _ can't be avoided. ok, we will leave it there but thank - can't be avoided. ok, we will leave it there but thank you i leave it there but thank you very much for coming on and explaining exactly what your role is left and indeed sending us those pictures ebbing as an extraordinary insight into exactly the danger that everyone who is working for you is under so we really appreciate your time. let's return to the olympic games in tokyo where we've been taking a deeper look at the host city. to give us some insight into the creative side of tokyo, we met yinka oshiletu — a british—nigerian dancer who's part of a growing afrobeat dance scene in japan's capital. afrobeat in japan afrobeat injapan is getting more popular but i think the scene is really small still. right now there isn't any kind of famous afrobeat dancers coming up injapan and i think if there was then i think they would be perhaps more of an explosion of it here.
2:23 am
my my name is yinka —— whincup she let you. i am now living in japan. dance to me is freedom. ijust think it is something that has been with me since as long as i can remember though it isjust part long as i can remember though it is just part of myself. when i'm dancing completely, like, not worrying what other people think, that is the time i feel closest to god and it is a really sacred space for me. i grew up in african churches in london. my family always used to just say london. my family always used tojust say oh, london. my family always used to just say oh, get yinka to dance and so on. i started on ballet when i was seven and then i went to this local street dance school. hip—hop,
2:24 am
like, dance and hip—hop culture injapan is insanely popular. i feel as english speaker and a hip—hop dancer injapan i don't think i could ever be unemployed. i have my own kind of dance business out here, i guess. i would call it a dance school. i have four orfive classes a week, ages ranging from four to 1a. they are literally just the light from four to 1a. they are literallyjust the light of my life and i am so, so, so, so grateful to god that i can combine my two lover switches kids and dance. my experience out here as a reddish passport holding person —— british passport holding person in japan is completely different to that of citizenship african i remember once a few years ago i remember once a few years ago i was in tokyo and i heard footsteps running behind me so i turned around to step out of the way to the way to let
2:25 am
whoever was running go past me and it was just the police chasing me down the street, and they wanted my passport, they wanted to see my id. when i showed them my passport, the way the attitude completely changed, honestly, they were asking me about peter rabbit and harry potter. like... and that was a real awakening for me and because i think they saw me and because i think they saw me and because i think they saw me and on principle they thought maybe that i was here illegally. dance is like, it has been like a teacher to me and it is a journey and it is something that has challenged me and broken me and saved me all of the same time. we me and broken me and saved me all of the same time.— all of the same time. we will be back in — all of the same time. we will be back in tokyo _ all of the same time. we will be back in tokyo with - all of the same time. we will be back in tokyo with all- all of the same time. we will be back in tokyo with all the| be back in tokyo with all the rest in the olympics at the top of the hour. i will be back with the actually in just a couple of minutes but you can reach me anytime online, social
2:26 am
media, you can reach me on twitter — i'm @lvaughanjones. good morning. once again, sunday was a day of extreme. the highest temperature was in northern ireland with 28 celsius, but there was lots of sunshine for scotland, as you can see by this weather watcher picture. northern ireland, northern england, and northwest wales were by contrast further south, there's quite a lot of cloud, and it certainly went downhill, the story, after lunchtime. this is a weather watcher picture sent in from kent, where there was a severe cluster of thunderstorms that developed, and it brought some localised flooding as well. and you can see the volume of lightning strikes too, stretching all the way down from east anglia over to the isle of wight. they slowly faded away and the area of low pressure is moving away as we speak. now, that is going to continue to anchor itself up into the far northeast
2:27 am
for the start of our monday morning. it will bring a fair amount of cloud across eastern scotland and northeast england, but it's going to be a relatively quiet start to monday. dry with some sunshine coming through, maybe a few isolated showers lingering for a time, but generally a better day. there will be a few showers developing through the afternoon, some of these possibly heavy and thundery, but they should be a little more interspersed in comparison to the weekend. temperatures, well, with a little more sunshine, higher in england, with 26 celsius the high. but we will start to see more showers developing. from the west, moving into northern ireland, southwest wales, southwest england by the end of the day. it's a weather front that's going to move through, and the weather story changes as we go through the week. with low pressure anchored to the north and those winds swinging in a clockwise direction, it will be driving in more moisture, more cloud, and certainly more of a breeze on those exposed west—facing coasts. so tuesday is really quite a messy picture, there will be a lot of cloud around, there will be some showers, and some of those showers thundery in nature once again.
2:28 am
i'm not going to be too clever about it, almost anywhere could catch a shower on tuesday and it could be quite heavy, and the temperatures — well, they are going struggle, 15—21 celsius, sojust going below where they should be now for the time of year. the low pressure doesn't move very far at all throughout the week. we still keep this feed coming in off the atlantic, a cooler source, brisk wind as well, so that means it stays rather cool and showery. indications of something a little better, though, as we head to the weekend. take care.
2:29 am
2:30 am
this is bbc news — the headlines: day three of the olympics has got underway in tokyo with norway's kristian blummenfelt winning gold in the men's triathlon. he finished ahead of great britain's alex yee who took silver. the race was marred by a bizarre false start. in the united states, more than 80 large wildfires are burning across several states. the tamarack fire has burned more than 70,000 acres along the california—nevada border. scientists are warning the fires are creating their own weather systems with lighting storms sparking even more blazes. the president of tunisia, kais saied, has sacked his prime minister and suspended parliament following a day of nationwide protests against the government's mishandling of the coronavirus crisis. mr saied, a former law professor with no previous political experience, said the measures were aimed at saving the state.

26 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on