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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 25, 2021 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

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in support of afghan forces in an attempt to curb the taliban. who have made rapid territorial gains and are now gearing up to attack the big cities. austria's anna kiesenhofer won a surprise road race gold and tunisian teenager ahmed hafnaoui stunned the favourites in the swimming pool on a drama—filled second day at the tokyo olympics. the health secretary sajid javid has apologised for — and deleted — a tweet in which he said the nation should stop "cowering" from coronavirus. campaigners for people who've died during the pandemic had condemned the remark as "deeply insensitive" and "distasteful". tunisia's president has frozen parliament and dismissed the prime minister after violent protests over the government's handling of the pandemic. the speaker of parliament has accused him of staging a coup.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are disability consultant and comedy producer simon minty, and annabel denham, director of communications at the institute of economic affairs. lovely to see you both, before our chats, let's take the viewers to some of those front page beginning with the times, which says the uk is seeing a sustained fall in reported coronavirus cases outside of lockdown for the first time since the pandemic began. the daily express also reflects on covid infections falling for the fifth day in a row, raisinghopes that the third wave has peaked. meanwhile, the guardian features a picture of britain's first medallist at the tokyo olympics — chelsie giles — and carries
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a warning from doctors — that increasing numbers of young people with coronavirus are being admitted to hospital. and... we are going to turn to the daily telegraph says union leaders are challenging government plans to end the pingdemic — in a move that they say threatens a summer of disruption for holiday—makers, shoppers and commuters. according to the daily mail, up to 50,000 dementia cases were missed during lockdown because referrals to memory clinics all but stopped at the start of the covid pandemic. the �*i' says over three—quarters of police officers have had mental health difficulties in the past year. the health secretary, sajid javid, is pictured on the front page of the metro.
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he's apologised to bereaved families and millions of people at risk because of health issues — after suggesting people should not — as he said — "cower" from coronavirus. and the financial times reports ministers are exploring ways to remove china's state—owned nuclear energy company from all future uk power projects. of flavour than a monday morning's newspapers. let's begin our chat and get your thoughts on those big stories, signing, and about, great to see you back. simon, you will pick us out this time around. we starting off the times, we didn't have this paper earlier, covid cases fall as jabs turned the tide. it’s fall as “abs turned the tide. it's aood fall as jabs turned the tide. it's good news. — fall as jabs turned the tide. it�*s good news, and quite a few of the papers, there front pages, we have had a 40% drop in covid infections.
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161 last week, down to... it's the first sustained drop. the talk you mentioned in your introduction about getting past the third wave. it feels a little bit premature to me. the scientists are saying this is welcome, maybe the numbers were a bit higher than they expected because of the drop, but also there is a caution to say well it's only been one week. we haven't got the numbers which relates to so—called freedom day, which was last monday, when a lot of the restrictions where lifted. so it's still a little bit premature, and i do... we have had a tendency along the way to get slightly over six site —— excited over sister certain statistics and have a look as it goes. i get it because it is positive news, and goodness me, that will be lovely to have. but there are still youngsters
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that i know we will come to, if there is a positive, it's the ability of the vaccine and how much it can really change it, but as i said, freedom day stats have yet to come. �* said, freedom day stats have yet to come. ~ ., ,., y said, freedom day stats have yet to come. i, ., come. and about my suppose for the government — come. and about my suppose for the government and _ come. and about my suppose for the government and also _ come. and about my suppose for the government and also of— come. and about my suppose for the government and also of our- government and also of our scientists, you know, they want to hit that 70-75% to scientists, you know, they want to hit that 70—75% to say that we have heard immunity. hit that 70-75% to say that we have heard immunity.— heard immunity. yes, they do, and how interesting _ heard immunity. yes, they do, and how interesting that _ heard immunity. yes, they do, and how interesting that the _ heard immunity. yes, they do, and how interesting that the words - heard immunity. yes, they do, and i how interesting that the words heard and immunity are now coming back into common parliament after being sort of— into common parliament after being sort of ignore it and hidden away and avoided it for many months, we are now— and avoided it for many months, we are now able — and avoided it for many months, we are now able to talk about that as our coronavirus strategy, and to get to some _ our coronavirus strategy, and to get to some of— our coronavirus strategy, and to get to some of the planes that simon said, _ to some of the planes that simon said. i_ to some of the planes that simon said, i completely agree. this is a rare good — said, i completely agree. this is a rare good news in the coronavirus
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pandemic, — rare good news in the coronavirus pandemic, and we should absolutely embrace _ pandemic, and we should absolutely embrace it. — pandemic, and we should absolutely embrace it, but with a hint of caution — embrace it, but with a hint of caution because even the scientists themselves are saying it might be good _ themselves are saying it might be good news for the summer, but we 'ust good news for the summer, but we just don't— good news for the summer, but we just don't know what's going to happen— just don't know what's going to happen in— just don't know what's going to happen in the autumn, and this is problematic for those of us who are pretty— problematic for those of us who are pretty desperate for her life to get back to _ pretty desperate for her life to get back to normal, business owners who are desperate for some certainty, to know— are desperate for some certainty, to know what's— are desperate for some certainty, to know what's going to happen in the coming _ know what's going to happen in the coming months and be able to plan accordingly, because it is quite hard _ accordingly, because it is quite hard to— accordingly, because it is quite hard to shake the feeling that this is only— hard to shake the feeling that this is only temporary, and as simon said, _ is only temporary, and as simon said. we — is only temporary, and as simon said. we are _ is only temporary, and as simon said, we are not entirely sure, sdentists— said, we are not entirely sure, scientists are slightly baffled still as — scientists are slightly baffled still as to why we are seeing this sustained — still as to why we are seeing this sustained drop. is it because the euros _ sustained drop. is it because the euros and — sustained drop. is it because the euros and we know that that led to a rise in— euros and we know that that led to a rise in cases — euros and we know that that led to a rise in cases because we saw an increase. — rise in cases because we saw an increase, particularly among men? is it because _ increase, particularly among men? is it because schools have closed? in which _ it because schools have closed? in which case — it because schools have closed? in which case are we going to see cases increasing _ which case are we going to see cases increasing again come september? to be just— increasing again come september? to be just have _ increasing again come september? to be just have some mitigating factors at the _ be just have some mitigating factors at the moment that they won't be sustainable and will the third wave start to _ sustainable and will the third wave start to rage again in the next couple — start to rage again in the next couple of— start to rage again in the next couple of months. we just don't know. _ couple of months. we just don't know. but— couple of months. we just don't know, but at least in the short term. — know, but at least in the short term. i— know, but at least in the short term, i think the nation is really welcoming — term, i think the nation is really welcoming and embracing some rare
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-ood welcoming and embracing some rare good news — welcoming and embracing some rare good news. right next to the front pa-e good news. right next to the front page of— good news. right next to the front page of the guardian pointing to one group _ page of the guardian pointing to one group of— page of the guardian pointing to one group of people that would help us keep that — group of people that would help us keep that good news at the top of the agenda, and that is the young, but they— the agenda, and that is the young, but they have to get the jab in order— but they have to get the jab in order for— but they have to get the jab in order for that to happen. he has a we are _ order for that to happen. he has a we are seeing, it's a third of the 18-29 _ we are seeing, it's a third of the 18—29 —year—olds have not had any 'ab 18—29 —year—olds have not had any jab whatsoever, and because i'm a little _ jab whatsoever, and because i'm a little bit _ jab whatsoever, and because i'm a little bit older, and assuming they are partying and going to discuss, they don't— are partying and going to discuss, they don't go to discos, but nightclubs, the point being that they are — nightclubs, the point being that they are more likely to be out and about— they are more likely to be out and about and — they are more likely to be out and about and mixing and doing these things. _ about and mixing and doing these things, there is some really cautionary advice from the doctors and scientists saying that the majority _ and scientists saying that the majority of the people going into the hospitals now are they younger people. _ the hospitals now are they younger people, some of them are going into intensive _ people, some of them are going into intensive care, and that means some of them _ intensive care, and that means some of them will— intensive care, and that means some of them will die. these are not peopie — of them will die. these are not people that i've got, you know, secondary — people that i've got, you know, secondary health conditions are some underlying _ secondary health conditions are some underlying issues. they are relatively fit, so the joy of youth
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is that— relatively fit, so the joy of youth is that you — relatively fit, so the joy of youth is that you are invincible, but in this case. — is that you are invincible, but in this case, it's a good idea to get that jab — this case, it's a good idea to get that jab i— this case, it's a good idea to get that jab. i also think if they get the jab. — that jab. i also think if they get the jab, we know we can still get it and we _ the jab, we know we can still get it and we know that we can still pass it on. _ and we know that we can still pass it on. but— and we know that we can still pass it on, but the impact will be less, it on, but the impact will be less, itjust _ it on, but the impact will be less, itjust brings it on, but the impact will be less, it just brings everything it on, but the impact will be less, itjust brings everything a little bit quicker, we can get back to some sort of— bit quicker, we can get back to some sort of normality the more of us are 'ab. sort of normality the more of us are jab so— sort of normality the more of us are jab so it's — sort of normality the more of us are jab so it's a — sort of normality the more of us are jab. so it's a word of caution for the youngsters, and i know it's a dragon _ the youngsters, and i know it's a dragon it— the youngsters, and i know it's a dragon it must be doll, but if they can, dragon it must be doll, but if they can. it _ dragon it must be doll, but if they can. it will— dragon it must be doll, but if they can, it will help, and it will ultimately help themselves. i wonder if ou can ultimately help themselves. i wonder if you can take _ ultimately help themselves. i wonder if you can take us _ ultimately help themselves. i wonder if you can take us to _ ultimately help themselves. i wonder if you can take us to the _ ultimately help themselves. i wonder if you can take us to the front page i if you can take us to the front page of the telegraph, because there is one group of people here who will come as the paper says committee unions are fighting virus testing plan to ease the alerts coming from that test and trace app.— that test and trace app. phrased this hands the _ that test and trace app. phrased this hands the unions _ that test and trace app. phrased this hands the unions another. that test and trace app. phrased - this hands the unions another excuse to disagree with government, and i think it's very fortunate that farmers and lorry drivers and supermarket workers aren't unionis? because then we really would be in trouble, but i think that this is just really intensifying this
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debate. the pandemonium that we have been experiencing ever since we move to phase four of the road map you know commits this huge disruption. i think it's going to have potentially quite big economic costs if we delay the return of overall gdp to pre—pandemic levels by a few months and it costs us about £4 billion a month and lost output. those are really big numbers that are going to have a big impact, and i think it strengthens the case for the government changing the rules, for changing them sooner rather than later, because how are we really returning to normality if we have half a million people self isolating?— half a million people self isolatina? , , ., , ., half a million people self isolatinu ? , , . , ., . isolating? this is a question i have asked a coople _ isolating? this is a question i have asked a couple of— isolating? this is a question i have asked a couple of times _ isolating? this is a question i have asked a couple of times that - asked a couple of times that business owners this week. how do your workers feel about coming to work despite being alerted can he do two tasks and still coming and they all said they all want to come to work. but the union seemed to be
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saying the opposite here. i am work. but the union seemed to be saying the opposite here. i am with annabel and _ saying the opposite here. i am with annabel and us _ saying the opposite here. i am with annabel and us on. _ saying the opposite here. i am with annabel and us on. the _ saying the opposite here. i am with annabel and us on. the app - saying the opposite here. i am with annabel and us on. the app has - saying the opposite here. i am with l annabel and us on. the app has been pinging so many people that that it's become a bit of a crisis, so the government said if you can take a test and show that you are clear, then you can go back, which seems relatively sensible to me. there will be one or two people you may think in the welcome of a crisis, so the government said if you can take a test and show that you are clear, then you can go back, which seems relatively sensible to me. there will be one or two people you may think, well, their condition or something underlying puts them at risk, and we can agree that, but then the unions have set, no, if you do get payments, you must stay at home, but that does seem a bit contrary to me. maybe there's more to the story that i don't know, but i do worry that people do want to work, as you say, it's good for our well—being commits good power mental health, not if they are exhausted and have been working really hard, and have been working really hard, and i know people have come up at that general sense that people would want to go to work. and if the tests i saying that you are ok to go to work, it seems kind of peculiar. so
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i feel this is a work, it seems kind of peculiar. so ifeel this is a little bit of work, it seems kind of peculiar. so i feel this is a little bit of a spat going on that needs to be resolved because it could cause major disruption you know, things like holidays and travel and shopping. i take the point that not all people are unionis? now, but i don't know how far that impact could be. . don't know how far that impact could be. , �* , ., don't know how far that impact could be. , �*, ., be. yes, indeed. let's go back to the front page — be. yes, indeed. let's go back to the front page of _ be. yes, indeed. let's go back to the front page of the _ be. yes, indeed. let's go back to the front page of the times. - be. yes, indeed. let's go back to the front page of the times. save women from a rise in violent crime, police are told. we have had a few announcements, happily, orarticles announcements, happily, or articles covering announcements, happily, orarticles covering government's approach to violent crime and the police. what is this particular article about? sure, well, this is about you know, the government calling on the police to offer more support to victims of domestic violence and to really have a more hands—on approach a methodical approach to this. you now can i methodical approach to this. you now can ijust _ methodical approach to this. you now can ijust wanted to look a little bit at _ can ijust wanted to look a little bit at some of the numbers that are cited in— bit at some of the numbers that are cited in this — bit at some of the numbers that are cited in this article, because they reaiiy— cited in this article, because they reaiiy are — cited in this article, because they really are quite damning. 0n the i~4%_ really are quite damning. 0n the i~4% of— really are quite damning. 0n the 1.4% ofaround really are quite damning. 0n the 1.4% of around 55,000 rape cases reported _ 1.4% of around 55,000 rape cases reported to — 1.4% of around 55,000 rape cases reported to the police in england and wales in 2019 and 2020 resulted
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in a suspect being charged, while more _ in a suspect being charged, while more than — in a suspect being charged, while more than 750,000 domestic abuse cases— more than 750,000 domestic abuse cases were — more than 750,000 domestic abuse cases were recorded with only 47,530 convictions _ cases were recorded with only 47,530 convictions. you know, this is reaiiy. — convictions. you know, this is really, really troubling. 0f convictions. you know, this is really, really troubling. of christ, the pandemic is going to have made matters _ the pandemic is going to have made matters considerably worse. we had refuge _ matters considerably worse. we had refuge recording a 60% increase in the number of monthly contacts over the number of monthly contacts over the course _ the number of monthly contacts over the course of between april 2020 and february _ the course of between april 2020 and february 2021 when compared to the start of— february 2021 when compared to the start of 2020, and we talked a little _ start of 2020, and we talked a little bit — start of 2020, and we talked a little bit earlier about identifiable and unidentifiable victims — identifiable and unidentifiable victims of the pandemic. you know, for so _ victims of the pandemic. you know, for so long. — victims of the pandemic. you know, for so long, we framed the decisions that ministers were making in terms of how— that ministers were making in terms of how stress is wealth, but it was always _ of how stress is wealth, but it was always far— of how stress is wealth, but it was always far more complex than that, and women — always far more complex than that, and women being terrorised within their homes are just some of those less visible — their homes are just some of those less visible victims of the pandemic that i_ less visible victims of the pandemic
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that i expect we will hear more about— that i expect we will hear more about in— that i expect we will hear more about in the coming months, unfortunately.— about in the coming months, unfortunatel . . ., , , unfortunately. simon, the ministers want to ensure _ unfortunately. simon, the ministers want to ensure that _ unfortunately. simon, the ministers want to ensure that victims - unfortunately. simon, the ministers want to ensure that victims have - unfortunately. simon, the ministers| want to ensure that victims have and to and support throughout the criminaljustice process. that's going to cost, isn't it?- criminaljustice process. that's going to cost, isn't it? that was one of the _ going to cost, isn't it? that was one of the thoughts _ going to cost, isn't it? that was one of the thoughts i _ going to cost, isn't it? that was one of the thoughts i had. - going to cost, isn't it? that wasj one of the thoughts i had. i was looking at the saint, 0k, they have managed to get involved and get involved and how the police may investigate various issues around sexual offences and rape, and in about has alluded to the very low conviction rates. great to get involved, but then you need to follow that with support, and if thatis follow that with support, and if that is bigger budgets, more people, then the end to end support, the more police are allowed to do it, a lot of this is huge amounts of administration. it does worry me that people are not supported, but equally, and hesitating because i remember michael go with getting involved with teachers and being careful about being prescriptive, obvious it is an issue but i much rather they worked with the police to say what do we need to do? what support can we get you to make this better rather than dictating what they think should be done. tibia better rather than dictating what
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they think should be done. 0k, back ”aes they think should be done. 0k, back “aes of they think should be done. 0k, back pages of the — they think should be done. 0k, back pages of the guardian. _ they think should be done. 0k, back pages of the guardian. obviously - pages of the guardian. 0bviously sports, i mean eight seconds from gold. how do you reconcile that in your head, annabelle? eight seconds. though i know. i think that's back photograph reallyjust though i know. i think that's back photograph really just says though i know. i think that's back photograph reallyjust says it all. the agony of professional sports, the pain of snatching defeat from the pain of snatching defeat from the jaws of victory all encapsulated in one painful excruciating image. he can't help but wonder actually what his team set you know, what words of comfort may have been offered after the event, but still, i think there is a lot that can be taken from that, and we have a big day tomorrow for a team gb at the olympics, all of that focus 0lympics, all of that focus on whether adam petey will break his world record tiny and whether adam petey will break his world record tin— world record tiny and retain his ol mic world record tiny and retain his olympic title. _ world record tiny and retain his olympic title, so _ world record tiny and retain his olympic title, so i _ world record tiny and retain his olympic title, so i like - world record tiny and retain his olympic title, so i like to - world record tiny and retain his olympic title, so i like to lookl olympic title, so i like to look forward — olympic title, so i like to look forward to as a nation, but, of course. — forward to as a nation, but, of course, terrible disappointment for
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him on _ course, terrible disappointment for him on an— course, terrible disappointment for him on an individual level. | course, terrible disappointment for him on an individual level.- him on an individual level. i love the personal— him on an individual level. i love the personal story, _ him on an individual level. i love the personal story, simon, - him on an individual level. i love the personal story, simon, very| the personal story, simon, very quickly, and it's wonderful, son of a single mum, we spoke to her earlier. ~ , , �* ., ., earlier. absolutely. i'm not going to net to earlier. absolutely. i'm not going to get to talk _ earlier. absolutely. i'm not going to get to talk about _ earlier. absolutely. i'm not going to get to talk about chinese - earlier. absolutely. i'm not going i to get to talk about chinese nuclear energy, are we? but that's ok. that was outside of my comfort zone. they say, the paper, you don't know about these people, then suddenly every four years they pop up and you go wow, there is a whole back story, what i would add, don't forget, that jadejones didn't get her third goal and she could have done, and then chelsie giles who did get a bronze injudo, so it's ok we got two metals, and lots much look forward to as we heard.— to as we heard. under incredible circumstances, _ to as we heard. under incredible circumstances, no _ to as we heard. under incredible circumstances, no crowd - to as we heard. under incredible circumstances, no crowd to - to as we heard. under incredible i circumstances, no crowd to support them. and we have heard stories on how it impacted then. that them. and we have heard stories on how it impacted then.— how it impacted then. that was the issue. how it impacted then. that was the issue- very — how it impacted then. that was the issue. very interesting _ how it impacted then. that was the issue. very interesting bradley - issue. very interesting bradley talks about having the pressure, jade said the pressure got to reckon it's interesting how we react. brute it's interesting how we react. we have mr petey to look forward to,
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for now, simon, annabelle, thank you very

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