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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 25, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. at the toyko olympics, 18—year—old tunisian swimmer ahmed hafnaoui produces a major shock, winning gold in the aoom freestyle. the uk team claims its first silver medal — bradly sinden narrowly lost a dramatic taekwondo final. on a visit to kabul, a us commander says america has escalated airstrikes against the taliban in support of afghan forces. and we're prepared to continue this high—level support in the coming weeks if the taliban continue their attacks. counting the cost of deadly wildfires in the us — this one burned homes in oregon.
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more than 80 fires are raging in 12 other states. the uk's football supporters�* association expresses concern over plans to make proof of full vaccination mandatory at premier league matches. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. day two of the olympics saw some high drama, most notably in the swimming pool but also in cycling and tennis. theere was an unexpected gold medal for tunisia in swimming and the first medals for team gb, with a silver in taekwondo and a bronze injudo. the women's road race resulted in a huge shock
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and ash barty couldn't replicate her wimbledon success. let's cross to the bbc sports centre. chetan pathak has been watching the action in tokyo. what happened in the cycling? so much to packing on this second day. one of the most extraordinary moments in the day came with anna kiesenhofer, a relative unknown who doesn't even have a professional team, winning gold in the women's cycling race. she is a mathematician with 2 degrees and a phd, it was a test notjust with 2 degrees and a phd, it was a test not just of with 2 degrees and a phd, it was a test notjust of her mind but her body. a remarkable solo breakaway, finishing more than a minute ahead of 2019 world champion annemiek van vleuten of the netherlands. she finished so far ahead that annemiek van vleuten when she crossed the line on second thought she had won
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before being told she got silver. she admitted afterwards she didn't know who anna kiesenhofer was and was as surprised as everyone else. anna kiesenhofer screaming with delight at the end, austria's first olympic cycling medal for 125 years. i love the stories of firsts. haw i love the stories of firsts. how have the host _ i love the stories of firsts. how have the host nation _ i love the stories of firsts. how have the host nation done? a i i love the stories of firsts. how- have the host nation done? a really secial have the host nation done? a really special moment _ have the host nation done? a really special moment for _ have the host nation done? a really special moment for them. - have the host nation done? a really special moment for them. second l have the host nation done? a really| special moment for them. second in the medals table. a story even hollywood would be proud of, japanese siblings uta abe and her brother came the first brother and sister to win gold at the same olympics. they did it hours apart on home soil. this is the home ofjudo. uta abe won the women's half lightweight final and then her older brother beat the georgian fighter to join his sister as gold medallist. they are 21 and 24. he said as her big brother, he knew he couldn't
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afford to lose after she had won. a great moment forjapan. irate afford to lose after she had won. a great moment forjapan.— afford to lose after she had won. a great moment forjapan. we also had news from the _ great moment forjapan. we also had news from the tennis _ great moment forjapan. we also had news from the tennis courts. - great moment forjapan. we also had news from the tennis courts. did - great moment forjapan. we also had news from the tennis courts. did it i news from the tennis courts. did it have anything to do with the heat and humidity? we spoke about this, novak djokovic called it the worst conditions he had played in, daniil medvedev called it a joke. irate conditions he had played in, daniil medvedev called it a joke. medvedev called it a “oke. we have seen the women's _ medvedev called it a joke. we have seen the women's world _ medvedev called it a joke. we have seen the women's world number. seen the women's world number one ash barty go out. she really wasn't at it at all in terms of her play on sunday. she is one of the most consistent players on the women's tour this year. but remember the hip injury that forced her out of the french open in round two? she recovered in time for wimbledon and lifted the title just a couple of weeks ago. it has clearly taken a lot out of her physically and sara sorribes tormo wasn't bothered about the heat or humidity at all. outstanding performance, winning in straight sets. she has had a great year and she is one to look out for. we also saw naomi osaka winning her
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first match. the men's defending champion andy murray pulled out of the singles, he says he will keep going in the doubles. another big name performing on day two, simone biles. yes, she was less than perfect. we are not used to seeing that in the olympics. the us finished behind the russian olympic committee in qualifying. simone biles was penalised on both the floor and the vault, but she still reached all five individual finals. starting with thursday's all round, we will see her. as ever, all eyes on simone biles the most successful us gymnast of all time, arguably the biggest star at these games. she wants to add to the four gold medals and one is that she won in rio. what and one is that she won in rio. what can we look— and one is that she won in rio. what can we look forward _ and one is that she won in rio. what can we look forward to _ and one is that she won in rio. what can we look forward to on _ and one is that she won in rio. what can we look forward to on day three? the men's artistic gymnastics and the judo. the men's artistic gymnastics and
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thejudo. i would the men's artistic gymnastics and thejudo. iwould pay the men's artistic gymnastics and thejudo. i would pay particular attention to the swimming pull, adam peaty of great britain looking to complete five years of total domination in the men's 100 complete five years of total domination in the men's100 metres breaststroke, hoping to become the first british winner to defend an olympic title. he set world record of the world record, won two world titles since his gold medal in rio. the overwhelming favourite for that one. also usa's katie ledecky has dominated for nearly a decade, ariarne titmus of australia has her eyes on that title. they go head—to—head in the 400 metres freestyle final. she beat katie ledecky in the 2019 world championships, this is not katie ledecky�*s signature event, which is the 800 metres, so it may be ariarne titmus's best chance. tom daley in the diving pool, looking for his first gold medal in his fourth
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olympics. the best chance, in the men's ten metre synchro event in which he won bronze in rio five years ago. which he won bronze in rio five years age-— years ago. can he get the gold this time? thank _ years ago. can he get the gold this time? thank you _ years ago. can he get the gold this time? thank you very _ years ago. can he get the gold this time? thank you very much. - the head of the us central command, general kenneth mackenzie, has said in kabul that the us will continue airstrikes in support of afghan troops if the taliban continue their offensive. the taliban have made rapid territorial gains in recent months after international troops started withdrawing from the country. they are now gearing up to attack the big cities. secunder kermani reports from kabul. general mckenzie's visit to afghanistan comes amidst heightened concern over the country's future. with the taliban closing in on a number of afghan cities after having already captured vast swathes of rural territory, the us has launched a number of air strikes in recent days in support of embattled afghan forces, notably around the southern city of kandahar, where heavy fighting has been taking place. general mckenzie said america was prepared to continue with those air strikes in the coming weeks, though he refused to categorically
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answer repeated questions about whether or not they would continue after the end of august, when the us military presence in afghanistan formally ends. in the past, he has previously suggested they will not. general mckenzie did, however, praise the capabilities of the afghan air force, and said a taliban military victory was certainly not guaranteed. i'd like to be very clear. the government of afghanistan faces a stern test in the days ahead. the taliban are attempting to create a sense of inevitability about their campaign, but they are wrong. there is no preordained conclusion to this fight. taliban victory is not inevitable. general mckenzie said he had held meetings with the afghan president ashraf ghani in kabul and that he believed his team had a good plan to concentrate their forces against the taliban and defend key areas against the militants. but there is real concern here that the violence is going to continue escalating,
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and that it's going to increasingly focus on the country's cities. in other news: the leader of the amhara region of ethiopia has appealed to all residents with weapons to mobilise against rebels from neighbouring tigray. this follows a similar call by the head of the afar region, leading to fears that the conflict in tigray could spread. hundreds of tunisians have taken to the streets of the capital, tunis, to demand the resignation of the government over its handling of the coronavirus pandemic. cases have been rising sharply, putting further pressure on the faltering economy. heavy rainfall has again caused severe flooding in parts of belgium, ten days after flash floods killed at least 36 people. some of the worst affected areas were the city of namur and the historic town of dinant. more rain is forecast. let's turn to india now,
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and a horrifying incident which left nine people dead. it came as this landslide sent huge boulders tumbling down a hillside in the northern himachal pradesh region. one of them hit the bridge, causing it to collapse. local officials say another struck a vehicle carrying tourists, causing the fatalities. it comes as the western state of maharashtra has reported more than 130 deaths in the last two days, due to flooding brought about by monsoon rains. mayooresh konnoor reports from a landslide site in raigad, nearmumbai. consistent rains over the past few days have created havoc in the western indian state of maharashtra. where i'm standing right now, this is the mountain range, and once there was a village where i'm standing which was entirely washed out on thursday evening when a landslide occurred
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because of consistent rains. the soldiers of the national disaster management force have been looking for the missing bodies for three days now, and the operation is not over until sunday evening. what we have been told is about 49 bodies have been recovered so far and over 40 are still missing. the landslide in some parts and floods in other parts. that's the story of maharashtra. there are several towns on the plane region facing severe floods and the mountain regions are facing situations like landslides. on the parallel mountain range, there is another incident of landslides, 12 people have lost their lives, and here the rescue operation is still on. thousands of people in the western united states
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are spending the weekend in evacuation centres as wildfires continue to burn across the region. more than 80 large wildfires in 13 states have destroyed around 1.3 million acres in recent weeks. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the dixie wildfire, california's biggest blaze to the north of the state, is growing rapidly. firefighters are battling day and night to try to bring it under control, but it's spreading with such ferocity that it's making its own weather, creating huge clouds that are generating lightning strikes across the region. about a fifth of the fire's perimeter has been contained, but officials say the extreme nature of the fire, along with low humidity, is hampering efforts to quell the flames. people have been evacuated from their homes in several nearby counties. smoke from the fire is travelling far and wide and is even reaching the neighbouring state of oregon,
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where it's helping firefighters put out the country's largest blaze, known as the bootleg fire, south of portland. a layer of smoke is blocking sunlight and creating cooler conditions, making it easier for firefighters to gain ground on the blaze. but the phenomenon, known as smoke shading, is unpredictable and there are fears that high temperatures and wind gusts later in the weekend could fan the flames further. efforts to bring this fire under control have been further complicated by an outbreak of covid—19 among firefighters. those who've tested positive are isolating and are said to be exhibiting mild symptoms. with a long, hot summer still ahead, these fires will challenge much of the western united states for many weeks to come. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. let's get more from dr patrick brown assistant professor of meteorology and climate science at sanjose state university in california.
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thank you very much. wildfires, first off. it is of the season, or rather it isn't, because it has started fairly early. the conditions have been primed for the dixie fire in particular. take us through those. . �* , in particular. take us through those. .,�*, , in particular. take us through those. ., �*, , ., ., those. that's right, they are a part of our ecosystem _ those. that's right, they are a part of our ecosystem in _ those. that's right, they are a part of our ecosystem in the _ those. that's right, they are a part of our ecosystem in the us - those. that's right, they are a part of our ecosystem in the us west i those. that's right, they are a part l of our ecosystem in the us west and california, but we have seen a long—term trend of increases in wildfire activities since the 1970s. part of that is our wildfire season is getting longer. we definitely say that this year. we had a very dry winter, low facilitation, so the vegetation was much drier than usual, much earlier in the year. so we have been running ahead of pace
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compared to our record scenting 2020 season so far this year in terms of fire activity. season so far this year in terms of fire activity-— fire activity. what has put the us ahead of pace? _ fire activity. what has put the us ahead of pace? the _ fire activity. what has put the us ahead of pace? the long-term . fire activity. what has put the us - ahead of pace? the long-term trend has to do with _ ahead of pace? the long-term trend has to do with burning _ ahead of pace? the long-term trend has to do with burning coal- ahead of pace? the long-term trend has to do with burning coal oil- ahead of pace? the long-term trend has to do with burning coal oil and l has to do with burning coal oil and natural gas which puts co2 in the atmosphere which raises all temperatures. where it is dry, in the us west, during the summer, higher temperatures essentially mean drier conditions, they mean disk you wills and the vegetation is drier so you can have larger amounts of time to start fire. —— fuels and the vegetation. suppressing fires has caused them to be much worse now than they would be otherwise because we were allowing this fuel to build up we were allowing this fuel to build up unnaturally in our forests.
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normally we have more frequent low intensity fires, now we have a situation where it is much hotter and drier than before and we have much more fuel built up. so when there is a fire, it can be much more severe and difficult to contain. aha, severe and difficult to contain. a couple of aspects of this particular fire that we are reading about, the spot fires, the smoke shading, the pyro cumulonimbus clouds, but i would like to go back to 2018, the campfire smoke, you are a meteorologist, we saw that smoke go as far as europe. we have heard reports of smoke across the united states, but there is some research that has been done about the 2018 smoke cloud that carried toxic particles and the effects it has been having. are we likely to see the same thing? have these fires burned in residential areas as well as the natural environment? this
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burned in residential areas as well as the natural environment? as fires become more _ as the natural environment? as fires become more intense, _ as the natural environment? as fires become more intense, they- as the natural environment? as fires become more intense, they release| as the natural environment? as fires| become more intense, they release a lot more smoke, we see it on the satellite. we can see it with the bootleg fire, filling the entire western state region. that is always a risk. especially when fires move into areas where they are burning structures, you have more opportunity for chemicals and things like that to get into the smoke. that is always a concern that it lowers the air quality. it depends very much on the local meteorology, whether the smoke gets trapped close to the surface or sometimes it can be trapped above the surface. that would obviously be a much better situation for those people, for us living on the ground. it depends on the fire, depends on where you are, but it's always a thing to be concerned about. the but it's always a thing to be concerned about. ., . , ., concerned about. the toxicity of the heavy metals _ concerned about. the toxicity of the heavy metals is _ concerned about. the toxicity of the heavy metals is the _ concerned about. the toxicity of the heavy metals is the concern. - concerned about. the toxicity of the | heavy metals is the concern. doctor, thank you very much indeed.
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the headlines on bbc news: a tunisian teenager has caused a major surprise at the tokyo olympics by winning a swimming gold, while team gb has claimed a first silver medal. bradly sinden narrowly missed out on taekwondo's top prize. the head of us central command has said the us will continue air strikes in support of afghan troops if the taliban continue their current offensive. plans to require football fans to be fully vaccinated for premier league matches from october, are considered by the uk government. "wholly inadequate" — that's how mps here in uk have described as the complaints process for women in the armed forces who are sexually assaulted or harassed at work. the defence select committee found that 60% of female personnel had faced bullying, harassment and discrimination during their careers.
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the ministry of defence says many improvements have been made, but admits women's experience isn't yet equal to men's. jonathan beale reports. what's it like being a female soldier, i'm often asked. this is the army's latest recruitment campaign, aimed at women. i'm the one stitching them up! i'm not a miss or a mrs, i'm a sergeant. - it suggests gender is not an issue in today's armed forces. but this report by mps paints a very different picture with women suffering disproportionately from bullying, harassment, discrimination and even sexual assault and rape. six out of ten women in our evidence said that they don't make complaints because of fear of reprisals and repercussions. and what we are finding is that women are subsequently leaving the military before their time. put some pressure on this for me. women make up around 12% of the regular armed forces. the report highlights practical issues for them,
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such as not being given uniforms and body armour that fit. but mps say they're gravely concerned that women are ten times more likely than men to experience sexual harassment. you're asking for it, that's the impression you get, you're not completely blameless in all of this. sophia, not her real name, was an officer in the royal navy when she was sexually harassed and then assaulted by her male boss. she left in 2017 after a five—year career, successfully taking her complaint to a civilian court after she felt let down by her chain of command. it was such an effort to have anyone hear me. and why do you think they didn't want to hear you? it's a boys' club. they closed ranks. they wanted to make sure he was all right. they don't want it happening on their watch. it's bad press for them and it doesn't look good on their reports. that's definitely the impression i got. the ministry of defence said it's made many changes to improve
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the experience of women in the armed forces. it said it profoundly regretted the experience of some. but mps want the chain of command to be removed from complaints of a sexual nature and cases of rape to no longer be tried in a military court. jonathan beale, bbc news. the american comedian, jackie mason, has died aged 93 in new york. the former rabbi was a regular on television and had a number of hit broadway shows. known for his distinctive new york accent, his humour was based on innuendo and observation. let's speak to ted johnson, washington correspondent for deadline.com. he formerly worked at variety magazine. many young viewers will not have heard of jackie mason. many young viewers will not have heard ofjackie mason. put him into context for us.
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heard of jackie mason. put him into context for us.— context for us. sure. he was a comedian — context for us. sure. he was a comedian from _ context for us. sure. he was a comedian from another- context for us. sure. he was a comedian from another era, i context for us. sure. he was a comedian from another era, a | context for us. sure. he was a - comedian from another era, a whole generation of comedians that kinda grew up performing in the catskills, a series of summer resorts. it kind of established its own brand of comedy back in the 50s and 60s. a lot of them are closed now, but he really took that and carried it well into the 80s and the 90s. he had a remarkable career, as you said. he was a rabbi, didn't really like that family line of business. eventually kind of migrated, got out of that line or business by performing in some of these resorts, and started getting a few lucky breaks and ended up getting a few lucky breaks and ended up on national television in the 60s. up on national television in the 605. i up on national television in the 60s. i would think that if you are a young person and you don't know who jackie mason is, look at somebody
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like jerry seinfeld, jackie mason is, look at somebody likejerry seinfeld, larry david, who remain exceedingly popular. they really have this kind of jackie mason kind of conversational humour, which is what jackie mason would call it. i would say it is almost more observation humour, tied with a tinge of indignation. from more observation humour, tied with a tinge of indignation.— tinge of indignation. from the age of 12, he tinge of indignation. from the age of 12. he was _ tinge of indignation. from the age of 12, he was trying _ tinge of indignation. from the age of 12, he was trying to _ tinge of indignation. from the age of 12, he was trying to get - tinge of indignation. from the age of 12, he was trying to get out - tinge of indignation. from the age of 12, he was trying to get out of l of 12, he was trying to get out of the hole rabbi tradition of his family! about his style of comedy, it was very blunt, wasn't it? very non—pc. he had a few ups and downs. it wasn't until the world according to me that he recovered. talk to us about that bluntness. in to me that he recovered. talk to us about that bluntness.— to me that he recovered. talk to us about that bluntness. in 1964 he got in trouble when _ about that bluntness. in 1964 he got in trouble when he _ about that bluntness. in 1964 he got in trouble when he was _ about that bluntness. in 1964 he got in trouble when he was on _ about that bluntness. in 1964 he got in trouble when he was on the - about that bluntness. in 1964 he got in trouble when he was on the ed . in trouble when he was on the ed sullivan show, which at the time was the most prestigious platform for
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any musical act, because it had this huge national audience on cbs. ed sullivan was on the side of the stage, motioning to him with his fingers, trying to get him to get off the air, because his time was coming up. mason was doing really good, having a really good reception from the audience, and wanted to continue the act. he made a remark that made it seem like to ed sullivan that he was giving an offensive gesture to the audience, and sullivan fired him. even though mason actually won a court settlement based on that, i think there was a defamation case, it ended up really hurting his career for almost two decades. it wasn't until the 1980s when he started these one—man shows, where he had this resurgence notjust on broadway but also in movies and tv. {line
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this resurgence notjust on broadway but also in movies and tv.— but also in movies and tv. one of his last shows _ but also in movies and tv. one of his last shows was _ but also in movies and tv. one of his last shows was in _ but also in movies and tv. one of his last shows was in 2008 - but also in movies and tv. one of his last shows was in 2008 in - but also in movies and tv. one of| his last shows was in 2008 in new york, the ultimatejew i think it was called. where would you put him? someone like rodney dangerfield, don nicholls, more names that may not be known to current generations, but he is right up there with amazing creativity. thinking on yourfeet, responding to the audience. it's so funny because when we think of stand—up comedy, you often think of one liners, and if it was just one liners, i could repeat whatjackie mason said, some of his lines. but it doesn't have the timing, it doesn't have the delivery, and that really was i think the gift of jackie mason.—
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really was i think the gift of jackie mason. ., ~ , ., , . jackie mason. thank you very much for reminding _ jackie mason. thank you very much for reminding us _ jackie mason. thank you very much for reminding us who _ jackie mason. thank you very much for reminding us who jackie - jackie mason. thank you very much for reminding us who jackie mason | for reminding us who jackie mason was. plenty more on the website. all the olympic news. now it's time for a look at the weather with alina. hello. some of us have seen big changes in the weather through the weekend, from the heat to thunderstorms, and we'll all see something different in the week ahead, as the blue skies and sunshine are replaced with something cooler, frequent showers, but still some spells of sunshine, especially later in the week. and whereas last week the focus was on high—pressure, in the week ahead, it's all down to low pressure. and this has been generating plenty of showers and thunderstorms across parts of south—east and southern england through sunday afternoon. this is what's been happening. you can see this line of thunderstorms and showers developing really from east anglia all the way down to the isle of wight. the yellow and red flashes there indicating the frequent lightning strikes. and they'll be gradually fading away through the first half of the night,
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may keep going all night across the far southeast of england. elsewhere, it's mainly dry, mist and low cloud pushing into north—eastern coasts, also across parts of northern ireland, but elsewhere, some clearer skies. it's still a mild, and in places, muggy night, with temperatures across the southern half of the uk not much lower than 14—15 celsius. it's a fairly quiet start to the new week for many, plenty of cloud across parts of scotland, northern ireland and north—east england. elsewhere, some spells of sunshine. we should all see some sunshine through the day, but also the chance of seeing a thunderstorm as well. very well scattered, very hit and miss, not everyone will see them, in fact, where we miss them and get the best of the sunshine, we could see highs of 25—26 celsius across parts of england and wales. but those showers never too far away, and starting to gather in the west as we head through monday night and into tuesday. so this area of low pressure is very much the dominant feature, and we also see these showers pushing their way eastwards through tuesday, so tuesday is quite a messy picture in terms of showers, always hit and miss, but equally, they could begin to merge to give
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a longer spell of rain, and still the chance of some thunder and lightning in those showers. cloud around on tuesday, some warm spells of sunshine coming through, and temperatures around 17—21 celsius, quite a drop from the 31 celsius that we saw last week. through wednesday and thursday, this area of low pressure begins to deepen. it also strengthens the wind, so could start to see some wind gusts of 40—45 mph in some places on both wednesday and thursday, but the week ahead will bring some showers, also bring something cooler both by day and night. goodbye.
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hello, this is bbc news with me, lukwesa burak. the headlines: team gb have won their first medals at the end of the second day of action at the tokyo olympics.
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chelsie giles took bronze in the women's judo before bradly sinden won silver in the men's taekwondo. three people, including a nine—year—old boy, have died at loch lomond after getting into difficulty in the water. a second boy was rescued and is in intensive care at the royal hospital for children in glasgow. the health secretary sajid javid has apologised for — and deleted — a tweet in which he said the nation should stop "cowering" from coronavirus. campaigners for people who've died during the pandemic had condemned the remark as "deeply insensitive" and "distasteful". british mps have warned that taxpayers will bear the cost of the government's coronavirus spending for decades. a report found £372 billion has already been spent, pushing government debt to a rate not seen since the early 1960s. thousands of people in the western united states are spending the weekend in evacuation centers,
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as wildfires continue to burn across the region.

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