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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 25, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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you're watching bbc news, broadcasting in the uk and around the world, i'm lucy hockings live in tokyo. national and family triumph forjapan in judo as a brother and sister both win gold. africa wins its first gold medal as a tunisian teenager stuns the field to win the men's 400 metre freestyle. chelsie giles has won team gb's first medal with judo bronze. i'll also be speaking to british weightlifter emily campbell about how she's preparing for her event. all that in a moment here on bbc world news. i'm tim willcox in london. in other news... plans to require football fans to be fully vaccinated if they want to go to premier league matches from october are being considered by the uk government.
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wildfires in northern california force thousands into evacuation centres while a covid outbreak in oregon puts firefighters into quarantine. it's day two of the olympics and the sporting action has brought us just the sort of unpredictability and excitement only these games can bring. there have been some major shocks in the swimming pool — a world record was broken — and today has brought something of a gold rush forjapan�*s olympians. mariko oi has the details. what an exciting evening for teamjapan but in particular for one family — thejudo siblings uta and hifumi abe
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winning double gold medals within an hour of each other, and now the hashtag the most powerful siblings is trending on social media. also, earlier in the day, we had yuto horigome winning the first ever gold medalfor skateboarding. we went out to find out how people made of his achievements. let's take a listen. translation: | used to do - skateboarding and i knew horigome, so congratulations to him for winning the gold medal. especially in this heat. and hopefully this will make the sport more popular. translation: it's a proud moment i forjapan, especially given this i is the first gold medal for skateboarding at the olympics. translation: i wasn't too excited about the olympics because of all the scandals, but it does make me happy to see goodj performance of japanese athletes. so team japan now winning the fifth gold medal. and now sport minds have practically taken over from all the negative
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publicity about the scandals, controversies surrounding the games, which is exactly what the japanese government and the organising committee had been hoping for. meanwhile, it's been very interesting to see all the medallists being given that victory bouquet made of all the flowers from the three prefectures the hardest—hit by the earthquake and tsunami of 2011, including the town of namie, which had to be evacuated after that nuclear accident because it was only likm away from the power plant. only four years ago, people were allowed to go back to that town, and flower farmers have been working, growing those flowers, hoping that they will be used in the tokyo olympics, and not just those athletes achieving their olympic dreams but also a very proud moment for those flower farmers. let's cross to the bbc sport centre
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and speak to our reporter, austin halewood, who has been watching the action. can we start with the woman's road race? an extraordinary race, and a remarkable woman. it race? an extraordinary race, and a remarkable woman.— remarkable woman. it really was a brilliant race, _ remarkable woman. it really was a brilliant race, as _ remarkable woman. it really was a brilliant race, as you _ remarkable woman. it really was a brilliant race, as you say _ remarkable woman. it really was a brilliant race, as you say and - remarkable woman. it really was a brilliant race, as you say and it - brilliant race, as you say and it was the australian who was the shock winner in the woman's road race, anna kiesenhofer, she led for almost every single metre of those 137 kilometres when they had to race around tokyo, she finished so far in front of the rest of the pack that the second placed rider of the netherlands thought she had won only to be told that she only had the server, the italian rider took the bronze, but it was anna kiesenhofer with gold, austria's first olympic
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cycle medal for 125 years, with gold, austria's first olympic cycle medalfor125 years, and with gold, austria's first olympic cycle medal for 125 years, and what makes it even more remarkable is that she doesn't even have a professional team right now but i'm sure that will not be the case for too long after what was a brilliant performance from her. fine too long after what was a brilliant performance from her.— too long after what was a brilliant performance from her. one of the reasons is — performance from her. one of the reasons is she _ performance from her. one of the reasons is she is _ performance from her. one of the reasons is she is a _ performance from her. one of the | reasons is she is a mathematician, she has a phd from cambridge university station obviously did the sums today to figure out how to win that race. team gb won bronze today but there is disappointment to? it was a mixed day. team gb are on board with medal games, that came in thejudo chelsie giles board with medal games, that came in the judo chelsie giles taking bronze in the women's under 52 kilograms event, you can see her there in that bronze final, she went on to take that middle, and team gb are guaranteed another medal in about 45 minutes' time because bradley sinden
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is guaranteed at least a silver but if he wins gold he will be the first british man to win a tae kwon do in the olympics, but as many of you will know jade the olympics, but as many of you will knowjadejones the olympics, but as many of you will know jadejones has been the leader of the british tae kwon do team over the last decade, she won gold in london and in rio but was beaten in the first round in tokyo a few hours ago, so that really was a disappointment for her to be knocked out in that first round. and also some disappointment as well this morning, the two—time olympic champion andy murray, just like jones, the gold medallist in and tokyo, surrey, rio, he has had to withdraw from the men's singles because of a thigh strain, i think you picked up on his men's doubles win yesterday but he will compete in the minds doubles and will carry on in that competition but has been
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advised not to do both so he has pulled out of the singles but we will still see murray in the double is a bit later on in tokyo. find will still see murray in the double is a bit later on in tokyo. and what is a bit later on in tokyo. and what is happening _ is a bit later on in tokyo. and what is happening with _ is a bit later on in tokyo. and what is happening with the _ is a bit later on in tokyo. and what is happening with the men's - is a bit later on in tokyo. and what is happening with the men's golf, l is happening with the men's golf, some unfortunate news coming to us today in terms of who is participating? today in terms of who is ”articiatinu? ~ , , ., today in terms of who is ”articiatinu? ~ , ., participating? absolutely for those artici atin: participating? absolutely for those participating and — participating? absolutely for those participating and golf _ participating? absolutely for those participating and golf fans - participating? absolutely for those participating and golf fans because two of the favourites for the gulf, the big hitting american and the spanish player have both tested positive for coronavirus and they have had to withdraw from the competition. is the second time that rahm tested positive as well. last month he was forced to pull out after being told he had tested positive with just one round to go in that big lead but he did then go to when the us open a few weeks
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later, but this positive result was detected in a third pcr test following the open championship in sandwich in kent in the uk last week. neither had travelled to tokyo but of course disappointment for them both that they will not be able to compete there.— them both that they will not be able to compete there. absolutely, thank ou for to compete there. absolutely, thank you for that- — an 18—year—old athlete from tunisia has had a shock win here in tokyo with a gold medalfor the 400 metre men's freestyle race. ahmed hafnaoui beat a field of more experienced swimmers despite being the slowest qualifier for the final. our bbc africa reporter, celestine karoney, is here with me. tell us the story of this remarkable young man who would be a swimming star in tunisia now, surely. imilieu star in tunisia now, surely. when ou sa star in tunisia now, surely. when you say it — star in tunisia now, surely. when you say it was — star in tunisia now, surely. when you say it was a _ star in tunisia now, surely. when you say it was a surprise - star in tunisia now, surely. when you say it was a surprise win - star in tunisia now, surely. when you say it was a surprise win for. you say it was a surprise win for everyone it was also surprising for
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him. he came into the pool in the morning, he packed his bag, but he did not carry his ceremonial kit. after the race, he said, i wasjust coming to participate in the 400 metres final, i did not expect to win, i was shocked i was in the final, so that is why when he got to the podium he was shot —— in shorts and a t—shirt. that is how big a shock it was for him but this is a boy who grew up in tunisia, trains and lives in tunisia unlike other swimmers from tunisia, some who went to france as a teenager, then he went to the us to continue developing as a swimmer, this is a man made in tunisia, so i think tunisians tonight are really celebrating one of their own in a very new way. is celebrating one of their own in a very new way-— celebrating one of their own in a very new way. is that quite unusual that all the — very new way. is that quite unusual that all the training _ very new way. is that quite unusual that all the training would - very new way. is that quite unusual that all the training would be - very new way. is that quite unusual that all the training would be done | that all the training would be done at home? it
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that all the training would be done at home? , ., , that all the training would be done at home? , . , , ., at home? it is a bit unusual, especially — at home? it is a bit unusual, especially for _ at home? it is a bit unusual, especially for swimming, - at home? it is a bit unusual, - especially for swimming, because a lot of our countries in africa, a lot of our countries in africa, a lot of our coaches are not at that level, the facility is also available to you, the equipment and know—how and capabilities of the coaches, the fact that he has... everybody has been screaming and celebrating, so he trains and lives in tunisia with his coach, so i think for him it meant a bit more because even for his coach you could see... it's very difficult to get a lot of recognition. even a swimmer from europe, he is africa's top swimmer currently.— from europe, he is africa's top swimmer currently. you can see the shock and delight _ swimmer currently. you can see the shock and delight in _ swimmer currently. you can see the shock and delight in their— swimmer currently. you can see the shock and delight in their faces, - shock and delight in their faces, they look so surprised and shocked, has he been restricted in terms of how much time he has had competing against other swimmers because of covid? ~ , ,., ,
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against other swimmers because of covid? ~ ,,., , w covid? absolutely, in fact the bronze medallist _ covid? absolutely, in fact the bronze medallist when - covid? absolutely, in fact the bronze medallist when he - covid? absolutely, in fact the | bronze medallist when he was covid? absolutely, in fact the - bronze medallist when he was asked what he knew about ahmed coming into this final, he said absolutely nothing! shows you how covid has restricted a lot of swimmers from travelling and being able to compete, last year he wanted to compete, last year he wanted to compete in europe, he was not able to get visas at the height of travel restrictions especially from tunisia to europe, and it also puts this victory into more perspective. when you look at the build—up it has had. and this is not even his main race, we can look forward to seeing him in chest a. ~ ,,., , .,, chest a. absolutely, he said it was a ractice chest a. absolutely, he said it was a practice run _ chest a. absolutely, he said it was a practice run for— chest a. absolutely, he said it was a practice run for the _ chest a. absolutely, he said it was a practice run for the 800 - chest a. absolutely, he said it was a practice run for the 800 metres. | a practice run for the 800 metres. the last time it was there was a 1904 so it's the first time here in a century. 1904 so it's the first time here in a centu . �* 1904 so it's the first time here in a century-— a century. and he will go unto america. _ a century. and he will go unto america. he _ a century. and he will go unto america, he has— a century. and he will go unto america, he has not - a century. and he will go unto america, he has not chosen i a century. and he will go untol america, he has not chosen his university yet, i'm sure they are all desperately trying to get him now, you can only imagine. women's weightlifting events will begin on monday, and one of the those going for gold
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during the games will be emily campbell. she is already european champion, and her event is likely to be focused on because she will be competing against the games�* first trans athlete, laurel hubbard. emilyjoins me live now from the olympic village. you were lucky enough to be at the opening ceremony, tell us about the experience. it opening ceremony, tell us about the exerience. ., , opening ceremony, tell us about the experience-— experience. it was fantastic, such a moment to — experience. it was fantastic, such a moment to step — experience. it was fantastic, such a moment to step into _ experience. it was fantastic, such a moment to step into that _ experience. it was fantastic, such a moment to step into that stadium i experience. it was fantastic, such a i moment to step into that stadium and see that flag waving hi. there was no crowd in there but the energy we got from the dancers was fantastic and it really made you feel like you are part of a special olympic games. how are you feeling about competing against laurel hubbard?— how are you feeling about competing against laurel hubbard? everybody in this whole competition _ against laurel hubbard? everybody in this whole competition who _ against laurel hubbard? everybody in this whole competition who qualifies l this whole competition who qualifies has stuck by those rules and i need to concentrate on myself and my performance, weight lifting is a
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selfish sport, only you can lift the bar, nobody can help you, we are in a village full of thousands of fantastic athletes and we need to focus on everybody�*s journey and i'm looking forward to competing against other girls in that line—up. so looking forward to competing against other girls in that line-up.— other girls in that line-up. so what do ou other girls in that line-up. so what do you say — other girls in that line-up. so what do you say when — other girls in that line-up. so what do you say when you _ other girls in that line-up. so what do you say when you hear - other girls in that line-up. so what | do you say when you hear scientists say that lorelle has a biological advantage because she went through puberty as a man, her muscle and bone density is different?- puberty as a man, her muscle and bone density is different? rules are rules, bone density is different? rules are rules. there — bone density is different? rules are rules. there is _ bone density is different? rules are rules, there is nothing _ bone density is different? rules are rules, there is nothing i _ bone density is different? rules are rules, there is nothing i make i rules, there is nothing i make decisions on, i am just here to compete as an athlete, i just decisions on, i am just here to compete as an athlete, ijust had to give my best performance and hope that that rewards me with a nice place. that that rewards me with a nice lace. �* , ., that that rewards me with a nice lace, �* , ., ., that that rewards me with a nice lace. �* ., ., place. are you worried that the focus will _ place. are you worried that the focus will be _ place. are you worried that the focus will be on _ place. are you worried that the focus will be on par, _ place. are you worried that the focus will be on par, though, i place. are you worried that the i focus will be on par, though, that could detract from your efforts on the efforts of your competitors? trio. the efforts of your competitors? no. i have the efforts of your competitors? i157. i have planned to do a good performance and i hope that gets media attention i deserve, i'm
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looking and excited to go out there and give it the best i can. what looking and excited to go out there and give it the best i can.— and give it the best i can. what is the message _ and give it the best i can. what is the message you _ and give it the best i can. what is the message you would _ and give it the best i can. what is the message you would like i and give it the best i can. what is the message you would like to i and give it the best i can. what is i the message you would like to give about weightlifting, what drew you to the sport in the first place? the to the sport in the first place? tue: competitiveness, to the sport in the first place? tte: competitiveness, it's to the sport in the first place? "tt2 competitiveness, it's fantastic, sometimes you can go in and feel amazing and then the next day you have never done it before, i love the challenge of that, i hope i can inspire girls do not feel ashamed and walking to the gym, pick up a bar, be healthy and strong and happy and strong and hopefully if girls watch me and they get there and go to the gym i have definitely done my job. to the gym i have definitely done my “ob. , , ., �* to the gym i have definitely done my “ob. , ,, �* .,, ., job. emily, you're the european champion. _ job. emily, you're the european champion, everyone _ job. emily, you're the european champion, everyone is - job. emily, you're the european champion, everyone is picking l job. emily, you're the european i champion, everyone is picking you for a medal, good luck going for gold, thank you so much forjoining us. gold, thank you so much for “oining us. ., ~' gold, thank you so much for “oining us. ., ~ , 2, gold, thank you so much for “oining us. . ~' i” ., gold, thank you so much for “oining us. . ~ ., ., gold, thank you so much for “oining us. ., ,, , 2, ., ., good us. thank you for having me. good luck, us. thank you for having me. good luck. emily- _ that's all for now here in tokyo. back to you in the studio, tim. plans to require football fans to be
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fully vaccinated if they want to go to premier league matches are being considered by the british government. it's understood clubs in england's top flight are keen to become early adopters of proof of vaccination so they can keep full capacity crowds. our political correspondent, helen catt, has the story. football fans have already been part of testing ways to keep big events going when coronavirus is very much still here. the fa cup final at wembley was a pilot event. and this weekend, the government has also turned to football to try to boost uptake of the vaccine among young people with a message from the england manager. i know oldies like me have had both jabs so we can crack on with our lives. but for you younger ones especially with the chance for everything to open up. concerns about the number of younger people still unvaccinated are also thought to be a driver behind the idea for vaccine passports for events. the government is in talks
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with the premier league to use them at matches from october. ministers want to make things equal between all sports so it's likely other crowds would have to do the same. earlier this week, the prime minister announced that vaccine passports would be needed to go to nightclubs in england from the end of september. i should serve notice now that, by the end of september, when all over—185 will have had their chance to be double jabbed, we're planning to make full vaccination the condition of entry to nightclubs and other venues where large crowds gather. other spectator events with crowds of over 20,000 people, such as big concerts, are also likely to face similar requirements. mps and fans groups have already raised concerns. at the start of the pandemic in 2020, questions were raised about the role the cheltenham festival may have played in spreading the virus. the government and sports bodies are likely to be keen to make sure they can have full capacity crowds this winter without such worries. helen catt, bbc news.
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malcolm clarke is the chairman of the football supporters' association. he told bbc news that some of the supporters would be reassured by the measure while others would not be happy. well, i think our members are reflective of the wider society, so there will be some who feel that this will give them the kind of reassurance they need in order to return safely to games. equally, there will be others who are opposed to it in principle and may even decide, as mark said, not to attend games. our major concern, really, is to ensure that, again as mark said, the club is put in place sufficient staff to enable this to happen without chaos outside the grounds and very long queues. and i think it would probably need an extra layer of checks rather than trying to do it at the turnstiles, and that obviously needs extra resources.
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and we also want to see both the government and the clubs consult supporters about how this will operate in practice. football isn't always terribly good at consulting supporters. but we want to see that at both national and club level. at the moment, it appears just to be the vaccination passports. at the euros recently, and particularly at wembley, you had to show a negative test if you didn't have the double vaccination. is there a way fans could get around this but still get into the stands? is that open to some kind of neglect? well, the passport proof obviously is open to some abuse because they don't do and didn't do at wembley id checks to ensure that the person showing the proof was actually the person it related to, and i wouldn't have thought that was practical at football league grounds either. but no doubt the
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government know this. the euros example is probably not the best one because they had to abandon the covid test a couple of hours before kick—off at the final. admittedly, there were a very large number of people there. but that does emphasise the need to put the resources in place. and communicate very clearly with fans about exactly what the arrangements at each club are going to be and if they need to be encouraged to come earlier to explain that to them. if you do the proper communication and explanation, then some of these problems i'm sure can be avoided. the other issue as well is, if a season—ticket holder has bought a season ticket on the assumption that this isn't in place and doesn't want to take the vaccination for whatever reason, then they should be entitled to a refund — and the football industry will have to accept that as well. britain's health secretary has
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apologised for a "poor choice of word" when he said people should no longer "cower" from coronavirus. sajid javid made the comment after tweeting he'd made a "full recovery" from the virus. but he faced criticism from labour as well as some medical and familes groups, who said it was insensitive to those who'd suffered serious illness or lost their lives. thousands of people in the western united states are spending the weekend in evacuation centers as wildfires continue to burn across the region. more than 80 large wildfires in 13 states have destroyed around 1.3 million acres in recent weeks. our north america correspondent, peter bowes, reports. the dixie wildfire, california's biggest blaze to the north of the state, is growing rapidly. firefighters are battling day and night to try to bring it under control, but it's spreading with such ferocity that it's making its own weather, creating huge clouds that are generating lightning
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strikes across the region. about a fifth of the fire's perimeter has been contained, but officials say the extreme nature of the fire, along with low humidity, is hampering efforts to quell the flames. people have been evacuated from their homes in several nearby counties. smoke from the fire is travelling far and wide and is even reaching the neighbouring state of oregon, where it's helping firefighters put out the country's largest blaze, known as the bootleg fire, south of portland. a layer of smoke is blocking sunlight and creating cooler conditions, making it easier forfirefighters to gain ground on the blaze. but the phenomenon, known as smoke shading, is unpredictable and there are fears that high temperatures and wind gusts later in the weekend could fan the flames further. efforts to bring this fire under control have been further complicated by an outbreak of covid—19 among firefighters. those who've tested positive
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are isolating and are said to be exhibiting mild symptoms. with a long, hot summer still ahead, these fires will challenge much of the western united states for many weeks to come. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. elsewhere this lunchtime, and mps have described as "wholly inadequate" the complaints process for women in the armed forces who are sexually assaulted or harassed at work. the defence select committee found that 60% of female personnel had faced bullying, harassment and discrimination during their careers. the ministry of defence says many improvements have been made but admits women's experience isn't yet equal to men's. jonathan beale reports. what's it like being a female soldier, i'm often asked. this is the army's latest recruitment campaign, aimed at women. i'm the one stitching them up! i'm not a miss or a mrs, i'm a sergeant. it suggests gender is not an issue
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in today's armed forces. but this report by mps paints a very different picture. with women suffering disproportionately from bullying, harassment, discrimination and even sexual assault and rape. six out of ten women in our evidence said that they don't make complaints because of fear of reprisals and repercussions. and what we are finding is that women are subsequently leaving the military before their time. put some pressure on this for me. women make up around 12% of the regular armed forces. the report highlights practical issues for them, such as not being given uniforms and body armour that fit. but mps say they're gravely concerned that women are ten times more likely than men to experience sexual harassment. you're asking for it, that's the impression you get, you're not completely blameless in all of this. sophia, not her real name, was an officer in the royal navy when she was sexually harassed
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and then assaulted by her male boss. she left in 2017 after a five—year career successfully taking her complaint to a civilian court after she felt let down by her chain of command. it was such an effort to have anyone hear me. and why do you think they didn't want to hear you? it's a boys' club. they closed ranks. they wanted to make sure he was all right. they don't want it happening on their watch. it's bad press for them and it doesn't look good on their reports. that's definitely the impression i got. the ministry of defence said it's made many changes to improve the experience of women in the armed forces. it said it profoundly regretted the experience of some. but mps want the chain of command to be removed from complaints of a sexual nature and cases of rape to no longer be tried in a military court. jonathan beale, bbc news. let's get some of the day's other news.
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environment ministers from more than 50 countries are holding a two—day meeting in britain to prepare for a climate summit later this year. alok sharma, who's the president of the un conference cop26, said the world would be watching the meeting in glasgow in november to see if it can do what is necessary in a decisive decade. floods have swamped areas of belgium and washed away cars as a wave of thunderstorms and heavy rain hit the country. two provinces south—east of brussels were particularly badly hit. they had already been impacted by the devastating floods that left 36 people dead and seven missing. the american comedianjackie mason has died at the age of 93. he spent his final days in hospital in new york. mason started as an amateur boxer then got ordained as a rabbi before becoming a full—time
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comedian in 1959. he held many one—man shows throughout his long career, which culminated in sold—out shows on broadway in the 1980s. he was known to younger audiences because of the simpsons. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello there. temperatures have been nudging down a little bit over recent days and we'll continue to see that cooling trend for the next few days too, so a change in weather type after the heatwave of last week but this coming week cooler conditions and quite unsettled, so more heavy showers, perhaps in thunderstorms around the time but, equally, some sunshine to be enjoyed at times through the week as well. so let's take a look at the satellite image. you can see this zone of cloud here that's been sitting across parts of central, southern and eastern england in particular. now, that is going to be bringing further heavy showers and thunderstorms through the course of today, particularly across parts of southern england,
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perhaps into south—east wales as well, so a risk of some localised flooding and disruption to transport if you do catch some of these intense downpours. thunderstorms and lots of lightning and hail mixed in with them as well. but away from south—east england, east anglia and the midlands as well, most other places looking drier and settled with some sunshine breaking through today. not as hot as recent days but still temperatures getting up to about 24 or 25 degrees across parts of scotland and northern ireland as well. england and wales typically about 22 or 23 degrees. some of these heavy downpours in the south—east and east anglia will continue through this evening and overnight as well, so still the odd rumble of thunder and, again, some surface water flooding possible. during the second half of the night, most places do become dry as showers ease away and there'll be quite a lot of low cloud pushing in across parts of scotland, northern england and perhaps northern ireland as well. temperatures overnight about 12—16 but into monday and things still unsettled, this area of low pressure just move on its way a little bit further northwards up the north sea, so that means we will have quite
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a bit of cloud and a few showers for parts of northern and eastern scotland, for instance, as well. a little bit of showery rain which will reach the far west later in the day and northern ireland as well. but, actually, quite a lot of places having a largely dry day. just the chance of a few isolated showers for scotland so parts of wales as well later on but one in the south compared to sunday with temperatures around 25 or 26 degrees. and then, moving through into tuesday, low pressure sitting to the north of the uk and then we've got this system here working in towards the west so we've got more showers in the forecast for the day on tuesday and, in fact, much of the week ahead is looking pretty unsettled. some places about 10 degrees cooler than they have been during the past week or so. perhaps some drier weather, particularly in the south, towards the end of the week. bye— bye.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... national and family triumph forjapan injudo, as a brother and sister both win gold. austria's anna kiesenhofer causes one of the biggest shocks in olympic road racing history with an audacious victory in the women's cycling race. and africa wins its first gold medal, as a tunisian teenager stuns the field to win the men's 400 metre freestyle. thousands of people in the western united states, are spending the weekend in evacuation centers, as wildfires continue to burn across the region. more than 80 large fires in 13 us states have burnt around 1.3 million acres in recent weeks. british mps have warned that taxpayers will bear the cost of the government's coronavirus spending for decades.

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