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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 25, 2021 12:00pm-12:31pm BST

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good afternoon. team gb have won their first medal at the olympics. into the men's tae kwon do medal means guaranteed at least a silver medal. our sports correspondent andrew smith bryt reports. battling for britain's first medal. 24—year—old chelsie giles from coventry in a
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bronze medal bout in the judo. chelsie giles from coventry in a bronze medal bout in thejudo. she rose to the challenge, securing bronze in style. delight for her and for team gb. theirfirst medal of the games, and you could see just what it meant. in the tae kwon do, meanwhile, bradly sinden from doncaster was ready for the fight of his life. victory in the semifinal and he would be guaranteed a medal, but with less than 20 seconds less heat —— left, he was trailing, until this. the stunning late flurry saw him pass china into the final. what a moment for him, now guaranteed at least a silver, but hoping it would soon be gold. but earlier it was a different story as jade jones�* hopes of a third consecutive olympic title
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endedin of a third consecutive olympic title ended in a shock defeat. her team—mates left in tears as one of britain�*s biggest medal hopes left early. i britain's biggest medal hopes left earl . early. i felt scared, i felt too much pressure, _ early. i felt scared, i felt too much pressure, and - early. i felt scared, i felt too much pressure, and then - early. i felt scared, i felt too| much pressure, and then the early. i felt scared, i felt too - much pressure, and then the whole tournament has been obviously different to what i am used to. used to having my family there. then cheering for me gives me that extra push to go for it, and like i said i just kind of got trapped in that fear mode today. just kind of got trapped in that fear mode toda . , , ., fear mode today. disappointment also for andy murray _ fear mode today. disappointment also for andy murray in _ fear mode today. disappointment also for andy murray in the _ fear mode today. disappointment also for andy murray in the tennis, - fear mode today. disappointment also for andy murray in the tennis, who - for andy murray in the tennis, who has withdrawn from the singles which he has won at the last two games because of a thigh strain, although he will continue in the doubles with joe salisbury. more encouraging news for another defending champion, and adam peaty qualifying fastest in the 100 metre breaststroke and in confident mood.— 100 metre breaststroke and in confident mood. , confident mood. olympics is always about ratios. _ confident mood. olympics is always about ratios, and _ confident mood. olympics is always about ratios, and i'm _ confident mood. olympics is always about ratios, and i'm the _ confident mood. olympics is always about ratios, and i'm the best - confident mood. olympics is always about ratios, and i'm the best ratio | about ratios, and i'm the best ratio in the _ about ratios, and i'm the best ratio in the world — about ratios, and i'm the best ratio in the world i think so i am looking forward _ in the world i think so i am looking forward to— in the world i think so i am looking forward to it. in the world i think so i am looking forward to it— forward to it. swimming also produced _ forward to it. swimming also produced the _ forward to it. swimming also produced the shock- forward to it. swimming also produced the shock of - forward to it. swimming also produced the shock of the i forward to it. swimming alsol produced the shock of the day forward to it. swimming also - produced the shock of the day in the
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men�*s 400 metres freestyle. atjust 18, the tunisian taking a surprise gold. something certainly worth shouting about. the games also saw a new sport making its debut, the first ever skateboarding competition. gold forjapan for this moment of olympic history. andy swiss, bbc news. in under to my hours at nearly ten p m local time we will see bradley sinden vie to become the first briton to take a tae kwon do title. a very tearful jadejones in the first shot, clearly struggling without her family in the crowd. adam peaty has spoken —— first shock. adam peaty has spoken about this in the swimming as well, saying it has not
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felt like the olympics. he said tomorrow in the final he will have tomorrow in the final he will have to try to make his own story. that story, barring a disaster, should be gold. he is unbeaten in that race in seven years and given he holds the 15 fastest times in history, nobody would bet against him. studio: many thanks, natalie pirks. meanwhile plans to require football fans to be fully vaccinated to go to matches are being considered by the government. helen catt has the story. football fans have already been part of testing ways to keep big events going when coronavirus is very much still here. the fa cup final at wembley was a pilot event. and this weekend, the government has also turned to football to try to boost uptake of the vaccine among young people, with a message from the england manager.
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i know oldies like me have had both jabs, so we can crack on with our lives. but for you young ones, especially with the chance for everything to open up. concerns about the number of younger people still unvaccinated are also thought to be a driver behind the idea for vaccine passports for events. the government is in talks with the premier league to use them at matches from october. ministers want to make things equal between all sports, so it�*s likely other crowds would have to do the same. earlier this week, the prime minister announced that vaccine passports would be needed to go to nightclubs in england from the end of september. i should serve notice now that by the end of september, when all over 185 will have had their chance to be double jabbed, will planning to make full vaccination the condition of entry to nightclubs and other venues where large crowds gather. other spectator events with crowds of over 20,000 people, such as big concerts, are also likely to face similar requirements. mps and fans groups have already raised concerns. at the start of the pandemic at 2020, questions were raised about the role the cheltenham festival may
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have played in spreading the virus. the government and sports bodies are likely to be keen to make sure they can have full capacity crowds this winter without such worries. helen catt, bbc news. uk taxpayers face "significant costs" of the coronavirus pandemic for decades to come. that is the warning from a group of mps. a report from the public accounts committee found £372 billion has already been spent, pushing government debt to a rate not seen since the early 1960s. mps also criticised the government�*s procurement of personal protective equipment — saying "despite spending over £10 billion on supplies, the stockpile is not fit for purpose," and is costing about £6.7 million a week to store. the department of health
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says there are measures in place to ensure taxpayers receive value for money — and it had delivered more than 12 billion items of ppe to the front line at record speed. the health secretary has apologised for a "poor choice of word" when he said people should no longer "cower" from coronavirus. sajid javid made the comment after tweeting he�*d made a "full recovery" from the virus. but he faced criticism from labour — as well as some medical and familes groups, who said it was insensitive to those who�*d suffered serious illness or lost their lives. elsewhere this lunchtime, and mps have described as "wholly inadequate" the complaints process for women in the armed forces, and a reported 60% had faced bullying, discrimination during their careers. the ministry of defence said many improvements have been made but admitted that women plus my experience is not yet equal to men�*s. jonathan beale reports. what�*s it like being a female soldier i�*m often asked. this is the army�*s latest recruitment campaign, aimed at women. i'm the one stitching them up!
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i'm not a miss or a mrs, i'm a sergeant. it suggests gender is not an issue in today�*s armed forces. but this report by mps paints a very different picture. with women suffering disproportionately from bullying, harassment, discrimination and even sexual assault and rape. six out of ten women in our evidence said that they don�*t make complaints because of fear of reprisals and repercussions. and what we are finding is that women are subsequently leaving the military before their time. put some pressure on this for me. women make up around i2% of the regular armed forces. the report highlights practical issues for them, such as not being given uniforms and body armour that fit. but mps say they�*re gravely concerned that women are ten times more likely than men to experience sexual harassment. you're asking for it, that's the impression you get, you're not completely blameless in all of this. sophia, not her real name, was an officer in the royal navy when she was sexually harassed
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and then assaulted by her male boss. she left in 2017, after a five—year career successfully taking her complaint to a civilian court after she felt let down by her chain of command. it was such an effort to have anyone hear me. and why do you think they didn�*t want to hear you? it's a boys club. they closed ranks. they wanted to make sure he was all right. they don't want it happening on their watch. it's bad press for them and it doesn't look good on their reports. that's definitely the impression i got. the ministry of defence said it�*s made many changes to improve the experience of women in the armed forces. it said it profoundly regretted the experience of some. but mps want the chain of command to be removed from complaints of a sexual nature and cases of rape to no longer be tried in a military court. jonathan beale, bbc news.
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and before we go, uk army bomb disposal experts have safely detonated a world war ii device. the bomb was found during the construction of a new housing estate in east yorkshire. it�*s thought an raf lancaster bomber ditched the bomb when it was attempting to crash land. you can see more you can see more on you can see more on all of today�*s stories on the bbc news channel. the next news here on bbc news is at six o�*clock. have a good afternoon. hello, you�*re watching the bbc news channel. let�*s get more on the news that the health secretary, sajid javid, has apologised for an earlier tweet which suggested the nation doesn�*t need to "cower" from coronavirus. he said he�*s deleted the original post which used the word "cower". a covid victims�* group had accused mrjavid of "flippancy and carelessness" over the use
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of that word. before the tweet was deleted, i spoke tojean adamson, who�*s a member of the covid—19 bereaved families forjustice group. she lost her father to coronavirus last year and she said that the language used on social media really matters. we�*ve had a series of insensitive remarks, barbed comments, disparaging remarks over the last few months or so from various government ministers, including the pm himself. we�*ve lost tens of thousands of people who have died due to covid in this country. there are so many people who are bereaved and who will be very hurt by these remarks today. let�*s get more on plans to require
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football fans to be fully vaccinated if they want to go to premier league matches. that�*s what�*s being considered by the government. it�*s understood clubs in england�*s top flight are keen to become early adopters of proof of vaccination so they can keep full capacity crowds. the former fa chief executive and owner of tranmere rovers club, mark palios, is with us. some fans will be happy, some fans will not be, what is your take? . football stop if you asked me whether it�*s the right or wrong thing to do from the aspect of controlling the pandemic, i would
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never second guess these guys because they have got other information and statistics and the implications, so if that is the recommendation, that is what should and will happen. fist recommendation, that is what should and will happen-— and will happen. at the moment we are talkin: and will happen. at the moment we are talking about _ and will happen. at the moment we are talking about premier _ and will happen. at the moment we are talking about premier league i are talking about premier league football clubs, you are sat there with a tranmere rovers badge behind you, some papers suggesting this might extend to clubs like your own at some point, how will it be implemented at a club like yours if it gets to that stage? it implemented at a club like yours if it gets to that stage? if it implemented at a club like yours if it gets to that stage?— it gets to that stage? if it is at the levels _ it gets to that stage? if it is at the levels we _ it gets to that stage? if it is at the levels we have _ it gets to that stage? if it is at the levels we have heard, - it gets to that stage? if it is at i the levels we have heard, which it gets to that stage? if it is at - the levels we have heard, which is 10,000, probably for a lot of lower league clubs, it would not make that much of an impact on the game itself. pre—pandemic we had 7000 so you could manage that. the issues, if it is implemented and you do have to check the covid double vaccinations, you have to put in extra costs in terms of more
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stewards in the stadium to check that and other costs would certainly accrue to implementing the protocols that would be necessary to protect the fans and the players and the staff as well.— the fans and the players and the staff as well. , . ., , ., staff as well. given the context you have 'ust staff as well. given the context you have just touched _ staff as well. given the context you have just touched upon _ staff as well. given the context you have just touched upon there - staff as well. given the context you have just touched upon there and l staff as well. given the context you i have just touched upon there and how clubs like yours have been affected by the pandemic over the last 16 months or so, how easy and affordable is that? in months or so, how easy and affordable is that?— months or so, how easy and affordable is that? in terms of the practicalities _ affordable is that? in terms of the practicalities and _ affordable is that? in terms of the practicalities and logistics - affordable is that? in terms of the practicalities and logistics it - practicalities and logistics it would probably be relatively easy because we are all used to working in difficult conditions. we had to operate games with 2000 fans. so i don�*t think the logistical difficulties will present a problem. it will hurt finances, i don�*t think it will be disastrous for clubs in that regard, we have gone through quite a bit of difficulty of course of the last 15—18 months and whilst this would be unwelcome from a financial perspective if it�*s the right thing to do the clubs always
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do it and they will comply both with the spirit and letter of the law. i know this story is only a few hours old but have you heard from your supporters on this? i�*m old but have you heard from your supporters on this?— supporters on this? i'm about to hear that because _ supporters on this? i'm about to hear that because we _ supporters on this? i'm about to hear that because we have - supporters on this? i'm about to hear that because we have an i supporters on this? i'm about to i hear that because we have an open day here to ironically show the extent to which the club has not survived through covid but has thrived so there is a 0&a survived through covid but has thrived so there is a q&a session at one o�*clock so i�*m sure i will hear from them as to what they think of it. ~ ., ., from them as to what they think of it. . ., ., , ., from them as to what they think of it. . ., ., i. ~ from them as to what they think of it. what do you think they take miaht it. what do you think they take might be. _ it. what do you think they take might be. is — it. what do you think they take might be. is a _ it. what do you think they take might be, is a case _ it. what do you think they take might be, is a case of- it. what do you think they take might be, is a case of they - it. what do you think they take might be, is a case of theyjust want to get back to football? absolutely. i think they do want to get back to football. it underlines the point i said, people here don�*t want to take that vaccination, our way of imposing a choice and then? you either take a double vaccination or don�*t come to a game of football and that choice has been highlighted and that choice has been highlighted and given to people, there are consequences if you choose not to take the vaccine, if you are not double vaccinated you chose not to come to a game of football. so for
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me it�*s not a question of imposing things and people, it�*s a question of they still have choices to make, and that�*s what i would say to the fans later on this afternoon, if they raise the issue with me. en'oy they raise the issue with me. en'oy the 0 en they raise the issue with me. en'oy the open day. fl they raise the issue with me. en'oy the open day, thank d they raise the issue with me. en'oy the open day, thank you i they raise the issue with me. en'oy the open day, thank you for�* they raise the issue with me. enjoy the open day, thank you forjoining us here on bbc news, the former fa chief executive and owner of tranmere rovers. malcolm clarke is the chairman of the football supporters�* association. if you�*re not double jab, you�*re not getting on, it seems the messages. i think our members are reflective of the wider society, so there will be some who feel that this will give them the kind of reassurance they needin them the kind of reassurance they need in order to return safely to games, equally there will be others who are opposed to it in principle and may even decide, as mark said, not to attend games. our major
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concern really is to ensure again as mark said that the club put in place sufficient staff to enable this to happen without chaos outside the grounds and very long queues, and i think it would probably need an extra layer of checks rather than trying to do it at the turnstiles, and that obviously needs extra resources. and we also want to see both the government and the clubs consult supporters about how this will operate in practice. football is not always terribly good at consulting supporters but we want to see that it was national and club level. at the moment it appears to just be the vaccination passports, at the euros in particular, wembley and had to show a negative test if he did not have a double vaccination, is there a way fans could get around this but still get into the stands, is not open to
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neglect? the passport proof is open to some abuse because they do not do and did not do at wembley id checks to ensure that the person showing the proof was actually the person it is related to and i would not think thatis is related to and i would not think that is practical at football league grounds either, but no doubt the government know this. the euros example is probably not the best one because they had to abandon the covid test a couple of hours after —— before kick—off at final, admittedly there were a large number of people there but that emphasises the need to put the resources in place and communicate clearly with fans about exactly what the arrangements at each club will be, and if they need to be encouraged to come earlier to explain that to them. if you do the proper communication and explanation then some of these problems i�*m sure can be avoided. the other issue as well
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is if a season—ticket holder bought a season ticket on the assumption this is not in place and does not want to take the vaccination for whatever reason, then they should be entitled to a refund and the football industry will have to accept that as well.- football industry will have to accept that as well. thank you for “oininr us accept that as well. thank you for joining us on _ accept that as well. thank you for joining us on bbc— accept that as well. thank you for joining us on bbc news. - let�*s get more now on the story that the commons public accounts committee, which examines government spending, has warned that taxpayers will be exposed to significant financial risks for decades to come because of the way ministers responded to the pandemic. earlier, i spoke to dame meg hillier, who chairs the committee. i started by asking her how significant the financial risks are. it�*s not unexpected that we would be be spending huge sums of money on an unprecedented pandemic. but there is a cost to managing that. and in the past decade, we�*ve seen cuts through the austerity programme because of the then—government�*s desire to tackle some
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of the challenges in the public finances, and yet that�*s going to be very difficult if the government takes that route — it could also raise taxation or it could borrow more. but all of these have risks. and every pound spent on paying interest on borrowing is not a pound that could be spent on delivering public services. so it�*s not a surprise that there will be a long—term cost and, if you look at the second world war and the first world war, there were similar challenges then. they were the last two very big episodes in pushing taxpayer spending to very high levels. and what we are talking about here is vast amounts of money being spent at high speed, given the nature of the pandemic. absolutely, and one of the things we looked at, as you highlighted in your introduction, is ppe, where at the very beginning there was a global shortage of it and everyone was bidding against each other, so very high amounts were being spent. but what our concern... obviously, it will raise concerns about what happened at that particular time. but now we know that there�*s 10,000 shipping containers of ppe waiting to be used,
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and we�*re really clear with the government — it needs to know where that is, how it�*s going to be used, and make sure it doesn�*t expire. and some of that, you suggested, is wasted. well, it�*s not all good for medical use. so, if it�*s not good for medical use it can�*t be wasted, it needs to be used elsewhere. and the government likewise needs to have a plan. that is effectively taxpayer�*s money sitting in those shipping containers. that that�*s not wasted. let�*s go back to the olympics, and coventry�*s chelsie giles has claimed great britain�*s first medal winning a bronze in thejudo. and there was disappointment for medal hopefuljade jones in the taekwondo. earlier, i spoke to andy anson. he�*s the ceo of the british olympic association, which is responsible for organising and overseeing the participation of athletes. he said it was sad to see jadejones lose out on a medal. i think the games are tough but also taekwondo is a tough sport, jade has said anything can happen,
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there is a lot of dramatic results like that and it�*s just one of those things, she has prepared amazingly well, she is an incredible athlete and personality and the result did not go her way, but what i thought was fantastic was to see her ringside cheering bradley on in his semifinal, overjoyed for him, so she is a wonderful team player. you have spent the last few days there, can you take us to tokyo, what is it like, can you paint us a picture of what the olympic games so far have been like for you and the team gb members? it�*s been a roller—coaster ride, the athletes have been coming out in small groups and going mainly into the prep camp and athletic stadium where they all train and have been training in this team
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gb bubble, and that has been a good environment, but equally we have had the issue with the athletes going into isolation because a member of the public on the plane subsequently tested positive, and that has been tough, so there have been good and difficult moments to deal with, and that is what we are all learning, i speak to my peers in the us, australia and new zealand, and we are all experiencing the same emotions. now we are in the rhythm of the games, the actual environment is difficult, we are doing a covid test every morning, we have to take our temperature, you go into the venues and have your temperature taken, you are sitting at a distance from other people, although i went to the road cycling yesterday and there were spectators there, which was wonderful to see, it was a brilliant race, so it�*s tough, there are some sports where you feel a lack of fans more than others, certainly the football has been difficult without spectators,
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but the swimming arena, because you have the teams cheering on their own fellow athletes, that creates a good noise and a good environment, so the swimming is actually quite a fun venue to be at so it�*s different from venue to venue. thousands of people in the western united states are spending the weekend in evacuation centers as wildfires continue to burn across the region. more than 80 large wildfires in 13 states have destroyed around 1.3 million acres in recent weeks. our north america correspondent, peter bowes, reports. the dixie wildfire, california�*s biggest blaze to the north of the state, is growing rapidly. firefighters are battling day and night to try to bring it under control, but it�*s spreading with such ferocity that it�*s making its own weather, creating huge clouds that are generating lightning strikes across the region. about a fifth of the fire�*s perimeter has been contained, but officials say the extreme nature
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of the fire, along with low humidity, is hampering efforts to quell the flames. people have been evacuated from their homes in several nearby counties. smoke from the fire is travelling far and wide and is even reaching the neighbouring state of oregon, where it�*s helping firefighters put out the country�*s largest blaze, known as the bootleg fire, south of portland. a layer of smoke is blocking sunlight and creating cooler conditions, making it easier forfirefighters to gain ground on the blaze. but the phenomenon, known as smoke shading, is unpredictable and there are fears that high temperatures and wind gusts later in the weekend could fan the flames further. efforts to bring this fire under control have been further complicated by an outbreak of covid—19 among firefighters. those who�*ve tested positive are isolating and are said to be exhibiting mild symptoms. with a long, hot summer still ahead, these fires will challenge much of the western united states for many weeks to come.
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peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. the government has announced extra support for parts of the country, including the north—east of england, in the battle against rising numbers of covid—19. it�*s due to recent data showing that nearly 30% of adults in newcastle, for example, haven�*t even had theirfirstjab — among younger adults, it�*s almost half. in the whole of england, nearly 70% of the adult population has had both jabs, which is why auhorities say they�*re taking action. the bbc�*s martin forster reports. injanuary, worried people queued up to be vaccinated and the limiting factor was how quickly the nhs could get hold of vaccines. six months later, and it�*s a very different story. the vaccines are there, the vaccinators are there, but the nhs is dealing with a far more sceptical audience. while the north—east is seeing the highest rates of infection in the country, in newcastle, nearly three
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in ten adults remain completely unvaccinated. i guess there�*s a sense that perhaps we�*re getting towards the end of the pandemic and i think that�*s probably playing into people�*s minds as to, "actually, do i still need the vaccine, then?" of course, no—one told the virus that we�*re coming to the end of the pandemic and that�*s why we�*re seeing the numbers that we�*re seeing and that�*s why we�*re concerned that people come forward. so the nhs finds itself back under pressure, with around 500 covid patients in hospitals across the north east and cumbria. though, at the moment, farfewer are in intensive care than in previous waves. so the priority now is to getjabs in arms, particularly in teesside, but also here on tyneside. i mean, obviously, boris is saying that he wants the passport for the nightclubs. i was like, may as well get it. i'm going to a few gigs later- on in the year and ijust wouldn't feel right going to them without having myself. vaccinated first. like, it wouldn't feel safe. why would you need to? why would you risk your kid�*s health? as everyone can already see, no—one�*s dying. where�*s the missing people? nowhere. not one person in my full neighbourhood has passed
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away of coronavirus. not one person. so, while the push to sell vaccines is showing some early success, there�*s still a long way to go to win hearts, minds and arms. martin foster, bbc look north. russia�*s annual navy day parade has started in st petersburg. the huge event celebrates the anniversary of the russian navy with a display of more than 50 warships, 48 aircraft and 4,000 servicemen. president vladimir putin is reviewing the two—hour procession in st petersburg whilst similar parades take place across five other russian cities. a woman has been reunited with her wedding ring — two months after it was lost at sea! jenny urquhart tweeted that she had given up hope of ever seeing her ring again after it fell off while she was surfing in devon in may. but, yesterday — on her 17th wedding anniversary — she was contacted by a metal detectorist to say they�*d found it. now it�*s time for
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a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. hello. sunny spells across much of the uk today, but not everywhere. we�*ve also got some really heavy showers and some thunderstorms, especially for south—east england, other parts of southern and central england, into the south—east of wales as well. some of those heavy thunderstorms could bring some localised flooding and disruption. so particularly for parts of kent, sussex, the london region, east anglia too, some heavy downpours likely. for the rest of the uk, you should stay predominantly dry. long spells of sunshine developing during the afternoon. temperatures still warm in glasgow — 25 degrees. only about 22 in london. through this evening and tonight, the showers continue for a time, the odd rumble of thunder in the south—east, but most places become dry by the early hours of monday with temperatures 12—16 degrees first thing tomorrow. monday brings a drier day for parts of southern and south—east england. actually, much of the uk having quite a bit of dry weather but, later in the day, isolated heavy showers and thunderstorms for scotland, perhaps wales as well. cloudier conditions in the north and north—east and temperatures around 21—26 degrees.
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bye— bye. hello, this is bbc news with ben mundy. the headlines... austria�*s anna kiesenhofer has caused one of the biggest shocks in olympic road racing history with an audacious victory in the women�*s cycling race — beating the dutch favourite. africa has won its first gold medal — as a tunisian teenager stuns the field to win the men�*s 400 metre freestyle. coventry�*s chelsie giles has taken britain�*s first medal, winning bronze after defeating switzerland�*s fabienne kocher in the women�*s 52kg judo. plans to require football fans to be fully vaccinated if they want to go to premier league matches from october are being considered by the government. and health secretary sajid javid has apologised for an earlier tweet which suggested the nation doesn�*t need to "cower" from coronavirus.

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