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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 25, 2021 10:00am-10:31am BST

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you're watching bbc news, broadcasting in the uk and around the world, i'm lucy hockings live in tokyo. austria's anna kiesenhofer causes one of the biggest shocks in olympic road racing history with an audacious victory in the women's cycling race, beating the dutch favourite. africa wins its first gold medal, as a tunisian teenager stuns the field to win the men's 400 metre freestyle. two huge disappointments for team gb as double olympic champion andy murray is forced out of the tennis singles with injury, while jadejones is beaten in the taekwondo. there are still lots of medals up for grabs on the second day of action, including injudo and fencing. i'll have all the latest. i'm ben mundy in london. in other news...
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wildfires in northern california force thousands into evacuation centres while a covid outbreak in oregon puts firefighters into quarantine. british mps have warned that taxpayers will bear the cost of the government's coronavirus spending for decades. a parliamentary report says the uk military is failing to protect female recruits with almost two—thirds of women experiencing bullying, sexual harassment and discrimination. and the uk army safely detonates a world war ii bomb on the site of a new housing estate. a warm welcome to tokyo, it's day 2 of the olympics and the sporting action has brought
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us just the sort of excitement we've been looking for in the games. there were major shocks in the swimming pool, a world record was broken — and for some big names their olympic dream has come to an end. a couple of sports have made their debut too. let's cross to the bbc sport centre and speak to our reporter jane dougall, who's been watching the action. what an exciting road race for the women and it was austria taking the gold. women and it was austria taking the old. , . , , , gold. yes, incredible finish but erha -s gold. yes, incredible finish but perhaps not — gold. yes, incredible finish but perhaps not for _ gold. yes, incredible finish but perhaps not for the _ gold. yes, incredible finish but perhaps not for the reason - gold. yes, incredible finish but perhaps not for the reason you gold. yes, incredible finish but - perhaps not for the reason you might imagine. anna kiesenhofer was the shock winner in the women's cycling road race, she led all day and she was so far ahead of her competitors that they almost forgot about her. she finished one minute ahead of second rider annemiek van vleuten, who actually thought she had won, because anna kiesenhofer crossed the line so far ahead of her there was no sign of her when annemiek van vleuten pushed up towards the line
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herself. annemiek van vleuten was in floods of tears, thinking they had the gold but was then told she had come second instead. incredible result for anna kiesenhofer, who isn't even in a pro cycling team at the moment. it was italy's who came home for the third place but incredible result for austria and a gold medalfor them to boot. incredible result for austria and a gold medal for them to boot. gold medalfor them to boot. indeed, two hue gold medalfor them to boot. indeed, two huge disappointments _ gold medalfor them to boot. indeed, two huge disappointments for - gold medalfor them to boot. indeed, two huge disappointments for team | two huge disappointments for team gb. ., �* , , ., gb. yeah, let's start with the defending — gb. yeah, let's start with the defending olympic _ gb. yeah, let's start with the | defending olympic champion, gb. yeah, let's start with the - defending olympic champion, andy murray. he had to pull out of the men's singles are medical advice because of a problem with his squad. the double gold medallist was due to start his singles campaign today and that was after he won in the doubles yesterday alongside his partnerjoe salisbury. in a statement from team gb, andy murray said he was disappointed but had to take the advice of his medical staff. he was pulled out of the singles but is still in the doubles competition.
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another disappointment for team gb because jadejones's another disappointment for team gb because jade jones's chance of becoming the first british woman to win gold medals at three successive olympics ended earlier. the two—time olympics ended earlier. the two—time olympic taekwondo champion suffered a shock first—round defeat by coming alan zadie of the refugee team in tokyo. —— by alizadeh. she had a chance of winning bronze. that has now gone, too because of the results have not gone her way. no medalfor jadejones. staying with taekwondo, better news for team gb and bradly sinden, who has secured at least an olympic silver. he is through to the file. that would be team gb's first medal at tokyo. —— through to the final. at a brilliant comeback he was 9—16 down at the end of the second round but he went on to win his semifinal 33—25 against the chinese competitor.
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his semifinal 33-25 against the chinese competitor.— his semifinal 33-25 against the chinese competitor. africa has its first old chinese competitor. africa has its first gold medal. _ chinese competitor. africa has its first gold medal. tell _ chinese competitor. africa has its first gold medal. tell us - chinese competitor. africa has its first gold medal. tell us about. chinese competitor. africa has its| first gold medal. tell us about this tunisian swimming sensation who will be a household name, now. yes. tunisian swimming sensation who will be a household name, now.— be a household name, now. yes, this was in the pool— be a household name, now. yes, this was in the pool early _ be a household name, now. yes, this was in the pool early and _ be a household name, now. yes, this was in the pool early and it _ be a household name, now. yes, this was in the pool early and it was - be a household name, now. yes, this was in the pool early and it was a - was in the pool early and it was a shock result. the tunisian to laser ahmed hafnaoui were swimming in the outside lane for the men's 400 freestyle because he was the slowest qualifier. —— tunisian teenager. he had an incredible finish to take hold and cause a huge upset. he pipped australia's jack mclaughlin, who took silver and kevin smith, the american, getting bronze. that gold medal is only the fifth by a tunisian athlete at the olympics, their third in tunisian athlete at the olympics, theirthird in swimming tunisian athlete at the olympics, their third in swimming and the reaction from him was incredible. he was absolutely ecstatic as was his coach by the side of this may, jumping up and down. theyjust didn't expect it. they had talked about getting a medal in paris but now they are going to have to defend his gold medal in paris. incredible news for him. it his gold medal in paris. incredible news for him-—
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his gold medal in paris. incredible news for him. it was so exciting to watch, the — news for him. it was so exciting to watch, the look _ news for him. it was so exciting to watch, the look of _ news for him. it was so exciting to watch, the look of shock _ news for him. it was so exciting to watch, the look of shock on - news for him. it was so exciting to watch, the look of shock on their i watch, the look of shock on their face. both the coach and him, as well, when he won the gold was absolutely priceless. really magical olympic moment. thanks so much. mariko oi is in ginza, which is one of the city's top shopping districts. in tokyo. some gold medals for japan, today? in tokyo. some gold medals for japan. today?— in tokyo. some gold medals for jaan, toda ? �* ., japan, today? indeed. at the moment, we are watching _ japan, today? indeed. at the moment, we are watching the _ japan, today? indeed. at the moment, we are watching the brother _ japan, today? indeed. at the moment, we are watching the brother and - we are watching the brother and sister have been four double gold medals this evening. the system made it to the final. a matter of gold or silver and we are waiting for her brother to compete in the semifinal. we had the exciting moment with the first ever olympic gold medal for skateboarding given to yuto horigome. we went on the streets to
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see how people felt. translation: i used to do skateboarding l and i knew horigome, so congratulations to him for winning the gold medal. especially in this heat. and hopefully this will make the sport more popular. translation: it's a proud moment forjapan, especially given - this is the first gold medal for skateboarding at the olympics. translation: i wasn't too excited | about the olympics, because of allj |the scandals but it does make mej happy to see good performance of japanese athletes. everywhere i looked today, people were watching the skateboarding, it has gone down well in tokyo. he nailed the tricks to get the gold. one of the other things people have been commenting on, and perhaps you could explain the significance, the flowers that the athletes are receiving on the podium, what is the
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story behind that?— story behind that? that's right, the victory bouquet _ story behind that? that's right, the victory bouquet of _ story behind that? that's right, the victory bouquet of flowers - story behind that? that's right, the victory bouquet of flowers that - victory bouquet of flowers that every medallist has been given. the flowers come from the three prefectures hardest hit by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. including a town which had to be evacuated after the nuclear accident because it was only about four kilometres away from the fukushima nuclear power plant. residents were only allowed back into their town about four years ago. it flower farmers went back in and they have been growing those flowers, hoping they would be used in the tokyo olympics. it is not just athletes achieving their olympic dreams but a very proud moment for those flower farmers as well. ., , ., , ,, moment for those flower farmers as well. ., , ., , ., moment for those flower farmers as well. ., , ., ., well. lovely to see you and thanks for that explanation. _ well. lovely to see you and thanks for that explanation. just - well. lovely to see you and thanks for that explanation. just one - well. lovely to see you and thanks| for that explanation. just one other point to bring you because we are learning more about austria's anna
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kiesenhofer, who hasjust won learning more about austria's anna kiesenhofer, who has just won the road race. she came out of nowhere, she is not in any professional cycling team, so we're just getting more details about her. remarkably, she is a mathematician, a graduate of vienna and cambridge university, and she has a phd. then, what a remarkable woman. plenty more to come from here in tokyo. for now, back to you. studio: incredible story, thank you very much, lucy. taxpayers in the uk will be facing the "significant costs" of the coronavirus pandemic for decades to come. that's the warning from a group of mps. a report from the public accounts committee found £372 billion has already been spent, pushing government debt to a rate not seen since the early 1960s. mps also criticised the decision to buy items of ppe that have gone to waste because they can't be used in hospitals. the department of health says there are measures in place to ensure taxpayers receive
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value for money. the house of commons public accounts committee is chaired by dame meg hillier, whojoins us now. thanks forjoining us on bbc news. these reports state downing street's response to the crisis has exposed a uk taxpayer to a significant financial risk, how significant? you hiuuhlihted financial risk, how significant? 7m, highlighted that figure of £375 billion spent on the covid response was not unexpected we would be spending huge sums of money on an unprecedented pandemic. but there is a cost to managing that. and in the past decade, we have seen cuts through the austerity programme, because of the then government's desire to tackle some of the challenges in the public finances. and yet, you know, that's going to be very difficult if the government takes that route, could raise taxation, it could borrow more. they all have risks. with every pound spent on paying interest on borrowing is not a pound that could be spent on delivering public services. it is not a surprise that
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there will be a long—term cost. look at the second world war and the first world war, there were similar challenges, the last two big, big, episodes in pushing government spending, taxpayer spending, to very high levels. find spending, taxpayer spending, to very hiuh levels. �* ., spending, taxpayer spending, to very hiuh levels. �* . ., spending, taxpayer spending, to very hiahlevels. �* . ., ., ~ high levels. and what we are talking about here is _ high levels. and what we are talking about here is vast _ high levels. and what we are talking about here is vast amounts - high levels. and what we are talking about here is vast amounts of - high levels. and what we are talking | about here is vast amounts of money being spent at high speed, given the nature of the pandemic.— nature of the pandemic. absolutely. and one of the _ nature of the pandemic. absolutely. and one of the things _ nature of the pandemic. absolutely. and one of the things that _ nature of the pandemic. absolutely. and one of the things that we - nature of the pandemic. absolutely. | and one of the things that we looked at, as you highlighted in your introduction is ppe. at the very beginning, there was a global shortage and everybody was bidding against each other. very high amounts were being spent. what will raise concerns is that there are 10,000 shipping containers or ppe waiting to be used. we are really clear with the government that it needs to know where that is, how it is going to be used and make sure it doesn't expire. you suggested some is wasted. it is not all good for medical use. if it isn't, it can't be wasted and needs to be used elsewhere and the government needs to have a plan so taxpayers money in
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those shipping containers isn't wasted. , , , ., , wasted. these numbers are very high. often hard to — wasted. these numbers are very high. often hard to get _ wasted. these numbers are very high. often hard to get your _ wasted. these numbers are very high. often hard to get your head _ wasted. these numbers are very high. often hard to get your head around. i often hard to get your head around. but what of those watching will be able to understand is that ppe situation was of the department of health said there were processes to ensure spending gives taxpayers value for money. the prime minister has pledged to the independent public inquiry into the handling of the pandemic will take base amount spring 2022. is that too far away? from the beginning, as a committee, we have been determined that we will look at issues around the pandemic from day one, right when the moment it was happening. i was already clear that we have been counting the pounds as well as watching how effective the government's response has been. we have done a number of reports over the last year and we are continuing that work. we will pull that together. we can't wait for a public inquiry to start learning lessons about what to do with the pandemic. you know, next to the work of a national audit office, which can get into department and gather information, we are getting
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data and information to the cost tracker that we highlighted today about where money is being allocated. and through other work we have done, how that money is being spent. it is really important we don't wait. there are lessons we have to be learned lao and we are going through another increase in infections and we don't know where that will lead —— have to be learned right now. it is part of ourjob to make sure taxpayers money is safeguarded in the process. thank ou for safeguarded in the process. thank you forjoining _ safeguarded in the process. thank you forjoining us, _ safeguarded in the process. thank you forjoining us, dame - safeguarded in the process. thank you forjoining us, dame meg - you forjoining us, dame meg hillier, on bbc news. a covid victims�* group has accused the health secretary, sajid javid, of "flippancy and carelessness" after he said that people should no longer "cower" from the infection. mrjavid made the comment in a tweet confirming he'd recovered from the virus, a week after testing positive. labour claimed he'd denugrated those who followed the rules, while the liberal democrats called on him to apologise. mps have described as "wholly inadequate" the complaints process for women
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in the armed forces who are sexually assaulted or harassed at work. the defence select committee found that 60% of female personnel had faced bullying, harassment and discrimination during their careers. the ministry of defence says many improvements have been made, but admits women's experience isn't yet equal to men's. jonathan beale reports: what's it like being a female soldier i'm often asked. i wouldn't know. this is the army's latest recruitment campaign, aimed at women. i'm the one stitching them up! i'm not a miss or a mrs, i'm a sergeant. it suggests gender is not an issue in today's armed forces. but this report by mps paints a very different picture. with women suffering disproportionately from bullying, harassment, discrimination and even sexual assault and rape. six out of ten women in our evidence said that they don't make complaints because of fear of reprisals and repercussions. and what we are finding is that
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women are subsequently leaving the military before their time and have this complaint or allegation or incident that's happened in the military as having a legacy effect. put some pressure on this for me. women make up around 12% of the regular armed forces. the report highlights practical issues for them, such as not being given uniforms and body armour that fit. but mps say they're gravely concerned that women are ten times more likely than men to experience sexual harassment. you're asking for it, that's the impression you get, you're not completely blameless in all of this, because how can you be? because he's got to where he is, he's obviously a good guy. sophia, not her real name, was an officer in the royal navy when she was sexually harassed and then assaulted by her male boss. she left in 2017, after a five—year career successfully taking her complaint to a civilian court after she felt let down by her chain of command. it was such an effort
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to have anyone hear me. and why do you think they didn't want to hear you? it's a boys club. they closed ranks. they wanted to make sure he was all right. they don't want it happening on their watch. they don't want something like that to be... it's bad press for them and it doesn't look good on their reports. that's definitely the impression i got. sophia's lawyer has dealt with dozens of similar cases. proof, he says, that the military complaints and justice system simply isn't working. there's a couple of factors, really. the fact that the service - complaints system is not fit for purpose is one of them. and i also think that there are old, antiquated attitudes— towards women that seem to live on despite all sorts _ of recommendations for change. the ministry of defence says it's made many changes to improve the experience of women in the armed forces. it said it profoundly regretted
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the experience of some. but mps want the chain of command to be removed from complaints of a sexual nature and cases of rape to no longer be tried in a military court. jonathan beale, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... austria's anna kiesenhofer causes one of the biggest shocks in olympic road racing history with an audacious victory in the women's cycling race, beating the dutch favourite. africa has won its first gold medal at the tokyo olympics, as a tunisian teenager stunned the field to win the men's 400 metre freestyle. wildfires in northern california have forced thousands into evacuation centres while a covid outbreak in oregon puts firefighters into quarantine. british mps have warned that taxpayers will bear the cost of the government's coronavirus spending for decades. thousands of people in the western
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united states are spending the weekend in evacuation centers, as wildfires continue to burn across the region. more than 80 large wildfires in 13 states have destroyed around 1.3 million acres in recent weeks. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the dixie wildfire, california's biggest blaze to the north of the state, is growing rapidly. firefighters are battling day and night to try to bring it under control, but it's spreading with such ferocity that it's making its own weather, creating huge clouds that are generating lightning strikes across the region. about a fifth of the fire's perimeter has been contained, but officials say the extreme nature of the fire, along with low humidity, is hampering efforts to quell the flames. people have been evacuated from their homes in several nearby counties. smoke from the fire is travelling far and wide and is even reaching the neighbouring state of oregon, where it's helping firefighters put out the country's largest blaze, known as the bootleg fire,
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south of portland. a layer of smoke is blocking sunlight and creating cooler conditions, making it easier forfirefighters to gain ground on the blaze. but the phenomenon, known as smoke shading, is unpredictable and there are fears that high temperatures and wind gusts later in the weekend could fan the flames further. efforts to bring this fire under control have been further complicated by an outbreak of covid—19 among firefighters. those who've tested positive are isolating and are said to be exhibiting mild symptoms. with a long, hot summer still ahead, these fires will challenge much of the western united states for many weeks to come. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. a typhoon has made landfall in eastern china's zhejiang province, just days after severe flooding killed at least 58 people in central china.
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air, sea and rail transport has been halted in preparation for the heavy rains and high winds across large parts of china's east coast, including the financial hub of shanghai. more than1 million people have been forced to relocate due to record flooding in central china caused by heavy rain. business leaders across england are calling for an end to self—isolation rules for people who are fully vaccinated. it comes as the so—called "pingdemic" continues to cause staff shortages for thousands of firms. people in england with the nhs app on their smartphone are forced to self—isolate — if the app pings with a notification to say they've come into contact with someone who's tested positive for coroanvirus. but calls are growing for a re—think, as robert coxwell reports. this coffee shop in west hampstead in north london is thriving, while another round the corner is struggling, because some of their staff are self—isolating. there is this, sort of, wax and wane effect and i hope... we love those guys, i hope they, sort of, get back on their feet.
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it's quite stressful, thinking about it. the number of people being asked to self—isolate reached a record high in england, last week. while a bbc crew were out filming this report, they met someone who had just been contacted by the nhs test and trace app. ijust got pinged! and i haven't been with anyone except for my daughter, who's tested negative, so i can't understand it. and it seems to be really conflicting, you know? that the advice and actually what we're expected to do are two different things. now, london's mayor hasjoined calls to change self—isolation rules by adding his name to a joint letter, calling on prime minister boris johnson to allow those who are fully vaccinated to return to work following a negative pcr test. we're asking the government to bring forward the date they've announced of the 16th of august, the date after which, if you've had both jabs and you're pinged and you're a negative test, you can go back to work. that's something staff at this restaurant in hove on the south coast of england would welcome.
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they had to close for six days a few weeks ago. that had a massive knock—on effect on the business financially, and also mentally, for a lot of people. it's stressful having to isolate, due to positive tests coming back to them. while rules on those required to self—isolate in england will change on the 16th of august, british business groups say the next three weeks are crucial. all of a sudden, you're having your staff who need to isolate, - your're having to close the business at different parts of the day- or you have to close fully. this has a massive implication on whether or not you're - going to see through the summer months and through to 2022. - as it stands, though, the millions of phones of people in england will continue to ping until mid—august. robert coxwell, bbc news. the uk government has announced extra support for parts of the country, including the north east of england, in the battle against rising numbers of covid—19.
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it's due to recent data showing that nearly 30% of adults in newcastle for example, haven't even had their firstjab. among younger adults it's almost half. in the whole of england, nearly 70% of the adult population has had both jabs, which is why auhorities say they're taking action. the bbc�*s martin forster reports. injanuary, worried people queued up to be vaccinated and the limiting factor was how quickly the nhs could get hold of vaccines. six months later, and it's a very different story. the vaccines are there, the vaccinators are there, but the nhs is dealing with a far more sceptical audience. while the north—east is seeing the highest rates of infection in the country, in newcastle, nearly three in ten adults remain completely unvaccinated. i guess there's a sense that perhaps we're getting towards the end of the pandemic and i think that's probably playing into people's minds as to, "actually, do i still need the vaccine, then?" of course, no—one told the virus that we're coming to the end of the pandemic and that's why we're seeing the numbers that we're seeing
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and that's why we're concerned that people come forward. so the nhs finds itself back under pressure, with around 500 covid patients in hospitals across the north east and cumbria. though, at the moment, farfewer are in intensive care than in previous waves. so, the priority now is to getjabs in arms, particularly in teesside, but also here on tyneside. i mean, obviously, boris is saying that he wants the passport for the nightclubs. i was like, may as well get it. i'm going to a few gigs later- on in the year and ijust wouldn't feel right going to them without having myself. vaccinated first. _ like, it wouldn't feel safe. why would you need to? why would you risk your kids health? as everyone can already see, no—one's dying. where's the missing people? nowhere. not one person in my full neighbourhood has passed away of coronavirus. not one person. so, while the push to sell vaccines is showing some early success, there's still a long way to go to win hearts, minds and arms. martin foster, bbc look north. uk army bomb disposal experts have safely detonated a world war ii bomb — which was found during
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the construction of a new housing estate in east yorkshire. it's thought an raf lancaster bomber ditched the bomb when it was attempting to crash land. jake zuckerman reports. explosion. oooohhh! 0h! the moment a live world war ii bomb was detonated on the outskirts of goole. this was the device dug up by workers building a new housing estate in the town. bomb disposal experts spent much of today preparing for the controlled explosion, and, for motorists, it was the cause of much frustration. the m62, which passes right next to the site, was closed in both directions as police cordoned off the area. meanwhile in goole, local people watched and waited and tried to find a good vantage point. yeah, i'm meant to be inside, watching t�*phones, but i've got my head down t�*road thinking, "what's happening here?" trying to catch a little glimpse of it all. i've just snuck through the edge there onto the field to see if we can see it, and it's a good viewpoint. spectators had to wait until 4:30, but when the moment finally came, it was dramatic.
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oh, there you go! explosion. oooohh! 0h! yeah, it's been a diversion from all the covid and everything, so yeah, it's been exciting. something quite different for goole. certainly put it on the map today! jake zuckerman, bbc look north, goole. you're watching bbc news. let's get back to the olympics... and plenty of british interest on the first full day's action. disappointment forjade jones in the taekwondo. such an upset because it was widely expected she was going to at least be in with a chance of the gold medal. the two—time olympic taekwondo champion suffered a shock first round defeat by alizadeh of the refugee olympic team in tokyo.
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missing out on gold forjadejones is a hugely unexpected blow. she looked stunned after the defeat, to be honest with you, as did bianca walkden, that is how watching on, her flatmate and very close friend. alizadeh had beatenjones twice before, including at the world championships in 2015, but huge disappointment for the whole of team gb and bianca walkden. as you can see her crying. and jadejones as well stop she had a chance of a bronze medal but, unfortunately, that has gone as well because other results have not gone her way. better news for the britt bradly sinden, who has secured at least a silver medal. —— for the british athlete. he is through to the final after a brilliant comeback from 9—16 down at the end of his second round. he battled on to go on to win his semifinal 33—25. against the chinese competitor. the final is under four
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hours' time. looking forward to that. , ., _, . that. he will be full of confidence auoin into that. he will be full of confidence going into that — that. he will be full of confidence going into that final. _ going into that final. disappointment for two—time olympic champion, so andy murray. because he has had to pull out of the singles. yes, that is our medical advice. he has been told he should pull out of the men's singles. there is concerns about a quad strain. the double gold medallist was due to start his singles campaign today after he won in the doubles yesterday alongside his partnerjoe salisbury. at the time, there wasn't any hint of entry. in fact, andy murray had said he felt he was in with a chance of the singles. after consulting with his medical team and by a statement from team gb, he said he was very disappointed, but that he had to take the advice of his medical staff. out of the singles but still in the doubles. aha, staff. out of the singles but still in the doubles.— staff. out of the singles but still in the doubles. a busy day for you add one more _ in the doubles. a busy day for you add one more for— in the doubles. a busy day for you add one more for now, _ in the doubles. a busy day for you add one more for now, what - in the doubles. a busy day for you add one more for now, what has l in the doubles. a busy day for you - add one more for now, what has been happening in the swimming pool, very exciting stuff. aha, happening in the swimming pool, very exciting stuff. b. bit happening in the swimming pool, very exciting stuff-— exciting stuff. a bit of a day of shocks, hasn't _ exciting stuff. a bit of a day of shocks, hasn't it? _ exciting stuff. a bit of a day of shocks, hasn't it? teenager, i shocks, hasn't it? teenager, 18—year—old tunisian ahmed hafnaoui
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was swimming in the outside lane for the men's 400 metres freestyle. he was the slowest qualifier but look at this, he pulled off an incredible finish to take hold and cause a huge upset. he pipped australia's jack mclaughlin for silver and ciaran smith, the american, for bronze. look at that reaction. incredulous and surprise elation and delight. fantastic to watch. that is what the olympics is about. his gold is only a fifth gold medal by a tunisian but fifth in the pool, that is a tunisian speciality. a lovely reaction for the 18—year—old, to him. reaction for the 18-year-old, to him. ., ~ reaction for the 18-year-old, to him. . ,, , ., hello this is bbc news. the headlines... australia has claimed their first games gold, breaking the world
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record for the women's 400 metre freestyle team relay. the hosts, japan, also won their second gold, in the pool. while the tunisian teenager, ahmed hafnaoui, stunned the field to win the men's 400 metre freestyle gold. thousands of people in the western united states are spending the weekend in evacuation centers, as wildfires continue to burn across the region. more than 80 large wildfires in 13 us states have burnt around 1.3 million acres in recent weeks. british mps have warned that taxpayers will bear the cost of the government's coronavirus spending for decades. a report found £372 billion has already been spent, pushing government debt to a rate not seen since the early 1960. the department of health says there are measures in place to ensure taxpayers receive value for money. now on bbc news... the future of fashion — halima aden, the world's first hijab wearing supermodel meets us fashion
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designer tommy hilfiger to talk diversity, and how to go beyond tokenism to see real change.

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