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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 25, 2021 9:00am-9:30am BST

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this is bbc news — i'm ben mundy. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. africa wins its first gold medal at the tokyo olympics, as a tunisian teenager stuns the field to win the men's 400 metre freestyle. australia smashes the world record to win gold in the women's 4 x 100 metre freestyle relay. two huge disappointments for team gb as double olympic champion andy murray is forced out of the tennis singles with injury, while jadejones is beaten in the taekwondo. elsewhere today... wildfires in northern california force thousands into evacuation centres while a covid outbreak in oregon puts firefighters into quarantine. british mps have warned that taxpayers will bear the cost of the government's coronavirus spending for decades. a parliamentary report says
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the uk military is failing to protect female recruits, with almost two—thirds of women experiencing bullying, sexual harassment and discrimination. thousands take to the streets across brazil for the fourth weekend in a row, calling for a faster vaccination programme and the impeachment of president bolsonaro. 0h! and the uk army safely detonates a world war ii bomb on the site of a new housing estate. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. day 2 of the olympics in tokyo has brought us all what we have come to expect from the games. there were major shocks in the swimming pool —
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a world record was broken — and for some big names, their olympic dream has come to an end. and a couple of sports have made their debut too. the bbc�*s sarah mulkerrins has been following the action. well, what a story we had as we have seen the first gold medal given out in one of the four new sports here at the olympic games. skateboarding took centre stage this sunday morning with this street event final for the man taking place. and i can tell you that the hosts, japan, have won it with the 22—year—old local boy from tokyo, yuto horigome, winning gold in that. now, the street event sees the skateboarders make some runs and pull off great tricks and skills on rails and ramps and also steps in that event. a wonderful win for the hosts, japan, in that. there was also a big win for them in the pool, as yui ohashi won gold in the women's 400 metres individual medley. there was also a great win
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for tunisia, as 18—year—old ahmed hafnaoui won gold for them. that was the first gold of the games and just their fifth olympic gold in total. and then the australia women smashed the world record to claim the victory in the 4 x 100 metres freestyle. elsewhere, we have had the surfing taking place today with the heats in that, that's one of the other new sports here. but we have had some big shocks in the tennis, as the world number one, ash barty, is out of that in the opening round. remember, she came in as wimbledon champion here. the organisers at that event have also been forced to put in the extreme heat policy, which allows them to monitor the health and safety of the players in the court in the very high temperatures in tokyo. one other news line we have had today as we deal with covid—19 cases
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is that the cases linked to these games since july the 1st has now risen to 132, with ten more being announced today. prior to hisjourney to japan, we also had the news that the us golfer bryson dechambeau has had to pull out of the men's golf event as he tested positive for covid—19 before he was making his journey to japan. so, patrick reid will now take his place. jane dougall is at the bbc sport centre and has been following the action on day 2 of the games. a disappointing few hours for team gb. , ., , ., a disappointing few hours for team gb. , ., , a, g a, gb. yes, and we start with jade jones because _ gb. yes, and we start with jade jones because it's _ gb. yes, and we start with jade jones because it's been - gb. yes, and we start with jade - jones because it's been devastating for the double olympic taekwondo gold medallist. she has suffered a shock first—round defeat, meaning she will now not have the chance to become the first british woman to win gold medals at three successive olympics. she was beaten by a
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alizadeh of the refugee olympic teams. she had beaten her twice before including at they bottom up and shipped in 2015 but missing out on the gold here isjust and shipped in 2015 but missing out on the gold here is just an unexpected huge blow for the brit. she was stunned after the defeat. she was stunned after the defeat. she then did have a chance of getting a bronze medal but that has now gone. that was only if alizadeh had got to the final and she got put out in the semifinal. no medals for jamesjones at this olympics, really disappointing for her and then another two—time gold medallist, andy murray, has had to pull out of the men's singles at the tennis. that is of concerns after a quad strain. it has been on medical advice was of the double gold medallist was due to start a campaign today but he won in the doubles yesterday with partnerjoe salisbury and murray had said he felt he was in with a chance and there was no obvious injury after that doubles went with joe salisbury. but after consulting with his medical team, salisbury. but after consulting with his medicalteam, he salisbury. but after consulting with his medical team, he said in a
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statement from team gb that he was very disappointed but that he had to take the advice of his medical staff. not in the singles but still in the doubles for andy murray. let's park the disappointing few hours for team gb, jade, what have we got to look forward to for the rest of the day? figs we got to look forward to for the rest of the day?— we got to look forward to for the rest of the day? as we speak the gymnastics _ rest of the day? as we speak the gymnastics is — rest of the day? as we speak the gymnastics is on _ rest of the day? as we speak the gymnastics is on anti-wealth - rest of the day? as we speak the gymnastics is on anti-wealth to i gymnastics is on anti—wealth to watch out for but simone biles quest uneven bars, not herfavourite piece of apparatus but she is on the beam and she is in the fifth qualifying place as it stands. her big name for this olympics is to become the first woman to defend the all—around title at the games since 1968. she is such at the games since 1968. she is such a remarkable athlete, isn't she? 30 olympic and world championship medals. incredible decorated gymnast. normally a huge draw, of course. but it is an empty venue, only officials and fellow gymnasts looking on. simone biles had said
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she planned to retire after this olympics but she has since said she might continue to 2024 in paris after being jilted into considering it by her french coaches —— she had been gilted into it. sticking with the gymnastics, look out for germany later on because there gymnasts will be wearing full body leotards or unitards as they are calling them. the german gymnastics federation is its athletes will be wearing those unitards as a stand against the sexualisation m gymnastics. that is very poignant because of what has happened with the norwegian beach handball team. unitards are allowed in gymnastics but have only been typically worn for religious reasons. if you remember, the norwegian beach handball team were fined for not wearing full bikini bottoms. they said they were
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uncomfortable and it sexualised the athletes. the german gymnasts are now saying the same thing as taking a stand wearing the unitard. bier? a stand wearing the unitard. very toical a stand wearing the unitard. very tepical issue- _ a stand wearing the unitard. very topical issue. thank _ a stand wearing the unitard. very topical issue. thank you - a stand wearing the unitard. very topical issue. thank you very much. for more on the olympics — go to the bbc news website. you can keep up to date with the full schedule — and take a look at the current medal table. go to bbc.com/news — and follow the links. thousands of people in the western united states, are spending the weekend in evacuation centres. this as wildfires continue to burn across the region. more than 80 large wildfires in 13 states have destroyed around 1.3 million acres in recent weeks. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the dixie wildfire, california's biggest blaze to the north of the state, is growing rapidly. firefighters are battling day and night to try to bring it under control, but it's spreading with such ferocity that it's making its own weather,
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creating huge clouds that are generating lightning strikes across the region. about a fifth of the fire's perimeter has been contained, but officials say the extreme nature of the fire, along with low humidity, is hampering efforts to quell the flames. people have been evacuated from their homes in several nearby counties. smoke from the fire is travelling far and wide and is even reaching the neighbouring state of oregon, where it's helping firefighters put out the country's largest blaze, known as the bootleg fire, south of portland. a layer of smoke is blocking sunlight and creating cooler conditions, making it easier for firefighters to gain ground on the blaze. but the phenomenon, known as smoke shading, is unpredictable and there are fears that high temperatures and wind gusts later in the weekend could fan the flames further. efforts to bring this fire under control have been further complicated by an outbreak of covid—19 among firefighters. those who've tested positive are isolating and are said to be
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exhibiting mild symptoms. with a long, hot summer still ahead, these fires will challenge much of the western united states for many weeks to come. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. earlier, stefan myers, who is with the bootleg fire information team for the oregon state fire marshal, gave us an update from the incident command post in lakeview oregon. yeah, so we now stand at 4,001 acres or 401,000 acres. we're at 42% containment. weather has been somewhat favourable, the last couple of days to make great progress, but it is heating up this weekend and we do have concern for nearby communities. we have 1,200 firefighters that are assigned to this and all of them are staying vigilant, as this has still been a really dry summer. we had drought conditions in this part of the state. so we still have a lot of dry fuels out there
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and we still remain concerned. yeah, so we did have nine firefighters that tested positive. they are exhibiting mild symptoms and they were isolated from camp. others that came in contact were tested and luckily came out negative. so, this time, we're feeling confident that we have a handle on this. and it hasn't hampered firefighting efforts. taxpayers in britain will be facing the "significant costs" of the coronavirus pandemic for decades to come, a group of mps has warned. a report from the public accounts committee found £372 billionhas already been spent, pushing government debt to a rate not seen since the early 1960s. mps also criticised the decision to buy items of ppe that have gone to waste because they can't be used in hospitals. the department of health says there are measures in place to ensure taxpayers receive value for money. our political correspondent, helen catt, is with us in the studio.
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good to see you, we are talking about vast amounts of money spent at high speed. this about vast amounts of money spent at hiuh seed. , .,, ., about vast amounts of money spent at hia-hseed. , ., , high speed. this was from the very start of the — high speed. this was from the very start of the pandemic. _ high speed. this was from the very start of the pandemic. the - start of the pandemic. the government sort of had to loosen up its usual rules and processes to be able to spend lots of money very quickly. and it was a lot of money. the estimates have come to about £372 billion, the cost of all of that spending on pandemic measures. what the committee is that is that that has created significant financial risk for decades to come. —— is saying that. it gives examples of ways. the committee backed lots of ways. the committee backed lots of loans made to businesses so of course it is not necessarily going to be the case that all of those get paid back. current government estimates is that they might lose £26 million on loans that go bad although treasury say it makes the point to mps it is difficult to know how many businesses will pay it back. this is looking to how the government will manage the risk in the future. fin government will manage the risk in the future. ., , , .
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government will manage the risk in the future. . , , . ., the future. on the aspect of ppe, ersonal the future. on the aspect of ppe, personal protective _ the future. on the aspect of ppe, personal protective equipment, l the future. on the aspect of ppe, l personal protective equipment, the mps say they are concerned the stockpile is not fit for purpose. and some of it hasn't even been unpacked yet. and some of it hasn't even been unpacked yet-— unpacked yet. there are pretty astonishing — unpacked yet. there are pretty astonishing numbers _ unpacked yet. there are pretty astonishing numbers in - unpacked yet. there are pretty astonishing numbers in this . unpacked yet. there are pretty - astonishing numbers in this report. looking at personal protective equipment, things like gloves, masks, gowns, things like that, the come and bought a lot of it, 32 billion pieces of ppe were ordered. now what 12.6 billion pieces of ppe were ordered. now what12.6 billion pieces of that is being stored as a central stock, which costs a lot of money. £6.7 million every week. it says there are 10,000 shipping containers, which, as you have said, had not been unpacked. that was in may. the of ppe already found not to be suitable for medical use. —— 2 million pieces. they haven't seen a robust plan from the cabinet about what they will do with that and find a new use of that. they are worried they will be unacceptably high levels of ways. the department of health said they had delivered over 12.7 billion items of ppe to the
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front line at record speed and established stocks to ensure supply. labour says it backs the necessity for having a public inquiry immediately.— in the uk, mps have described as "wholly inadequate" the complaints process for women in the armed forces who are sexually assaulted or harassed at work. the defence select committee found that 60% of female personnel had faced bullying, harassment and discrimination during their careers. the ministry of defence says many improvements have been made, but admits women's experience isn't yet equal to men's. jonathan beale has this. i'm often asked what's it like being a female soldier. i wouldn't know. this is the army's latest recruitment campaign, aimed at women. i'm not a miss or a mrs, i'm a sergeant. it suggests gender is not an issue in today's armed forces. but this report by mps paints
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a very different picture. with women suffering disproportionately from bullying, harassment, discrimination and even sexual assault and rape. six out of ten women in our evidence said that they don't make complaints because of fear of reprisals and repercussions. and what we are finding is that women are subsequently leaving the military before their time and have this complaint or allegation or incident that's happened in the military as having a legacy effect. put some pressure on this for me. women make up around 12% of the regular armed forces. the report highlights practical issues for them, such as not being given uniforms and body armour that fit. but mps say they are gravely concerned that women are ten times more likely than men to experience sexual harassment. you're asking for it, that's the impression you get, you're not completely blameless in all of this, because how can you be? because he's got to where he is,
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he's obviously a good guy. sophia, not her real name, was an officer in the royal navy when she was sexually harassed and then assaulted by her male boss. she left in 2017, after a five—year career. successfully taking her complaint to a civilian court after she felt let down by her chain of command. it was such an effort to have anyone hear me. and why do you think they didn't want to hear you? it's a boys club. they closed ranks. they wanted to make sure he was all right. they don't want it happening on their watch. they don't want something like that to be... it's bad press for them and it doesn't look good on their reports. that's definitely the impression i got. sophia's lawyer has dealt with dozens of similar cases. proof, he says, that the military complaints and justice system simply isn't working. there's a couple of factors, really. the fact that the service - complaints system is not fit for purpose is one of them.
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and i also think that there are old, antiquated attitudes— towards women that seem to live on despite all sorts _ of recommendations for change. the ministry of defence says it's made many changes to improve the experience of women in the armed forces. it said it profoundly regretted the experience of some. but mps want the chain of command to be removed from complaints of a sexual nature and cases of rape to no longer be tried in a military court. jonathan beale, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... africa has won its first gold medal at the tokyo olympics, as a tunisian teenager stunned the field to win the men's 400 metre freestyle. australia has smashed the world record to win gold in the women's 4 x 100 metre freestyle relay. wildfires in northern california have forced thousands into evacuation centres while a covid outbreak in oregon puts firefighters into quarantine.
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hopes of a third gold medalfor team gb's jadejones in the women's taekwondo were dashed when she was eliminated in her opening bout. sarah stevenson represented team gb in taekwondo at the 2008 and 2012 olympics. she says it's disappointing forjade to leave at this stage. just to let me explain a little bit on that one, i think, obviously, she is first seed, world number one. and, of course, double olympic champion, but the person that she's fought in the first match was a very, very tough match. it kind of was a little bit of a false picture of her first match, because she was fighting against an athlete who is now... has refugee status. to then put that... she is then put at the bottom of the list in terms of seeds. but this girl is actually... she is a world medallist, she is also an olympic medallist
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in rio, she got a bronze medal in rio. and the four times her and jade have actually competed together, she has beatjade three times, so that was a very, very tough first match for both of them. it's just unfortunate that that kind of happened to jade, really. you always want that first match to be, you know, blowing the cobwebs off. and when you're first seed, you tend to get that easier match to kind of warm yourself up and get yourself ready but jade didn't have that opportunity, this time. so, yeah, i'm totally gutted for her. and just hopefully alizadeh gets to the final and our champ goes for the bronze medal. we can speak now tojordyn smith and maddison moore, two taekwondo athletes — they're speaking to us thank you forjoining us on bbc news, heartbreakforjadejones thank you forjoining us on bbc news, heartbreak forjadejones and news, heartbreak forjade jones and team news, heartbreak forjadejones and team gb. it news, heartbreak forjade jones and team gb. , ., ., ., ., , .,~ team gb. it is a lot of heartbreak for us. team gb. it is a lot of heartbreak for us- itut _ team gb. it is a lot of heartbreak for us. but she _ team gb. it is a lot of heartbreak for us. but she is _
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team gb. it is a lot of heartbreak for us. but she is still _ team gb. it is a lot of heartbreak for us. but she is still the - for us. but she is still the champion, she is still a legend. she is still double olympic champion. it is still double olympic champion. it isjust one of is still double olympic champion. it is just one of those things. i know she will bounce back even stronger. madison, as an expert in the sport, an incredible performance from the opponent in that bout.— opponent in that bout. yeah, as we had sarah stevenson _ opponent in that bout. yeah, as we had sarah stevenson say, - opponent in that bout. yeah, as we had sarah stevenson say, the - opponent in that bout. yeah, as we had sarah stevenson say, the girl l opponent in that bout. yeah, as we| had sarah stevenson say, the girl is a very— had sarah stevenson say, the girl is a very experienced fighter. she has fought— a very experienced fighter. she has fought jade quite a few times. it was a _ fought jade quite a few times. it was a very— fought jade quite a few times. it was a very close fight and jade did very well— was a very close fight and jade did very well but it was just unfortunate how it went. jordyn, for those who don't _ unfortunate how it went. jordyn, for those who don't know, _ unfortunate how it went. jordyn, for those who don't know, fill _ unfortunate how it went. jordyn, for those who don't know, fill us - unfortunate how it went. jordyn, for those who don't know, fill us in - unfortunate how it went. jordyn, for those who don't know, fill us in on i those who don't know, fill us in on taekwondo, it is a martial art using punching and kicking techniques, give us more details of it is original originally south korea and it basically is fighting. you original originally south korea and it basically is fighting.— it basically is fighting. you fight each other _ it basically is fighting. you fight each other -- — it basically is fighting. you fight each other -- it _ it basically is fighting. you fight each other -- it is _ it basically is fighting. you fight each other -- it is originally - it basically is fighting. you fight i each other -- it is originally from. each other —— it is originally from. it is an exciting sport. anything can happen. one minute it can be a close fight and next minute, someone could be knocked out, you just don't know. like i said, it is all about scoring points and the winner who
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has the most points at the end comes out on top. has the most points at the end comes out on to. ., has the most points at the end comes outonto. . , out on top. looking at the positives here with jade _ out on top. looking at the positives here with jade jones, _ out on top. looking at the positives here with jade jones, her _ here with jade jones, her performances here with jadejones, her performances in here with jade jones, her performances in the here with jadejones, her performances in the sport over a number of years now has really helped your sport's reputation, hasn't it? ~ , ,., , helped your sport's reputation, hasn't it? ~ , ,, hasn't it? absolutely. she was unfortunate — hasn't it? absolutely. she was unfortunate today _ hasn't it? absolutely. she was unfortunate today but - hasn't it? absolutely. she was unfortunate today but that - hasn't it? absolutely. she was - unfortunate today but that doesn't take away— unfortunate today but that doesn't take away what jade jones has achieved. she has been doing this fora _ achieved. she has been doing this fora long — achieved. she has been doing this for a long time. she has racked up a lot fora long time. she has racked up a lot of— for a long time. she has racked up a lot of medals, not of golds. two olympic— lot of medals, not of golds. two olympic medals, gold. she has done so it was— olympic medals, gold. she has done so it wasjust olympic medals, gold. she has done so it was just unfortunate. they always — so it was just unfortunate. they always has _ so it was just unfortunate. they always has to be a winner and a loser_ always has to be a winner and a loser and — always has to be a winner and a loser and unfortunately, she lost out today — loser and unfortunately, she lost out today. , loser and unfortunately, she lost out toda . g ., , .,, loser and unfortunately, she lost out today-— out today. , jordyn i was jordyn readin: out today. , jordyn i was jordyn reading early — out today. , jordyn i was jordyn reading early that _ out today. , jordyn i was jordyn reading early that jade - out today. , jordyn i was jordyn reading early that jade jones i out today. , jordyn i was jordyn i reading early that jade jones was reading early that jadejones was caught smoking as a ten—year—old and she was dragged to taekwondo by her grandad. that was a different pathway for her, where you inspired by jade pathway for her, where you inspired byjadejones? how did you get into the sport? i by jade jones? how did you get into the sort? , . .,, the sport? i started when i was four, the sport? i started when i was four. my _ the sport? i started when i was four. my dad — the sport? i started when i was four, my dad took _ the sport? i started when i was four, my dad took me - the sport? i started when i was four, my dad took me to - the sport? i started when i was four, my dad took me to a - the sport? i started when i was| four, my dad took me to a local club. he was worried i was going to get picked on at school for having ginger hairso he
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get picked on at school for having ginger hair so he took me along to build my confidence and for self defence. taekwondo is such a respectful sport, as well. you grow, like, as a character throughout the sport i'd ever since i started, i havejust sport i'd ever since i started, i have just loved sport i'd ever since i started, i havejust loved it sport i'd ever since i started, i have just loved it and sport i'd ever since i started, i havejust loved it and couldn't jordyn stop. have just loved it and couldn't jordyn stop-— jordyn stop. jordyn smith and madison moore, _ jordyn stop. jordyn smith and madison moore, thank - jordyn stop. jordyn smith and madison moore, thank you i jordyn stop. jordyn smith and l madison moore, thank you very jordyn stop. jordyn smith and - madison moore, thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news. —— and i couldn't stop. in cities across brazil thousands of protesters have taken to the streets for the fourth weekend in a row. they're calling for the covid vaccination programme to be speeded up, and demanding the impeachment of president bolsonaro. gail maclellan reports. "out, bolsonaro". the message in 20 states across brazil. as the coronavirus death toll in the country passes half a million, protesters demand the resignation of the man they say is to blame — presidentjair bolsonaro. translation: we allowed this person to become the president _ of the republic and we are seeing the consequences of that today —
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in the absurd number of deaths due to the pandemic, due to the irresponsible way in which he handled the pandemic in brazil. the president has been famously dismissive of the health crisis — opposing masks and social distancing measures — and he's been criticised for the slow roll—out of vaccines. only 17% of the population is fully vaccinated. with a presidential election looming next year, mr bolsonaro's approval rating is at a record low and he faces investigation in the senate on charges of corruption. as night fell, skirmishes broke out between protesters and police... explosion. ..who fired tear gas and threw flash bangs. explosion. such clashes are likely to persist, putting president bolsonaro under increasing pressure as the pandemic continues to exact a devastating toll. gail maclellan, bbc news.
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let's get some of the day's other news the president of cuba's supreme court says 59 people have been prosecuted over the unprecedented mass protests on the island two weeks ago. ruben reijiro ferro did not specify how many protesters had been arrested, but dismissed accusations of summary trials. dissident groups say there were more than six—hundred arrests dissident groups say there were more than 600 arrests after protests erupted to demand democratic change. the senior guatemalan anti—corru ption prosecutor, juan francisco sandoval, has left the countryjust hours after being removed from office. he's reported to have crossed the border into el salvador. the government said he'd been dismissed because of abuse of office, but mr sandoval says he was fired for seeking truth and justice. uk army bomb disposal experts have safely detonated a world war ii bomb — which was found during the construction of a new housing estate in east yorkshire. it's thought an raf lancaster
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bomber ditched the bomb when it was attempting to crash land. jake zuckerman reports. explosion. oooohhh! the moment a live world war ii bomb was detonated on the outskirts of goole. this was the device dug up by workers building a new housing estate in the town. bomb disposal experts spent much of today preparing for the controlled explosion, and, for motorists, it was the cause of much frustration. the m62, which passes right next to the site, was closed in both directions as police cordoned off the area. meanwhile in goole, local people watched and waited and tried to find a good vantage point. yeah, i'm meant to be inside watching t�*phones, but i've got my head down t�*road thinking, "what's happening here?" trying to catch a little glimpse of it all. i've just snuck through the edge there onto the field to see if we can see it, and it's a good viewpoint. spectators had to wait until 4:30, but when the moment finally came, it was dramatic.
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oh, there you go! explosion. oooohh! 0h! yeah, it's been a diversion from all the covid and everything, so yeah, it's been exciting. something quite different for goole. certainly put it on the map today! jake zuckerman, bbc look north, goole. and we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers david wooding, political editor of sun on sunday and miatta fahnbulleh, chief executive of new economics foundation a social—economic left wing think tank and former labour adviser — that's coming up after the latest headlines and a full sport update. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. we've got a mix of weather types over the next couple of days and we've lost that intense heat
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we had over the last week or so but we have got some thunderstorms and particular for southern and south—eastern england today, they could bring some ready torrential rain. really torrential rain. there is a risk of some localised flooding, perhaps some travel disruption, particular for the south—east of england, east anglia, perhaps into the midlands, as well. that is where we are expecting the showers and thunderstorms, today. elsewhere, looking largely dry with some longer spells of sunshine. temperatures in the northwest 24 or 25 degrees but about 22 under the showers in the south—east. most of the heavy showers in the east fade away overnight. we've got quite a lot of low cloud drifting in from north—east england and eastern scotland. clearer skies towards the west and overnight temperatures about 13 to 16 degrees. during the day on monday, we got quite a bit of cloud across some coastal regions in particular. more sunshine in the south but they will be further heavy showers and thunderstorms put it in for eastern scotland and they could be some elsewhere. eyes of 21 to 25 degrees.
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hello. this is bbc news.
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we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment — first, the headlines at 9:30. australia has claimed their first games gold, breaking the world record for the women's four hundred metre freestyle team relay. the hosts, japan, also won their second gold, in the pool. while the tunisian teenager, ahmed hafnaoui, stunned the field to win the men's 400 metre freestyle gold. thousands of people in the western united states, are spending the weekend in evacuation centers, as wildfires continue to burn across the region. more than 80 large wildfires in 13 us states have burnt around 1.3 million acres in recent weeks. in cities across brazil, thousands of protesters have taken to the streets for the fourth weekend in a row. they're calling for the coronavirus vaccination programme to be speeded up and demanding the impeachment of president bolsonaro. only 17% of brazilians have been fully vaccinated so far.

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