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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 25, 2021 3:00am-3:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm sarah mulkerrins, live in tokyo, on day 2 of the olympics. the united states has claimed its first medals in the pool, taking both gold and silver in the men's 400 metre individual medley. surfing and skateboarding are both making their olympic debuts today at the games. i'm lewis vaughan jones, in london. the rest of the day's headlines: wildfires in northern california force thousands into evacuation centres while a covid outbreak in oregon puts firefighters into quarantine. thousands of hungarians join the annual pride march and protest against a new anti—lgbt law. and the uk army safely
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detonates a world war ii bomb on the site of a new housing estate. hello. day two of the olympics is underway and we have our first medal winners in the pool. chase kalisz has given the united states their first gold and medal of the games. he came first in the men's 400 metres individual medley final finishing well ahead of his fellow countrymen, jay litherland, who took silver. let's see what else is up for grabs, with some
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of the other highlights expected on day two of the games. coming up later the women's road race starts — with current champion anna van der breggen representing the netherlands for the final time at the games before she retires. we will also see the first appearance at the tokyo games of simone biles — the most decorated us gymnast of all time — will lead her team in women's qualifying. local favourite — naomi osaka — who lit the olympic cauldron at friday's opening ceremony — begins her bid for a medal. it's osaka's first match since withdrawing from the french open because of mental health issues. two sports are making their olympic debut — skateboarding and surfing. as i said, surfing is making it's debut the games. let's speak to the surfing journalist keith plocek who has been following all the action currently happening on tsurigasaki surfing beach.
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how special a day has it been for you? i how special a day has it been for ou? ~ , ., for you? i think it is a monumental- for you? i think it is a i monumental milestone. for you? i think it is a - monumental milestone. for for you? i think it is a _ monumental milestone. for many years the surfing community has been trying to make surfing part of the olympics. as early as 1912, there were people pushing for it to become an olympic sport so it has been a long time coming.— long time coming. who would wear look _ long time coming. who would wear look out _ long time coming. who would wear look out for? _ long time coming. who would wear look out for? who - long time coming. who would wear look out for? who has . wear look out for? who has impressed you in the men's heat so far? �* . ., , ., so far? their brazilians are lookin: so far? their brazilians are looking very _ so far? their brazilians are looking very good, - so far? their brazilians are looking very good, gabriel| looking very good, gabriel medina, ferreira, who is the current champion. they both advanced pretty easily. the real story, the fan favourite
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is the sofa from japan — — so far. he has dual citizenship with america and his father was a surfer injapan and he wanted his son to be a surfer so bad that they moved to california to make him into of all sofa. he is number six in the world now. he is really looking good and it is a fun sorry to watch with the us and japan connection.— with the us and japan connection. ~ . ., connection. what about the women's — connection. what about the women's events? _ connection. what about the women's events? the - connection. what about the women's events? the heat| connection. what about the - women's events? the heat have got under way. women's events? the heat have got under way-— got under way. what other big names? the — got under way. what other big names? the two _ got under way. what other big names? the two american, i names? the two american, clarissa moore and carly barrs. clarissa moore and carly barrs. clarissa is well champion. the other became a professional and
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joined the ball to add 15, making her the youngest surfer to qualify for the pro— tour. she is a prodigy. she is want to watch. the brazilians are also looking good. the brazilians, americans and australians in both the men's and women's dominate just based on culturally and the way they have been serving on the world tour. they are the three big countries. i was watching before i came on. and it is very exciting. i before i came on. and it is very exciting.— before i came on. and it is very exciting. i wanted to ask ou very exciting. i wanted to ask you about — very exciting. i wanted to ask you about the _ very exciting. i wanted to ask you about the ways _ very exciting. i wanted to ask you about the ways we - very exciting. i wanted to ask you about the ways we have l you about the ways we have seen. a couple of days ago people were worried we may not have waves. there is a typhoon out the coast which may whip them up.
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out the coast which may whip them u -. ., , out the coast which may whip them via-— out the coast which may whip them u. . , ., ., them up. the waves not great riaht them up. the waves not great right now- _ them up. the waves not great right now. the _ them up. the waves not great right now. the wind _ them up. the waves not great right now. the wind is - right now. the wind is currently on shore so it flattens out the waves. a lot of regular surfaces would not go out in that. but they started the day because, with the typhoon out, it could generate good waves in the next few days for the semifinals and finals. oftentimes, surface like bad weather, hurricane and these things, they cause all kinds of problems but they also generate great swells.- generate great swells. kate, lovel to generate great swells. kate, lovely to talk _ generate great swells. kate, lovely to talk to _ generate great swells. kate, lovely to talk to you - generate great swells. kate, lovely to talk to you on - generate great swells. kate, lovely to talk to you on the l lovely to talk to you on the programme and thank you for that information. the bbc�*s mariko oi is outside the olympic
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park in tokyo. we started off this news bulletin with the news of a gold and silver medal for the usa in the pool. that should have been potentially a japanese swimmer who could be contending but there was disappointment there? that's ri . ht. disappointment there? that's riuht. he disappointment there? that's right. he said _ disappointment there? that's right. he said after _ disappointment there? that's right. he said after the - disappointment there? that's right. he said after the match that he wanted to reserve his energy for the finals, learning from the mistakes of his recent raceway he was too tired but i got to the finals but he miscalculated. in ethics, also another disappointment for japan. known as the king, here injapan. buta
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japan. known as the king, here injapan. but a lot of excitement by the first gold medal, takato naohisa. an emotional expression in ever newspapers here. he had a disappointment in the rear games when he got bronze stop —— rio. buti games when he got bronze stop —— rio. but i could sense that sport headlines are now starting to headline the newspapers which is exactly what the government was hoping for because we have been talking about all the controversy and scandals but now sporting headlines now overtaking. now sporting headlines now overtaking-— now sporting headlines now overtakina. ~ ., , ., , overtaking. who should we be lookin: overtaking. who should we be looking out — overtaking. who should we be looking out for _ overtaking. who should we be looking out for on _ overtaking. who should we be looking out for on day - overtaking. who should we be looking out for on day two - overtaking. who should we be looking out for on day two of. looking out for on day two of the japanese hope? obviously, we will have — the japanese hope? obviously, we will have naomi _ the japanese hope? obviously, we will have naomi osaka. - the japanese hope? obviously, j we will have naomi osaka. she is a polarising figure. some people love her. she is the face of the new generation of japanese athletes. very
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outspoken, not afraid to speak her mind, unlike athletes here in japan who her mind, unlike athletes here injapan who have long been expected to be apolitical. at the same time, some say because she does not speak much japanese, and does not live here, some people do not see here, some people do not see her as a japanese athlete but it is better to say that everyone will be watching her first match.— everyone will be watching her first match. just before we go, tell us about _ first match. just before we go, tell us about this _ first match. just before we go, tell us about this brother - tell us about this brother sister combination i think a lot of us are going to hear about? , ., ., about? indeed, brother and sister are — about? indeed, brother and sister are hoping _ about? indeed, brother and sister are hoping for- about? indeed, brother and sister are hoping for double j sister are hoping for double gold medals for the family which would be unprecedented if they managed to pull it off. a lot of excitement around judo. wejust mentioned
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lot of excitement around judo. we just mentioned takato we just mentioned ta kato naohisa, we just mentioned takato naohisa, also wejust mentioned takato naohisa, also a silver for funo tanaki. that was the 500th olympic medal for tanaki. that was the 500th olympic medalforjapan. a lot of excitement. the organising committee and japanese government a bit relieved that people are finally talking about spot instead of all the scandal surrounding the opening ceremony and of course about the covid—19 pandemic. ceremony and of course about the covid-19 pandemic.- the covid-19 pandemic. thank ou so the covid-19 pandemic. thank you so much- _ the covid-19 pandemic. thank you so much. remember, - the covid-19 pandemic. thank you so much. remember, for| the covid-19 pandemic. thank i you so much. remember, for all go to the bbc news website. you can look at the current medal table and see where your country is ranking.
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the second medal has been one at the swimming. i shot up that in the men's 400 metres freestyle. the gold medal has gone to tunisia, an 18—year—old, shocking the pool. two americans came after with silver and bronze. the action is coming thick and fast as are the shocks and it is good to be in the flow of things.— in the flow of things. bring us up-to-date — in the flow of things. bring us up-to-date by _ in the flow of things. bring us up-to-date by the _ in the flow of things. bring us up-to-date by the second. it| in the flow of things. bring usl up-to-date by the second. it is up—to—date by the second. it is a beautiful backdrop behind you. where are you in relation to the action and to wear mariko was earlier? we to the action and to wear mariko was earlier? we are here at to 0 mariko was earlier? we are here at tokyo bay. — mariko was earlier? we are here at tokyo bay, into _ mariko was earlier? we are here at tokyo bay, into the _ mariko was earlier? we are here at tokyo bay, into the south i mariko was earlier? we are here at tokyo bay, into the south of l at tokyo bay, into the south of tokyo, this is a newer area of
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the city. a lot of events around here. the bridge links tokyo bay and brings you right into the heart of the city. in that you have the heritage area where mariko was. a lot of the infrastructure from the 1964 games are in there. we are in the south of the city where we have the triathlon, the olympic village just over beyond the rainbow bridge into the heart of the city and then over on this site, you have the beach volleyball, the rowing, so lots of action around here as well. pretty stunning backdrop. you can feel the heat that as well that a lot of competitors are speaking about.— that a lot of competitors are speaking about. while you are keein: speaking about. while you are keeping your— speaking about. while you are keeping your cool. _ speaking about. while you are keeping your cool. thank i speaking about. while you are keeping your cool. thank you. j thousands of people in the western united states,
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are spending the weekend in evacuation centers, as wildfires continue to burn across the region. more than 80 large wildfires in 13 states have burnt around 1.3 million acres in recent weeks. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the dixie wildfire, california's biggest blaze, to the north of the state, is growing rapidly. firefighters are battling day and night to try to bring this under control, but it's with such ferocity that it's making its own weather, creating huge clouds that are generating lightning strikes across the region. about a fifth of the fire's perimeter has been contained, but officials say the extreme nature of the fire, along with low humidity, is hampering efforts to quell the flames. people have been evacuated from their homes in several nearby counties. smoke from the fire is travelling far and wide and is even reaching a neighbouring state of oregon, where it's helping firefighters put out the country's largest blaze, known as the bootleg fire, south of portland. a layer of smoke
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is blocking sunlight and creating cooler conditions, making it easierfor firefighters to gain ground. making it easierfor firefighters to gain ground on the blaze. but the phenomenon known as smoke shading is unpredictable. there are fears that high temperatures and wind gusts later in the weekend could fund the flames further. in oregon, firefighters are facing another problem, and a number have tested positive for covid—19. those who tested positive are now isolating in an area away from the base camp. they are said to be exhibiting mild symptoms. with a hot summer seller had they will challenge much of the united states for weeks to come. rob mayeda is the nbc bay area meteorologist and hejoins us now from sanjose california. good to be here. talk us
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through _ good to be here. talk us through what _ good to be here. talk us through what exactly i good to be here. talk us through what exactly is i good to be here. talk us i through what exactly is going on. �* , ., , through what exactly is going on. �* , ., ., on. behind me you 'ust heard on that report. h on. behind me you 'ust heard on that report, the i on. behind me youjust heard on that report, the extreme - that report, the extreme wildfire behaviour, we are calling it in california, our new brand of severe weather, these are known as pyro cumulonimbus type structures, wildfire generated thunderstorms, the intense heat of the fire causes the updraught of ash and much like a thunderstorm, on the downdraught we sometimes have rain or lightning, this involves wind speeds leaving the firefight anywhere from 60— 100 kilometres per hour, so that takes something like the dixie fire, and allows it to spread so rapidly to the point we have to the large—scale evacuations. the fire is burning so intensely on radar we are at detecting ash as opposed to heavy rain like we might do during the winter season, so when we saw the type of activity, it wasn't a surprise that we saw this fire and adjust the span of five days become one of california's
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top 20 wildfires, at number 16 now, and part of this wildfire seasonis now, and part of this wildfire season is already well ahead of last year's season is already well ahead of last yea r�*s pace season is already well ahead of last year's pace which was the all—time record for the most acres burnt in california. that is where things stand right now, and i think the key driving factor here, also in oregon and canada, is the difference in drought conditions we have seen in the western united states including california, that's how it looked one year ago compared to what we're seeing right now, and these are the conditions that are setting the stage for the extreme fire behaviour and the extreme fire behaviour and the recipe for some of these magnifiers that we are seeing like the dixie fire in northern california. like the dixie fire in northern california-— california. you other expert this area. — california. you other expert this area, supporters i california. you other expert this area, supporters into i this area, supporters into some historical context, and on a personal level, given your experience, how do these events compare? experience, how do these events com tare? ~ ., , experience, how do these events com-are? ~ .,, ,, experience, how do these events com-are? t ., compare? well, as you saw on the charge. — compare? well, as you saw on the charge. to _ compare? well, as you saw on the charge, to see _ compare? well, as you saw on the charge, to see 8596 - compare? well, as you saw on the charge, to see 8596 of- compare? well, as you saw on | the charge, to see 8596 of these the charge, to see 85% of these largest fires occurring since 2000, a lot has been pointed towards climate change and are
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warmer temperatures through time, the more frequent droughts driving that, by two other components, which affects millions more people, you see over my shoulder, the view taken moments ago, looking towards susanville, that is how the skies look outside. we saw a lot of this in the bay area just last september when the wildfires were a lot closer, and this is how things look right now, and that's what hazardous air quality looks like, and on the oi index 100 is considered unhealthy. we are seeing numbers from 400 to 1000 on that index, and the wildfire smoke starting here in california, travels all the way across the rest of the country, combined with fires in canada and oregon, the impact of what is occurring is being felt all across the globe, and across the north atlantic being carried by some of those upper level winds as well.— level winds as well. absolutely fascinating. — level winds as well. absolutely fascinating, thank _ level winds as well. absolutely fascinating, thank you - level winds as well. absolutely fascinating, thank you so i level winds as well. absolutely | fascinating, thank you so much for talking us through that so clearly with is really striking images there as well.
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you're watching bbc world news. the headlines: the united states has claimed its first olympic medals in the pool taking both gold and silver in the men's 400 metre individual medley. and firefighters are facing ever bigger challenges as blazes spread across the north—western united states. as the olympics get going under the heat of the tokyo sun this week, organisers from paris, the 2024 hosts, will be looking at what works and doesn't work, and one thing they will be focusing on, is the sustainability of the games. georgina grenon is the director of sustainability for the paris 2024 olympics and paralympics, and shejoins me live now from tokyo. thank you so much for coming on the programme. you look at
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everything, but especially like olympic games, it's a huge operation, a huge organisation, you look at something like that and you don't think that sustainability is top of the list. how big a challenge is it? ., , it? you just said it. the olympics _ it? you just said it. the olympics are _ it? you just said it. the olympics are the i it? you just said it. the | olympics are the biggest it? you just said it. the - olympics are the biggest event in the world, and we are now facing the world's biggest challenges, so we have to take action, this has to be at the heart of our activities, we cannot organise paris in 2020 for the media 20 30 years ago, so there are two objectives. first, limiting their contribution to climate change, and using our games as an beacon towards a lower carbon emission. beacon towards a lower carbon emission-— beacon towards a lower carbon emission. t . ., ., emission. what are some of the tractical emission. what are some of the practical things? _ emission. what are some of the practical things? how— emission. what are some of the practical things? how will i emission. what are some of the practical things? how will you . practical things? how will you try and achieve that? the keyword _ try and achieve that? the keyword is _ try and achieve that? tue: keyword is anticipation. try and achieve that? tte: keyword is anticipation. we try and achieve that? "tt2
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keyword is anticipation. we are drastically reducing emissions since the games were conceived. paris 2024 games were conceived to be lower carbon, we are building much less because we are using 95% of existing or temporary infrastructure, so very little construction, and whatever we build is low carbon technology. then, all the venues are chosen to be accessible by public transportation, we are using 100% renewable energy to power the games, the food will be served in low carbon packaging, so we're to avoid and reduce emissions as much as possible for the whole scope of the games. that includes spectators travelling, of course, five years in advance, we have set for paris 2020 for a maximum number of emissions, a sort of carbon budget we want to
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respect,. carbon budget we want to respect. -_ carbon budget we want to respect,. carbon budget we want to res-ect,. .. . , respect,. you pre-empted me there, it's — respect,. you pre-empted me there, it's the _ respect,. you pre-empted me there, it's the people - there, it's the people travelling from all the way around the world together using flights, that is a problem that is very difficult to solve i imagine. just quickly because i have to let you go, but one of the things that comes up with these events, one of them is these events, one of them is the cost, the expense, they are really really expensive to put on. is there a danger that if costs get too high, the thing that will be sacrificed will be some of these green initiatives?— some of these green initiatives? . . ., initiatives? we have factored this in from _ initiatives? we have factored this in from the _ initiatives? we have factored this in from the very - this in from the very beginning, and working very hard to maintain our objectives, to respect both our budget and our carbon budget. this is a daily task, the carbon agenda is at the heart of our management as well. we will abide by its like everyone.— will abide by its like everyone. will abide by its like eve one. ., everyone. good luck with all our everyone. good luck with all your planning- _ in hungary, thousands of people have marched through the streets of budapest, to mark what organisers say is the largest gay pride gathering in the country's history. it comes after viktor orban's right—wing government pushed through a law banning the portrayal or promotion of homosexual or transgender
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content to people under—18. courtney bembridge reports. thousands gathered in budapest to send a message of acceptance, unity and defiance. i think it's more important than ever to out onto the streets and show that we are together, we are joined in this fight for the rights and the freedom for lg btq people. the annual parade on took on special significance this year after a controversial law was passed, making it illegal to depict homosexuality and gender reassignment to children. so that means, you know, books with gay characters in, it means advertising it means television programmes with any kind of portrayal or discussion of lgbt themes is technically against the law. the government has billed it as an anti—pedophile law, but these crowds say it's a move designed to divide. translation: this is nothing
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more than a diversion - that is trying to tear the country apart. i think it's provocation because of the elections. translation: the law is an outrage. - we live in the 21st century when things like that shouldn't be happening. we aren't in communist times, this is the eu, where everybody should live freely. organisers of the pride parade say it's the largest ever held in hungary, and they hope it will send a strong message to prime minister viktor orban. there was fear that many lgbt people are now planning to leave the country if there is no change or no change in government next year. many of hungary's eu partners are furious over the new law and the block has begun legal action, warning it will use all power is available to force hungry to appeal or change the law. courtney bembridge, bbc news.
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protestors have again taken to the streets across brazil in support of vaccination, and to demand the impeachment of president bolsonaro as the country struggles with high numbers of covid deaths. local media reported demonstrations in 13 state capitals including sao paulo and rio dejaneiro. around 17% of the brazilian population has been fully vaccinated so far. uk army bomb disposal experts have safely detonated a world war 2 bomb which was found during the construction of a new housing estate in east yorkshire. it's thought an raf lancaster bomber ditched the bomb when it was attempting to crash land. jake zuckerman reports. the moment a live world war ii bomb was detonated on the outskirts of goole. this was the device dug up by workers building a new housing estate in the town. bomb disposal expert
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spent yesterday and much of today preparing for the controlled explosion, and for motorists, it was the cause of much frustration. the m62, which passes right next to the site, was closed in both directions as police cordoned off the area. it led to traffic chaos across large parts of east yorkshire. i live in doncaster, i'm working today, at the infirmary on call, but i'm stuck in the traffic. i'm absolutely frustrated, but what else can we do? i have just told the on—call person to hold on, because i think i'm going to be very late today. i meant to be inside watching the olympics, but i'm trying to work out what's going on, trying to catch a glimpse of it all. i've just nipped through to see if we could see through and if it's a good viewpoint. spectators had to wait until 4:30, but when the moment finally came, it was dramatic. it's been a diversion from all the covid and everything, so it's been exciting. something quite different for goole, certainly putting it on the map today. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @lvaughanjones.
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i will be back with the headlines in a couple minutes time. this is bbc news. good evening. the weather story is on the change, and we've seen signs of that today with some contrasting conditions out there. yes, there were early—morning thunderstorms across southern england, and then those eased to a legacy of cloud for much of the day. further north and west, we've had some beautiful sunshine, and yet again, some warmth — not the extreme warmth, but 25 degrees. that's 77 fahrenheit. it looks likely that we see that north—south divide through the night with clearer skies to the north—west. but low pressure really dominating the story over the next few days, and that could trigger off further thundery downpours overnight tonight for southern england and for south wales, and that'll continue into the early hours of sunday morning. so, at risk, then, of some showers here. there'll be quite a lot of cloud as well spilling in off north sea coasts, the clearer skies the further north and west.
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it's not going to be a cold night. temperatures will hold up quite widely into double figures, perhaps quite a humid feel generally down to the south, with 16 degrees to start off sunday morning. so, sunday, once again, we could see some sharp, thundery downpours first thing in the morning, with this area of low pressure really not going very far, very fast at all. the best of the dry, brighter weather is likely to be further north and west. the lion's share of the sunshine will be in scotland and northern ireland. early—morning cloud should thin and break across north—east england, the risk of those showers across east anglia and down to the south—east are likely to linger for much of the day. if you keep some sunshine, the highest values are likely to be once again into the mid—20s. now, this more unsettled theme is set to continue into monday with the low pressure just drifting its way further north and east up through the north sea. that means the further east is likely to see more in the way of showers. so, monday is a messy mix,
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really, of sunny spells and scattered showers. the best of the sunshine is likely to be out to the west, and we could see temperatures once again into the mid—20s. but some of these showers could bring a lot of heavy rain in a short space of time, so the weather story is certainly on the change. last week, it was extreme heat and lots of sunshine. our week ahead keeps those showers and certainly, a notable difference to the feel of the weather, with temperatures just below where they should be for the time of year.
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this is bbc news. the headlines:
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chase kalisz has given the united states their first medal — a gold — on day two of the olympic games. he came first in the men's 400 metres individual medley final, finishing well ahead of his fellow countryman jay litherland, who took silver. thousands of people in the western united states are spending the weekend in evacuation centres as wildfires continue to burn across the region. more than 80 large wildfires in 13 us states have burnt around 1.3 million acres in recent weeks. thousands of people have marched through the streets of the hungarian capital budapest to mark the largest gay pride gathering in the country's history. it comes after viktor orban's right—wing government pushed through a law banning the portrayal or promotion of homosexual or transgender content to people under 18. lightning has partially destroyed two properties in hampshire as the heatwave comes to an end in some parts of the country.

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