Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 24, 2021 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

11:30 pm
at the tokyo olympics, the defending champion team gb's adam peaty is through to the semifinal of the 100 metres breaststroke, while max whitlock advanced to the final of the pommel horse — the event in which he won gold four years ago. a daily testing scheme allowing key workers to avoid covid self—isolation in england has been expanded. essential services have been disrupted after hundreds of thousands of people have come into contact with infected people. a 11—year—old girl who sparked a nationwide search when she went missing in england has been found safe and well. fatuma kadir left her home in bolton, greater manchester, on thursday. a night—time curfew has come into force across almost all of afghanistan in an attempt to stop taliban infiltration into urban areas. the government said no—one is allowed to move around between ten at night and four in the morning.
11:31 pm
army explosives experts have safely detonated a second world war bomb which was found during the construction of a new housing estate in east yorkshire. part of the m62 had to be shut near goole for a controlled explosion to be carried out. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the political commentatorjo phillips, and nigel nelson, who's the political editor at the sunday mirror and sunday people. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the observer has been hearing from bosses within the uk food industry, who say government measures to prevent staff from isolating have been so badly mishandled, they've made the crisis worse.
11:32 pm
the sunday people focuses on the transport industry which is also suffering the adverse effects of the pingdemic. it says a shortage of staff at heathrow meant travellers were queueing for hours. according to the mail on sunday, the health secretary, sajid javid, has been accused of frightening borisjohnson into making his decision to move france into the amber—plus travel category. the sunday times reports that private schools have been accused of taking advantage of covid disruption to a—levels and playing the system by lobbying top universities and medical schools to take pupils whose performance is too weak to qualify for a place — even before exam results are published in two weeks�* time. the sunday telegraph leads on reports that premier league football fans who've not been fully vaccinated could be barred from attending matches from october under plans expected to be signed off
11:33 pm
by ministers, the sunday mirror has the same story but adds it will include all fans through to league 2 in england. and, finally, the sunday express says every victim of crime will be given a named police officer they can call or email about their case as part of a major new blitz by the government. so, let's begin... a little flavour of the papers this sunday. nigeland a little flavour of the papers this sunday. nigel and jo, a little flavour of the papers this sunday. nigeland jo, thank a little flavour of the papers this sunday. nigel and jo, thank you for coming back. let's crack on, front page of the observer, nigel, food buses. , , , , ., buses. yes, this is the confusion over who — buses. yes, this is the confusion over who has — buses. yes, this is the confusion over who has to _ buses. yes, this is the confusion over who has to isolate - buses. yes, this is the confusion over who has to isolate and - buses. yes, this is the confusion over who has to isolate and who | over who has to isolate and who doesn't — over who has to isolate and who doesn't. they are saying poor communications is making the whole thin- communications is making the whole thing worse and so you are starting to see _ thing worse and so you are starting to see shortages in supermarkets, empty— to see shortages in supermarkets, empty shelves, that kind of thing.
11:34 pm
and i_ empty shelves, that kind of thing. and i think— empty shelves, that kind of thing. and i think they've got a point that the problem with the government, when _ the problem with the government, when they— the problem with the government, when they decided to adopt this policy— when they decided to adopt this policy for— when they decided to adopt this policy for essential workers, is it didnt— policy for essential workers, is it didn't quite make it clear which essential— didn't quite make it clear which essential workers were on the list. for instance, local government workers — for instance, local government workers were exempt, but it didn't actually— workers were exempt, but it didn't actually specify which workers. obviously, local government doesn't mean _ obviously, local government doesn't mean your— obviously, local government doesn't mean your counsellors and people like that, — mean your counsellors and people like that, it — mean your counsellors and people like that, it looks like it will mean — like that, it looks like it will mean rubbish collectors because that is an essential service. so, when the government panicked, as they so often _ the government panicked, as they so often do. _ the government panicked, as they so often do, they hadn't actually gone through— often do, they hadn't actually gone through this list properly, transmitted the right left to various— transmitted the right left to various people, the food industry is arguing _ various people, the food industry is arguing that is the reason, if you find your— arguing that is the reason, if you find your shelf hasn't got what it -- what — find your shelf hasn't got what it -- what you _ find your shelf hasn't got what it —— what you want on it, that is the reason _ —— what you want on it, that is the reason for— —— what you want on it, that is the reason for it _ —— what you want on it, that is the reason for it. jo. -- what you want on it, that is the reason for it— reason for it. jo. yeah, i mean, this whole _ reason for it. jo. yeah, i mean, this whole covid _ reason for it. jo. yeah, i mean, this whole covid catalogue - reason for it. jo. yeah, i mean,
11:35 pm
this whole covid catalogue hasl reason for it. jo. yeah, i mean, - this whole covid catalogue has been no story of missed communication and mixed messages to out. and just as we seem to be coming towards the end of it, what is abundantly clear is that the government hasn't thought through the effect of what its initiatives are. and, so, this whole business at self isolating, even if you have had two vaccines and even if you are tested negative for coronavirus is an absolute nonsense. and we've got staff shortages across the piece in every possible sector, and it is beginning to have an impact on everybody�*s lives, whether it is supermarkets, whether it is food getting to supermarkets, whether it is lorry drivers, bin collectors, border officials at airports and things, train drivers, staff on transport and things, and it is absolutely in danger of collapsing the countryjust as we
11:36 pm
begin to get going again. and i think the chap who is quoted here, james bilby, the federation of distribution, he said the problem as there was no idea who is on this list of exempt categories, only 3% of the whole of the industry has been contacted. this is the sort of thing that should have been in place, who is exempt, well actually, pretty much everybody, frankly. 50. pretty much everybody, frankly. so, niel, pretty much everybody, frankly. so, nigel, when we go to the front page of the telegraph, asjo said that, it is binmen, the security services, the headline, the story we are looking at, pingdemic chaos engulfs matt as binmen get reprieve. the binmen -- _ matt as binmen get reprieve. the binmen -- the — matt as binmen get reprieve. the binmen —— the met seem to be suffering — binmen —— the met seem to be suffering more. 7% of officers are
11:37 pm
isolating — suffering more. 7% of officers are isolating at — suffering more. 7% of officers are isolating at the moment but that goes _ isolating at the moment but that goes up — isolating at the moment but that goes up to 17% in the match. if you're — goes up to 17% in the match. if you're talking about nearly one in five officers, that means 30 —— 13 things— five officers, that means 30 —— 13 things won't _ five officers, that means 30 —— 13 things won't be done, certain crimes will not _ things won't be done, certain crimes will not he _ things won't be done, certain crimes will not be investigated. —— certain things _ will not be investigated. —— certain things. there is a crisis here, and i things. there is a crisis here, and ithink— things. there is a crisis here, and i think that — things. there is a crisis here, and i think that what needs to happen now, _ i think that what needs to happen now, because so many sectors are treing _ now, because so many sectors are being affected, what needs to happen now is— being affected, what needs to happen now is they have to review this idea of about— now is they have to review this idea of about whether you need to isolate before _ of about whether you need to isolate before the _ of about whether you need to isolate before the moment you obtained because — before the moment you obtained because after august the 16th, you won't _ because after august the 16th, you won't have — because after august the 16th, you won't have too. if you are double iahhed _ won't have too. if you are double jabbed after august the 16th and you are double jabbed now, there can't be any— are double jabbed now, there can't be any difference, so what needs to be any difference, so what needs to he done _ be any difference, so what needs to he done as— be any difference, so what needs to be done as this has to be brought forward _ be done as this has to be brought forward and so if you are double iahhed, — forward and so if you are double iahhed, no— forward and so if you are double jabbed, no need to isolate. gk, forward and so if you are double jabbed, no need to isolate. ok, so, the front page _ jabbed, no need to isolate. ok, so, the front page of — jabbed, no need to isolate. ok, so, the front page of the _ jabbed, no need to isolate. ok, so,
11:38 pm
the front page of the sunday - jabbed, no need to isolate. ok, so, the front page of the sunday times| the front page of the sunday times points to the number of infections that has halved in a week. yes. points to the number of infections that has halved in a week. yes, this is very good — that has halved in a week. yes, this is very good news. _ that has halved in a week. yes, this is very good news. it _ that has halved in a week. yes, this is very good news. it is _ that has halved in a week. yes, this is very good news. it is possibly - is very good news. it is possibly too premature to be absolutely over the moon but it certainly does look as though infections have halved. they have an obviously caught up with so called freedom day on monday so we will have to see because there is always a bit of a lag but it does appear to give some sort of hope that maybe, you know, we're not going to a terrible sort of third wave of infections. i think what is quite confusing about some of these statistics is that the rate of infections is going up or coming down, according to this, in fact, but hospitalisations are still creeping up. and so are the number of deaths. but what we don't really know from the infection rate is whether these are people who have
11:39 pm
presented to doctors or hospitals complaining of feeling unwell or whether they are people who are taking test themselves and their attacks are coming back positive. 50 attacks are coming back positive. so many questions, so many questions. let's turn to the front page of the mail on sunday, nigel, and france fiasco cabinet at war, not in france but it is about france. it is fiasco cabinet at war, not in france but it is about france.— but it is about france. it is about france and _ but it is about france. it is about france and it _ but it is about france. it is about france and it is _ but it is about france. it is about france and it is actually - but it is about france. it is about france and it is actually in - but it is about france. it is about i france and it is actually in downing street _ france and it is actually in downing street. what the mail on sunday is claiming _ street. what the mail on sunday is claiming is — street. what the mail on sunday is claiming is that sajid javid, the health — claiming is that sajid javid, the health secretary, bounced boris johnson — health secretary, bounced boris johnson into making france and amber plus country. _ johnson into making france and amber plus country, which meant you had to guarantine _ plus country, which meant you had to quarantine for ten days when you came _ quarantine for ten days when you came home. now, the significant factor— came home. now, the significant factor here — came home. now, the significant factor here is that grant shapps, the transport secretary, wasn't actually _ the transport secretary, wasn't actually in — the transport secretary, wasn't actually in the meeting, and had he been. _ actually in the meeting, and had he been. he _ actually in the meeting, and had he been, he would probably have had something to say about that. what sa'id something to say about that. what sajid javid — something to say about that. what sajid javid was worried about was ripples— sajid javid was worried about was ripples that the astrazeneca vaccine
11:40 pm
was less _ ripples that the astrazeneca vaccine was less effective against the peter south _ was less effective against the peter south africa variant and that is what _ south africa variant and that is what bounced borisjohnson into the decision _ what bounced borisjohnson into the decision if— what bounced borisjohnson into the decision. if you listen to people from _ decision. if you listen to people from france and what they are saying is that _ from france and what they are saying is that infection rate overall is a good _ is that infection rate overall is a good deal— is that infection rate overall is a good deal lower than ours and of course _ good deal lower than ours and of course if— good deal lower than ours and of course if you have travel insurance you should — course if you have travel insurance you should be able to go there without — you should be able to go there without any problems. but you still don't _ without any problems. but you still don't get _ without any problems. but you still don't get over this difficulty of suddenly changing the rules and then having _ suddenly changing the rules and then having to _ suddenly changing the rules and then having to quarantine when you get back _ having to quarantine when you get back and — having to quarantine when you get back. and this is the kind of thing i back. and this is the kind of thing ithink— back. and this is the kind of thing i think that — back. and this is the kind of thing i think that people are getting really— i think that people are getting really fed up with. it is that if you go— really fed up with. it is that if you go abroad, you don't know what you go abroad, you don't know what you face _ you go abroad, you don't know what you face once you get bad, and is not the _ you face once you get bad, and is not the country you are rain which could _ not the country you are rain which could he _ not the country you are rain which could be reasonably safe, it is what you have _ could be reasonably safe, it is what you have to— could be reasonably safe, it is what you have to do when you come back to your own _ you have to do when you come back to your own country. it is you have to do when you come back to your own country-— your own country. it is interesting, isn't it, because _ your own country. it is interesting, isn't it, because as _ your own country. it is interesting, isn't it, because as we _ your own country. it is interesting, isn't it, because as we turn - your own country. it is interesting, isn't it, because as we turn to - your own country. it is interesting, isn't it, because as we turn to the | isn't it, because as we turn to the front page of the mirror, i am going to get thoughts from both of you but if i turn to you first, jo, we are
11:41 pm
looking at the possibility of vaccine passports for a0 matches, is the headline there. can you remember the headline there. can you remember the time a couple of weeks or months ago when we were talking aboutjust the thought of using a passport and people saying, no, no, no. absolutely. it was only back in february that the vaccine minister said absolutely there will not be any such thing as a covid possible. we already had a couple of weeks ago that you will need to have proof of vaccinations from september, end of september, if you want to go to a nightclub, even though you can be at a nightclub every night of the week between now and the end of september. this idea to bring in some sort of covid vaccination possible in order to go to a football match, again, you know, it is covid passports by the back door, if that is what the government is going to do, then and i sit and have
11:42 pm
a proper consultation and work out how it is going to work. because if this is down to stewards on turnstiles, there is going to be massive queues, there is also going to be, you know, what is going to happen to children or under a teens who haven't beenjabbed? are happen to children or under a teens who haven't been jabbed? are they not going to be able to go? and the real problem is for a lot of the smaller clubs, because this isn't just the rich premier league clubs, it is going down to other links as well and they have had a terrible 18 months, obviously. most of their money doesn't come from television like the premier league, it comes from the turnstiles, so if people don't go to football, people will be losing money and it will put many of them on the edge of collapse. fligeii. them on the edge of collapse. nigel, cuickl , them on the edge of collapse. nigel, quickly. you — them on the edge of collapse. nigel, quickly. you were — them on the edge of collapse. nigel, quickly, you were talking _ them on the edge of collapse. nigel, quickly, you were talking about - quickly, you were talking about france, on the front of the mirror, this is your paper, the uk would not be the first place, france had just introduced covid health passport. it
11:43 pm
introduced covid health passport. it goes one step further, it is not 'ust goes one step further, it is not just based _ goes one step further, it is not just based on vaccination, what the french— just based on vaccination, what the french have — just based on vaccination, what the french have got is a three tier thing — french have got is a three tier thing which is what we have been encouraged to use in this country, but it— encouraged to use in this country, but it means that either you are double — but it means that either you are double maxed or that you can show proof _ double maxed or that you can show proof of _ double maxed or that you can show proof of a _ double maxed or that you can show proof of a recent test, or that you have _ proof of a recent test, or that you have lreen— proof of a recent test, or that you have been affected and are therefore inrnrune _ have been affected and are therefore immune. and of course the previous positive _ immune. and of course the previous positive test — immune. and of course the previous positive test with actually prove that _ positive test with actually prove that. those things which make it an awful— that. those things which make it an awful lot _ that. those things which make it an awful lot easier than stopping people — awful lot easier than stopping people getting getting into football matches. did people getting getting into football matches. , , ., people getting getting into football matches. , ., ., matches. did you want to say something. _ matches. did you want to say something, nigel? _ matches. did you want to say something, nigel? did - matches. did you want to say something, nigel? did i - matches. did you want to say - something, nigel? did i interrupt you? no. that is turned quickly to the sunday express. named police officers for every victim. this is the prime minister blitzing crime, you are shaking your head, jo, the floor is yours. it you are shaking your head, jo, the floor is yours-— floor is yours. it is so predictable, - floor is yours. it is so predictable, isn't - floor is yours. it is so predictable, isn't it,| floor is yours. it is so i predictable, isn't it, he floor is yours. it is so - predictable, isn't it, he is floor is yours. it is so _ predictable, isn't it, he is going to announce his crime strategy on
11:44 pm
tuesday. that this is a typical headline grabbing story that will probably never be realised. i think people are more concerned about him sorting out social care which is an absolute crisis. he promised to do it as he entered downing street two years ago. the idea that you would have a named police officer for every victim who would then be e—mailed and phoned able by every victim of crime is utterly ludicrous. i mean, where i live in a small town in kent, we don't even have a police station, we have a police officer that we see and we share that with other town. lots and lots of places around the country are in exactly the same position. nigel... jo, sorry, we've got 22nd. nigel, quickly, your thoughts. nigel... jo, sorry, we've got 22nd. nigel, quickly, yourthoughts. boris johnson— nigel, quickly, yourthoughts. boris johnson has promised to recruit 20.000 — johnson has promised to recruit 20,000 police officers, we are nowhere — 20,000 police officers, we are nowhere near that number yet and i can't _ nowhere near that number yet and i can't see _ nowhere near that number yet and i can't see a — nowhere near that number yet and i can't see a player like this being
11:45 pm
workable — can't see a player like this being workable with not enough police to carry it _ workable with not enough police to carry it out — workable with not enough police to carry it out-— carry it out. nigel nelson,j phillips. — carry it out. nigel nelson,j phillips, thank— carry it out. nigel nelson,j phillips, thank you - carry it out. nigel nelson,j phillips, thank you so - carry it out. nigel nelson, j | phillips, thank you so much, carry it out. nigel nelson, j i phillips, thank you so much, i carry it out. nigel nelson, j - phillips, thank you so much, i am so sorry about the interruptions, we didn't have enough time this time around. thank you to post and thank you forjoining us, do stay with us because lewis vaughanjones will be with you at that top of the hour. to get you there, here is that film review. hello, and welcome to the film review with me, mark kermode — rounding up the best new movies available for viewing in cinemas and in the home. tuesday, january 1st, 1856.

18 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on