Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 23, 2021 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

5:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines at 5pm — music. the greatest show on earth, but with no spectators — 11,000 athletes from more than 200 countries will compete in this year's tokyo olympics. the 32nd summer games was declared open as the olympic flame was lit at the spectacular opening ceremony. a high courtjudge rules there should be a new investigation into whether state agencies might have prevented the 0magh bombing in 1998. the victims�* families feel vindicated. for a very long time,
5:01 pm
there's been no doubt in my mind that 0magh was a preventable atrocity, but nobody wanted to hear that message, not the irish government, not the british government. thousands of workers in the food supply chain in england no longer need to isolate if pinged by the covid app as long as they test negative. several trainlines are reducing their services as hundreds of staff are asked to isolate to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. and at 5:45pm, mark kermode is here with the film review, taking a look at new releases including the world to come and off the rails.
5:02 pm
it's one year late and has been beset by problems, but the olympics are officially under way in toyko. the opening ceremony injapan�*s national stadium ended with the lighting of the olympic cauldron. the 3.5—hour—long spectacle has been described as "sombre", reflecting the mood of a nation which is having to host the biggest sporting event in the world during a pandemic. just 22 of team gb�*s 375—strong squad joined a much—reduced athletes�* parade. joe lynskey reports. as the flame was lit, the sights felt the same, but the sound was empty. this was naomi 0saka, tennis�* grand slam champion, marking the start of a games in the silence. at this olympics, the backdrop is inescapable. this opening ceremony was different. it was solemn. let us all take moment to remember all those friends and loved ones
5:03 pm
who are no longer with us, in particular because of the covid—19 pandemic. there was reflection, but the theme, too, was moving forward. music. and a tribute to how athletes have had to adapt to 12 months of lockdown. at the front of it, japan�*s arisa tsubata, a boxer and a nurse who missed out on the games when her qualifier was cancelled. japan�*s flag, too, was brought on by key workers, waved on in the stands by around 1000 dignitaries. the build—up has been fraught, but japan still wants to showjoy. and just like in 2012, there was tradition. these figures are daiku, traditional carpenters who sing as they chisel. tokyo were last host for the games in 1964, when trees were planted. the wood�*s being used for these 0lympic rings.
5:04 pm
and so, more than 200 nations converged on a city in a state of emergency. all in masks, the british team for the night was trimmed down. just 22 of them marched, led by moe sbihi and hannah mills, a rower and a sailor. this games is a year late. the ioc�*s called it the light at the end of a tunnel. the pandemic forced us apart. this separation made this tunnel so dark. l but today, wherever in the world - you may be, we are united in sharing this moment together. 0ver four hours, there was fun and, too, the sense of an 0lympics as a tv event. it�*s showtime. but tokyo�*s showpiece has come with the world still in a pandemic. for the next 17 days, they want sport to be the focus. joe lynskey, bbc news. 0ur sports correspondent natalie pirks was watching
5:05 pm
the opening ceremony from inside the stadium. the world had been waiting a long time to see how tokyo would officially open these games. and it was no queen parachuting into the london olympic stadium, let�*s put it that way. but it was a very sombre, intimate affair, especially with no spectators in the stadium. and i think it was reflective of the times that we are living in, and i think it was fitting that they didn�*t have a massive celebration, especially when the japanese public, who are paying for this, can�*t be part of this party. during the quietest part, you could hear some spectators outside, some protesters should i say, chanting things like "stop the games". i�*d say it was a noisy minority, but it does show the strength of feeling here in japan. a recent survey said that two thirds of the public didn�*t believe that japan could pull off a safe games, and it hasn�*t helped that covid infection rates are rising.
5:06 pm
they�*re at their highest level now since january, and we�*ve had yet more positive cases today of people accredited for these games, including three athletes. everything was muted, including the traditional parade of nations. more than 11,000 athletes are here at these games, but only around 5000 actually marched, including only 22 for team gb. so, thatjust gives you an idea of how muted the celebrations are. overall, though, this ceremony was free of the bombast, i would say, that we�*ve seen in the past. it was poignant. at times it was actually beautiful, and i think it was well pitched for where we�*re at, but over the next 18 days, we�*re going to some amazing sports, some true feats of athleticism and hopefully that will be the catalyst really for the japanese public to get behind these games. natalie perks will be following the
5:07 pm
olympic for us throughout in tokyo. a high courtjudge has ruled there should be a new investigation into whether state agencies could have prevented the 0magh bombing in 1998. the attack, which was carried out by the dissident republican group the real ira, was the worst single atrocity of the conflict in northern ireland. 29 people died, and several hundred were injured. in 2013, the government said it would not hold a public inquiry. we will talk a lot about these findings today. danjohnson is our correspondent in 0magh. yes, the question that families have asked ever since the 0magh bombing was could it have been prevented was? there was intelligence evidence that if it had been shared better, could have prevented the attack and saved some of the lives lost that day or indeed lead to the
5:08 pm
prosecution of those who planted the car bomb here in 0magh in august of 1998. families campaigned for the government refused a public inquiry in that led to the judicial review that concluded today. let me bring you the words of the judge that ruled he was satisfied there were certain grounds that gave rise to possible allegations that there was a real prospect of preventing the 0magh bombing. that�*s what the judge said there should now be an investigation which would have to look at whether a more proactive campaign of disruption, especially if coordinated north and south of the border, had a real prospect of beginning the bombing and without benefit of hindsight the advantages of taking a much more aggressive approach toward the suspected terrorists outweighed the potential disadvantages. that is news that has been welcomed by the families of the victims who died that day and i can introduce you to michael gallagher, whose son was killed in the 0magh bombing. thank you for your time today, michael. tell us about your son first of all. he
5:09 pm
today, michael. tell us about your son first of all.— son first of all. he was a 21-year-old, _ son first of all. he was a 21-year-old, a _ son first of all. he was a 21-year-old, a typical i son first of all. he was a _ 21-year-old, a typical 21-year-old. 21—year—old, a typical 21—year—old. he enjoyed — 21—year—old, a typical 21—year—old. he enjoyed going out with his friends — he enjoyed going out with his friends at the weekend, and having a few beers _ friends at the weekend, and having a few beers. he was a part of our family — few beers. he was a part of our family you _ few beers. he was a part of our family. you know, he lives in our family— family. you know, he lives in our family home, and we thought when he was there. _ family home, and we thought when he was there, anything was possible because — was there, anything was possible because that was atop a parson and he was _ because that was atop a parson and he was. that left a space that could never _ he was. that left a space that could never be _ he was. that left a space that could never be filled and never will be filled _ never be filled and never will be filled. but we talk about aiden every— filled. but we talk about aiden every day. he is still part of our lives _ every day. he is still part of our lives you — every day. he is still part of our lives. you know, he was big into cars, _ lives. you know, he was big into cars. and — lives. you know, he was big into cars, and music and when we change the car, _ cars, and music and when we change the car, we _ cars, and music and when we change the car, we would say i wonder what he would _ the car, we would say i wonder what he would think about this. so he is slill parl— he would think about this. so he is slill part of— he would think about this. so he is still part of our lives and that is important — still part of our lives and that is important to keep them alive. why has it been — important to keep them alive. why has it been so _ important to keep them alive. twig has it been so important for important to keep them alive. “iii"ig' has it been so important for you that there is notjust an investigation but a public inquiry into what was known in the to that bombing? brute into what was known in the to that bombin: ? ~ ., into what was known in the to that bombin: ? ~ . ., ., into what was known in the to that bombin: ? ~ . . ., , bombing? we have had quite a number
5:10 pm
of inuuiries. bombing? we have had quite a number of inquiries l— bombing? we have had quite a number of inquiries. i think _ bombing? we have had quite a number of inquiries. i think that _ bombing? we have had quite a number of inquiries. i think that several- of inquiries. i think that several police _ of inquiries. i think that several police ombudsmen inquiries and police _ police ombudsmen inquiries and police investigations on both sides of the _ police investigations on both sides of the border. but they all look to specific— of the border. but they all look to specific areas. we need an overarching public inquiry that can deal particularly with the intelligence issues that have been raised _ intelligence issues that have been raised it's— intelligence issues that have been raised. it's only a public inquiry that— raised. it's only a public inquiry that can — raised. it's only a public inquiry that can deal with that. so that's why we _ that can deal with that. so that's why we feel that it needs to be a public inquiry. why we feel that it needs to be a public inquiry-— public inquiry. does it need to be able to get _ public inquiry. does it need to be able to get at _ public inquiry. does it need to be able to get at that _ public inquiry. does it need to be able to get at that sensitive - able to get at that sensitive intelligence evidence that otherwise might be kept secret? yes. intelligence evidence that otherwise might be kept secret?— might be kept secret? yes, and i mean we appreciate _ might be kept secret? yes, and i mean we appreciate that - might be kept secret? yes, and i mean we appreciate that some . might be kept secret? yes, and i - mean we appreciate that some things have to _ mean we appreciate that some things have to be _ mean we appreciate that some things have to be kept secret. we don't want _ have to be kept secret. we don't want the — have to be kept secret. we don't want the workings of the intelligence service to pass into terrorist~ — intelligence service to pass into terrorist. we are reasonable people but we _ terrorist. we are reasonable people but we do _ terrorist. we are reasonable people but we do need... there are questions _ but we do need... there are questions we need answers to them and it— questions we need answers to them and it is— questions we need answers to them and it is only in that public forum that we _ and it is only in that public forum that we can — and it is only in that public forum that we can get those answers. and we encourage government to forward with that _ we encourage government to forward with that. do we encourage government to forward with that. , ., ~' we encourage government to forward with that. , ., ,, , ., ., with that. do you feel like you are a step closer _ with that. do you feel like you are a step closer today _ with that. do you feel like you are a step closer today with _ with that. do you feel like you are a step closer today with this - a step closer today with this
5:11 pm
judgment?— a step closer today with this 'udament? ~ , . ., a step closer today with this 'udament? ~ , , . ., ., judgment? absolutely. we have a senior high _ judgment? absolutely. we have a senior high court _ judgment? absolutely. we have a senior high courtjudge _ judgment? absolutely. we have a senior high courtjudge it - judgment? absolutely. we have a senior high courtjudge it looked l judgment? absolutely. we have a. senior high courtjudge it looked at these _ senior high courtjudge it looked at theseissues senior high courtjudge it looked at these issues and has said today what we have _ these issues and has said today what we have said over the past 20 years. we believe _ we have said over the past 20 years. we believe this was a preventable atrocitv _ we believe this was a preventable atrocity. the judge has recommended future _ atrocity. the judge has recommended future serious action on both sides of the _ future serious action on both sides of the border, which is very important, and we look forward to cooperating with both governments. thank— cooperating with both governments. thank you — cooperating with both governments. thank you. we appreciate your time today, michael. i know you will come today�*s news but it must�*ve been a difficult day and a difficult place for you to come. this was a memorial garden laid in memory of the klingon victims that day. we wish you all the best. let�*s bring you the response of the british government. brandon lewis that he wanted to put on record his deep regret for the families of those killed and that they have had to wait so long for them to find out what happened. he said they deserve answers and i have great respect for their patients, grace and determination. each of the market —— government recognises that there were things set out and there were preventable allegations and
5:12 pm
more should be done to investigate them into the government would take time to consider the judge�*s statement and all recommendations carefully. but this does apparently look like it means that the story, the investigation of all the issues in the run—up to the 0magh bombing is not over now and will be reconsidered.— is not over now and will be reconsidered. dan, thank you. s-ueakin reconsidered. dan, thank you. speaking there _ reconsidered. dan, thank you. speaking there to _ reconsidered. dan, thank you. speaking there to michael - reconsidered. dan, thank you. - speaking there to michael gallagher who lost his son. let�*s speak to the investigative journalistjohn ware. he�*s reported extensively on the toubles, and in 2008, made the bbc panorama programme 0magh: what the police were never told. thank you forjoining us. and as i understand it, it was that documentary that revealed the fact that some of the conversations between the bombers had been listened to. between the bombers had been listened to—
5:13 pm
between the bombers had been listened to. well, they had been monitored. _ listened to. well, they had been monitored, let's _ listened to. well, they had been monitored, let's put _ listened to. well, they had been monitored, let's put it _ listened to. well, they had been monitored, let's put it that - listened to. well, they had been monitored, let's put it that way. j monitored, let's put it that way. there _ monitored, let's put it that way. there were _ monitored, let's put it that way. there were transcripts _ monitored, let's put it that way. there were transcripts of- there were transcripts of interchanges _ there were transcripts of interchanges between i there were transcripts ofl interchanges between the there were transcripts of— interchanges between the individuals and the _ interchanges between the individuals and the scout — interchanges between the individuals and the scout car, _ interchanges between the individuals and the scout car, the _ interchanges between the individuals and the scout car, the car— and the scout car, the car that went. ahead of the bomb car to check there were no— ahead of the bomb car to check there were no vehicle _ ahead of the bomb car to check there were no vehicle checkpoints - ahead of the bomb car to check there were no vehicle checkpoints and - ahead of the bomb car to check there were no vehicle checkpoints and so . were no vehicle checkpoints and so on and _ were no vehicle checkpoints and so on and there — were no vehicle checkpoints and so on and there it— were no vehicle checkpoints and so on and there it was _ were no vehicle checkpoints and so on and there it was clear— were no vehicle checkpoints and so on and there it was clear to - were no vehicle checkpoints and so on and there it was clear to the - on and there it was clear to the target — on and there it was clear to the target in — on and there it was clear to the target in 0magh. _ on and there it was clear to the target in 0magh. and - on and there it was clear to the target in 0magh. and the - on and there it was clear to the - target in 0magh. and the occupants of the _ target in 0magh. and the occupants of the bomb— target in 0magh. and the occupants ofthe bomb car— target in 0magh. and the occupants of the bomb car itself, _ target in 0magh. and the occupants of the bomb car itself, and - target in 0magh. and the occupants of the bomb car itself, and these . of the bomb car itself, and these were _ of the bomb car itself, and these were captured _ of the bomb car itself, and these were captured by— of the bomb car itself, and these were captured by gc _ of the bomb car itself, and these were captured by gc hq - of the bomb car itself, and these were captured by gc hq at- of the bomb car itself, and these were captured by gc hq at the l were captured by gc hq at the request— were captured by gc hq at the request of— were captured by gc hq at the request of the _ were captured by gc hq at the request of the special- were captured by gc hq at the request of the special branch i were captured by gc hq at the - request of the special branch which is interesting — request of the special branch which is interesting in _ request of the special branch which is interesting in itself— request of the special branch which is interesting in itself because - request of the special branch which is interesting in itself because i- is interesting in itself because i think— is interesting in itself because i think the — is interesting in itself because i think the judge _ is interesting in itself because i think the judge is _ is interesting in itself because i think the judge is probably- is interesting in itself because i- think the judge is probably alluding to the _ think the judge is probably alluding to the fact — think the judge is probably alluding to the fact that _ think the judge is probably alluding to the fact that the _ think the judge is probably alluding to the fact that the special- think the judge is probably alluding to the fact that the special branch i to the fact that the special branch by to the fact that the special branch bv the _ to the fact that the special branch bv the time — to the fact that the special branch by the time 0magh _ to the fact that the special branch by the time 0magh happened - to the fact that the special branchj by the time 0magh happened had to the fact that the special branch - by the time 0magh happened had built a fully— by the time 0magh happened had built a fully -- _ by the time 0magh happened had built a fully -- pretty— by the time 0magh happened had built a fully -- prettvfull_ by the time 0magh happened had built a fully —— pretty full picture _ by the time 0magh happened had built a fully —— pretty full picture of - a fully —— pretty full picture of the individuals— a fully —— pretty full picture of the individuals who _ a fully —— pretty full picture of the individuals who turned - a fully —— pretty full picture of| the individuals who turned out a fully —— pretty full picture of - the individuals who turned out to, i believe. _ the individuals who turned out to, i believe. and — the individuals who turned out to, i believe, and the _ the individuals who turned out to, i believe, and the police _ the individuals who turned out to, i believe, and the police believe, - believe, and the police believe, carried — believe, and the police believe, carried out _ believe, and the police believe, carried out the _ believe, and the police believe, carried out the 0magh - believe, and the police believe, i carried out the 0magh bombing. believe, and the police believe, - carried out the 0magh bombing. and they also— carried out the 0magh bombing. and they also had — carried out the 0magh bombing. and they also had a — carried out the 0magh bombing. and they also had a telephone _ carried out the 0magh bombing. and they also had a telephone numbers l they also had a telephone numbers and these — they also had a telephone numbers and these had _ they also had a telephone numbers and these had been _ they also had a telephone numbers and these had been passed - they also had a telephone numbers and these had been passed to - they also had a telephone numbers and these had been passed to gc. they also had a telephone numbers i and these had been passed to gc hq for monitoring — and these had been passed to gc hq for monitoring. by _ and these had been passed to gc hq for monitoring. by the _ and these had been passed to gc hq for monitoring. by the time - and these had been passed to gc hq for monitoring. by the time of- and these had been passed to gc hq for monitoring. by the time of the i for monitoring. by the time of the bombing. — for monitoring. by the time of the bombing. the _ for monitoring. by the time of the bombing, the intelligence - for monitoring. by the time of the | bombing, the intelligence services certainly— bombing, the intelligence services certainly had — bombing, the intelligence services certainly had a _ bombing, the intelligence services certainly had a pretty— bombing, the intelligence services certainly had a pretty full- bombing, the intelligence services certainly had a pretty full picture l certainly had a pretty full picture of the _
5:14 pm
certainly had a pretty full picture of the individuals _ certainly had a pretty full picture of the individuals who _ certainly had a pretty full picture of the individuals who had - certainly had a pretty full picture of the individuals who had done i of the individuals who had done this _ of the individuals who had done this. " , ., ., , ., of the individuals who had done this. " i. ., , ., ., this. and your thoughts therefore on the rulin: this. and your thoughts therefore on the ruling today. _ this. and your thoughts therefore on the ruling today, the _ this. and your thoughts therefore on the ruling today, the decision i the ruling today, the decision today? the ruling today, the decision toda ? ~ ., , ., today? well, a small element if you like a personal— today? well, a small element if you like a personal vindication _ today? well, a small element if you like a personal vindication but i today? well, a small element if you like a personal vindication but only. like a personal vindication but only in this— like a personal vindication but only in this sense — like a personal vindication but only in this sense that _ like a personal vindication but only in this sense that within _ like a personal vindication but only in this sense that within 36 - like a personal vindication but only in this sense that within 36 hours i in this sense that within 36 hours of the _ in this sense that within 36 hours of the transmission _ in this sense that within 36 hours of the transmission of _ in this sense that within 36 hours of the transmission of our - in this sense that within 36 hours i of the transmission of our programme which _ of the transmission of our programme which disclosed — of the transmission of our programme which disclosed for— of the transmission of our programme which disclosed for the _ of the transmission of our programme which disclosed for the first _ of the transmission of our programme which disclosed for the first time i which disclosed for the first time that gc_ which disclosed for the first time that gc h0 — which disclosed for the first time that gc hq have _ which disclosed for the first time that gc hq have been _ which disclosed for the first time | that gc hq have been monitoring which disclosed for the first time i that gc hq have been monitoring the phones _ that gc hq have been monitoring the phones of— that gc hq have been monitoring the phones of the — that gc hq have been monitoring the phones of the individuals _ that gc hq have been monitoring the phones of the individuals involved, i phones of the individuals involved, the prime — phones of the individuals involved, the prime minister— phones of the individuals involved, the prime minister then, _ phones of the individuals involved, the prime minister then, gordon i the prime ministerthen, gordon brown, — the prime ministerthen, gordon brown, ordered _ the prime ministerthen, gordon brown, ordered an _ the prime ministerthen, gordon brown, ordered an inquiry- the prime ministerthen, gordon brown, ordered an inquiry about| the prime minister then, gordon i brown, ordered an inquiry about the then intelligent _ brown, ordered an inquiry about the then intelligent services _ then intelligent services commissioner— then intelligent services commissioner and i then intelligent services commissioner and theyl then intelligent services _ commissioner and they questioned me and many— commissioner and they questioned me and many other— commissioner and they questioned me and many other people _ commissioner and they questioned me and many other people and _ commissioner and they questioned me and many other people and his- commissioner and they questioned me and many other people and his reportl and many other people and his report really— and many other people and his report reallv missed — and many other people and his report really missed the _ and many other people and his report really missed the whole _ and many other people and his report really missed the whole point - and many other people and his report really missed the whole point of- and many other people and his report really missed the whole point of the i really missed the whole point of the programme, — really missed the whole point of the programme, which _ really missed the whole point of the programme, which was _ really missed the whole point of the programme, which was really - really missed the whole point of the programme, which was really not i programme, which was really not about— programme, which was really not about whether— programme, which was really not about whether it _ programme, which was really not about whether it could _ programme, which was really not about whether it could have i programme, which was really not about whether it could have beenj about whether it could have been stopped — about whether it could have been stopped or— about whether it could have been stopped or not— about whether it could have been stopped or not but— about whether it could have been stopped or not but whether- about whether it could have been stopped or not but whether there had been sufficient _ stopped or not but whether there had been sufficient cooperation _ stopped or not but whether there had been sufficient cooperation and i been sufficient cooperation and obvious— been sufficient cooperation and obvious that _ been sufficient cooperation and obvious that there _ been sufficient cooperation and obvious that there had - been sufficient cooperation and obvious that there had not i been sufficient cooperation andl obvious that there had not been been sufficient cooperation and i obvious that there had not been by the intelligence _
5:15 pm
obvious that there had not been by the intelligence agencies _ obvious that there had not been by the intelligence agencies and i obvious that there had not been by the intelligence agencies and the l the intelligence agencies and the cid try— the intelligence agencies and the cid try to— the intelligence agencies and the cid try to catch _ the intelligence agencies and the cid try to catch the _ the intelligence agencies and the cid try to catch the bombers. i the intelligence agencies and the | cid try to catch the bombers. but they focused _ cid try to catch the bombers. but they focused all— cid try to catch the bombers. but they focused all the _ cid try to catch the bombers. but they focused all the criticism - cid try to catch the bombers. but they focused all the criticism on i they focused all the criticism on they focused all the criticism on the bbc— they focused all the criticism on the bbc for— they focused all the criticism on the bbc for suggesting - they focused all the criticism on the bbc for suggesting we - they focused all the criticism on the bbc for suggesting we had. they focused all the criticism on i the bbc for suggesting we had as they focused all the criticism on - the bbc for suggesting we had as it were cruelly— the bbc for suggesting we had as it were cruelly come _ the bbc for suggesting we had as it were cruelly come out _ the bbc for suggesting we had as it were cruelly come out of _ the bbc for suggesting we had as it were cruelly come out of the - the bbc for suggesting we had as it were cruelly come out of the use i were cruelly come out of the use that word — were cruelly come out of the use that word to— were cruelly come out of the use that word to be _ were cruelly come out of the use that word to be fair— were cruelly come out of the use that word to be fair but - were cruelly come out of the use that word to be fair but he - that word to be fair but he suggested _ that word to be fair but he suggested we _ that word to be fair but he suggested we have - that word to be fair but he suggested we have been. suggested we have been irresponsible, _ suggested we have been irresponsible, and - suggested we have been irresponsible, and i- suggested we have been| irresponsible, and i think suggested we have been- irresponsible, and i think i'm guotihg — irresponsible, and i think i'm quoting him _ irresponsible, and i think i'm quoting him almost - irresponsible, and i think i'ml quoting him almost precisely, raisihg — quoting him almost precisely, raising the _ quoting him almost precisely, raising the expectations - quoting him almost precisely, raising the expectations of - quoting him almost precisely, | raising the expectations of the families— raising the expectations of the families unreasonably- raising the expectations of the families unreasonably that - raising the expectations of the families unreasonably that the tragedy, — families unreasonably that the tragedy, the _ families unreasonably that the tragedy, the stressful- families unreasonably that the | tragedy, the stressful atrocity, families unreasonably that the - tragedy, the stressful atrocity, the biggest _ tragedy, the stressful atrocity, the biggest single _ tragedy, the stressful atrocity, the biggest single atrocity _ tragedy, the stressful atrocity, the biggest single atrocity of _ tragedy, the stressful atrocity, the biggest single atrocity of the - biggest single atrocity of the entire — biggest single atrocity of the entire conflict, _ biggest single atrocity of the entire conflict, could - biggest single atrocity of the entire conflict, could have i biggest single atrocity of the i entire conflict, could have been prevented _ entire conflict, could have been prevented we _ entire conflict, could have been prevented. we never— entire conflict, could have been prevented. we never said - entire conflict, could have been prevented. we never said that. | entire conflict, could have been i prevented. we never said that. we asked _ prevented. we never said that. we asked what— prevented. we never said that. we asked what clearly— prevented. we never said that. we asked what clearly today _ prevented. we never said that. we asked what clearly today has - prevented. we never said that. we asked what clearly today has been| asked what clearly today has been assessed — asked what clearly today has been assessed by— asked what clearly today has been assessed by another— asked what clearly today has been assessed by anotherjudge - asked what clearly today has been assessed by anotherjudge as - asked what clearly today has been. assessed by anotherjudge as being asked what clearly today has been i assessed by anotherjudge as being a wholly— assessed by anotherjudge as being a wholly independent _ assessed by anotherjudge as being a wholly independent question. - assessed by anotherjudge as being a wholly independent question. could, | wholly independent question. could, stress, _ wholly independent question. could, stress, i_ wholly independent question. could, stress, i the — wholly independent question. could, stress, i the bombing _ wholly independent question. could, stress, ithe bombing had _ wholly independent question. could, stress, ithe bombing had been - stress, ithe bombing had been prevented? _ stress, ithe bombing had been prevented? and _ stress, ithe bombing had been prevented? and it— stress, ithe bombing had been prevented? and it seems- stress, ithe bombing had been prevented? and it seems the l stress, ithe bombing had been - prevented? and it seems the learned judge, _ prevented? and it seems the learned judge, who _ prevented? and it seems the learned judge, who assume _ prevented? and it seems the learned judge, who assume had _ prevented? and it seems the learned judge, who assume had access - prevented? and it seems the learned judge, who assume had access to - prevented? and it seems the learnedj judge, who assume had access to the same _ judge, who assume had access to the same papers — judge, who assume had access to the same papers that— judge, who assume had access to the same papers that gibson _ judge, who assume had access to the same papers that gibson had - judge, who assume had access to the same papers that gibson had it, - judge, who assume had access to the same papers that gibson had it, has. same papers that gibson had it, has concluded _ same papers that gibson had it, has concluded there _ same papers that gibson had it, has concluded there indeed _
5:16 pm
same papers that gibson had it, has concluded there indeed is— same papers that gibson had it, has concluded there indeed is an - concluded there indeed is an argument _ concluded there indeed is an argument for— concluded there indeed is an argument for suggesting - concluded there indeed is an| argument for suggesting that concluded there indeed is an - argument for suggesting that the bombing — argument for suggesting that the bombing coutd _ argument for suggesting that the bombing could have _ argument for suggesting that the bombing could have been - argument for suggesting that the i bombing could have been stopped. argument for suggesting that the - bombing could have been stopped. so, you know. _ bombing could have been stopped. so, you know. i_ bombing could have been stopped. so, you know. ifeet— bombing could have been stopped. so, you know, i feel vindicated. _ bombing could have been stopped. so, you know, i feel vindicated. thank- you know, i feelvindicated. thank ou so you know, i feelvindicated. thank you so much- _ you know, i feelvindicated. thank you so much. thanks _ you know, ifeelvindicated. thank you so much. thanks for- you know, i feelvindicated. thank you so much. thanks for your - you know, i feelvindicated. thank. you so much. thanks for your time, john from panorama. the government say we will take time to consider thejudge's statement, say we will take time to consider the judge's statement, so clearly more to emerge on that. thousands of people in the food supply chain in england, who are told to self—isolate by the nhs tracing app, are now allowed to carry on working as long as they test negative for covid. a government scheme has begun which means staff at 15 supermarket depots are now able to take a daily test instead, and other key sectors will be able to join the scheme next week. simon browning reports. empty shelves, gaps in food supply. industry has blamed the problem on the amount of critical food sector workers being pinged and they wanted action. last night, the government intervened. now, supermarket depot workers and food manufacturers will be exempt from self—isolating rules.
5:17 pm
workers, regardless of vaccination status, will be able to do daily covid testing instead of isolating. it's expected 10,000 workers will qualify. new daily testing measures are beginning at 15 supermarket depots, followed by 150 more next week. supermarket store staff are not included. industry has broadly welcomed the changes. i think any intervention is welcome. i think we were all feeling, in the food industry in particular, that something needed to happen, something needed to change. so, any change, any improvement is welcome. we've got to see the devil in the detail here. it's been highlighted it's only certain companies who are on the list. who's on the list? who's been identified there? it's not just the food sector that wants exemptions for isolating staff. the government is offering a limited number of exclusions for 16 critical industries, such as energy, the nuclear industry, medicines and water supply.
5:18 pm
those government departments will agree with these key businesses, people, and so for instance the water industry, the nuclear power industry, agree with them the job roles that should be included in this and you'll have quite an expedited system where, if they want somebody to come off isolation, they'll simply provide the name and that'll be agreed. but unions say with three weeks until self—isolation rules change, these sectors are presented with difficulties because they expect some workers will qualify for exemption and others won't. in a power station, - in telecommunications, in critical defence infrastructure, these are all interdependent - occupations. and just listing named individuals, which seems to be at the core - of this proposal, won't work. as businesses across the country adapt, the government maintains the app is doing itsjob and is needed to stem the rising tide of coronavirus infections. simon browning, bbc news. transport links have also been impacted by people being pinged by the nhs app, with hundreds of train journeys cancelled last week and reduced timetables being introduced from monday.
5:19 pm
let's get more from our transport correspondent caroline davies. it seems like quite several rail lines are already slashing their timetables.— lines are already slashing their timetables. , �*, ., , . timetables. yes, it's obvious that many peeple _ timetables. yes, it's obvious that many peeple are _ timetables. yes, it's obvious that many people are now— timetables. yes, it's obvious that many people are now being - timetables. yes, it's obvious that. many people are now being pinged timetables. yes, it's obvious that - many people are now being pinged and self isolating is already having an impact on the real operators. we know west midlands rail and the northwest cancel 600 trains last week. they went from having 32 staff isolating on the 2ist ofjune to having isolating on the 21st ofjune to having 131 on the 21st ofjuly. they have chosen to cut their northwest timetable from tomorrow and there will be for saturday service at our bus instead of rail and cutting several services up to northampton. gw are, in er and it tends like we'll all have reduced timetables this week although it is key to say that the operators are saying it is
5:20 pm
not entirely just this that the operators are saying it is not entirelyjust this is it is difficult to figure out what proportion because some people tested positive for cover 19 or other reasons they might be off work. the fact there will be some of the services cut and potentially some could be shorter because of course it is notjust about train drivers being unable to comment, it is also about engineers and operators who might be able to operate the rest of the train service as well and there are concerns from some of the unions that that could lead to overcrowding if they are fewer services. dare that that could lead to overcrowding if they are fewer services.— if they are fewer services. are they sa in: if they are fewer services. are they saying anything _ if they are fewer services. are they saying anything about _ if they are fewer services. are they saying anything about wanting - if they are fewer services. are they saying anything about wanting to i if they are fewer services. are they | saying anything about wanting to be on exempt lists? i know it is so tricky this whole issue, but what are they saying about trying to get their staff exempted because again their staff exempted because again the important part of national infrastructure?— the important part of national infrastructure? , . . infrastructure? yes, an important art of infrastructure? yes, an important part of national _ infrastructure? yes, an important part of national infrastructure - infrastructure? yes, an important part of national infrastructure and speaking to senior rail sources earlier, they were saying we transport some of the essential workers to theirjob so if we are not operating, we are an official service. the existing process, the
5:21 pm
government has set a very high bar for that, there needs to be major that her mental impact on your ability and integrity to deliver essential services, so the rail operators had to get to the point where the really could not be operating no strains unless they had some exemptions. the same senior rail source i was speaking to earlier was saying that they thought the whole system was unmanageable because i thought it would take longer to apply for an exemption thanit longer to apply for an exemption than it wasjust longer to apply for an exemption than it was just to wait for somebody to come out of isolation in the first place was to be just have to go through the department for transport and then up to the department of health and the cabinet office to be signed off and so it is quite a long process. so at this case, while they have fewer staff, a lot of these train lines are going with cancelling services and now they are going with reducing timetables so services are a bit more printable. there is a real balance here for the government because they do of course want to make sure that they back the system and make sure the app is still being used and they want to not have too low a bar to a people to be able to
5:22 pm
get out of quarantine because otherwise the whole system starts to crumble. and on the other side of the argument, things are quite interested in these potential services rely on other essential services rely on other essential services and at what point do you decide that other exemptions are needed? mi decide that other exemptions are needed? �* . ~', ., decide that other exemptions are needed? �* . ., ., needed? all right, thanks for now, caroline. caroline _ needed? all right, thanks for now, caroline. caroline davies _ needed? all right, thanks for now, caroline. caroline davies art - caroline. caroline davies art transport correspondent, sounds like check timetables in advance if you are travelling from next week. the scottish government has confirmed that some essential staff working in critical areas who are close contacts for covid cases will no longer be required to self—isolate. people working in a range of sectors including health and social care, transport and the provision of food supplies can apply for an exemption. they will only be granted for employees who agree not to self—isolate. they must be double—vaccinated and have had their second dose at least two weeks previously. a negative pcr test and daily lateral flow tests will also be required. the government has released the latest coronavirus figures for the uk. in the latest 24—hour period,
5:23 pm
there were 36,389 cases and 64 deaths, that's within 28 days of a positive test. 46.5 million people have had their first dose of the vaccine. that's 88% of the adult population. daily lateral flow tests for pupils may be just as effective as class bubbles to control transmission of covid in schools, according to a study by oxford university. more than a million children in england were forced to stay away from school last week for covid—related reasons. i'm joined now by dr lee elliot major, a professor of social mobility at the university of exeter. good afternoon to you. so this research from oxford university suggests one hopes a sort of a
5:24 pm
better way out of trying to deal with this in schools and presumably that has to be welcome. absolutely. i think this could _ that has to be welcome. absolutely. i think this could be _ that has to be welcome. absolutely. i think this could be a _ that has to be welcome. absolutely. i think this could be a real _ i think this could be a real breakthrough for us. there have been big concerns about the amount, relate, of children having to take time off school. our own research has shown about one third of learning has been lost in the first year of the pandemic. about half of the school days lost and nothing can replace face—to—face teaching, and we know that if we don't address those losses, then this will have a generational impact. it will affect children for years to come. 50. generational impact. it will affect children for years to come.- children for years to come. so, a generational— children for years to come. so, a generational impact, _ children for years to come. so, a generational impact, that - children for years to come. so, a generational impact, that is - children for years to come. so, a l generational impact, that is huge. also what do we know about the impact on different groups people? are there some who have suffered more than others if i can put it that way?— more than others if i can put it that way? more than others if i can put it thatwa ? , , that way? yes, absolutely. so, the andemic that way? yes, absolutely. so, the pandemic has _ that way? yes, absolutely. so, the pandemic has exacerbated - that way? yes, absolutely. so, the
5:25 pm
pandemic has exacerbated and - that way? yes, absolutely. so, the - pandemic has exacerbated and exposed the profound educational inequalities that we already knew were existing in society. we know that sadly those children from the poorest backgrounds, many of whom need school, right, those are the ones that suffered the greatest learning issues. all sorts of reasons whether it is not attending school is much as some of their more privileged counterparts or when they are at home, if they are able to access the internet and do their home learning. so, yes, in terms of social mobility if he were the chances of climbing the social ladder or the life chances for the poorest in society, this could have catastrophic consequences if we don't get on top of it. i think the realfearfor me is don't get on top of it. i think the real fear for me is that we don't want lots of children off when we come back from summer holidays. everyone is pretty got for summer holidays of the moment. we need the systems in place for when they start the autumn term.— the autumn term. that's really interesting _ the autumn term. that's really interesting because _ the autumn term. that's really interesting because i _ the autumn term. that's really interesting because i was - the autumn term. that's really - interesting because i was beginning to think about the autumn term. to
5:26 pm
your mind, what sort of planning has been done and how much planning is in place and how much confidence do you have that we don't look backwards and we look forwards and that things are in place to at least try to hit the ground running and give all children a decent, proper, full academic yearfrom september give all children a decent, proper, full academic year from september or late august? i full academic year from september or late august?— late august? i think we have got to learn from some _ late august? i think we have got to learn from some of— late august? i think we have got to learn from some of the _ late august? i think we have got to learn from some of the mistakes i late august? i think we have got to i learn from some of the mistakes that we have made already during the pandemic, and i think what would be really helpfulfor pandemic, and i think what would be really helpful for schools across the country is having clear advice ahead of that start of term. we have got six weeks most children have and that goes very quickly as many children know. i think what teachers will want is clear advice well before we start the autumn term about, forcible, whether we will be able to use testing instead of the bubble policy we have now. schools are suffering profoundly or have been up to now in terms of notjust
5:27 pm
children but teachers having to take time off as well. education is such a big priority, you know? time off as well. education is such a big pi’ioi’ity, you know? and i time off as well. education is such a big priority, you know? and i am hearing the news, it is amazing times we are and balancing the short—term health impacts of this pandemic but will he really must make sure is that this does not have a generational impact on the youngest children in society. doctor, many thanks for your time from exeter university. six people have been taken to hospital after a car crashed into a pub at pontyclun in south wales. one is said to have life—changing injuries. the 79—year—old driver of the car is also in a critical condition. police believe he suffered a "medical episode" before the crash. ben price reports. we understand that six people remain in hospital following the crash that happened outside the windsor pub here on llantrisant road in pontyclun just after 8:30pm yesterday evening. now, we understand one of those six has life—changing injuries.
5:28 pm
four other people were also taken to hospital to be treated for minor injuries. now, there were a number of people sat outside the winsdor pub yesterday evening enjoying the warm summer sunshine, having some food and a few drinks when a car drove off the road and crashed into a group that was set on this benchjust behind me here. police and emergency services arrived at the scene shortly after, and today, they've released a statement thanking those who responded very quickly to the people who were injured following the collision. now, we also understand that the driver of the car was a 79—year—old gentleman who had a medical episode behind the wheel of his car which it's believed caused him to veer off the road. but south wales police are continuing their investigations today.
5:29 pm
ben price there with that report following that dreadful crash in south wales. much more coming up in the next half an hour. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. that evening. storm clouds gathering to the south of the u kate setting us up for some southern areas with a heavy downpour. these pulses of rain pushing up through south england and south wales of the night and at the same time missed and merck berlin across eastern and central parts of scotland and down the eastern side of england. another pretty warm night was 17 the overnight low in liverpool and then into tomorrow expect pulses of heavy rain at times across southern england, wales, east anglia with some broader gaps in between but the showers intense and to cause localised disruption. we will seek some of the mist and merck for north sea coast and requesting
5:30 pm
lastingly much of scotland and particularly west and northern ireland will seek sunny spells and still some relative warmth with highs of 26 degrees. states drive to the northwest on sunday but with more thunderstorms in the southeast. hello, this is bbc news with jane hill. the headlines... the greatest show on earth — but with no spectators. 11,000 athletes from more than 200 countries will compete in this year's tokyo olympics. the 32nd summer games was declared open as the olympic flame was lit at the spectaclar opening ceremony. a high courtjudge rules there should be a new investigation into whether state agencies might have prevented the 0magh bombing in 1998.
5:31 pm
thousands of workers in the food supply chain in england no longer need to isolate if pinged by the covid app, as long as they test negative. several trainlines are reducing their services as hundreds of staff are asked to isolate to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. and at 5.45pm, mark kermode is here with the film review — taking a look at new releases including the world to come and off the rails. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. nice to see you, jane! the olympics are officially open after the cauldron was lit in the stadium in tokyo by naomi osaka. the tennis star will compete forjapan for the first time since taking a break from the sport partly down to the pressures of media scrutiny. no fans were allowed inside, but millions watched around the world.
5:32 pm
the organisers still put on a spectacular show and a ceremony focusing on togetherness, connection and inclusion. only 22 of team gb were there, led by flag—bearers hannah mills, the sailor and rower mo sbihi — both gold medallists from rio 2016. and then the olympic flame entered the stadium and was passed to the final torchbearer — naomi osaka, one of the faces of the games to light the cauldron which will burn for the next 16 days. jeannette kwayke is there for the bbc. it was just fantastic to see when the athletes came in, the energy that they brought to the ceremony. of course it was toned it down, it was understated and, for a lot of people watching, they were thinking of the spectacular things we may have seen it previous olympic games. but this was reflecting the time we are living in at the moment. and like you said, there were some standout moments — the drone light up standout moments — the drone light up was fantastic to watch, along with naomi osaka just now lighting the torch. there's no pressure on naomi osaka. butjust being in and
5:33 pm
around tokyo and seeing what is not what you would expect — for example, there's no branding, no adverts, nothing to suggest that the olympic games is happening here. so we're hoping maybe after seeing this that the japanese population might perk up, might feela bit the japanese population might perk up, might feel a bit better and say, you know what? lets sit back for the next two weeks — like we will do at home, and become the armchair expert after watching sport for five minutes. that's what this is about, bringing everybody together. australia and new zealand's decision to pull out of the rugby league world cup was "premature", according to australia's players�* union, who have claimed a number of its members wanted to travel to england for the tournament this autumn. here's the union's chief exec, clint newton. it's always really important, if you're going to make a decision that's going to obviously impact the players, it's, we believe, fundamental to have the players as part of that decision—making process. and again, we have been speaking to the nrl, so i can be clear on that —
5:34 pm
but our view is that this decision was premature, and that we would like to see what unfolds in the coming weeks. so, frustration among many of those represented by the rugby league players association, but the new zealand rugby league chief has defended the withdrawal. if looking after your people and human safety is cowardly, then i am a coward but i don't believe it is. i believe it's the only decision we could make. some of those comments quite honestly are misjudged and ill—advised. south korea'sjeongeun lee birdied her last two holes to record the lowest round ever at either a men's or women's golf major. this chip at 17 was one of ten birdies that helped her to a round of 61 at the the amundi evian championship in france. she currently leads the field by three strokes. and the third match of the women's hundred is underway. captain amyjones got the only six
5:35 pm
for birmingham phoenix in their 128 against london spirit at edgbaston. that should have been caught by freya davis, but she palmed it over the boundary. they need 17 now off 18 to win a short while ago, that was the state of play. the men's teams play after the women. follow it all on the bbc sport website. we'll have more for you in sportsday at 6.30pm. thanks, gavin. we will stay with the olympics, in terms of particularly how the athletes will be coping with this most unusual of olympic games. where there are so many restrictions on those taking part in terms of where they can go and no spectators at the venues? someone who may be able to shed some light on how they are feeling is the sports psychologist, sophie bruce. hi, sophie, good evening. hi there,
5:36 pm
how are you — hi, sophie, good evening. hi there, how are you doing? _ hi, sophie, good evening. hi there, how are you doing? i'm _ hi, sophie, good evening. hi there, how are you doing? i'm doing - hi, sophie, good evening. hi there, how are you doing? i'm doing very i how are you doing? i'm doing very well but i'm _ how are you doing? i'm doing very well but i'm wondering _ how are you doing? i'm doing very well but i'm wondering what - well but i'm wondering what difference does it make to a professional athlete to have no spectators — and we think of that meaning no atmosphere at all. we sort of assume that that has a detrimental impact, but i'm interested in your take on it. absolutely, these games are unprecedented and will be different to what we've seen before. they come at the end of a very difficult and challenging 18 months, you know, on a global stage, that makes sense, the events, sport, skills being performed by the same as what are athletes practised and trained for and have been working for for five years or more. so they'll be really looking to go out there and do their best in tokyo. i looking to go out there and do their best in tokyo-_ best in tokyo. i suppose maybe it was because _ best in tokyo. i suppose maybe it was because we _ best in tokyo. i suppose maybe it was because we reflected - best in tokyo. i suppose maybe itj was because we reflected through best in tokyo. i suppose maybe it - was because we reflected through the prism of london 2012 and we think about, did it give athletes home advantage? we all remember cheering onjessica in his hill on super
5:37 pm
saturday, so actually, is the fact that there will be no spectators at a disadvantage perhaps for the home athletes who might�*ve expected to be really cheered on? i athletes who might've expected to be really cheered on?— really cheered on? i think it's important — really cheered on? i think it's important to _ really cheered on? i think it's important to remember - really cheered on? i think it's important to remember that l really cheered on? i think it's i important to remember that this really cheered on? i think it's - important to remember that this will be different for each athlete at the games. so athletes are people first and foremost, and they'll experience the change differently. for some it might provide an opportunity for them to take away some of those external distractions and pressure, and allow them to focus on their performance — whereas for others, they may look to replicate that big crowd experience like their music or self—taught visualisation. it'll be unique to the individual. it self-taught visualisation. it'll be unique to the individual. it might be a benefit _ unique to the individual. it might be a benefit for _ unique to the individual. it might be a benefit for some, _ unique to the individual. it might be a benefit for some, everyone | unique to the individual. it might i be a benefit for some, everyone is different, of course they are. the athletes are the same in that way. this is one year delayed, as well, and that there is out or obliges you to change your training programme, both mentally and physically. i'm interested in what a sport
5:38 pm
psychologist will have been saying to those taking part, about how that's shifted everything, that one year delay? that's shifted everything, that one eardela? , that's shifted everything, that one year delay?— that's shifted everything, that one eardela? , ,, year delay? absolutely, i think each s-uortin year delay? absolutely, i think each sporting system _ year delay? absolutely, i think each sporting system will _ year delay? absolutely, i think each sporting system will have _ year delay? absolutely, i think each sporting system will have been - sporting system will have been preparing for this in the lead up to the games. we've known for a while that this will look very different, and i think this last year has taught us more than ever that we need to be prepared for plan a, plan b, plan c, andy's high—performance systems will have with their individual athletes and teams to tailor their needs best suited to them and allow them to perform at their best. en'oy the next few weeks and the their best. enjoy the next few weeks and the paralympics, _ their best. enjoy the next few weeks and the paralympics, thanks - their best. enjoy the next few weeks and the paralympics, thanks very . and the paralympics, thanks very much, sophie bruce, a sport psychologist. much, sophie bruce, a sport psychologist-— in china, at least 51 people have died in floods in henan province. massive rescue and relief efforts are under way. officials say that nearly 400,000 people have been moved to safer areas and now the flooding has moved to different towns and cities in the province as more rivers burst their banks. china correspondent stephen mcdonell reports from beijing.
5:39 pm
people in their hundreds of thousands have been moved to safety in central china's henan province. deadly flash flooding following record—breaking heavy driving rain has shutdown cities and towns across the region. some people have been trapped for days, cut off by the rising waters without fresh food or water. officials say tens of thousands of rescuers have been mobilised, including the military to reach stranded residents and evacuate the most dangerous areas. the rain has eased in zhengzhou city and water is being pumped from rail and car tunnels. as these tunnels are cleared, bodies are being found, pushing up the official death toll. while the emergency situation may have improved in zhengzhou, elsewhere it's become more dire. floodwaters have spread to new locations with more rivers in henan province breaching their banks. makeshift bridges are being put in to allow emergency teams to operate. on social media, china's rapidly
5:40 pm
growing cities have been criticised for not better preparing for catastrophic weather events. at times, the drainage infrastructure here has not kept up with increased population density. chinese scientists are warning, though, that the source of this devastating weather can be traced back to climate change, leading to calls for a much more rapid plan to ameliorate it. over the coming days, the priority is going to be surviving the current flooding crisis. the rain hasn't stopped in henan and over the weekend, a typhoon is expected to hit to china's east coast. stephen mcdonnell, bbc news, beijing. in western india, more than 100 people have been killed after torrential monsoon rains triggered landslides and flooding that submerged low—lying areas in the state of maharashtra. parts of india's west coast received up to 23 inches of rainfall in 24 hours, forcing people to leave their homes.
5:41 pm
the rescue operations have been hampered by heavy downpours and foggy conditions. maharashtra is experiencing its heaviest monsoon season injuly in 40 years. the coast guard in alaska has rescued a man who was repeatedly attacked by a grizzly bear for an entire week. the man is now recovering from his injuries. he was alone in a remote mining camp when the bearfirst attacked him, dragging him down to a river. he escaped but then had to fend off the animal as it returned to his shack every night. an sos sign was spotted during a routine helicopterflight last week. the man is suffering from a leg injury and a bruised torso. the headlines on bbc news... the greatest show on earth,
5:42 pm
but with no spectators. 11,000 athletes from more than 200 countries will compete in this year's tokyo olympics. a high courtjudge rules there should be a new investigation into whether state agencies might have prevented the 0magh bombing in 1998. thousands of workers in the food supply chain in england no longer need to isolate if pinged by the covid app, as long as they test negative. more coming up on those stories at 6pm. now it's time for the film review with mark kermode. hello, and welcome to the film review with me, mark kermode — rounding up the best new movies available for viewing in cinemas and in the home.
5:43 pm
tuesday, january 1st, 1856. with little pride and less hope, we begin the new year. in the world to come, us—based norwegian film—maker mona fastvold captures an intense romantic relationship set against the bleak, unforgiving backdrop of 19th—century frontier life. when the day is done, my mind turns to her, and i think... "why are we to be separated?" adapted from a story byjim shepard, who shares screenwriting credits with ron hansen, the film follows the fortunes — or misfortunes — of two couples living on remote farms in schoharie county.
5:44 pm
it's a tough existence, with narrator abigail, played by katherine waterston, recording the daily grind in her diary — a monotone document of a life filled with hardship, tinged with grief, and notably lacking in love. until, that is, abigail's neighbour, tallie, played by vanessa kirby, arrives on her doorstep, stirring long dormant emotions. soon, the pair have become inseparable — to the disapproval of their husbands, both of whom seem to swing between anger and disappointment at the respective marriages. the winner of the queer lion at the 2020 venice film festival, the world to come has been called a female version of brokeback mountain — although in truth, the two films have very little in common. a closer comparison would be with francis lee's ammonite — another film about love in a harsh climate which offered much to admire, if little to enjoy. focusing on the suffocating strictures of a society in which women have little or no agency, fastvold conjures an authentic air of misery, alleviated only briefly by stolen moments of affection quickly snatched away by the dour, patriarchal cloud
5:45 pm
of tragedy and heartbreak. my daughter would've been five today. 0h... how did she pass? there's no doubting the conviction of the performances, with kirby, who earned an oscar nomination for pieces of a woman, continuing to cement her reputation as one of the finest screen actors of her generation. god puts heavy stones in our path. it's up to us to step over them. plaudits, too, to cinematographer andre chemetoff, whose imposing views of romanian mountains double efficiently for upstate new york, and british composer daniel blumberg, whose music captures the discordant mood shifts with gut wrenching aplomb. stones are what the fortunate receive. my mother's mother was born in 1780, right here in schoharie county. the result is a film that offers what appears to be an honest and accurate depiction of hard times, but in which any sense of hope orjoy
5:46 pm
lies not in this world,

53 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on