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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 23, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — with lucy hockings in tokyo and victoria derbyshire in london — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. after months of uncertainty and last—minute controversy, the opening ceremony of the tokyo olympics takes place later today. i'm lucy hockings in tokyo — despite rising infection rates despite rising infection rates and protests on the streets, the opening ceremony is just two hours away. it's been a long road to get here for the organisers and of course for the athletes. we'll bring you all the coverage of a games like no other. here in the uk, thousands of workers in the food supply chain won't need to isolate if they're "pinged" by the nhs covid app. are you trying to run a service? do you consider yourself
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to be a critical worker? are you not exempt and think that you should be? let me know this morning. tweet me @vicderbyshire or by emailing me on victoria@bbc.co.uk. a new study suggests that daily lateral flow testing for pupils could be equally as effective as closing class bubbles to control transmission in schools. calls to create a �*ring of steel�* around australia's biggest city, sydney, as cases of the virus remain high despite four weeks in lockdown. campaigners call for new rules on e—scooters after a teenager was killed on one and a toddler was seriously injured. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the 2020 tokyo olympic games
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will officially start today — a year later than expected. 11,000 athletes from over 200 countries will compete over the next few weeks, but spectators have been banned from almost all events, as japan deals with its highest surge in coronavirus infections for six months. let's go now to lucy hockings in tokyo. hi, lucy. hi, victoria. after all the controversies, the state of emergency here in tokyo, rising infection rates and constant testing and restrictions — the opening ceremony is almost upon us. these games will not be like any other we have seen but they are finally here. more than 11,000 athletes from 205 nations will compete over the next couple of weeks, all hoping to deliver the performance of a lifetime. and when i speak to athletes victoria they are razor focussed,
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they are putting aside the noise of the pandemic, the masks, the spit tests, and all the restrictions they are under, and tell me they are excited about finally getting to compete. we've been told to expect an opening ceremony that will reflect the fragile nature of the world we're living in but also the positive power of sport. and of course we have an incredible view so we are expecting lots of fireworks. it has been a controversial decision to host these 0lympics controversial decision to host these olympics and there is still widespread opposition to the games injapan. we have had a few polls out in the last few days suggesting 55% of the japanese public would prefer a further postponement, and outright cancellation. these pictures you are seeing are a group of small protesters but they are gathered outside the tokyo metropolitan government building as the olympic torch reached its final destination ahead of the opening
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ceremony. —— oran destination ahead of the opening ceremony. —— or an outright cancellation. here is the latest from my colleague rupert wingfield—hayes who looks now at the preparations ahead of the opening ceremony. finding 0lympic fans in tokyo these days isn't so easy. but on this roof top at least, it's a different story. skateboarding is in the olympics for the first time, and with the hope of attracting young new fans, and it seems to be working. translation: it would be cool to watch great - skateboarders at the olympics. translation: i love snowboarding, i so skateboarding is good practice i for me, and it's fine! for me, and it's fun! tokyo! cheering at one time, everyone here was an olympic fan. on the day tokyo won the bid back in 2013, people were delirious with joy. tokyo! tokyo! tokyo! today, the atmosphere couldn't be more different. the stadium where the opening ceremony will happen
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is surrounded by high fences. spectators kept far away. first, there was the enormous cost of the main stadium, then problems with the olympic logo, then allegations of corruption, and then covid hit. the whole games had to be moved by a year. there was a sexism row. then the composer of music for the opening ceremony was forced out because of bullying allegations. finally, one day before the games were due to open, the director of the whole opening ceremony has been fired because it turns out he made jokes about the holocaust. it's no wonder some people here think these games are cursed. it's no wonder some people here think these games are cursed. the world's biggest city, more than 10 million population and still growing, tokyo... it was also different the last time
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tokyo had the games back in 1964. author robert whiting had arrived injapan two years earlier. it's too bad, one of the really nice things about the '64 olympics was for two weeks, two and half weeks, the city was just failed with tourists. and athletes mingling with each other. the nice thing about the olympics is that they are a global festival. it really was a festival atmosphere. it was quite nice, and you know, now it's like the city is like a ghost town. not quite a ghost town. tokyo is supposed to be under a state of emergency, but you wouldn't know it from the famous nightlife district of shinjuku. like many others, the owner of this restaurant is refusing to close early or stop serving alcohol. he said he lost a quarter million dollars during the last shutdown. translation: i am struggling. i have friends who had to close the restaurant. i was short of cash and had problems paying bills. that's why i decided to reopen. the government is not helping us, so i have to protect my own living. there are certainly those who are looking forward
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to tonight's opening ceremony. many of them are already lining up to take photos close to the main stadium, but overall, the mood in tokyo is more weary acceptance than eager anticipation. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in tokyo. it is a nervous couple of hours ahead for those involved in the opening ceremony. the opportunity of a lifetime. i'm joined now by gareth hulance — he was the stage manager for the opening ceremony of the london 2012 olympics. what do you think the organisers are going through withjust what do you think the organisers are going through with just a few hours to go? i going through with 'ust a few hours to no? . , �* going through with 'ust a few hours to no? ., , �* ., , going through with 'ust a few hours toao? ., to go? i wasn't the only stage manauer to go? i wasn't the only stage manager in — to go? i wasn't the only stage manager in london, - to go? i wasn't the only stage manager in london, there - to go? i wasn't the only stage i manager in london, there were to go? i wasn't the only stage - manager in london, there were about 40 manager in london, there were about a0 of us, it was a really big team. definitely at the moment very, very exciting. it is always a really nervous moment waiting to start the show but ultimately it is a really, really exciting moment that has been months and months, if not years in
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the preparation.— the preparation. what about the ressure, the preparation. what about the pressure, gareth? _ the preparation. what about the pressure, gareth? it— the preparation. what about the pressure, gareth? it must - the preparation. what about the pressure, gareth? it must be i the preparation. what about the - pressure, gareth? it must be intense knowing that billions of people are watching. knowing that billions of people are watchinu. ., , , knowing that billions of people are watchinu. . , , ., watching. yeah, it is definitely a hue watching. yeah, it is definitely a huge pressure- _ watching. yeah, it is definitely a huge pressure. but— watching. yeah, it is definitely a huge pressure. but it _ watching. yeah, it is definitely a huge pressure. but it is - watching. yeah, it is definitely a huge pressure. but it is a - watching. yeah, it is definitely a huge pressure. but it is a very i huge pressure. but it is a very unique moment. obviously everyone wants it to go perfectly and the way we deal with that is to plan for every single eventuality. so should something go wrong we always have a plan b and a plan c, but definitely it is a lot of nerves building up to it. in it is a lot of nerves building up to it. , ., ., �* , it is a lot of nerves building up to it. in terms of tonight's ceremony, thou~h, it. in terms of tonight's ceremony, though. we — it. in terms of tonight's ceremony, though. we have — it. in terms of tonight's ceremony, though, we have been _ it. in terms of tonight's ceremony, though, we have been talking - it. in terms of tonight's ceremony, l though, we have been talking about how this will be an olympics like no other. i think the opening ceremony will be like no other either. what are you looking forward to and what are you looking forward to and what are you looking forward to and what are you expecting? you are you looking forward to and what are you exueeting?_ are you looking forward to and what are you exoeeting?_ are you expecting? you never know what to exoeet- _ are you expecting? you never know what to expect. that _ are you expecting? you never know what to expect. that is, _ are you expecting? you never know what to expect. that is, in - are you expecting? you never know what to expect. that is, in a - are you expecting? you never know what to expect. that is, in a way, l what to expect. that is, in a way, the beauty of these ceremonies. whenever we work on them, none of us
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breathe a word about what it's going to be so on waiting like everyone else to sit back and be amazed, because i'm sure whatever it will be will be fantastic. iuntil]! because i'm sure whatever it will be will be fantastic.— will be fantastic. will there be a sense of sadness, _ will be fantastic. will there be a sense of sadness, gareth, - will be fantastic. will there be a sense of sadness, gareth, that| will be fantastic. will there be a - sense of sadness, gareth, that there will be a near empty stadium they will be performing to? i will be a near empty stadium they will be performing to?— will be performing to? i think it will be performing to? i think it will feel different, _ will be performing to? i think it will feel different, certainly - will feel different, certainly having the audiences and their reaction is the final part of the show that we don't get until the actual show day and i think for the athletes it will feel strange because the most important part of any olympic ceremony is the athletes' parade, and for them not being greeted by the applause will feel different. but ultimately, everyone is very aware that you have billions of people watching, so i think it will feel different but i think it will feel different but i think it will still feel amazing and very special, as these things always do. ~ . very special, as these things always do. . ., ., very special, as these things always do. ~ ., ., ,., very special, as these things always do. ~ ., ., do. we have had some last-minute controversies _ do. we have had some last-minute controversies around _ do. we have had some last-minute controversies around the _ do. we have had some last-minute controversies around the opening l controversies around the opening ceremony, people have been fired and
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resigned, do you think that will make a difference, or they were so well rehearsed up until now that that will not change things? absolutely not. the thing is that these shows are rehearsed for months and months so everyone's focus will be on delivering a beautiful show for everyone to see.— be on delivering a beautiful show for everyone to see. gareth, good to net our for everyone to see. gareth, good to get your thoughts. _ for everyone to see. gareth, good to get your thoughts. we _ for everyone to see. gareth, good to get your thoughts. we are _ for everyone to see. gareth, good to get your thoughts. we are looking i get your thoughts. we are looking forward to it, just a few hours away now. lots of nerves for all of the olympians too, they are in the athletes' village just over the harbour from where we are. they are training, of course and it is all about to come to fruition. the expectation that the countries have that they may bring home a medal. one person who knows that feeling of pressure and how to deal with the pressure, of course, is matthew pinsent who is a full—time olympic gold medalist foot team gb, he is a rowing icon, hejoined me here earlier and i asked him what was hearing from the olympic village and how the athletes were feeling and whether they were nervous about some of the conditions they have had to train and get ready in, and the
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pandemic, and whether they were just itching to start competing? there are lots of things _ itching to start competing? there are lots of things to _ itching to start competing? there are lots of things to be _ itching to start competing? there are lots of things to be accessed l are lots of things to be accessed about in the olympic arena, but covid, strangely, even at this point, is not one of them on an athlete's worry sheet. you worry about your performance, your competitors perhaps, you worry about the outcome, and it sounds selfish and it sounds very strange, but it's part of the skill of performing at a top level, that you are able to get rid of the external things you can't control. you can't control the weather, you can't control the weather, you can't control the weather, you can't control the media, you can't control the crowd, and in this instance you can't control covid, so you are trying as best you can to put it to one side and get on. the trying as best you can to put it to one side and get on.— one side and get on. the sports psychologist working _ one side and get on. the sports psychologist working with - one side and get on. the sports psychologist working with the l psychologist working with the athletes, their advice has not changed despite the extraordinary times we are living in?— times we are living in? exactly. it is that sports _ times we are living in? exactly. it is that sports mentality _ times we are living in? exactly. it is that sports mentality to - times we are living in? exactly. it is that sports mentality to the - is that sports mentality to the extra degree in a way that other generations of olympic athletes arguably haven't had something similar. we are talking about olympic games that have had
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terrorist incidents, boycotts, extreme weather delays, all these sorts of things. i genuinely think that with a year delay and tokyo hanging in the balance for so long, this generation are having to cope with something even more than that. the president of the organising committee said in an interview the pandemic means athletes are reconsidering their role and the role of sport in society, that this is like a fresh opportunity for them to reflect on the power of sport. do you think that's true?— you think that's true? i think that's true. _ you think that's true? i think that's true. i _ you think that's true? i think that's true. i think _ you think that's true? i think that's true. i think the - you think that's true? i think i that's true. i think the olympics has this amazing ability to genuinely unite the world in a way that an individual sport probably doesn't. and the olympics has this amazing binding power. and of course the athletes are right at the centre of that. so to have that sense, even when you might be far away on a very different time zone doing your thing on a rowing lake, or a swimming on a rowing lake, ora swimming pool or a track or whatever and your whole nation is willing you on is a very powerful one. even though there
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might not be people in the stadium here, it still is a really proud moment in the truest sense that you feel bigger than one person can feel. ., ., , , ., , feel bigger than one person can feel. ., ., , , , feel. there are many people still criticisinr feel. there are many people still criticising the _ feel. there are many people still criticising the decision _ feel. there are many people still criticising the decision to - feel. there are many people still criticising the decision to go - feel. there are many people still. criticising the decision to go ahead with these games, though. what would it mean for some of the olympic sports if tokyo 2020 didn't happen? it would be dramatic financially, and that's the impetus. let's be honest, that's the impetus to keep it going. the funding for a huge number of these olympic sports, and indeed olympic teams, the federations, the british olympic association and american team and what have you, their income derives from the biggest event that they attend which is the summer games. and so it is slightly unfair to the international olympic committee to just say you are doing it for money. i mean, they are, that keeps the wheels going. but there is an enormous pyramid of sporting structure underneath them which is also pressuring them to say we must
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keep going and we must keep tokyo on the rails. this is how we have ended up the rails. this is how we have ended up where we are. you the rails. this is how we have ended up where we are.— up where we are. you have four ol mic up where we are. you have four olympic golds- _ up where we are. you have four olympic golds. yes. _ up where we are. you have four olympic golds. yes. when - up where we are. you have four olympic golds. yes. when you | up where we are. you have four - olympic golds. yes. when you think back to the — olympic golds. yes when you think back to the moment... olympic golds. yes. when you think back to the moment... oh! - olympic golds. yes. when you think back to the moment. .. oh! how- olympic golds. yes. when you think back to the moment... oh! how is l olympic golds. yes. when you think i back to the moment... oh! how is it? can back to the moment... oi! how is it? can you evoke back to the moment... ©“ii how is it? can you evoke the feeling even back to the moment... (zi“ii how is it? can you evoke the feeling even now of what it was like? ila. of what it was like? no, because it changes- it — of what it was like? no, because it changes. it changes _ of what it was like? no, because it changes. it changes as _ of what it was like? no, because it changes. it changes as you - of what it was like? no, because it changes. it changes as you go - of what it was like? no, because it changes. it changes as you go on. | of what it was like? no, because it i changes. it changes as you go on. in the instant it is incredibly emotional, both sort of hire, and in a funny way low. at points i was sort of in tears indeed on a podium at one point, and you have this very strange roller—coaster in the days and weeks and months afterwards, some of which is elation and some of which is quite low because you feel as if you have achieved something so important, how could life ever match up important, how could life ever match up to that, which is... you know, what now? that's a good way of summing it up. overtime it what now? that's a good way of summing it up. over time it settles out into a feeling of, i don't regret anything i did for sport, or that endeavour to win, with some of
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my best friends and stand on the podium in the middle and know on that particular day you with the best at what you did. and that is a wonderful feeling of satisfaction and commitment and hard work that we saw right through to the end. what are you looking forward to over the next few weeks? we are you looking forward to over the next few weeks?— are you looking forward to over the next few weeks? we are going to see surfin: next few weeks? we are going to see surfing making _ next few weeks? we are going to see surfing making its _ next few weeks? we are going to see surfing making its appearance - next few weeks? we are going to see surfing making its appearance and . surfing making its appearance and skateboarding as well. fire surfing making its appearance and skateboarding as well.— skateboarding as well. are you lookin: skateboarding as well. are you looking forward _ skateboarding as well. are you looking forward to _ skateboarding as well. are you looking forward to some - skateboarding as well. are you looking forward to some of- skateboarding as well. are you looking forward to some of the skateboarding as well. are you - looking forward to some of the new sports? i love the olympic family getting bigger. climbing, surfing, skateboarding you have touched on, i think those are really worthy additions. i like football ndilu pics. some people don't. i like golf in the olympics. some people don't. i love the feeling of being in a city and at any particular moment from about six hours from now throughout the next 17 days there will be somewhere, somebody having the moment of their life, and that is a wonderful sense to be in. it is
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a little story. that magnified to some other country where everyone in indonesia will be suddenly watching a badminton game, or brazil will suddenly be watching the football, or we are going to be watching swimming, athletics, swimming, rowing, orsailing, swimming, athletics, swimming, rowing, or sailing, whatever it may be, it is magnificent sporting salivation.— be, it is magnificent sporting salivation. ., ., ., . salivation. indonesia have a chance in the surfing- _ salivation. indonesia have a chance in the surfing. they _ salivation. indonesia have a chance in the surfing. they have _ salivation. indonesia have a chance in the surfing. they have a - salivation. indonesia have a chance i in the surfing. they have a champion surfer. how are team gb looking? there have been some notable athletes who one year extra was too much and we have lost them, and that's a shame. but equally there have been a young —— some young athletes who have come up to that level after that year. i hope that classic combination of experienced, seasoned veterans who we hope are going to do well and also a new generation coming up underneath, some of who will perform out of their skins and we will celebrate their skins and we will celebrate their medals as well. so fantastic to net the their medals as well. so fantastic
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to get the thoughts _ their medals as well. so fantastic to get the thoughts of _ their medals as well. so fantastic to get the thoughts of matthew i to get the thoughts of matthew pinsent. we talked about some of the new sports after we finished the interview. we're both excited to see how the surfing will be making its olympic debut these games. a0 athletes will take to the waves of tsurigasaki beach. one of the favourites will be brazil's gabriel medina — he's already a double world champion and runs his own educational foundation for young surfers in sao paulo. he's confident he can rise to the challenge and become surfing's first male olympic champion. it feels amazing, the olympics are coming up. it's really big for us, you know, for this sport, and i'm excited to go to japan. it will be a good event.
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hopefully we get some good waves, you know? and make the best of it. i know we are not going to have people on the beach there, not many, you know, but, yeah, i know everyone is going to be reading for as and i appreciate all the love and support. surfing is a very individual sport. you know? we are not having a contest that is a real team you know? we are for brazil, but i want to win the gold medal, everyone wants a gold medal, sojust one guy is gonna win. the sport will grow even more, you know, and this is a great opportunity for everyone, you know? so it's good for the sport, good for the new generation and, good for us. we work really hard for this, you know? and we can inspire people to one day become a professional surfer and change their life just
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like we did. a huge amount of interest in the surfing. they need the waves, of course, and the conditions are still very calm in tokyo but we are keeping an eye on the beach and hoping they get the right conditions to surf in because otherwise they could be some delays to that event. thank you, lucy, much more from lucy through the olympics, of course. now here are the headlines on bbc news. it's finally happeneing — the tokyo games officially starts today. thousands of workers in the food supply chain won't need to isolate if they're �*pinged' by the nhs covid app. a new study suggests that daily lateral flow testing for pupils in could be equally as effective
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as closing class bubbles to control transmission in schools in england. people working in critical parts of the food industry in england will be able to do a daily covid test instead of having to self—isolate from today. it comes as record numbers of staff are pinged by the covid app and kept away from work. sites including supermarket depots and food manufacturers. close to 10,000 staff at 500 sites in the uk will be affected — but it will not apply to staff who actually work in supermarkets. the move came after supermarkets said the supply of some products was being affected by the �*pingdemic�*. a record 618,903 people were told to self—isolate by the app in england and wales last week. in a separate development, other key industries in england including transport, emergency services, border control and energy will be allowed to deploy daily testing instead of self—isolation for a limited number of workers, providing they're fully vaccinated. and in scotland the government is expected to announce critical workers in fields such as health and social care will also be exempt from self—isolation under a new scheme.
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tom holderfrom the british retail consortium — which represents british retailers. hello to you, mr holder. what does it mean for staff who work in shops up—and—down the country? so it mean for staff who work in shops up-and-down the country?- up-and-down the country? so they won't be impacted _ up-and-down the country? so they won't be impacted by _ up-and-down the country? so they won't be impacted by this - up-and-down the country? so they won't be impacted by this new - won't be impacted by this new system, but what it will help is the distribution side. it means the stuff is in store, ready to go on shelves, because we are trying to iron out the kinks that have come up through the distribution scheme can both in food manufacturers and supermarket distribution centres. hundreds of sites are going to benefit from this new daily contact testing scheme. we do really welcome that and we urge the government to roll this out as fast as possible, so that we can try and start the situation quickly.— situation quickly. so that begins today? they still _ situation quickly. so that begins today? they still need to - situation quickly. so that begins today? they still need to roll it| today? they still need to roll it out to the _ today? they still need to roll it out to the varying _ today? they still need to roll it out to the varying sites. - today? they still need to roll it out to the varying sites. while | today? they still need to roll it i out to the varying sites. while the first sites will be able to take advantage of this scheme from now,
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it may take a few days for it to be rolled out to the hundreds of sites they are planning it for. understood. what's the point in doing that if supermarket staff, the people who put the food on the shelves and serve the customers, are not included in this scheme? mellii. not included in this scheme? well, b and not included in this scheme? well, by and large _ not included in this scheme? -ii by and large have still managed to get fully staffed on the whole. there are some occasions where there is some disruption and supermarkets working hard to make sure they can still get the staffing the. but the main issue is making sure the supply wasn't disrupted and that's exactly what this will do. supermarkets will be providing data to the government, both on the distribution centres, but also on the supermarkets themselves to ensure the government can see and adapt if necessary this scheme to include anyone who needs it. but we will see how this plays out first. ,, ,, out first. do you think the august 16 date, which is _ out first. do you think the august 16 date, which is when _ out first. do you think the august
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16 date, which is when everybodyj out first. do you think the august i 16 date, which is when everybody who is fully vaccinated won't have to self—isolate if they are pinged, do think that should be brought forward? , ., ., ., forward? they have said that date should be brought _ forward? they have said that date should be brought forward. i forward? they have said that date should be brought forward. now? | forward? they have said that date i should be brought forward. now? that would help across _ should be brought forward. now? that would help across the _ should be brought forward. now? that would help across the retail industry. yes, as soon as possible would be great. but for now in terms of dealing with this pingdemic which is seen disruption in and around the country, the steps the government has taken are going to make a real impact in reducing that.— impact in reducing that. thank you for talkin: impact in reducing that. thank you for talking to us, _ impact in reducing that. thank you for talking to us, tom. _ impact in reducing that. thank you for talking to us, tom. tom i impact in reducing that. thank you | for talking to us, tom. tom holder from the british retail consortium. daily lateral flow testing for pupils may be equally as effective as class bubbles to control transmission in schools — that's according to a study by oxford university. one of the government's scientific advisers, susan hopkins, welcomed the study staying it was evidence of a "safe alternative" to the policy of isolation. our health correspondent, naomi grimley has more. the isolating of bubbles in schools has caused no end of frustration in households during this pandemic.
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take last week, for example, the department for education says on the 15th ofjuly, over a million state school pupils in england did not attend class for covid—19 related reasons. of those, more than 930,000 were self isolating, due to a possible contact with a covid case. but a new study by oxford university suggests daily testing is a safe alternative to isolating contacts. researchers followed pupils and staff in more than 200 schools. in half, the close contacts of positive cases had to isolate for ten days. in the other half, however, close contacts of positive cases were offered supervised daily tests at school over seven days and allowed to carry on as normal if they were negative. i think the results of this study are really reassuring for parents, as well as for students and for teachers. what we see here is that for people in schools and colleges,
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the chance of getting infected with covid—19, when there has been a case in school or college is low, it's less than 2%, one in 50. what we also see is dct is able to pick up those people who are most infectious, even when they don't have symptoms. i am really confident that what this study shows us is daily testing of contacts is a safe thing to do in schools and colleges. researchers said findings would make encouraging reading for parents and teachers, especially as they believe daily contact testing could reduce covid—related absences by as much as 39%. naomi grimley, bbc news. bernardette young, is one of the investigators from the study.
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i think i want to be really careful about retrospectively calling policies needless because for 18 months we have been working under such uncertainty but we are really pleased to bring forward evidence that says we can safely make changes to that policy now. in the future it is needless? yes, we can go forward and say there are safe alternatives here and young people have had such a burden in this pandemic on their well—being and their education and we can start to change that and feel safe about doing so. daily using the lateral flow tests daily, which are like a pregnancy test, really, does using those reduce symptomatic infections in schools? we found exactly the same number, we found no difference in the rate of symptomatic infections in the two schools when we compared all of those who had the policy of isolating and all of those who had a policy of daily contact testing. 0k. we know over a million schoolchildren had to self—isolate last week. daily testing is the way now to stop that happening, isn't it? so i think what we have shown is that for all of those students who have contact in schools and college, the chance of becoming
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infected is really low so you can safely say, i can come to school, i can do my test, and if i'm not tested positive, then it is safe for me to be here. yes. could this type of testing be rolled out across the board? it's the $6a million question, isn't it? we are all looking for safe ways to manage the next stage of the pandemic. there is going to be really important scientific data on this coming out from under the large study looking at these daily tests and how they perform in adults. when we went into this study and designed it we had observations which suggested particularly for young people who had contact in education the absolute chance of becoming infected was probably one of the lowest. so they felt like a safe group to do this first study in. but there is going to be information coming to help us make decisions about how it might affect adults as well. a man who was attacked by a grizzly bearin a man who was attacked by a grizzly bear in alaska for a week is recovering from injuries after being rescued by the us coast guard. he
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was alone in a remote mining camp when the bear first attacked him dragging him down to a river. he escaped but then had to fend off the animal as it returned to his shack every night. an sos sign was spotted during a routine helicopter flight last week. he had reportedly scrawled it across the top of his shack. the man is suffering from a leg injury and bruised torso. apart from that he's doing ok. the headlines on bbc news: after months of uncertainty and last minute controversy, the opening ceremony of the tokyo olympics takes place in an hour's time. thousands of workers in the food supply chain won't need to isolate if they're �*pinged' by the nhs covid app in england. a new study suggests that daily lateral flow testing for pupils in could be equally as effective as closing class bubbles to control transmission in schools in england. calls to create a �*ring of steel�* around australia's biggest city, sydney, as cases of the virus remain high despite four weeks in lockdown.
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campaigners call for new safety rules on e—scooters after a teenager was killed on one and a toddler was seriously injured. the australian state of new south wales is asking the federal government to urgently send more vaccines and other resources, describing the delta variant outbreak in sydney as a "national crisis". only twelve per cent of australians have been vaccinated so far. the state premier has warned sydney's five million residents that the lockdown there almost certainly won't be lifted next week— as planned. it comes as the city records its biggest daily rise in covid cases this year. new zealand has now suspended its quarantine—free travel bubble with australia for at least eight weeks. the sydney outbreak has also led to an extended lockdown in the neighbouring state of victoria. with the virus: i want to just make this point, though, if there
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is a national emergency and i'm not doubting that for a moment in sydney, then it is a national responsibility, the sydneysiders are locked into sydney. we need a ring of steel around sydney so that this virus is not spreading into other parts of our nation. let's focus on fixing what is going on in sydney, let's focus on not spreading what is going on in sydney across the rest of our country. we will finish up with the whole country in lockdown if we don't do this properly. our correspondent phil mercer has more from sydney. what we've seen since the pandemic began in many ways is australia like a distressed submarine, those compartments of a submarine being closed off like states and territories around australia. western australia has put up a hard order with covid affected regions. the state of queensland is doing the same as well. what we are hearing from dan andrews, the victoria state premier, is wanting more of those restrictions around the greater sydney region to keep the people in and to keep the virus out
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of other parts of australia. so we know today new south wales, of which sydney is the state capital, has recorded 136 new covid—19 infections. this is a new daily record for this latest outbreak. now, 136 infections might not sound much to people in other countries, but in the australian context it is extremely significant. and you have to remember that australia has been pursuing a national policy of elimination, and that's why we are hearing those tough words from political leaders like dan andrews, who wants to lock sydney down until the delta variant here is crushed. president xijinping has paid a surprise visit to the politically sensitive region of tibet, the first by a chinese president for more than thirty years. these images from government controlled state media show him being greeted in nyingchi.
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in contrast to the enthusiasm seen here, many exiled tibetans accuse the central government of religious repression and eroding their culture. our correspondent stephen mcdonell is following the story from beijing. well, china's leader, xijinping, he arrived in the tibetan region to cheering crowds in a highly choreographed welcome ceremony. he got off the plane and there were the tibetans dressed in their traditional clothes, waving chinese flags and cheering. it seems remarkable, but, apparently, a chinese leader has not visited the tibetan autonomous region since 1990. and this particular visit is an indication of how sensitive it is, we didn't know about this until now, but, actually, his arrival was two days ago. so he arrived in the tibetan autonomous region and it took two days for state media here to report
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that he was even there. now, there are several reasons for this, one is that, politically, it is a very sensitive place. we'll come to that in a minute. but, more recently, there have been clashes along the tibetan border with india, and so, it was interesting to see that on this trip, xijinping has been accompanied by a senior general, zhang youxia, to go to the region where chinese and indian soldiers have been fighting along the border region. he also went on the high altitude railway and visited the potala palace, it is the traditional home of the exciled tibetan spiritual leader, the dalai lama. and seeing xijinping there, of course, will, i guess, anger many exciled tibetans who think that the dalai lama should be able
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to return to his homeland and, in fact, i think many tibetans living in china would want the same thing. china has rejected a plan by the world health organization for a second phase of an investigation into the origins of covid 19. a senior chinese health official said the proposal, to consider whether the virus could have escaped from a chinese lab, did not respect science and disregarded common sense. the white house press secretary, jen psaki, was asked about this in the last few hours and gave this response. deeply disappointed. the position is irresponsible and frankly dangerous. alongside other member states around the world, we continue to call for china to provide the needed access to data and samples. our north america correspondent david willis has the latest. us intelligence officials were considering a number of leads and theories, among them
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coronavirus could have resulted from a laboratory accident in china and this gave momentum to a theory that up until then had been seen here as a right—wing conspiracy theory, the possibility that the virus was man—made in some form. and china hasn't really been helping itself in this regard, some might argue. officials from the world health organization were only able to get access to the wuhan area in january of this year, more than a year after the first cases of the virus came to light and now, beijing has flatly rejected a request from the who for its investigators to be allowed to inspect the laboratories, the research institutes, in wuhan. italy is the latest country to announce it will introduce a mandatory covid vaccination certificate scheme. starting next month, it will allow people who've received at least one jab to go to various indoor venues like cinemas and gyms. in france, lawmakers
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are debating whether to only allow access to bars, restaurants and public transport to those who have had a covid vaccine, or can show proof of a negative test. our paris correspondent, lucy williamson has been talking to those for and against the new rules. if the government has its way, a pint of beer, a bistro lunch, a morning coffee will all require proof that the customer is covid—19 free. daniel runs this bistro a stone's throw from the old paris stock exchange. the bill being debated this week is designed to keep france open for business in the face of what the government is calling a fourth wave of infections. but daniel says it's going too far. translation: i am never going to ask for the health pass. i am not a policeman. i don't have that kind of authority. no, i won't do it. i think it shows a lack of respect and
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it is not the kind of conviviality we should have your in france. mattieu will keep coming for lunch anyway. he works in finance and says there is no alternative to the health pass. if we are going to avoid another confinement, a fourth confinement and all that painful thing, and keep the economy going, no choice. a majority here seem to support the government plan, but this being france, opposition to it has been vocal too. more than 100,000 people protested here last week. and there have been fresh protests outside the national assembly. a few have compared the current government to the nazi occupation here. i am here because we need to save the freedom, freedom. i think that if you are obliged to do something, it is a kind of dictator. it's like if the government wanted to force us to have this vaccine.
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the vaccine is seen as the way to avoid lockdown and this new law, the stick rather than the carrot in getting people to sign up, but for those who already see the government as arrogant and out of touch, it is just another constraint, another control. a health pass is already required for entry to many public spaces, at the eiffel tower, tests are available for anyone who arrives without one. because even the most divisive ideas can sometimes become an accepted part of france. nobel laureates, politicians, humanitarians and business leaders are gathering for this year's one young world summit in munich. the event is bringing together delegates from more than 190 countries, who work alongside public figures like sir lewis hamilton, sir bob geldof and cher, to try secure more responsible leadership on global challenges. on this year's agenda: the climate
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crisis, future economies, education, covid—19 recovery and humanitarian issues. we can speak now to the business leader and campaigner paul polman, who was the chief executive of unilever until 2019. he'll be speaking at the summit. done, what are you going to be saying? the first thing we are doing is a tremendous opportunity, 13,000 people from 190 countries, the 11th time that we have the summit, this time that we have the summit, this time in germany, we have a global tribe of over 12,000 people doing amazing work. collectively, they have influenced positively over 30 million people and well on the way to 100 million. we will talk about several things, to 100 million. we will talk about severalthings, leadership, to 100 million. we will talk about several things, leadership, what we all do to unlock the potential of the group individually and together,
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climate change, the burning issue and what we can do to accelerate and set the ambitions of higher and importantly, reduce the co2 gap. and net positive, what is needed now is that successful companies that they need to be part of the solution and not part of the problem and that requires a transformation of the business model to be more regenerative, restorative and positive. i will be sharing some thou~hts. . , positive. i will be sharing some thou~hts. ., , , ., thoughts. the gap is what we see at the change, making commitments for 2050 is relatively easy. we need to be net zero, what is most important is what we are doing now in the coming decade. this is to be the decade of action where we need to reduce our global emissions by over 50%. it
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starts today and it starts here at home and we have to ensure that we don't have promises but action. are there 13,000 in germany?- don't have promises but action. are there 13,000 in germany? there are 1300, in the — there 13,000 in germany? there are 1300, in the city itself, _ there 13,000 in germany? there are 1300, in the city itself, there are i 1300, in the city itself, there are 500, and the safety protocol which we take very seriously and there are 800 joining from all parts of the world. , , ., world. some people must have travelled there _ world. some people must have travelled there when there is i world. some people must have| travelled there when there is no need any more.— travelled there when there is no need an more. , . need any more. oh, there is a need, there is a need _ need any more. oh, there is a need, there is a need for— need any more. oh, there is a need, there is a need for humans _ there is a need for humans to meet and spend time together. our real hog beats a virtual hug.— hog beats a virtual hug. even if it means it is _ hog beats a virtual hug. even if it means it is damaging _ hog beats a virtual hug. even if it means it is damaging the - means it is damaging the
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environment?— means it is damaging the environment? �* 'j~ ., , ., environment? after 18 months of bein: environment? after 18 months of being locked _ environment? after 18 months of being locked up _ environment? after 18 months of being locked up in _ environment? after 18 months of being locked up in your— environment? after 18 months of being locked up in your home, it| being locked up in your home, it is very important that you bring groups of people together and have quality time over three days to discuss the burning issues and to translate into action. we will be living in a world where there will be a hybrid, i will be travelling significantly and in terms of travel, non—travel... we have to be clear that one of the things we have to do is that our travel footprint is zero and not negative. it is important to get
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airlines included to set the challenging targets for in the headlines once again this week following two incidents involving children. a 16—year—old boy was killed on sunday after his e—scooter collided with a car and a three—year—old girl has been left with life—changing injuries after being hit by one. now some campaigners are calling for them to be banned in public places. adam mcclean reports. a scheme to rent e—scooters where people have to be over 18 and hold a provisional or full licence. they can only be bidden in places where people can use bikes including roads and cycle lanes. the government says it will understand the benefit e—scooters can have. i do not ride on the pavement. i appreciate the scooters, they are lovely scooters. i do not want to lose the opportunity of having these for the public. the law says an e—scooter is as much a motor vehicle as a car or motorbike, so riding them illegally can attract six points and a £300 fine, but the scooter being seized.
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there is no protection natural to the rider, they are completely exposed. if they are involved in a collision with a car, van or a bus or another motor vehicle, it is likely that the e—scooter rider will come off a lot worse than the other person in the other vehicle. while there are risks to those who ride them unsafely, like the scooter on a motorway near bradford, pedestrians and other road users are at risk. philjones was on a mobility scooter when he found his route blocked by an abandoned scooter. phil being phil, got off his mobility scooter to move it, the scooter was too heavy, full steam back down on the road and it fell on top of him and broke his hip. the resultant effect was he had to go into hospital and he never came out — he died 12 days later. dennis has delivered a petition to number 10,
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calling on the government to stop the hire schemes. these are some of the scooters he has found abandoned nearby. to rub salt into the wound, when we were doing my brother's funeral arrangements with them as one parked right outside the doorway to get into the funeral directors. i was beside myself. i was so angry, ijust didn't know really. the response from inside me was horrendous, you know? in a statement the department for transport said we continue to engage with vulnerable road user groups to help shape rules on top of existing safety features like compulsory horns and bells and ensuring trial areas have sufficient parking to avoid street clutter. the headlines on bbc news... after months of uncertainty and last minute controversy, the opening ceremony of the tokyo olympics takes place later today thousands of workers in the food supply chain won't need
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to isolate if they're �*pinged' by the nhs covid app in england. a new study suggests that daily lateral flow testing for pupils could be equally as effective as closing class bubbles to control transmission in schools in england the family of a british woman who went missing from her boyfriend's yacht in the caribbean, have appealed for him to help police piece together what happened on the night she disappeared. sarm heslop was last seen in march leaving a restaurant in the us virgin islands. her parents have been speaking exclusively to the bbc�*s graham satchell. sarm heslop has been missing since the beginning of march. she was last seen leaving a restaurant in the us virgin islands with her boyfriend, ryan bane. the mystery surrounding her disappearance, the lack of information, has left her parents devastated.
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you would be doing something and you would suddenly feel guilty because you haven't thought about her. then when you think about her, tears just come. i can't help it. i wake up every morning and it's the same nightmare. it'sjust horrible. i feel guilty because i can go to sleep. i don't go to bed till late because ijust can't get to sleep. then when i do to sleep and wake up in the morning, i feel guilty i've slept, i feel guilty when i smile, when i laugh. ijust feel awful — ijust feel... my heart's broken. sarm was working on ryan bane's yacht, seen here in the days after she disappeared just offshore. at 2:30am on march the 8th, mr bane rang the police to say sarm was missing. they told him to contact the coastguard to start a search.
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ryan bane didn't call the coastguard until 11:a6am the next day, almost ten hours later. we can't understand why it took him so long, there's such a time—lapse. he is saying that it was two o'clock when he realised she was missing but, you know, nobody had seen her since she left the restaurant. there could have been something happen in those hours so it would have been a longer period before he phoned the coastguard. sarm was a1 when she went missing. she'd worked as a flight attendant, travelled the world. she loved life, she was confident, loving, respectful. she liked to see places, she liked to experience different cultures, meet different people.
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she'd met so many people when she was away. she befriended so many people all over the places that she went all over the world. popular? very popular, very loving, fun loving. always made you laugh. yes. brenda and peter have been helped in the last few months by sarm's friends. it's the first time they'd been able to meet in person since she disappeared. family and friends have the same questions, why did mr bane refuse permission for the police to search his boat? why has he now left the area? the virgin islands police department told us... "we would like to interview ryan bane. we cannot confirm mr bane's location. however we urge him to make contact with us to aid us with this investigation. ryan bane has a previous conviction for assaulting his ex—wife in 2011. officially this is still a missing persons enquiry. police say mr bane is a person of interest but not a suspect.
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the day after sarm went missing, the us coast guard wrote this report obtained by the times. it describes ryan bane as heavily intoxicated and agitated and says mr bane physically placed himself at the entrance door of the vessel's main space, impeding the boarding team from completing an initial safety sweep of the vessel. mr bane's lawyer told that his client met with the us coast guard, answered all questions posed to him and gave them unfettered access to the vessel, as well as to sarm's personal belongings, including her phone and ipad. any reports to the contrary are categorically false. mr bane had nothing to do with sarm's disappearance, and remains heartbroken that she is missing. sarm's parents haven't spoken publicly since their daughter went missing. this is their first interview. and they have a clear message for ryan bane. any person, surely, any person would do everything they could to help find somebody that he was supposed to love.
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what sort of human being wouldn't be there to help? that's what i think he should do, he should just come forward. and cooperate. i would like bane to come forward and talk to the police, for a start. i would like a full forensic search of the ship, a full—on one, which i hope and hope they don't find anything. if they do, thatjustice be done, if there needs to be. that's what i want. i've got no peace, i'll never had any real peace ever for the rest of my life, i don't suppose. i don't know whether it would help or not, to be quite honest, but i'd still like to see it done, as hard as it may be, i'd like to see it done. i have hope — i still have hope. i'll always think that she will be back through the door, always. i'll never give up on her, i'll never give up. it is now almost five months since sarm went missing. her parents say they want, need and are demanding answers.
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graham satchell, bbc news. a spokesman from the foreign office said it "remains in contact with the authorities" on the us virgin islands and that "the uk police are supporting the investigation". the rock star eric clapton says he will not perform at venues that require concertgoers to be fully vaccinated against covid—19. he himself had a severe reaction to the astrazeneca vaccine. he says he objects to having a "discriminated audience present". borisjohnson has said proof of vaccination must be shown at clubs and venues from september. and experts insist the benefits of vaccination outweigh the risks for most people. mark lobel reports. eric clapton spoke out about vaccines in may, revealing his severe reaction to the astrazeneca one he feared he would leave him unable to play music again. earlier this week, he had a bad reaction to this.
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we are planning to make full vaccination the condition of entry to nightclubs and other venues where large crowds gather. after that, eric clapton issued a statement. he said... he went on... ..warning that... eric clapton's concerts hit america in september where vaccine proof is only required in a few venues and there is a european tour next year including london's royal albert hall in may. i am a huge fan of eric clapton and i'm shocked. you've got to be fair. think of the audience, think of the 5,000 people or 30,000 people they are all crammed together. you do not want to become a super spreader.
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are you worried this will put off people getting vaccinated? i am 100% worried it is going to slow down the vaccination rate and it has. but in the uk, these protesters met outside parliament to demonstrate their objections to vaccinations. elsewhere, the lead singer of the british group right said fred has warned anyone getting vaccinated that they are little more than lab rats. but not everyone in the music industry sees it that way. so many other rock stars are going on the other side, for example, dave grohl and the foo fighters, they will not play a concert unless the people there can show proof of vaccination. i wish more artists were like them and would say get the vaccine, we need to stop this virus now while we can. concerns about side effects and testing contribute to vaccine hesitancy, but medical experts stress that even though some people experience mild to moderate symptoms
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after being vaccinated, the benefit of vaccination outweighs the risks for the vast majority of people. mark lobel, bbc news. artist and activist ai weiwei has unveiled an iron tree in his latest exhibition, as a warning about environmental destruction. the 32—metre exhibit was moulded from a 1,200—year—old endangered caryocar genus tree he found during a trip to the brazilian forest four years ago. ai weiwei says "destroying the environment, destroys human society". scientists say protection of the amazon is vital to curbing climate change because of the greenhouse gas the rainforest absorbs. the olympics opening ceremony is almost upon us. we can have a look at the stadium as the prepared final
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preparations as we countdown to the opening ceremony, officially, the tokyo games having been delayed for a year and we wish them the very best of luck. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. in the next few days temperatures are going to go down. the few thunderstorms around, the heat continues to office amber extreme heat warning continues for one more day. lots of sunshine to come, temperatures 29 celsius. the seventh consecutive day to reach 30 degrees. cooler in eastern areas, low cloud, and later in the day, breeze air in
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the south, thunderstorms rolling into south—west, other parts of england and south wales tomorrow morning. temperatures in the mid teens, a protein start some as we start tomorrow morning. at the weekend, wider changes, thundery showers in england and south wales, low pressure pushing its way north, high pressure across the north and west, dry and sunshine in northern ireland, north—west england. cloud in eastern scotland. cloud across england and wales, thundery showers, some torrential downpours across the southern parts, drier moments too. the temperatures, 21 celsius, a drop on today in northern ireland and western scotland, 26 degrees. in the evening, showers and thunderstorms central england and wales and on
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sunday too. further north and west, another day of sunny spells, isolated showers, temperatures going down, 25 celsius and 26 in north—west scotland. most places closer to where we should be. next week, low pressure pulls away, wins in a northerly direction and temperatures will go down. on monday, showers in scotland and eastern england, the odd shower elsewhere. largely dry in northern ireland but temperatures closer to where they should be at this time of year. bye for now.
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one year overdue — but finally the olympic games are about to begin, in tokyo. delayed by the pandemic, more than 11,000 athletes from more than 200 countries will compete. the opening ceremony is less than an hour away. yes, iam yes, i am at the olympic stadium for the traditional curtain raiser to the games, only without any fans. we'll bring you the latest from tokyo. the other headlines this morning. thousands of workers in the food supply chain in england no longer need to isolate if pinged by the covid app, as long as they test negative. we're going to keep this under review but we think this is a sensible first step that we should do quickly, and so we've acted quickly and we're rolling it out from today.
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and, daily testing for pupils is just as effective at controlling covid in schools as self—isolation, according to new research. good morning and welcome to the bbc news at 11. it is one year late and has been beset by problems, but in the next hour the olympics finally formally begin in toyko. the opening ceremony injapan's national stadium will be three and a half hours long — but has been described as "sombre", reflecting the mood of a nation which is having to host the biggest sporting event in the world during a pandemic. our sports correspondent natalie pirks is inside the olympic stadium.
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natalie. normally with under an hour to no, the natalie. normally with under an hour to go, the stadium _ natalie. normally with under an hour to go, the stadium would _ natalie. normally with under an hour to go, the stadium would be - natalie. normally with under an hour to go, the stadium would be buzzing | to go, the stadium would be buzzing with noise and people but tonight, there are just 950 people allowed in and they are the ones who have been down there performing, or athletes or media. it is a japanese public holiday today and there are plenty of people outside get a glimpse of what is going on inside. the party they have paid for but are shout out. how are the japanese public feeling about these games? rupert wingfield now reports. finding olympic fans in tokyo these days isn't so easy. but on this rooftop, at least, it's a different story. skateboarding is in the olympics for the first time, in the hope of attracting young, new fans and it seems to be working. translation: it would be cool to watch great - skateboarders at the olympics. translation: i love snowboarding, i so skateboarding is good practice i for me and it's fun. tokyo!
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cheering at one time, everyone here was an olympic fan. on the day tokyo won the bid back in 2013, people were delirious with joy. tokyo! tokyo! tokyo! today, the atmosphere couldn't be more different. the stadium where the opening ceremony will happen is surrounded by high fences, spectators kept far away. first there was the enormous cost of the main stadium. then there were problems with the olympic logo, then there were allegations of corruption and then covid hit and the whole games had to be moved by a year. and then this year, japan's olympic chief had to step down over a sexism row, then the composer of music for the opening ceremony was forced out because of bullying allegations. finally, one day before the games were due to open, the director of the whole opening ceremony has been fired because it turns out he made jokes about the holocaust. it's no wonder some people here think these games are cursed.
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tokyo is supposed to be under a state of emergency but you wouldn't know it in the famous nightlife district of shinjuku. like many others, the owner of this restaurant is now refusing to close early or stop serving alcohol. he says he lost $250,000 during the last shutdown. translation: i am struggling. the government is not helping us, so i have to protect my own living. there are many who are looking forward to tonight's opening ceremony. at lunchtime today, thousands crowded a city centre park to watch japan's air force acrobatic team paint the olympic rings across the sky. outside the main stadium, they've been lining up all day to take photos with a different set of rings. but, overall, the mood in tokyo is more weary acceptance than eager anticipation. rupert wingfield hayes, bbc news, in tokyo. injust underan
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in just under an hour's time, we will see how tokyo intends to tell the world is ready to host these games. this ceremony will look very different to what was planned pre—pandemic. we will still have the traditional parade of nations where athletes come in with flags but for example the team gb, instead of 375 athletes, there will be just 30. ultimately, after three and a half hours of storytelling, lanterns, lights, dancing, the olympic flame will light the olympic cauldron and that flame will burn for the duration of the games and it is hoped that symbolic moment and the sporting feats which are to come will light a fire of imagination in the japanese public.— will light a fire of imagination in the japanese public. natalie, thank ou. the japanese public. natalie, thank you- natalie _ the japanese public. natalie, thank you. natalie pirks— the japanese public. natalie, thank you. natalie pirks in _ the japanese public. natalie, thank you. natalie pirks in tokyo. - thousands of people in the food supply chain in england, who are told to self—isolate by the nhs tracing app, are now allowed to carry on working as long as they test negative for covid. a government scheme has begun which means staff at 15 supermarket depots are now able to take
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a daily test instead. and other key sectors will be able to join the scheme next week. simon browning reports. empty shelves, gaps in food supply. industry has blamed the problem on the amount of critical food sector workers being pinged and they wanted action. last night, the government intervened. now, supermarket depot workers and food manufacturers will be exempt from self—isolating rules. workers, regardless of vaccination status, will be able to do daily covid testing, instead of isolating. it's expected 10,000 workers will qualify. new daily testing measures are beginning at 15 supermarket depots, followed by 150 more next week. supermarket store staff are not included. industry has broadly welcomed the changes. i think any intervention is welcome. i think we were all feeling in the food industry in particular, that something needed to happen, something needed to change. any change, any improvement is welcome. we've got to see the devil in the detail here.
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it has been highlighted that only certain companies are on the list. who is on the list? who has been identified? it is notjust the food sector that wants exemptions for isolating staff. the government is offering a limited number of exclusions for 16 critical industries, such as energy, the nuclear industry, medicines and water supply. those government departments will agree with these key businesses, people, and so for instance the water industry, the nuclear power industry agree with them the job roles that should be included in this and you'll have quite an expedited system where, if they want somebody to come off isolation, they'll simply provide the name and that will be agreed. but unions say with three weeks till self isolation rules change, these sectors are presented with difficulties because they expect some workers will qualify for exemption and others won't. in a power station, in telecommunications, critical defence infrastructure, these are all interdependent occupations. and just listing named individuals, which seems to be at the core of this
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proposal, won't work. as businesses across the country adapt, the government maintains the app is doing itsjob and is needed to stem the rising tide of coronavirus infections. simon browning, bbc news. our political correspondent jonathan blake is in westminster. so some changes today but is the government still under pressure with all of this, do you think? it is. the government _ all of this, do you think? it is. the government has - all of this, do you think? it is. the government has been i all of this, do you think? it is. i the government has been under pressure for days to give details on exemptions to the isolation system, ever since the prime minister said at his news conference on tuesday there would be exemptions to some critical workers. there would be exemptions to some criticalworkers. now there would be exemptions to some critical workers. now we have at least some of that. i think it's clear from weather in the food industry, where10,000 workers will be tested on a daily basis or in those other critical sectors where individuals will have to be designated by name did not have to isolate, the government is really doing the minimum that it needs to doing the minimum that it needs to do frankly keep the lights on, keep the trains running, keep the borders are secure. already, warnings that
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that system for critical industries will be on pressure from the food industry to get the system of exemptions up and running more quickly because it seems like a lot of the sites are yet to be identified and yet to be designated and calls from other industries as well, that their staff should be allowed to be exempt. but the environment secretary this morning acknowledging that in supermarkets there will still be difficulties, there will still be difficulties, there will still be difficulties, there will still be staff shortages. so i think we can expect to see more strain on that and other sectors of the economy and with that more pressure on the government in the coming days and weeks to go further. but they are holding fast at the moment to the date of august 16 and not before then we'll all fully vaccinated adults be able to avoid isolation. , ., ., ., vaccinated adults be able to avoid isolation. . ., ., ., ., «i , ., the scottish government is expected to announce a similar scheme later today. under the scheme, people working in a range of sectors, including health and social care, could avoid isolation. supermarket workers and some airline staff could also be exempt.
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let's take a look at some of today's other news. six people have been taken to hospital after a car crashed into a pub garden in pontyclun in south wales. police say a 79—year—old man is believed to have suffered a "medical episode" before his car hit the people and the pub. uk retail sales rose by a 0.5% injune compared with may. the office for national statistics says the increase was driven by higher demand forfood and drink, as millions of people watched the euros. the coastguard has urged people to take care in the hot weather, following nine deaths on the uk coastline in the last ten days. it's advising visitors to check tide times, be aware of sea currents, hidden depths and rip currents, and ensure they have a fully charged phone with them. daily lateral flow tests for pupils may be just as effective as class bubbles to control transmission in schools, according to a study
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by oxford university. more than a million children in england were forced to stay away from school last week for covid—related reasons. our health correspondent, naomi grimley has more. the isolating of bubbles in schools has caused no end of frustration in this pandemic. last thursday, for example, more than a million state school pupils in england did not attend class for covid—19 related reasons. of those, more than 900,000 were self isolating, due to a possible contact with a case. but a new study by oxford university suggests that if daily lateral flow testing is done in school over seven days, it's just as good at preventing transmission as isolating pupils at home. what we see here is that for people in schools and colleges, the chance of getting infected with covid—19 when there has been a case in the school or college is low, less than 2%, one in 50.
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i am really confident that what this study shows as is daily testing of contacts a safe thing to do in schools and colleges. the researchers believe daily contact testing like this can help reduce school absences. but can schools cope with this kind of intensive testing done on site? it very difficult. we have made it work before. i'm sure with the support of my support staff we can make it work again. we need to know exactly what is expected of us and we need to know as soon as possible. but we need clarity, consistency, we need kids in school and staff to be able to teach them. some experts worry whether lateral flow tests will detect enough positive cases, especially when infections are running high. but government advisers say the research is a breakthrough, considering how much learning has already been disrupted. naomi grimley, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich.
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good morning. the heat is ebbing away, some cooler weather over the weekend with some heavy downpours for some but not quite all of us. through the rest of today, still an amber warning from the met office, and extreme heat warning for northern ireland. lots of sunshine for most. the odd shower, low cloud across eastern coast and thundery rain approaching the far south—west with a strengthening breeze. low is low is that they have been for some of us but still up to 28 or 29. as we had three this evening and overnight and into tomorrow we will see heavy and thundery rain pushing into east anglia and part of wales, thunderstorm scattered. still rain for localised flooding and flooding. drier, brighterand for localised flooding and flooding. drier, brighter and warmerfurther drier, brighter and warmer further west. drier, brighter and warmerfurther west. temperatures across western scotland and northern ireland up to 25 or 26. it stays dry to the north—west on sunday, more thunderstorms in the south—east,
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cooler for all of us. thank you very much. that is it from the news team for now. now is the time for the news wherever you are in the country, bye—bye.
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hello this is bbc news with jane hill. we will turn first to some news that has just come through in the last few minutes.
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ahigh courtjudge has ruled there should be a new investigation into whether state agencies could have prevented the omagh bombing in 1998. this is the attack by the real ira. resulting in the deaths of 29 people. danjohnson is in belfast for us now and has been studying thejudgment. explain what has been said just in the last little while. i’m explain what has been said 'ust in the last little while.i the last little while. i'm actually in omuah the last little while. i'm actually in 0mgah at _ the last little while. i'm actually in omgah at the _ the last little while. i'm actually in omgah at the memorial i the last little while. i'm actually i in omgah at the memorial garden in 0mgah at the memorial garden which remembers the victims of that attack which was the single there has been claims and evidence over the years that the intelligence services had some degree of knowledge about what was being planned and what was potentially about to happen that day and if they had better coordinated bits of intelligence between security services, m15, special branch and
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the local police here in 0mgah they could have prevented that bombing, save more lives of india managed to prosecute the people who carried it out. a few years ago the uk government said this was no longer worthy as public enquiry and investigation. ajudge in the high court said he was satisfied that certain grounds when considered separately or together give rise to plausible allegations that there was a real prospect of preventing the omagh bombing which is why thejudge has ordered that there should be an investigation of some sort on both sides of the border even though his jurisdiction is only in northern ireland and he doesn't have the power to actually order a public enquiry he is saying that the uk government needs to go over the evidence from the run—up to the omagh bombing to explore all that evidence again and see whether intelligence failures did indeed mean that that attack wasn't prevented when perhaps it could have been. judge said in his ruling any
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investigation will have to look specifically at the issue of whether a more proactive campaign of disruption especially if coordinated north and south of the border had a real prospect of preventing the bombing and if without the benefit of hindsight the advantages and disadvantages of that approach were weighed up. that will come as welcome news to the families of the 29 victims who died in a bombing and have campaigned for investigations and a further enquiry which was something the uk victim had been resisting. the northern ireland secretary brandon lewis said in the last few minutes that we recognise that there are plausible allegations that there are plausible allegations that there are plausible allegations that there was a prospect of preventing the omagh and things should be done to investigate this. the uk government will take time to consider thejudge's the uk government will take time to consider the judge's statement and all its recommendations carefully as we wait for the full judgment to
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all its recommendations carefully as we wait for the fulljudgment to be published so what this means is this is not the end of the road now as we look back over the issues around the omagh bombing in 1998 and even though the government has proposed an end to all investigations and inquiries dating back to the trouble is we expect that point would be in april 19 88 at the belfast good friday agreement and because that bombing happened later that summer that could now be investigated. this investigation will in examine whether it information could have been... , ,, , whether it information could have been... ,, , ., been... doubtless there will be more reaction to the _ been... doubtless there will be more reaction to the news _ been... doubtless there will be more reaction to the news over _ been... doubtless there will be more reaction to the news over the - been... doubtless there will be more reaction to the news over the course | reaction to the news over the course of the afternoon and evening. for now we will return to the course of covid and what we have started
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causing the pingdemic. thousands of people in the food supply chain especially allowed to take part in a scheme which involves supermarket depots and elements of the food supply chain. more now on the news that thousands of people who are told to self—isolate by the nhs tracing app will be allowed to carry on working as long as they test negative for covid. the government said daily testing would be implemented at key sites in the food industry, including supermarket depots and food manufacturers. i'm joined now by ian wright, who's chief executive of the food hello. good morning. how helpful are at least today's _ hello. good morning. how helpful are at least today's changes? _ hello. good morning. how helpful are at least today's changes? i _ at least today's changes? i think there are moves _ at least today's changes? i think there are moves in _ at least today's changes? i think there are moves in the - there are moves in the right direction. we've been with our colleagues in retail and elsewhere in the food supply chain we have been warning for some weeks that the underlying labour sausages which have begun to systematically affect the food supply chain coupled with
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the continuity of supply in some cases. ., ., cases. un never, ever, ever going to have out of— cases. un never, ever, ever going to have out of food. _ cases. un never, ever, ever going to have out of food. that _ cases. un never, ever, ever going to have out of food. that is _ cases. un never, ever, ever going to have out of food. that is not - cases. un never, ever, ever going to have out of food. that is not going i have out of food. that is not going to happen but what was happening was that choice was being voted in certain stores. some products are unavailable because production lines had to be halted because of the pandemic and distribution is difficult because lorry drivers and others are not available so collectively this was having a big impact on the supply chain and it was beginning to be discernible on shelves, as we saw from some of those rather scary pictures of individual stores a couple of days ago. individual stores a couple of days auo. . ., , ., ago. indeed. there could be more weeks to this _ ago. indeed. there could be more weeks to this next _ ago. indeed. there could be more weeks to this next week. - ago. indeed. there could be more weeks to this next week. within i ago. indeed. there could be more i weeks to this next week. within your industry, are there still some sections or groups of staff that you would like to still be brought into the fold of this scheme, if you like? ., , ., «i ., , like? ideally, i would like to see the so-called — like? ideally, i would like to see the so-called test _
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like? ideally, i would like to see the so-called test and _ like? ideally, i would like to see the so-called test and release i the so—called test and release scheme started immediately rather than the 16th of august but the government does not want to do that. it would be interesting to know why that is. we don't know whether that is because of the numbers and because they believe that their projections of infection would be affected by that whether it is simply a lack of supply of the tests are the some other reason. it would be good to know what that is put in the interim this is a fix. will work to a certain extent. i am a little bit worried that the criteria for the 500 sites that we had told have been chosen may be more undersize than might be entirely sensible because some small site takers and abattoirs don't have many employees but are absolutely critical particularly in individual localities where they may be the only all major supplier in meat or bread but that is slightly on the margin. ithink bread but that is slightly on the margin. i think this is a good move. we were calling yesterday for urgent
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action and sajid javid and george eustice have taken urgent action and it would be mealy—mouthed not to recognise that and thank them for it. ., «i recognise that and thank them for it. ., , , ., , recognise that and thank them for it. ., «i i. , ., recognise that and thank them for it. thank you but that date of au . ust it. thank you but that date of august the — it. thank you but that date of august the 16th _ it. thank you but that date of august the 16th is _ it. thank you but that date of august the 16th is clearly i it. thank you but that date ofj august the 16th is clearly still an issue in your mind as it has been with some others we have spoken to? yes, and i think there is the sort of question it if this scheme can be undertaken for a limited number of sites under the government's auspices it is really interesting that the scheme itself does not discriminate on the basis of people's vaccination status so you could have been vaccinated twice, once or not at all and still can't explain the scheme if you are on a particular site. explain the scheme if you are on a particularsite. i presume explain the scheme if you are on a particular site. i presume this is for legal reasons. you begin to worry or wonder if the government is prepared to support 500 sites if the individual employee is prepared to do all of this in exactly the same way and it is legal for the government, why isn't it legal for
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the other sites? and i think that will get to be a question which is asked early next week. the now, in that case, thank you _ asked early next week. the now, in that case, thank you very _ asked early next week. the now, in that case, thank you very much. i asked early next week. the now, in i that case, thank you very much. that is ian wright, chief executive of the food and drink association. thank you. let's get more now on those retails sales figures which rose by 0.5% between may and june. our business correspondent katy austin says sales were helped by a boost in demand forfood and drink. well, apparently the euro 2020 football championship helped along the sales of food and drink. that was at the end ofjune. if we look back here, it's interesting to have a bit of a context. so, in april when physical shops reopened there was — quite understandably — a huge spike in retail sales. people went out to the shops for the first time in a long time and bought things. and there was a bit of a drop—off in may, which, again, you might expect once that pent—up demand had been released. so what we were expecting injune was something not so dramatic, not such a dramatic change and that's exactly what happened. there was a 0.5% overall increase in retail sales but much of that was driven by food and drink
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which was up much more. that was over a%, the increase in food and drink sales. as i say, the office for national statistics think anecdotally the football will have helped that along, but, actually, if you look at non—food, so clothes and furniture items, that was down a bit. down 1.7% compared to may, so people seem to have reined back in that way but splashed out a bit more on food and drink. our business correspondence there. we're expected to spent nearly £9 billion on domestic holidays this year — that's a ten—year—high. new statistics from mintel say over three in five british people plan to holiday in the uk this year, compared with just two in five before the pandemic. victoria fritz has been following the story and reports for us from north wales. welcome to the seaside resort of
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llandudno in north wales. it is places like these which will be a boost to domestic tourism this year. new figures show that we are due to spend £9 billion this summer alone on domestic holidays, that figure is a ten year high. 62% of us are going to spend our summer holiday in the uk and plan to spend some time elsewhere, not all our time in our homes. we're coming to places like this, north wales and cumbria as the most popular places. not devon or dorset or cornwall, which might surprise some people. many places are fully booked, presumably these holiday parks. how do you prepare for a season like this? it has been difficult, especially in the domestic tourism market where we've seen a massive demand coming through. people have had enough, i think,
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trying to make a booking abroad and realising that it is just a complete waste of time. it is unfair for that individual and now we are getting that footfall and we are hoping we can continue with that where people have had a nice time, they enjoy this type of weather, and they'rejust going to keep coming back and returning year—on—year. how are you managing the demand? lots of people are being sent home. pingdemic is a problem. we feel some of our staff are unfairly getting pinned and have perhaps only been in contact with somebody for a minute or two. the sooner the better to get a test of a turn back to work. i know altering the legalities of this to see whether we can get the backing to work as soon as they get a negative test, that would be great for us, you know? there is more of a mixture in terms of the people
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who are coming to holiday resorts who would otherwise go to the european continent, they are coming here as well, is it putting extra pressure on people and the older holiday—makers who would ordinarily come here, are they feeling a little bit uncomfortable perhaps about the excess volume of people? they will not be accustomed to the amount of volume, but i think they understand. the individuals who normally go to europe or america, they are here on holiday and it is... i think everybody understands the situation we're in and you have to enjoy the best of a bad situation and i think they are starting to enjoy it. we can report that there have been cases of verbal abuse for staff in restaurants and also people here because there is confusion about restrictions because they're different in wales compared to england. as a result, there can be a little bit of trouble. there have been problems
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locally in this area. but overall, you know, the summer seaside, the great british holiday seems to be doing incredibly well and numbers are very high. lucky victoria being in wales! time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. the heatwave continues for some today but over all of the coming days the outlook is a changing one, which will see temperatures gradually drop. the heatwave ends and through this weekend some thunderstorms around, mainly across parts of england, south and east wales. but there's still a met office extreme heat warning across parts of northern ireland for today, an amber one which lapses later on. it's here where we could see temperatures up to around 29, maybe 30 celsius. high 20s west of scotland, north—west england, west wales. low 20s, high teens towards eastern england, east of scotland, where we'll see some mist and low cloud continue to roll in. few isolated showers this afternoon
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and evening, like recent days, but through tonight more longer spells of thundery rain pushing on across southern counties of england and also, potentially, parts of south wales too. that will continue on and off as we go through saturday. some sunshine in between. low cloud to eastern areas. best of the sunshine, highest of the temperatures still in western scotland and northern ireland — up to around 26 degrees here, but even here it will turn cooler on sunday. after the longest and most diffcult build up
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to any olympic games, it's a moment, many thought wouldn't happen, but in just under half an hours' time, the opening ceremony, for the tokyo olympics, will get under way. it's live on bbc one. sailor hannah mills, and rower mohammed sibi—hee, will be team gb�*s flag bearers in the olympic stadium, lets have a look at our live pictures of tokyo right now, no spectators for what is usually one of the most iconic moments of the games but it is all happening. 11,000 athletes over the next two weeks from over 207 nations will be competing. it all gets going very soon indeed. british success will be measured by different criteria in tokyo. back in 1996, britain managed only one gold and finished 36th in the rankings, as hosts in 2012, britain rose to finish third, in the london games medal table of 2012, on the back of a huge injection of lottery funding. four years later in rio, britain finished an extraordinary second,
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behind the united states. expectations are lower this time, despite britain sending their biggest team to an overseas games. the welfare and well—being of the athletes is absolutely at the heart of what we are doing. if you want to be the best in the world, which is what athletes here are aspiring to be, it takes a special type of person and a huge amount of dedication and hard work. and what we want is our athletes to have really positive experiences in the programmes that they are in, so that when they get here they feel as best prepared as they can for the games and the competitions they have ahead of them. australia and new zealand's decision to pull out of the rugby league world cup was "premature", according to australia's players' union, who have claimed a number of its members wanted to travel to england for the tournament this autumn. rugby football league chairman simonjohnson calling it a "selfish,
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parochial, and cowardly decision", but the new zealand rugby league chief has defended the withdrawal. our paramount concern is the safety of our people. this brings into keen focus the stark difference what is acceptable in the uk and the management of the pandemic in the uk versus what is acceptable to new zealand and closely behind, australia. you are seeing upwards of 50,000 cases potentially in the uk. we will slam our borders and lock down with a handful of cases. the safety of our people is paramount. as rumours continue to swirl over the future of their star striker harry kane, one of tottenham's other top forwards, son heung min, has committed his future to the club he's signed a new four—year contract keeping him at spurs until 2025. son has scored 107 goals in 280 appearances for the club since joining from bayer leverkusen in 2015. he's also scored 27 times for south korea, appearing at two world cups.
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cricket�*s new competition, the hundred seems to be capturing the imagination. the oval invincibles competed the double over, manchester originals, after the women's side beat their counterparts in the inaugural match the men followed suit beating originals by 9 runs, in the first men's game of the new format. the invincibles captain sam billings starred with a9. it's the first double header today as birmingham phoenix take on london spirit at edgbaston. the women's sides play first from 3, with the men following at 6.30. legendary aussie bowler shane warne is head coach of spirit's men. when there is not much between teams, it can come down to the way you think, it can come down to the right feel, the right time. obviously, skill and all those sorts of things and execution, you know, if you bowl rubbish you're going to get whacked and you're probably going to lose, but if you take it that everyone is going to bowl all right and bat pretty well, then what's the point of difference between every team?
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it will come down to fielding, little things, the wides, no balls. but overall, it will come down to the strategy that you have and the tactical side of things and as i said, i think we've got the best captain in world cricket in eoin morgan. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. let's get more now on the study conducted by the university of oxford into the effectiveness of daily lateral flow testing for pupils. could daily testing be adopted by schools when they return to classrooms in the autumn, instead of isolating whole bubbles of school children? let's discuss this with natalie perera, chief executive of the nonpartisan think tank, the education policy institute; and with sammy wright, vice principal of southmoor academy in sunderland. she's also lead commissioner for schools and higher education at the social mobility foundation.
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welcome. thank you forjoining us. tell us first of all what the impact has been on your pupils and your school of self isolation? it has been on your pupils and your school of self isolation?- school of self isolation? it has been pretty — school of self isolation? it has been pretty devastating. i school of self isolation? it has been pretty devastating. the | been pretty devastating. the last day of term we were down to about a20 students out of what should have been over 1000. i think the thing important to understand is it's not just about simple metrics of days lost, it's about momentum lost. you have students who are isolating from disadvantaged backgrounds without parental support, disadvantaged backgrounds without parentalsupport, often disadvantaged backgrounds without parental support, often not doing much work at all and they come back in, otherstudents much work at all and they come back in, other students have not been isolating, it's very difficult to get them to mesh back with where they should be in terms of their learning and their confidence is shot by it. over the course of the year, one can put up the numbers of days they might have been out of the
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classroom but as students who have effectively had a wasted year because of that no point have they developed the momentum to engage with school work.— with school work. natalie, this new research has _ with school work. natalie, this new research has looked _ with school work. natalie, this new research has looked into _ with school work. natalie, this new research has looked into the i research has looked into the efficacy of the isolation policy. just put figures on it, and the study, 1.6% of those who self isolated tested positive for covid, 1.5% of those doing daily tests did. out of1 million pupils off, a7,000 is actually had covid. what does that say to you about how things should be, going forward? clearly the stud , should be, going forward? clearly the study. the _ should be, going forward? clearly the study, the findings _ should be, going forward? clearly the study, the findings of - should be, going forward? clearly the study, the findings of the i should be, going forward? clearly. the study, the findings of the study today— the study, the findings of the study today is_ the study, the findings of the study today is very positive and promising news _ today is very positive and promising news as_ today is very positive and promising news. as sammy said, we need to keep pupils— news. as sammy said, we need to keep pupils in— news. as sammy said, we need to keep pupils in school as consistently as we can— pupils in school as consistently as we can to — pupils in school as consistently as we can to avoid further learning disruptions. clearly it's important
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to do— disruptions. clearly it's important to do that — disruptions. clearly it's important to do that safely as well. but we know _ to do that safely as well. but we know that — to do that safely as well. but we know that the impact of the pandemic has been _ know that the impact of the pandemic has been vast. back in spring, we estimated — has been vast. back in spring, we estimated that young people were between _ estimated that young people were between 2—a months behind in their learning _ between 2—a months behind in their learning and that gap was larger for children— learning and that gap was larger for children from poor backgrounds and children— children from poor backgrounds and children in— children from poor backgrounds and children in some of the worst affected _ children in some of the worst affected areas in the country by the pandemic — affected areas in the country by the pandemic. if we can keep pupils in school— pandemic. if we can keep pupils in school safely by doing daily testing rather _ school safely by doing daily testing rather than having them isolate, that's— rather than having them isolate, that's clearly a step forward and something the government should be supporting the school to do. does the evidence _ supporting the school to do. does the evidence say _ supporting the school to do. does the evidence say that's _ supporting the school to do. lire" the evidence say that's exactly what the evidence say that's exactly what the situation is? ii the evidence say that's exactly what the situation is?— the situation is? if the study su: nests the situation is? if the study suggests that _ the situation is? if the study suggests that there - the situation is? if the study suggests that there is i the situation is? if the study suggests that there is very i the situation is? if the study i suggests that there is very little difference between peoples in close contact _ difference between peoples in close contact isolating, versus being tested — contact isolating, versus being tested daily, so that's what the government ought to be doing. but
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they need _ government ought to be doing. but they need to support schools to make sure that _ they need to support schools to make sure that that daily testing can happen, — sure that that daily testing can happen, it can happen safely and rigorously — happen, it can happen safely and rigorously. gn happen, it can happen safely and riuorousl . ., happen, it can happen safely and rigorously-— rigorously. on that point, how would ou feel rigorously. on that point, how would you feel about _ rigorously. on that point, how would you feel about having _ rigorously. on that point, how would you feel about having to _ rigorously. on that point, how would you feel about having to roll - rigorously. on that point, how would you feel about having to roll out i you feel about having to roll out daily testing in school? i think that i would _ daily testing in school? i think that i would be _ daily testing in school? i think that i would be grateful- daily testing in school? i think that i would be grateful for. that i would be grateful for anything that would allow us to keep young people in school. what i would say is that to echo what natalie said, it's really important we do get the resourcing to do this. we will already be testing every student when they come back in september. schools have already set “p september. schools have already set up systems to do that. what we need to make sure we have got is dedicated members of staff throughout the year to continue doing this, because we don't have the slack. every spare bit of manpower schools have is dedicated to catch up. we need to be able to employ extra people to run testing sites but if we can do that that i think it is an excellent solution. doesn't necessarily have to be done in school? couldn't kids do it at
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home? i in school? couldn't kids do it at home? . in school? couldn't kids do it at home? , ,. ., ., in school? couldn't kids do it at home? , ,. , , home? i see in school because that's what the trial — home? i see in school because that's what the trial was _ home? i see in school because that's what the trial was doing. _ what the trial was doing. that's part of the process they have outlined. i would not want to do something different from what had been rigorously tested in this way. i would say that it's very difficult to ensure students actually do the tests at home and do them properly because quite frankly they have their own... because quite frankly they have their own. . .— because quite frankly they have their own... you pulled a face at that point. _ their own... you pulled a face at that point. just _ their own... you pulled a face at that point, just on _ their own... you pulled a face at that point, just on that, - their own... you pulled a face at that point, just on that, there i their own... you pulled a face at i that point, just on that, there were rumours that there were cases where people using orange juice rumours that there were cases where people using orangejuice in their tests to stay off, is that what you are talking about? it’s tests to stay off, is that what you are talking about?— tests to stay off, is that what you are talking about? it's not so much that, it's almost _ are talking about? it's not so much that, it's almost the _ are talking about? it's not so much that, it's almost the opposite, i that, it's almost the opposite, that students don't want to take the test or or be off actually. i'm sure some do but the ones who do are the ones who could probably pull a sickie in any event. i don't think anyone enjoys ten days isolation to be frank. i would
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enjoys ten days isolation to be frank. iwould be enjoys ten days isolation to be frank. i would be more worried about students saying i can't be bothered and not doing the test.— and not doing the test. natalie, a final thought. _ and not doing the test. natalie, a final thought. sammy _ and not doing the test. natalie, a final thought. sammy made i and not doing the test. natalie, a final thought. sammy made a i and not doing the test. natalie, a i final thought. sammy made a really good point about the lack of momentum kids have been able to have this year. going forward, when do we reach the point where things can go back to how they were before in terms of exams and assessments? how quickly do decisions need to be made for the pupils next year who are going to be taking key exams? that's the key point- — going to be taking key exams? that's the key point- at _ going to be taking key exams? that's the key point. at the _ going to be taking key exams? that's the key point. at the moment, i going to be taking key exams? that's the key point. at the moment, the government is consulting on having exams _ government is consulting on having exams next year but altering them slightly— exams next year but altering them slightly for pupils taking gcse and a-levels — slightly for pupils taking gcse and a—levels. this consultation has come rather— a—levels. this consultation has come rather late, _ a—levels. this consultation has come rather late, given that we have known — rather late, given that we have known that we need to do something differently next year as well. if schools — differently next year as well. if schools continue to be close, then the government will need to look again— the government will need to look again at— the government will need to look again at whether exams are a viable option— again at whether exams are a viable option entirely. again at whether exams are a viable option entirely-— option entirely. thank you both very much forjoining _
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option entirely. thank you both very much forjoining us. _ option entirely. thank you both very much forjoining us. let _ option entirely. thank you both very much forjoining us. let us - option entirely. thank you both very much forjoining us. let us know- much forjoining us. let us know your thoughts on that. you can get in touch on twitter. parents are being warned to look out for the signs of a common respiratory illness known as rsv. the virus normally spreads in the winter, but social distancing and lockdowns kept it at bay earlier this year. cases are now on the rise since lockdown restrictions were eased, and some children could be at risk of serious complications, including breathing difficulties. let's discuss this with the medical director for public health england, professor yvonne doyle. thank you forjoining us. rsv we see is common but it is a term i have only quite recently come across. i don't how widely known it is. can you tell us more about rsv and how common it has been? inaudible can you hear me? we cannot hear you. good morning. can you hear me? we cannot hear you. good morning-—
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good morning. loud and clear, thank ou. good good morning. loud and clear, thank you. good morning. _ good morning. loud and clear, thank you. good morning. respiratory- good morning. loud and clear, thank you. good morning. respiratory sin i you. good morning. respiratory sin ci a you. good morning. respiratory sin city a virus — you. good morning. respiratory sin city a virus is _ you. good morning. respiratory sin city a virus is what _ you. good morning. respiratory sin city a virus is what it's _ you. good morning. respiratory sin city a virus is what it's called i common usually over the autumn, winter and spring but this is unusual in that children have not particularly been out and about much and may not be immune to it and therefore with a number of other infections they may pick it up and our routine surveillance has just shown that there has been an increase in this. it's not alarming but it's good practice to get people aware of what parents can do but also what we can all do to prevent further problems for children. before we talk about prevention, i know you see it's not too alarming, but we need to be aware. if kids have not built up an immunity, is it the case that kids can get it more seriously than previously would have been the case? i'm assuming it's because either they have not got it or it's most often passed off
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without really serious problems? that's right. most children who get this, it's reallyjust like a common cold for the older children. for children under two, it can be more serious. they get bronchiolitis, they get over that in a couple of weeks but then the ones that may be at risk of hitting them hard or premature babies and children under two with cardio conditions, particularly if they need cardiac surgery. that's the group we wanted to focus on just in terms of what parents should look out for but also what the rest of us can do to help ensure that we don't get exposed to this virus. ~ . . ensure that we don't get exposed to this virus. ~ ., ., ., , , ., this virus. what are the answers to those points? _ this virus. what are the answers to those points? for— this virus. what are the answers to those points? for parents, - this virus. what are the answers to those points? for parents, most i those points? for parents, most arents those points? for parents, most parents know — those points? for parents, most parents know their _ those points? for parents, most parents know their children i those points? for parents, most i parents know their children looking at them when they are not well. for children under two the signs of a fever of 37.8 or 30 degrees. that's common in children for any
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infections lingering, but particularly so if it doesn't reduce. children often feeds, irritable, dry nappies, for 2a hours is quite a serious sign. a dry cough. that is when you just need to be watched because this is hitting them harder. very serious if they are struggling with their breathing or more serious if they have blue lips or tongue is, that's a medical emergency. most children will get over this, with things to bring the temperature down, keep them hydrated but it is worth watching for these signs. i5 but it is worth watching for these si . ns. . but it is worth watching for these si . ns. , . ., , but it is worth watching for these sins. , ., , signs. is it the case that if this is happening _ signs. is it the case that if this is happening with _ signs. is it the case that if this is happening with rsv - signs. is it the case that if this is happening with rsv it i signs. is it the case that if this is happening with rsv it will. signs. is it the case that if this i is happening with rsv it will happen with other things? that over the last 18 months, all of our immunity systems have ta ken last 18 months, all of our immunity systems have taken a knock because we have not been having contact, we have been living in a much more
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sanitised world? what could be potential in plications be? taste potential in plications be? we are exectin: potential in plications be? we are expecting more — potential in plications be? we are expecting more infections - potential in plications be? we are expecting more infections this i expecting more infections this season, less have been exposed and we are already seeing other outbreaks. we have notified us around at the world. i wanted to say in addition to rsv and its true for any of these including covid, the current practices we are used to, washing our hands, waving a mask, in a confined space. making sure that we catch sneezes, particularly near to children are very transmissible, rsv is, so is covid, so all of this behaviour helps and particularly anyone in contact with premature or who have respiratory problems or
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cardiac problems, if you have a cold, please do not mix with those children because they may get your transmission and it will hit them hard. in two thank you very much for joining us. thank you. the opening ceremony of the tokyo olympic games is due to begin shortly at midday. they're not quite the games tokyo had envisaged when the city bid for them. severaljapanese sponsors have shunned the ceremony and many athletes are staying away to avoid the risk of infection. one person who is following very closely how the games have changed tokyo is our correspondent mariko oi. she's been describing what it's like to cover the olympics in her hometown. it is great to be back injapan. i'm reporting on the olympics in my hometown of tokyo. this is a once—in—a—lifetime opportunity. it's far from the once—in—a—lifetime opportunity. it's farfrom the olympic once—in—a—lifetime opportunity. it's far from the olympic dreams that many of us had when tokyo won the right to host the 2020 summer games.
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the pandemic has changed all of this. now once again, japan is facing a test of resilience and unity. it facing a test of resilience and uni . . . facing a test of resilience and uni. ., ., «i unity. it was supposed to mark the recovery from _ unity. it was supposed to mark the recovery from the _ unity. it was supposed to mark the recovery from the devastating i unity. it was supposed to mark the recovery from the devastating 2011 j recovery from the devastating 2011 earthquake and tsunami. similar to when they hosted the games in 196a, that was a powerful symbol of a new japan rising from the ashes of world war ii. my parents were in high school and both remember the games vividly. mum's dad, my late grandfather, got tickets to see the events. i wish i could have asked him what it was like. nearly six decades later, the games are back. it's a very different tokyo today from when my grandfather was here. without overseas visitors and spectators, it will be a subdued games, that's for sure. whilst it is
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uneasily about having the games here now, in our hearts, my hometown will be rooting for the athletes and the limp spirit. the australian state of new south wales is asking the federal government to send more vaccines and other resources urgently, describing the delta variant outbreak in sydney as a "national crisis". it comes as the city records its biggest daily rise in covid cases this year. only 12% of australians have been vaccinated so far. new zealand has now suspended its quarantine—free travel bubble with australia for at least eight weeks. our correspondent phil mercer has more from sydney. what we've seen since the pandemic began in many ways is australia like a distressed submarine, those compartments of a submarine being closed off like states and territories around australia. western australia has put up a hard order with covid affected regions. the state of queensland is doing the same as well.
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what we are hearing from dan andrews, the victoria state premier, is wanting more of those restrictions around the greater sydney region to keep the people in and to keep the virus out of other parts of australia. so we know today new south wales, of which sydney is the state capital, has recorded 136 new covid—19 infections. this is a new daily record for this latest outbreak. now, 136 infections might not sound much to people in other countries, but in the australian context it is extremely significant. and you have to remember that australia has been pursuing a national policy of elimination, and that's why we are hearing those tough words from political leaders like dan andrews, who wants to lock sydney down until the delta variant here is crushed. eric clapton says he will not perform at venues that require concertgoers to be
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fully vaccinated against covid—19. he himself had a severe reaction to the astra zeneca vaccine. he says he objects to having a "discriminated audience present". borisjohnson has said proof of vaccination must be shown at clubs and venues from september. and experts insist the benefits of vaccination outweigh the risks for most people. mark lobel reports. eric clapton spoke out about vaccines in may, revealing his severe reaction to the astrazeneca one he feared he would leave him unable to play music again. earlier this week, he had a bad reaction to this. we are planning to make full vaccination the condition of entry to nightclubs and other venues where large crowds gather. after that, eric clapton issued a statement. he said... he went on...
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..warning that... eric clapton's concerts hit america in september, where vaccine proof is only required in a few venues, and there is a european tour next year, including london's royal albert hall in may. i am a huge fan of eric clapton and i'm shocked. you've got to be fair. think of the audience, think of 5,000 people or 30,000 people there all crammed together. you do not want to become a super spreader. are you worried this will put off people getting vaccinated? i am 100% worried it is going to slow down the vaccination rate and it has. but in the uk, these protesters met outside parliament to demonstrate their objections to vaccinations. elsewhere, the lead singer
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of the british group right said fred has warned anyone getting vaccinated that they are little more than lab rats. but not everyone in the music industry sees it that way. so many other rock stars are going on the other side, for example, dave grohl and the foo fighters, they will not play a concert unless the people there can show proof of vaccination. i wish more artists were like them and would say get the vaccine, we need to stop this virus now while we can. concerns about side effects and testing contribute to vaccine hesitancy, but medical experts stress that even though some people experience mild to moderate symptoms after being vaccinated, the benefit of vaccination outweighs the risks for the vast majority of people. mark lobel, bbc news. china has rejected a plan by the world health organization for a second phase of an investigation into the origins of covid 19. into the origins of covid—19.
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a senior chinese health official said the proposal, to consider whether the virus could have escaped from a chinese lab, did not respect science and disregarded common sense. our north america correspondent david willis has the latest. us intelligence officials were considering a number of leads and theories, among them coronavirus could have resulted from a laboratory accident in china and this gave momentum to a theory that up until then had been seen here as a right—wing conspiracy theory, the possibility that the virus was man—made in some form. and china hasn't really been helping itself in this regard, some might argue. officials from the world health organization were only able to get access to the wuhan area in january of this year, more than a year after the first cases of the virus came to light and now, beijing has flatly rejected a request from the who for its investigators to be allowed to inspect the laboratories, the research institutes, in wuhan.
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the government's plans to end the extra universal credit payment the extra universal credit payment would be the biggest overnight reduction in the basic rate of social security since the creation of the welfare state, that's according to thejoseph rowntree foundation. the government introduced a £20 a week uplift to the basic entitlement at the start of the pandemic, but that's due to come to an end in october. our political correspondent nick eardley has this report. for many families, the pandemic has been a time of unprecedented challenges. the government added £20 a week to universal credit payments last march. it was a big increase, but it was temporary. and the uplift is due to come to an end in october. i'm anthony. i'm a father of two. i became redundantjust before the lockdown due to ill health. anthony says the end of the extra money will mean some tough choices.
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for us as a household, we are going to be left with the question of food versus fuel, or fuel versus clothes, you know, just the basic necessities. there are many households which have grown to rely on the uplift money as a source ofjust functioning. the number of universal credit claimants has almost doubled during the pandemic, and some are worried that taking away the extra money could have a big impact. at the end of a year that's probably the worst many people will have seen since the war, we're going to be hitting families right as we go into the winter. what we're going to find is that there are millions of families who are going to go hungry this winter, who are not going to be able to put the heating on. the uplift costs a lot though — £6 billion a year. in here, the treasury, the government is trying to bring spending down after the unprecedented emergency measures of the pandemic.
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ministers say the £20 a week extra was always due to come to an end. a government spokesperson said, some mps are worried, though, including many conservatives, and they intend to put pressure a government spokesperson said... some mps are worried, though, including many conservatives, and they intend to put pressure on the government for a rethink. nick eardley, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. for those of you finding this current hot spell a little bit too much, there are some words which may please you. in the next few days, we are going to see temperatures gradually starting to fall away a little bit, so turning cooler. there will be a few thunderstorms around but many, particularly to the north and west, will be dry, and it's here where the heat continues, certainly today. met office and extreme heat warning across northern ireland continues for one more day. lots of sunshine to come here today and temperatures up to around 29, maybe 30 degrees. if we get above 30 degrees it will be the seventh
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consecutive day we have done so. notice there is a bit of an east— west split. a bit cooler down eastern areas with some mist and low late in the day signs of proper change. breezy across the south, thunderstorms starting to roll into the south—west, other parts of southern england, maybe south wales as we go into tomorrow morning. temperatures for the most part stay in the mid teens, upper teens for some as we start tomorrow morning. this weekend the changes begin a bit more widely. the thundery downpours are still going to be mainly across parts of england and south wales, all due to this area of low pressure pushing its way northwards, but high pressure still holds on across many northern and western areas, so it's going to stay dry, the best sunshine in northern ireland, western scotland, north—west england, bit more cloud, which could linger in eastern scotland and eastern parts of england. a lot more cloud generally across england and where is, across england and wales, thundery showers coming or going, some torrential downpours in places, across some southern parts, but equally here there will be some drier moments too. notice the temperatures, though, 21, 22 degrees. drop down on what we have seen
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today in northern ireland and western scotland, 26, but still pretty warm out there. as we go into the evening, showers and thunderstorms continue across parts of central and southern england and wales, and it is here where we will see them again on sunday, particularly towards the south—eastern quarter. further north and west, still another day of sunny spells, maybe the odd isolated shower. temperature starting to fall away, maybe up to around 25, 26 in the north—west of scotland. most places, though, closer to where we should be. and as we go into next week, as that area of low pressure pulls away, we start to drag our winds more in from a northerly direction, so temperatures will drop even further. this is how monday looks, for instance. a greater chance of some downpours in scotland come across and eastern parts of england, the odd shower elsewhere. still largely dry in northern ireland but by this stage temperatures closer to where they should be for this time of the year. bye for now.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... one year overdue — but finally the olympic games are starting with the opening ceremony getting under way now one year overdue — but finally the olympic games is about to begin. thousands of workers in the food supply chain in england no longer need to isolate if pinged by the covid app, as long as they test negative. and, daily testing for pupils is just as effective at controlling covid in schools as self—isolation, according to new research. a high courtjudge rules there should be a new investigation into whether state agencies could have prevented the omagh bombing in 1998. and surfing will make its olympic debut at the tokyo games, as a0 thrill—seeking athletes take
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to the waves it is one year late and has been beset by problems, but the olympics are finally formally starting in toyko. the opening ceremony injapan's national stadium will be three—and—a—half hours long — but has been described as "sombre", reflecting the mood of a nation which is having to host the biggest sporting event in the world during a pandemic. our sports correspondent natalie pirks is inside the olympic stadium: natalie, what is the atmosphere like? ., «i ., ., ,, ., like? you know what, it is strange. first of all. — like? you know what, it is strange. first of all. let _ like? you know what, it is strange. first of all, let me _ like? you know what, it is strange. first of all, let me tell— like? you know what, it is strange. first of all, let me tell you, - like? you know what, it is strange. first of all, let me tell you, i'm i first of all, let me tell you, i'm not allowed to have any lights on during the send of a mini which is why i am so dark but it will light
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up why i am so dark but it will light up as we go along. it is odd. there are around 950 people allowed in here tonight. most of them will be down on that stage and the best in media like me and the athletes will be walking a little bit later. the ioc president said the athletes are sending a resounding message of hope to ourfragile world sending a resounding message of hope to our fragile world and the opening ceremony going to highlight the themes of resilience, solidarity and unity so down on the floor behind me as a giant red sun and we all know what that means and over my shoulder on the main stage is mount fuji and on the top of mount fuji is the cauldron where the olympic flame will be lit. in amount to highlight the themes of resilience, solidarity and unity so down on the floor behind me as a giant red sun and we all know what that means and over my shoulder on the main stage is mount fuji and on the top of mount fuji is the cauldron where the olympic flame will be lit. in around parade of nations. there are more than 11,000 athletes coming to the games but we will see if i reduce number of athletes in the traditional work they do. only about 5700 will be walking, around 13 for team gb out of the team of 375. you can see how
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small things like that have been massively affected by the pandemic. now, every country will walk into japanese music from video games, which is quite a nice touch. greece walking first then the refugee nation, and 29 displaced athletes from around the world. team gb are coming in around 20 eighth place because it goes on the japanese alphabet advance in the usa are second to last injapan is final and if this place had any spectators they would be clapping very loudly indeed because you are not allowed to cheer and anyone coming to the games has been told please do not clear dominic chia, please only clap so to try not to potentially cause infection. both defending champions from rio hannah mills the sailor and also a rower at the fourth bullet the honour in history and all the
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270 countries and territories are out there will be fireworks going off, quite a sight for everyone outside the stadium which is where most of the japanese people were earlier, eagerto most of the japanese people were earlier, eager to get a look at a party they have paid for but they are not allowed into. there could be some quite poignant moments i think. a little bit later they will be performing imagine byjohn lennon and yoko ono in a section all about we're together trying to say the solidarity of what the world has been through and then they will be speeches at the japanese emperor will officially declare that the games are open and then they will be speeches at the japanese emperor will officially declare that the games are open and then the cauldron will hydrogen in an attempt to keep these games with zero carbon, in an attempt to keep them carbon neutral and then of course that flame will burn for the rest of the games. we have got 18 days a sport ahead of us. some have already begun and there are more sports and events here than ever before and i think sport has this amazing ability to
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uplift and to unify, doesn't it? anything that is probably what the world really needs right now. thank ou, world really needs right now. thank you. natalie- _ world really needs right now. thank you, natalie. we _ world really needs right now. thank you, natalie. we got _ world really needs right now. thank you, natalie. we got a _ world really needs right now. thank you, natalie. we got a sense i world really needs right now. thank you, natalie. we got a sense of i world really needs right now. thank you, natalie. we got a sense of the atmosphere there. it is, as natalie said, the lights are starting to come on and if they made it look like there were people even though the van, put things on the seats to give an impression.— give an impression. yes, the seats are all different _ give an impression. yes, the seats are all different colours _ give an impression. yes, the seats are all different colours so - give an impression. yes, the seats are all different colours so even i are all different colours so even though you can hear the faint ripple of applause there and i have gone dark again, sorry about that, but even though there is no one here apart from the media and the athletes will be walking it does try to give that sense, really, that there are people here and when we came in, you know, they were so many people outside. it is a japanese public holiday today and there were so many of them watching us all queueing to get in and eager to get a glimpse of what is going on in here. i think that even though they have been really reticent so far and i think a survey said two thirds of them didn't want the games and
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didn't believe it could be held safely but i do think once the games begin they will get behind it. we do seem to see these stories all the time, don't we? of course nothing like what we've seen with the pandemic that i do think was they begin they will get behind it because the japanese have got some excellent medal hopes in these games and we have got new sports coming in that they are nailed on to win gold since, things like surfing, scholastic, skateboarding, so i think we will eventually see the japanese get behind it. == think we will eventually see the japanese get behind it. -- surfing, karate, skateboarding. _ japanese get behind it. -- surfing, karate, skateboarding. it - japanese get behind it. -- surfing, karate, skateboarding. it is - japanese get behind it. -- surfing, karate, skateboarding. it is a i karate, skateboarding. it is a very good point, always stories before the event about fears about how it will turn out to be, remember london 2012? and was a success that opening ceremony was. we can speak now to martin green, chief creative officer for the birmingham 2022 commonwealth games. he was the master of ceremonies for the 2012 olympics and paralympics and has been advising the tokyo ceremony team. ina distant in a distant way! welcome and thank
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you very much forjoining us. there are not many people we could speak to with more credibility to discuss what is happening there in tokyo right now can you say thank you for joining us. it was weird, wasn't it, to see into that stadium and to know the context of what's happening there and also to think about how much planning will have gone into that event before the pandemic hit so i'm just wondering how much has been done before that had to be scrapped and how dexterous they have had to be in terms of what they are actually putting on today. what is your insight into that? i do actually putting on today. what is your insight into that?— your insight into that? i do know that they have _ your insight into that? i do know that they have got _ your insight into that? i do know that they have got an _ your insight into that? i do know i that they have got an extraordinary team working on that show. i had an amazing experience injapan and i think they have had those big shifts from when the pandemic first hit was a certain amount of confusion about what the future may hold after getting a plan going forward. the fact is that these enormous shows have to be fixed at some point. we can't merely change them days before but i think they have got a great creative team and i think they've
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had a reasonably organicjourney towards this night but i'm sure it will be tremendous. 50. towards this night but i'm sure it will be tremendous.— towards this night but i'm sure it will be tremendous. so, how much do ou know will be tremendous. so, how much do you know about _ will be tremendous. so, how much do you know about what _ will be tremendous. so, how much do you know about what is _ will be tremendous. so, how much do you know about what is going - will be tremendous. so, how much do you know about what is going to - will be tremendous. so, how much do you know about what is going to be i you know about what is going to be unfolding, then?— unfolding, then? well, quite a bit. i've been working _ unfolding, then? well, quite a bit. i've been working with _ unfolding, then? well, quite a bit. i've been working with the - unfolding, then? well, quite a bit. i've been working with the team i unfolding, then? well, quite a bit. i i've been working with the team over there for a few years now. really honoured to be advising them but like anyone involved in the show we don't talk about the show until it happens to the world so i am also sitting here currently with my iphone next to me watching the show and drinking it and like everyone else. �* , ., and drinking it and like everyone else. �* ., , else. and you have your fingers crossed and _ else. and you have your fingers crossed and your _ else. and you have your fingers crossed and your heart - else. and you have your fingers crossed and your heart in - else. and you have your fingers crossed and your heart in your. else. and you have your fingers - crossed and your heart in your mouth as well as you watch something that you know how much is going to unfold? i'm trying to think whether they have never been any really terrible mistakes on the day. there's been some interesting moments in the past. i think sydney's cauldron got stuck, the sort winter olympics livings didn't quite open correctly and a hydraulic lift had a problem is that there are
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almost one or two things that it is amazing being one of the few people in the world who continually say i know how they feel at this moment and it is quite a moment for release on the show starts.— on the show starts. absolutely, and the thin . s on the show starts. absolutely, and the things we _ on the show starts. absolutely, and the things we the _ on the show starts. absolutely, and the things we the members - on the show starts. absolutely, and the things we the members well- on the show starts. absolutely, and the things we the members well at| the things we the members well at the things we the members well at the electrifying moments, the queen and james bond parachuting in for london 2012, there was a at beijing 2008, i think it was. and the actual lighting the cauldron with a flaming arrow across the stadium for barcelona 1992. these are moments of brilliance among the people that are organising them when they think about them but obviously there are some times, with the queen for instance, a sense of the ridiculous about it as well because nobody could believe it when that happened. when you are planning, how do you decide how far to push things? i think you have an innate sensibility. the fantastic thing about danny boyle as he would push us and there would be moments where every bone in your body wanted know
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to come out of your mouth but actually learned that the answer was yes and i was a great lesson in creativity. i think any ideas worth exploring and you can always find where the line is that you need those creative teams and danny's team is no different and he really put you to new and exciting places and i think it is amazing that when we took those ideas forward and got the people involved they said yes to. �* . ., , the people involved they said yes to. �* . .,, ., , , the people involved they said yes to. �* _,, ., , , , to. and the cost of these things is immense- — to. and the cost of these things is immense- the _ to. and the cost of these things is immense. the tokyo _ to. and the cost of these things is immense. the tokyo the - to. and the cost of these things is immense. the tokyo the cost - to. and the cost of these things is l immense. the tokyo the cost of the opening and closing ceremonies is about £121 million. how does the bill get to that?— about £121 million. how does the bill get to that? well, you've got a theatre that _ bill get to that? well, you've got a theatre that seats _ bill get to that? well, you've got a theatre that seats 80,000 - bill get to that? well, you've got a | theatre that seats 80,000 people, bill get to that? well, you've got a i theatre that seats 80,000 people, so it cost many millions of pounds just so everyone can see and everyone can hear, and you have a vast space to fill. i remembersomeone hear, and you have a vast space to fill. i remember someone saying it isjust like a fill. i remember someone saying it is just like a theatre, only have got 70 stage managers instead of one and you need a bike to get across the theatre. having said that, if you do other mathematics, say that
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120 million was on a project in the uk, if you divide that by 66 million people of the population it is £2 a head and if you actually turn that into marketing money ofjapan plc globally it is without doubt the best marketing money you will ever spend. we are almost two ten years on from london and that is a gift thatis on from london and that is a gift that is still using our marketing and how people consider this country so it really is an example of money incredibly well spent.— incredibly well spent. thank you so much forjoining us. _ incredibly well spent. thank you so much forjoining us. martin green. | a high courtjudge has ruled there should be a new investigation into whether state agencies could have prevented the omagh bombing in 1998. the attack, which was carried out by the dissident republican group the real ira, was the worst single atrocity of the conflict in northern ireland — resulting in the deaths of 29 people. in 2013, the government said it
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would not hold a public inquiry. that was challenged by families and the high court has today made its ruling. let's talk to our correspondent in omagh, danjohnson. dan, what will this ruling mean? this will mean that they will have to be some form of new investigation. this is the memorial park that stands in omagh in memory of the 29 people who died that day just yards from where that car bomb exploded and this review has come about through the family is challenging the uk's decision, ruling, judgment not to conduct a public enquiry. that is something they have been campaigning for because they have been questions for many years over the level of intelligence and the sharing of information in the days, hours, minutes running up to the moment when that bomb exploded. there was intelligence there was mobile phone tracking information. they were
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listening in on some mobile phone conversations between the people who are alleged to have planted that bomb. so the question has been, if that information had been coordinated and shared better could the bombing either have been prevented or could the people who carried it out been prosecuted and brought to justice? and carried it out been prosecuted and brought tojustice? and in his ruling today, the high courtjudge said i am satisfied that certain grounds give rise to plausible allegations that there was a real prospect of preventing the omo bombing. he said any investigation will have to look specifically at theissue will have to look specifically at the issue of whether a more proactive campaign of disruption especially coordinated north and south of the border had a real prospect of preventing the bombing and weather without the benefit of hindsight the potential advantages of taking a much more aggressive approach towards suspected terrorists outweigh the disadvantages inherent in such an approach. it is not going to have to be a public enquiry that is carried out but the uk will advise some form
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of investigation to reveal what that data was at the time and this presumably will be welcomed by the fixing's families which are due to speak very shortly. i had a response from the northern ireland secretary of state and put in his deep regret. he says they deserve answers and he has the greatest regret for the patient�*s grace and determination. he says he recognises that the court has set out that there are plausible allegations that there was a real prospect of preventing the omagh bombing and more should now be done to investigate this in the uk government will take time to consider thejudge's government will take time to consider the judge's statement in all its recommendations carefully but certainly this is not the end in terms of investigating the circumstances around the omagh bombing. even though the british government wants to end all prosecutions relating to the troubles after before the good friday agreement but but because this happened in the summer of 1998
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there could still be an investigation into this worst single atrocity of the troubles. daily lateral flow tests for pupils may be just as effective as class bubbles to control transmission in schools, according to a study by oxford university. more than a million children in england were forced to stay away from school last week for covid—related reasons. our health correspondent, naomi grimley has more. the isolating of bubbles in schools has caused no end of frustration in this pandemic. last thursday, for example, more than a million state school pupils in england did not attend class for covid—19 related reasons. of those, more than 900,000 were self isolating, due to a possible contact with a case. but a new study by oxford university suggests that if daily lateral flow testing is done in school over seven days, it's just as good at preventing transmission as isolating pupils at home. what we see here is that for people in schools and colleges, the chance of getting infected with covid—19 when there has been a case in the school or college is low, less than 2%, one in 50. i am really confident that what this
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study shows as is daily testing of contacts a safe thing to do in schools and colleges. the researchers believe daily contact testing like this can help reduce school absences. but can schools cope with this kind of intensive testing done on site? it very difficult. we have made it work before. i'm sure with the help of my support staff we can make it work again, but we need to know exactly what is expected of us and we need to know as soon as possible. but we need clarity, we need consistency, we need our kids in school and the staff to be able to teach them. some experts worry whether lateral flow tests will detect enough positive cases, especially when infections are running high. but government advisers say the research is a breakthrough,
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considering how much learning has already been disrupted. naomi grimley, bbc news. figures just out show that the prevalence of covid infections in england has risen to1 in 75 people in the week to july the 17th. that's up from 1 in 95 the week before. the office for national statistics estimates there were more than 740,000 people in england with the virus last week. let's get more on those numbers now, and speak to linda bauld, professor of public health at the university of edinburgh. one dvd into those figures? is worrying but we knew this would happen. this is actually the week before any of those changes happen with the easing of restrictions that it showed us what occurred due to the easing subsequent from the middle of may and what we are seeing is a rapid rise of infection in the
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community and there is a large reservoir, still, of the community who are able to pick up this virus and transfer it without the protection of vaccination and i keep hearing a couple of things. we know that the link is weakened in terms of the connection between covid—19 and positive cases going into hospital and mortality but it is still there and other indicators have been rising as welljust because there were so many people infected in the community. the final point i would make on that as we are seeing up here in scotland and i would suspect elsewhere in the uk that because there is so much infection and the vaccines are not 100% perspective we are actually seeing an increase in the proportion of older and vulnerable adults in hospital with covid—19 and that is something we all wish to avoid. hoar something we all wish to avoid. how do ou something we all wish to avoid. how do you read — something we all wish to avoid. how do you read where we are in terms of the number of cases, the impact of those cases that you have already talked somewhat about in terms of health but also the impact in terms of practicality and on society and
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on well—being and where we should be going forward? because, obviously, we can bring into that picture that studied today by oxford university on isolation in schools and identifying that actually daily testing is just as effective as having large numbers of people isolating. fin having large numbers of people isolatina. , isolating. on the first one, governments around - isolating. on the first one, | governments around the uk decisions balancing not only the direct hands of this virus but the other hand, the long period of restrictions, mental health, social and economic impacts and that is why you are seeing slightly different decisions by different governments around different parts of the country and that is for the policymakers to decide but i guess the point is that the virus by no means has gone away. still, now, in the uk. on the school study, this is really important research and the first thing i want to emphasises how difficult it is to do this kind of research, randomising the schools and encouraging young people to
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participate in the results are very encouraging and i think provide an example of real—world experimental research which can give us guidance on how to mitigate at least one of the other hand ijust mentioned and one of the other hands is the loss of learning and what this trial suggests, it has weaknesses as all studies do but what it suggests is that the alternative of regular daily testing for at least seven days instead of isolation of contacts could be a viable way forward for schools. it will now be discussed by governments. i would suspect this may provide a model as we look ahead to schools we starting later this year. why limited to schools, though? why not write a society? i suppose the government has already made that decision for some categories of employees that they won't have to self—isolate if they have had the vaccines and participate in testing, which is good and we are seeing that in practice but there are other
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discussions going on in community and workplace settings to look at exactly this issue but i think we cannot continue in the future where actually the risk of picking up covid—19 if you are the contact of a positive case is definitely there but you can see from the numbers in this trial is not huge so we have to find other than models to allow us to, we are almost going to have to use self—isolation with the person who has definitely tested positive for the virus, as we would for other aspects of public health but it is the question asked around the contacts and i think we should look very seriously research like this. professor, thank you very much. sport and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre. the olympics opening ceremony is under way in tokyo — it kicks off the games, after a year's delay due to the pandemic. no spectators are in the national
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stadium, as the city continues to deal with rising covid cases — and the strict arrangements mean only a handful of athletes will march in the ceremony, which is focusing on togetherness, connection and inclusion — reflecting the struggles over the last 18 months. you can see the fireworks at the stadium there, spectacular scenes. it marks the official start of the games, over the next 16 days. hannah mills and mohammed sbihi will be team gb�*s flag—bearers. hepthalton hopeful katerina johnson thompson, is happy the games are going the ahead,but is wary of the isolation rules surrounding athletes in the village. it feels like it is almost pot luck whether you are going to get pinged or not depending on what plane you have been on, the distance where you... and there are a lot of processes to get through that, you know, customs and stuff, we were walking for about 90 minutes just going through each station but it is all very well organised. everything is organised to a tee so i can't fault it in that and it is necessary in order to, you know, he fault it in that and it is necessary in order to, you know, be able to compete so i'm just happy about the games that are happening and all the athletes finally getting their chance after the year of waiting
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but, as i said, it was not hard but everybody is in the same boat so it is something we just have to adapt to. australia and new zealand's decision to pull out of the rugby league world cup was "premature", according to australia's players' union, who have claimed a number of its members wanted to travel to england for the tournament this autumn. rugby football league chairman simonjohnson calling it a "selfish, parochial, and cowardly decision", but the new zealand rugby league chief has defended the withdrawal. if looking after people and making sure they — if looking after people and making sure they are safe as i have a legal obligation— sure they are safe as i have a legal obligation let alone human obligation let alone human obligation to do is cowardly then i am a _ obligation to do is cowardly then i am a coward but i don't believe that is the _ am a coward but i don't believe that is the case — am a coward but i don't believe that is the case. it is the only decision we could — is the case. it is the only decision we could make and i think some of those _ we could make and i think some of those comments quite honestly were misjudged and ill—advised. as rumours continue to swirl over the future of their star striker harry kane, one of tottenham's other top forwards — son heung min —
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has committed his future to the club he's signed a new four—year contract keeping him at spurs until 2025. son has scored 107 goals in 280 appearances for the club since joining from bayer leverkusen in 2015. he's also scored 27 times for south korea, appearing at two world cups. that is all. sport the now and you can get all of those including the olympics on our website and also the build—up to the hundred, the men's and women's and traditions in action today. —— competitions in action today. thousands of people in the food supply chain in england, who are told to self—isolate by the nhs tracing app, are now allowed to carry on working as long as they test negative for covid. a government scheme has begun which means staff at 15 supermarket depots are now able to take a daily test instead. and other key sectors will be able to join the scheme next week. i'm joined now by tony sophoclides, who's strategic affairs director at uk hospitality.
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how big a change is that going to make? it is great that the supply chain as far as it has gone has been goodin chain as far as it has gone has been good in that matter but obviously with that list we are slightly disappointed that so much of hospitality has been left out and we purchase a summer of the new closures in reduced services when philosophy for the season is at its peak. 50, then you closes and lost so, then you closes and lost surfaces. tell us how you anticipate that unfolding. —— venue closures and lost services. obviously, that has an impact on those _ and lost services. obviously, that has an impact on those venues i and lost services. obviously, that l has an impact on those venues that are just starting has an impact on those venues that arejust starting to... has an impact on those venues that are just starting to... trying to make up a lot of lost time and lost revenue and older payoff of the accrued debts built up over the crisis and i think we all want to
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provide a great service but it is going to be done with one hand tied behind our backs going to be done with one hand tied behind our hacks for the summer unless things change. you behind our backs for the summer unless things change.— behind our backs for the summer unless things change. you sound a bit wea . unless things change. you sound a bit weary- yes. — unless things change. you sound a bit weary. yes, what _ unless things change. you sound a bit weary. yes, what we _ unless things change. you sound a bit weary. yes, what we are - bit weary. yes, what we are asking for, really, and it— bit weary. yes, what we are asking for, really, and it is— bit weary. yes, what we are asking for, really, and it is a _ bit weary. yes, what we are asking for, really, and it is a weary - for, really, and it is a weary situation but we onlyjust for, really, and it is a weary situation but we only just want to be able to operate and trade our way back and already help drive the economy more widely, as a nation, and we think that a pragmatic solution for us will be if loads who are fully vaccinated and things to be able to have a negative test but we have a very young workforce, really, comparatively in hospitality so those who aren't fully vaccinated, which is a lot of our workforce drawing to negative tests over the course of a couple of days should be sufficient to return to working and get them back, you know, driving the economy. because of course, yes from the 16th was anybody who is double vaccinated
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will be exempt from the self—isolation view but the point you make the proportion of workers in workers in the age group where they are probably not going to be vaccinated?— they are probably not going to be vaccinated? ., ., x; , vaccinated? under the age of 35 is full about vaccinated? under the age of 35 is fully about 6096 _ vaccinated? under the age of 35 is fully about 6096 succumbing - vaccinated? under the age of 35 is fully about 6096 succumbing to - fully about 60% succumbing to two thirds of the workforce which is a significant proportion that will be doubled by then so we really would need some action prior to the 16th of august if we really need potential we can. obviously, the government _ potential we can. obviously, the government is _ potential we can. obviously, the government is well _ potential we can. obviously, the government is well aware - potential we can. obviously, the government is well aware of - potential we can. obviously, the l government is well aware of these issues. there has been lobbying of the government yesterday and we had that list and the details of groups that list and the details of groups that would be exempt and yet it hasn't been extended to your sector. presumably you will continue lobbying? what conversations have you had? we have had plenty of conversations across different areas of government and we willjust have to continue to do that because it is all we can continue to do.—
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do that because it is all we can continue to do. ~ . , _ ., h, continue to do. what they say about wh not continue to do. what they say about why not your — continue to do. what they say about why not your sector? _ continue to do. what they say about why not your sector? i _ continue to do. what they say about why not your sector? i think - continue to do. what they say about why not your sector? i think the - why not your sector? i think the government _ why not your sector? i think the government has _ why not your sector? i think the government has had _ why not your sector? i think the government has had its - why not your sector? i think the government has had its focus i why not your sector? i think the i government has had its focus more why not your sector? i think the - government has had its focus more on the reasons for designing the way it has been explaining to was why it has been explaining to was why it has not. hopefully know those decisions have been made we can get onto those conversations in the better manner.— now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. the heatwave continues for some today but over all of the coming days the outlook is a changing one, which will see temperatures gradually drop. the heatwave ends and through this weekend some thunderstorms around, mainly across parts of england, south and east wales. but there's still a met office extreme heat warning across parts of northern ireland for today, an amber one which lapses later on. it's here where we could see temperatures up to around 29, maybe 30 celsius. high 20s west of scotland, north—west england, west wales. low 20s, high teens towards eastern england, east of scotland, where we'll see some mist and low cloud continue to roll in. few isolated showers this afternoon and evening, like recent days, but through tonight more longer
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spells of thundery rain pushing on across southern counties of england and also, potentially, parts of south wales too. that will continue on and off as we go through saturday. some sunshine in between. low cloud to eastern areas. best of the sunshine, highest of the temperatures still in western scotland and northern ireland — up to around 26 degrees here, but even here it will turn cooler on sunday. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... a spectacular start to the olympic games with the opening ceremony under way now. thousands of workers in the food supply chain in england no longer need to isolate if pinged by the covid app, as long as they test negative. daily testing for pupils is just as effective at controlling covid in schools as self—isolation, according to new research. a high courtjudge rules
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there should be a new investigation into whether state agencies could have prevented the omagh bombing in 1998. and surfing will make its olympic debut at the tokyo games, as lio thrill—seeking athletes take to the waves. let's get more now on those retails sales figures which rose by 0.5% between may and june. our business correspondent katy austin says sales were helped by a boost in demand forfood and drink. well, apparently the euro 2020 football championship helped along the sales of food and drink. that was at the end ofjune. if we look back here, it's interesting to have a bit of a context. so, in april when physical shops reopened there was, quite understandably, a huge spike in retail sales. people went out to the shops for the first time in a long time and bought things. and there was a bit of a drop—off in may, which, again, you might expect once that pent—up demand had been released. so what we were expecting injune was something not so dramatic,
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not such a dramatic change and that's exactly what happened. there was a 0.5% overall increase in retail sales but much of that was driven by food and drink which was up much more. that was over a%, the increase in food and drink sales. as i say, the office for national statistics think anecdotally the football will have helped that along, but, actually, if you look at non—food, so clothes and furniture items, that was down a bit. down 1.7% compared to may, so people seem to have reined back in that way but splashed out a bit more on food and drink. the debate over the safety of e—scooters has been in the headlines once again this week following two incidents involving children. a 16—year—old boy was killed on sunday after his e—scooter collided with a car and a three—year—old girl has been left with life—changing injuries after being hit by one. now some campaigners are calling for them to be banned in public places. adam mcclean reports.
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a scheme to rent e—scooters where riders have to be over 18 and hold a provisional or full licence. and hold a provisional orfull licence. orfull licence is being tested in 32 areas across england. they can only be hidden in places where people can use bikes including roads and cycle lanes. the government say it will help them understand the benefit and impact e—scooters can have. i do not ride on the pavement. you are responsible if you hit someone. i appreciate the scooters, they are lovely scooters. i do not want to lose the opportunity of having these for the public. the law says an e—scooter is as much a motor vehicle as a car or motorbike, so riding them illegally can attract six points and a £300 fine, plus the scooter being seized. some can go 20—30mph. there is no protection natural to the rider, they are completely exposed. if they are involved in a collision with a car, van or a bus or another motor
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vehicle, it is likely that the e—scooter rider is going to come off a lot worse than the other person in the other vehicle. while there are risks to those who ride them unsafely, like this scooter on a motorway near bradford, pedestrians and other road users are at risk. philjones was on a mobility scooter when he found his route blocked by an abandoned scooter. phil being phil, got— off his mobility scooter to move it, the scooter was too heavy, forced him back down - on the road and it fell on top of him and broke his hip. - the resultant effect _ was he had to go into hospital and he never came out. he died 12 days later. dennis has delivered a petition to number 10, calling on the government to stop the hire schemes. these are just some of the scooters he has found abandoned nearby. to rub salt into the wound, - when we were doing my brother's funeral arrangements, - there was one parked right
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outside the doorway to get into the funeral directors. i i was beside myself. i was so angry, ijust didn't know really. i the response from inside me was horrendous, you know? i in a statement, the department for transport said, "we continue to engage with vulnerable road user groups to help shape rules on top of existing safety features such as compulsory horns and bells and ensuring trial areas have sufficient parking to avoid street clutter." italy is the latest country to announce it will introduce a mandatory covid vaccination certificate scheme. starting next month, it will allow people who've received at least one jab to go to various indoor venues like cinemas and gyms. in france, lawmakers are debating whether to only allow access to bars, restaurants and public transport to those who have had a covid vaccine, or can show proof of a negative test. our paris correspondent, lucy williamson has been talking to those for and against the new rules.
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if the government has its way, a pint of beer, a bistro lunch, a morning coffee, will all require proof that the customer is covid—19 free. daniel runs this bistro a stone's throw from the old paris stock exchange. the bill being debated this week is designed to keep france open for business in the face of what the government is calling a fourth wave of infections. but daniel says it's going too far. translation: i am never going to ask for the health pass. _ i am not a policeman. i don't have that kind of authority. no, i won't do it. i think it shows a lack of respect and it is not the kind of conviviality we should have here in france. mattieu will keep coming for lunch anyway. he works in finance and says there is no alternative to the health pass.
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if we are going to avoid another confinement, a fourth confinement and all that painful thing, and keep the economy going, no choice. a majority here seem to support the government plan, but this being france, opposition to it has been vocal too. more than 100,000 people protested here last week. and there have been fresh protests outside the national assembly. a few have compared the current government to the nazi occupation here. i am here because we need - to save the freedom, freedom. i think that if you are - obliged to do something, it is a kind of dictator. it's like if the government wanted lto force us to have this vaccine. i the vaccine is seen as the way to avoid lockdown and this new law, the stick rather than the carrot in getting people to sign up, but for those who already see
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the government as arrogant and out of touch, it is just another constraint, another control. a health pass is already required for entry to many public spaces, at the eiffel tower, tests are available for anyone who arrives without one. because even the most divisive ideas can sometimes become an accepted part of france. the australian state of new south wales is asking the federal government to send more vaccines and other resources urgently, describing the delta variant outbreak in sydney as a "national crisis". it comes as the city records its biggest daily rise in covid cases this year. only 12% of australians have been vaccinated so far. new zealand has now suspended its quarantine—free travel bubble with australia for at least eight weeks. our correspondent phil mercer has more from sydney.
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what we've seen since the pandemic began in many ways is australia like a distressed submarine, those compartments of a submarine being closed off like states and territories around australia. western australia has put up a hard order with covid—affected regions. the state of queensland is doing the same as well. what we are hearing from dan andrews, the victoria state premier, is wanting more of those restrictions around the greater sydney region to keep the people in and to keep the virus out of other parts of australia. so, we know today new south wales, of which sydney is the state capital, has recorded 136 new covid—19 infections. this is a new daily record for this latest outbreak. now, 136 infections might not sound much to people in other countries, but in the australian context it is extremely significant. and you have to remember that australia has been pursuing a national policy of elimination,
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and that's why we are hearing those tough words from political leaders like dan andrews, who wants to lock sydney down until the delta variant here is crushed. six people have been taken to hospital after being struck when a car crashed into a pub in south wales. one is said to have suffered life—changing injuries. our reporter paul martin is in pontyclun. what happened? in this release only and hot weather _ what happened? in this release only and hot weather we _ what happened? in this release only and hot weather we have _ what happened? in this release only and hot weather we have been - what happened? in this release only l and hot weather we have been having, this place was really busy last night. lots of people outside this pub eating and drinking. just outside where the main road through the village is and it was around 830 that a ford came across, hit a table just outside the pub and ended up hitting the pub wall. as a result of
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that, one person was taken to hospital with what police have described as life changing injuries. also in hospital, 79—year—old man driving the car said to be in a critical condition and four others with minor injuries taken to hospital as well as a precaution. police have said the driver seems to have suffered a medical episode while he was at the wheel. speaking to eyewitnesses to the crash and aftermath this morning, they described last night being a chaotic scene, people screaming, lying on the floor and others trying to find blankets to keep them warm until the ambulance service came. the local mp this morning has said it was a truly devastating incident and she said community is completely devastated tjy community is completely devastated by it but people are rallying round and trying to help as much as they can. . ~' and trying to help as much as they can. . ~ , ., y and trying to help as much as they can. . ~' , ., , . as almost all us troops have now left afghanistan, the taliban has been gaining ground in the country.
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but in an interview with the bbc, afghanistan's national security adviser, hamdullah mohib, has said these gains by taliban forces are not irreversible. none of the gains the taliban have made are irreversible. sure, taking territory, militarily, is one issue, but keeping it is not going to be an easy thing for the taliban. we are working, as we speak right now, to consolidate some of our security forces, in order to retake some of those strategic locations that will have consequences for security forces, for our economy, for people. and you can watch the full interview with afghanistan's national security adviser on bbc world news today at 1630 and 2130.
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the mod has confirmed the death of a british soldier at larkhill garrison in wiltshire. police say her death isn't being treated as suspicious. a spokesperson for the mod said... "we can confirm the death of a soldier onjuly 22. "the circumstances surrounding this death are being investigated and it "would be inappropriate to comment any further at this time. "our thoughts are with the soldier's family and friends at "this difficult time." china has rejected a plan by the world health organization for a second phase of an investigation into the origins of covid—19. a senior chinese health official said the proposal, to consider whether the virus could have escaped from a chinese lab, did not respect science and disregarded common sense. our north america correspondent david willis has the latest. us intelligence officials were considering a number us intelligence officials
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were pursuing a number of leads and theories, among them the possibility the virus could have resulted from a laboratory accident in china and this gave momentum to a theory that up until then had been seen here as a right—wing conspiracy theory, the possibility that the virus was man—made in some form. and china hasn't really been helping itself in this regard, some might argue. officials from the world health organization were only able to get access to the wuhan area injanuary of this year, more than a year after the first cases of the virus came to light and now, beijing has flatly rejected a request from the who for its investigators to be allowed to inspect the laboratories, the research institutes, in wuhan. a man who was repeatedly attacked by a grizzly bear in the us state of alaska for an entire week is recovering from his injuries after being rescued
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by the coast guard. he was alone in a remote mining camp when the bearfirst attacked, dragging him down to a river. he escaped but then had to fend off the animal as it returned to his shack every night. an sos sign was spotted during a routine helicopter flight last week. the man is suffering from a leg injury and bruised torso. the headlines on bbc news... a spectacular start to the olympic games with the opening ceremony under way now. thousands of workers in the food supply chain in england no longer need to isolate if pinged by the covid app, as long as they test negative. and daily testing for pupils is just as effective at controlling covid in schools as self—isolation, according to new research. the family of a british woman who went missing
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from her boyfriend's yacht in the caribbean have appealed for him to help police piece together what happened on the night she disappeared. sarm heslop was last seen in march leaving a restaurant in the us virgin islands. her parents have been speaking exclusively to the bbc�*s graham satchell. sarm heslop has been missing since the beginning of march. she was last seen leaving a restaurant in the us virgin islands with her boyfriend, ryan bane. the mystery surrounding her disappearance, the lack of information, has left her parents devastated. you would be doing something and you would suddenly feel guilty because you haven't thought about her. then when you think about her, tears just come. i can't help it. i wake up every morning and it's the same nightmare. it'sjust horrible. i feel guilty because
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i can go to sleep. i don't go to bed till late because ijust can't get to sleep. then when i do go to sleep and wake up in the morning, i feel guilty i've slept, i feel guilty when i smile, when i laugh. ijust feel awful, ijust feel... my heart's broken. sarm was working on ryan bane's yacht, seen here in the days after she disappeared just offshore. at 2:30am on march the 8th, mr bane rang the police to say sarm was missing. they told him to contact the coastguard to start a search. ryan bane didn't call the coastguard until 11:46am the next day, almost ten hours later. we can't understand why it took him so long, there's such a time—lapse. he is saying that it was two o'clock when he realised she was missing but, you know, nobody had seen her since she left the restaurant. there could have been something
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happen in those hours so it would have been a longer period before he phoned the coastguard. sarm was 41 when she went missing. she'd worked as a flight attendant, travelled the world. she loved life, she was confident, loving, respectful. she liked to see places, she liked to experience different cultures, meet different people. she'd met so many people when she was away. she befriended so many people all over the places that she went all over the world. popular? very popular, very loving, fun loving. always made you laugh. yes. brenda and peter have been helped in the last few months by sarm's friends.
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it's the first time they'd been able to meet in person since she disappeared. family and friends have the same questions, why did mr bane refuse permission for the police to search his boat? why has he now left the area? the virgin islands police department told us... "we would like to interview ryan bane. we cannot confirm mr bane's location. however we urge him to make contact with us to aid us with this investigation. ryan bane has a previous conviction for assaulting his ex—wife in 2011. officially this is still a missing persons enquiry. police say mr bane is a person of interest but not a suspect. the day after sarm went missing, the us coast guard wrote this report obtained by the times. it describes ryan bane as heavily intoxicated and agitated and says mr bane physically placed himself at the entrance door of the vessel's main space, impeding the boarding team from completing an initial safety sweep of the vessel. mr bane's lawyer told that his client met with the us coast guard, answered all questions posed to him and gave them unfettered
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access to the vessel, as well as to sarm's personal belongings, including her phone and ipad. any reports to the contrary are categorically false. mr bane had nothing to do with sarm's disappearance, and remains heartbroken that she is missing. sarm's parents haven't spoken publicly since their daughter went missing. this is their first interview. and they have a clear message for ryan bane. any person, surely, any person would do everything they could to help find somebody that he was supposed to love. what sort of human being wouldn't be there to help? that's what i think he should do, he should just come forward. and cooperate. i would like bane to come forward and talk to the police, for a start. i would like a full forensic search of the ship, a full—on one, which i hope and hope they don't find anything. but if they do, thatjustice be
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done, if there needs to be. that's what i want. i've got no peace, i'll never had any real peace ever for the rest of my life, i don't suppose. i don't know whether it would help or not, to be quite honest, but i'd still like to see it done. as hard as it may be, i'd like to see it done. i have hope, i still have hope. i'll always think that she will be back through the door, always. i'll never give up on her, i'll never give up. on looking for her. it is now almost five months since sarm went missing. her parents say they want, need and are demanding answers. graham satchell, bbc news. a spokesman from the foreign office said it "remains in contact with the authorities" on the us virgin islands and that "the uk police are supporting the investigation". the leadup to the tokyo olympics has
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been a roller—coaster 18 months — not only for the athletes, but for their families and friends too, who sadly can't be there in tokyo to support their loved ones. but they won't let that dampen their spirits, as mike bushell reports. getting the party started at home. the family of real gold medallist are not able to cheer him on poolside that can feel his presence. cheering while this may be confusing the door, showing their support with friends in the garden in ripon... cheering can mask some of the extra stress of having to watch their son's third olympics only through the tv. i get more nervous _ olympics only through the tv. i get more nervous because _ olympics only through the tv. i get more nervous because i feel as though as i have some control when i am there even though i am in the stands. ijust know what's going on. you cannot see everything through a
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camera. a, .., , you cannot see everything through a camera. 1, , .., , ., ., you cannot see everything through a camera. , , ., ., ., you cannot see everything through a camera. , ., ., ., ., camera. basically going to have to leave the room _ camera. basically going to have to leave the room when _ camera. basically going to have to leave the room when his - camera. basically going to have to leave the room when his dive - leave the room when his dive comes around _ leave the room when his dive comes around i'm — leave the room when his dive comes around. i'm pretty nervous about the whole _ around. i'm pretty nervous about the whole thing — around. i'm pretty nervous about the whole thing. i've got to hand in front— whole thing. i've got to hand in front of— whole thing. i've got to hand in front of me, doctor who style. in 2016, front of me, doctor who style. 2016, jack front of me, doctor who style. in 2016, jack and chris became britain's first olympic champions and to make then there was worse this time, thousands of miles away, they don't expect to hear from him much. ~ �* ., ., ., , they don't expect to hear from him much.�* .,.,., i. much. we've got a family whatsapp that we use — much. we've got a family whatsapp that we use but _ much. we've got a family whatsapp that we use but jack _ much. we've got a family whatsapp that we use but jack is _ much. we've got a family whatsapp that we use but jack is very - much. we've got a family whatsapp that we use but jack is very much i that we use but jack is very much one for taking himself on flying even with us. he just wants to get on with hisjob. fist even with us. he 'ust wants to get on with hisjob._ even with us. he 'ust wants to get on with his iob-_ on with his 'ob. at least he is able to send on with his job. at least he is able to spend time _ on with his job. at least he is able to spend time poolside _ on with his job. at least he is able to spend time poolside with - to spend time poolside with his girlfriend who is diving from the higher ten metre board at her second olympic games. she higher ten metre board at her second olympic games-— olympic games. she is doing the hlatform olympic games. she is doing the platform ten _ olympic games. she is doing the platform ten metres _ olympic games. she is doing the platform ten metres as _ olympic games. she is doing the platform ten metres as well- olympic games. she is doing the platform ten metres as well so i olympic games. she is doing the l platform ten metres as well so you see her— platform ten metres as well so you see her up— platform ten metres as well so you see her up there _ platform ten metres as well so you see her up there and _ platform ten metres as well so you see her up there and think- platform ten metres as well so you see her up there and think oh, - platform ten metres as well so you see her up there and think oh, you | see her up there and think oh, you know _ see her up there and think oh, you know she — see her up there and think oh, you know she has— see her up there and think oh, you know... she hasjust _ see her up there and think oh, you know... she hasjust been - see her up there and think oh, you know... she hasjust been bonkers from _ know... she hasjust been bonkers from being — know... she hasjust been bonkers from being young, _ know... she hasjust been bonkers from being young, so _ know... she hasjust been bonkers from being young, so you - know... she hasjust been bonkers from being young, so you just - know... she hasjust been bonkers from being young, so you just go i know... she hasjust been bonkers. from being young, so you just go for
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it. from being young, so you just go for it at— from being young, so you just go for it at first _ from being young, so you just go for it at first it— from being young, so you just go for it. at first it was _ from being young, so you just go for it. at first it was a _ from being young, so you just go for it. at first it was a double _ it. at first it was a double olympian. _ it. at first it was a double olympian, then _ it. at first it was a double olympian, then for- it. at first it was a double olympian, then for theml it. at first it was a double l olympian, then for them to it. at first it was a double - olympian, then for them to be it. at first it was a double _ olympian, then for them to be there together— olympian, then for them to be there together because _ olympian, then for them to be there together because the _ olympian, then for them to be there together because the kind _ olympian, then for them to be there together because the kind of, - together because the kind of, the romance — together because the kind of, the romance started _ together because the kind of, the romance started in _ together because the kind of, the romance started in rio, _ together because the kind of, the romance started in rio, for- together because the kind of, the romance started in rio, for theml together because the kind of, the i romance started in rio, for them to be there _ romance started in rio, for them to be there as — romance started in rio, for them to be there as a — romance started in rio, for them to be there as a couple _ romance started in rio, for them to be there as a couple is _ romance started in rio, for them to be there as a couple isjust- romance started in rio, for them to be there as a couple isjust really. be there as a couple isjust really nice for— be there as a couple isjust really nice for them _ be there as a couple isjust really nice for them both. _ be there as a couple isjust really nice forthem both. i— be there as a couple is 'ust really nice for them both._ nice for them both. i am jack's number one — nice for them both. i am jack's number one fan. _ nice for them both. i am jack's number one fan. it's _ nice for them both. i am jack's number one fan. it'sjust - nice for them both. i am jack's number one fan. it'sjust like l nice for them both. i am jack's i number one fan. it'sjust like jack number one fan. it's just like jack taking six penalties. jack only has two seconds per dive and that's it, bang. it's ace. he two seconds per dive and that's it, bang- it's ace-— bang. it's ace. he is on the move! jack and lois's _ bang. it's ace. he is on the move! jack and lois's family... _ jack and lois's family... cheering these scenes have been repeated whatever time of day or night it may be. in keeping with the way of doing things over the last 18 months, i caught up with others feeling similar emotions from home. if i can
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start with you, what a moment. he has tot start with you, what a moment. he has got the feel of these bars over the last— has got the feel of these bars over the last few days... he has got the feel of these bars over the last few days. . .— the last few days... he has been dedicated _ the last few days... he has been dedicated for _ the last few days... he has been dedicated for such _ the last few days... he has been dedicated for such a _ the last few days... he has been dedicated for such a long - the last few days... he has been dedicated for such a long time. i the last few days... he has been i dedicated for such a long time. it's not the first sporty think of, you think of football and those sort of sports but being inspirationalfor those youngsters coming throughout think it's so important. he's done a greatjob. just think it's so important. he's done a treat 'ob. g , think it's so important. he's done a treat 'ob.g , , ., ., think it's so important. he's done a treat 'ob. , , ., ., ., great job. just the dismount to go! double front _ great job. just the dismount to go! double front have _ great job. just the dismount to go! double front have with _ great job. just the dismount to go! double front have with that - double front have with that little adjustment! _ double front have with that little adjustment! that _ double front have with that little adjustment! that was _ double front have with that little adjustment! that was a - double front have with that little adjustment! that was a routine i double front have with that little| adjustment! that was a routine a half _ adjustment! that was a routine a half. ., �* , ., ., half. even though it's a long time since i coached _ half. even though it's a long time since i coached her, _ half. even though it's a long time since i coached her, you - half. even though it's a long time since i coached her, you still- half. even though it's a long time since i coached her, you still feel| since i coached her, you still feel as though — since i coached her, you still feel as though you are there with her. like as though you are there with her. like i_ as though you are there with her. like i was— as though you are there with her. like i was when she was driving her first youth— like i was when she was driving her first youth event all those years ago _ first youth event all those years ago |_ first youth event all those years a . o. ., first youth event all those years a i o, ., , first youth event all those years ato. ., , .,. first youth event all those years a t 0. ., , ., . , ., ago. i have been teaching the same classroom for _ ago. i have been teaching the same classroom for many _ ago. i have been teaching the same classroom for many years _ ago. i have been teaching the same classroom for many years and - ago. i have been teaching the same classroom for many years and i - ago. i have been teaching the same classroom for many years and i will| classroom for many years and i will often say _ classroom for many years and i will often say that's _ classroom for many years and i will often say that's where _ classroom for many years and i will often say that's where adam - classroom for many years and i will
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often say that's where adam used. classroom for many years and i will. often say that's where adam used to sit. just— often say that's where adam used to sit. just a _ often say that's where adam used to sit. just a bit— often say that's where adam used to sit. just a bit of— often say that's where adam used to sit. just a bit of inspiration _ often say that's where adam used to sit. just a bit of inspiration for- sit. just a bit of inspiration for them — sit. just a bit of inspiration for them because _ sit. just a bit of inspiration for them because it's _ sit. just a bit of inspiration for them because it's like - sit. just a bit of inspiration for them because it's like anyone| sit. just a bit of inspiration for. them because it's like anyone of them _ them because it's like anyone of them there _ them because it's like anyone of them there. anything _ them because it's like anyone of them there. anything is- them because it's like anyone of. them there. anything is possible, it's a _ them there. anything is possible, it's a good — them there. anything is possible, it's a good demonstration. - them there. anything is possible, it's a good demonstration. the i it's a good demonstration. the families, coaches _ it's a good demonstration. families, coaches and it's a good demonstration.- families, coaches and athletes it has been the longest and most difficult build—up to any olympic games and over the last 18 months we have followed some of team gb's top stars to all the uncertainty and the games cancelled last summer and right up until today continuing speculation and some doubts. all those hours training in empty gyms at times and at home, new ways of staying on condition during lockdown. it staying on condition during lockdown-— staying on condition during lockdown. ., ,, , ., ., , ., lockdown. it takes a team effort, and ou lockdown. it takes a team effort, and you play _ lockdown. it takes a team effort, and you play a — lockdown. it takes a team effort, and you play a little _ lockdown. it takes a team effort, and you play a little part - lockdown. it takes a team effort, and you play a little part in - lockdown. it takes a team effort, and you play a little part in that l and you play a little part in that too, _ and you play a little part in that too, don't — and you play a little part in that too, don't you?— too, don't you? going behind-the-scenes i too, don't you? goingj behind-the-scenes as too, don't you? going - behind-the-scenes as they too, don't you? going _ behind-the-scenes as they juggle behind—the—scenes as theyjuggle preparations behind—the—scenes as they juggle preparations with the issue so many of us have faced. iaiihfe preparations with the issue so many of us have faced.— of us have faced. we haven't done everything — of us have faced. we haven't done everything but _ of us have faced. we haven't done everything but i — of us have faced. we haven't done everything but i will— of us have faced. we haven't done everything but i will still _ everything but i will still show
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fury~ — everything but i will still show fury~ l— everything but i will still show fu . .. everything but i will still show fu . ,, , , fury. i think the olympics will be won and lost _ fury. i think the olympics will be won and lost with _ fury. i think the olympics will be won and lost with whoever - fury. i think the olympics will be won and lost with whoever he i fury. i think the olympics will be l won and lost with whoever he has handled the pandemic best. realising their resilience _ handled the pandemic best. realising their resilience has _ handled the pandemic best. realising their resilience has all _ handled the pandemic best. realising their resilience has all been _ handled the pandemic best. realising their resilience has all been worth - their resilience has all been worth it. the same can be said when it comes to coping with families back, especially given the time difference. it especially given the time difference.— especially given the time difference. . , , , difference. it crept up on us this time with covid. _ difference. it crept up on us this time with covid. is _ difference. it crept up on us this time with covid. is it _ difference. it crept up on us this time with covid. is it on? - difference. it crept up on us this time with covid. is it on? is - difference. it crept up on us this time with covid. is it on? is it i time with covid. is it on? is it not? — time with covid. is it on? is it not? relate happen? i don't think we have not? relate happen? idon't think we have still— not? relate happen? i don't think we have still quite adjusted to the idea of— have still quite adjusted to the idea of it — have still quite adjusted to the idea of it going ahead. because it's on at 7am it _ idea of it going ahead. because it's on at 7am it will _ idea of it going ahead. because it's on at 7am it will be _ idea of it going ahead. because it's on at 7am it will be difficult - idea of it going ahead. because it's on at 7am it will be difficult to - on at 7am it will be difficult to get that atmosphere going. we will have to get up at 5am. get the tea on the stove ready. its, have to get up at 5am. get the tea on the stove ready.— on the stove ready. a bit too early for wine, on the stove ready. a bit too early for wine. i — on the stove ready. a bit too early for wine, i think. _ now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. hello. for those of you finding this current hot spell a little bit too
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much, there are some words which may please you. in the next few days, we are going to see temperatures gradually starting to fall away a little bit, so turning cooler. there will be a few thunderstorms around but many, particularly to the north and west, will be dry, and it's here where the heat continues, certainly today. met office and extreme heat warning across northern ireland continues for one more day. lots of sunshine to come here today and temperatures up to around 29, maybe 30 degrees. if we get above 30 degrees it will be the seventh consecutive day we have done so. notice there is a bit of an east— west split. a bit cooler down eastern areas with some mist and low late in the day signs of proper change. breezy across the south, thunderstorms starting to roll into the south—west, other parts of southern england, maybe south wales as we go into tomorrow morning. temperatures for the most part stay in the mid teens, upper teens for some as we start tomorrow morning. this weekend the changes begin a bit more widely. the thundery downpours are still going to be mainly across parts of england and south wales, all due to this area of low pressure pushing its way northwards, but high pressure still holds on across many northern and western areas, so it's going to stay dry, the best sunshine in
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northern ireland, western scotland, north—west england, bit more cloud, which could linger in eastern scotland and eastern parts of england. a lot more cloud generally across england and where is, across england and wales, thundery showers coming or going, some torrential downpours in places, across some southern parts, but equally here there will be some drier moments too. notice the temperatures, though, 21, 22 degrees. drop down on what we have seen today in northern ireland and western scotland, 26, but still pretty warm out there. as we go into the evening, showers and thunderstorms continue across parts of central and southern england and wales, and it is here where we will see them again on sunday, particularly towards the south—eastern quarter. further north and west, still another day of sunny spells, maybe the odd isolated shower. temperature starting to fall away, maybe up to around 25, 26 in the north—west of scotland. most places, though, closer to where we should be. and as we go into next week, as that area of low pressure pulls away, we start to drag our winds more in from a northerly direction, so temperatures will drop even further. this is how monday looks, for instance. a greater chance of some downpours in scotland come across and eastern parts of england, the odd shower elsewhere. still largely dry in northern ireland but by this stage temperatures closer to where they should be for this time of the year.
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bye for now.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... a spectacular start to the olympic games with the opening ceremony under way now — more than 11,000 athletes from more than 200 countries will compete. thousands of workers in the food supply chain in england no longer need to isolate if pinged by the covid app, as long as they test negative. and, daily testing for pupils is just as effective at controlling covid in schools as self—isolation, according to new research. a high courtjudge rules there should be a new investigation into whether state agencies could have prevented the omagh bombing in 1998. and surfing will make its olympic debut at the tokyo games, as do thrill—seeking athletes take to the waves.

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