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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 23, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... thousands of workers in the food supply chain are told they won't need to isolate if they're "pinged" by the nhs covid app. after months of uncertainty and last minute controversy, the opening ceremony of the tokyo olympics takes place later today. while brazil's men are off to a flying start in the olympic football, they thrashed germany 4—2, with a first half—hatrick from everton�*s richarlison. the search for sarm heslop. the parents of a missing british woman last seen on a yacht in the carribean urge her
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boyfriend to contact police. and boyfriend to contact police. a big boost for british 1 new and a big boost for british tourism. new figures suggest we are set to spend billions on holidays here in the uk. it is places like this, the beautiful north wales coastline that is set to receive the most visitors. i'm here at llandudno to discover what is on offer. fix, i'm here at llandudno to discover what is on offer.— i'm here at llandudno to discover what is on offer. a gorgeous start for victoria _ what is on offer. a gorgeous start for victoria as _ what is on offer. a gorgeous start for victoria as it _ what is on offer. a gorgeous start for victoria as it is for _ what is on offer. a gorgeous start for victoria as it is for many. - what is on offer. a gorgeous start for victoria as it is for many. a i for victoria as it is for many. a record—breaking day again in northern— record—breaking day again in northern ireland. there are changes ahead _ northern ireland. there are changes ahead. join— northern ireland. there are changes ahead. join me for the full forecast, _ ahead. join me for the full forecast, details here on breakfast. it's friday, the 23rd ofjuly. our top story. from today, thousands of workers in the food supply chain could avoid self—isolation when they are "pinged" by the nhs covid app. staff at key sites will instead take daily tests so they can continue working, in an effort to keep supermarket shelves stocked. our business correspondent,
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theo leggett, has this report. empty supermarket shelves. pictures like these revive memories of panic buying and shortages seen at the start of the pandemic and prompted the government to take action. the food industry, like other parts of the economy, has been suffering from a lack of staff because too many workers are isolating at home. here's the problem. if you are contacted by test and trace or pinged by the app, you're meant to self—isolate for ten days. but as infection rates rise, too many people are absent from work. so starting today, the government says it will allow workers at some 500 key sites to avoid isolation if they get pinged, provided they take covid tests for seven days. we're talking principally here, supermarket depots, distribution centres, where all of the work happens to get food out to those supermarkets. it doesn't include stores itself, because that would be a big departure from the approach we have now but certainly this is going to go a very long way to getting the food supply chain working properly. the response from food retailers
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so far has been positive but others within the sector say there are still many questions to answer. any intervention is welcome. i think we are all feeling in the food industry in particular something needed to happen, something needed to change. so any change, any improvement is welcome. we've got to see the devil and the detail here. it's been highlighted only certain companies are on the list. who's on the list? who's been identified there? what are the key workers they're talking about? what are the roles? what is the process? i hope government has put sufficient communication in place to be able to cope with the number of enquiries they get. the new programme only applies to the food business. the government is also offering limited exemptions to the isolation rules in other sectors, such as energy, the nuclear industry, medicines and water supply. but these will only be available for a small number of specific employees, whose absence from work would have a major impact on essential services
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or national security. theo leggett, bbc news. some critical workers in scotland can also avoid self—isolation if they've been alerted as a covid contact. under a new scheme announced by the scottish government, people working in a range of sectors — including health and social care — can continue working if they meet certain criteria. further details are expected later. the 2020 tokyo olympic games will officially start today — a year later than expected. more than 11,000 athletes from 207 countries will compete over the next few weeks, but spectators have been banned from almost all events, as japan deals with its highest surge in coronavirus infections for 6 months. our sports correspondent natalie pirks is in tokyo. natalie, the games will be different this year. yes. i think that the athletes, that
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is the big downfall, isn't it? not having spectators in most of the events but most of the stadiums. we have been waiting for a long time for the opening ceremony, a year longer than billed. whenjapan won the bid, the public were overjoyed. things have changed somewhat since then, not least because covid infections are at their highest level in tokyo since january. we have had 19 more positive cases to tell you about two people accredited to the olympics. three of them are athletes, one in the olympic village. that is doing little to seize an anxious public. this is one of the papers here. it says believe in the value of sport. for the athletes, this is still a really important moment for them. there will be some familiar touches on the olympic ceremony like the parade of nations. they will be allowed to
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nominate two flag—bearers. normally you will have the athletes walking together. tonight around 30% you still have lanterns, lights. bring snacks, it is three and a half hours long. then it kicks off, the smorgasbord of sports. more events than ever before. it is going to be a busy 18 days. fix, than ever before. it is going to be a busy 18 days— a busy 18 days. a smorgasbord of sorts, a busy 18 days. a smorgasbord of sports. i love _ a busy 18 days. a smorgasbord of sports, i love that! _ a busy 18 days. a smorgasbord of sports, i love that! keep saying l sports, i love that! keep saying that. that is the biggest challenge. daily lateral flow testing for pupils may be equally as effective as class bubbles to control transmission in schools — that's according to a study by oxford university. one of the government's scientific advisers, susan hopkins, welcomed the study staying it was evidence of a "safe alternative" to the policy of isolation. our health correspondent, naomi grimley has more. the isolating of bubbles in schools has caused no end of frustration in households during this pandemic. take last week, for example, the department for education says on the 15th ofjuly,
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over a million state school pupils in england did not attend class for covid—19 reasons. of those, more than 930,000 were self isolating, due to a possible contact with a covid case. but a new study by oxford university suggests daily testing is a safe alternative to isolating contacts. researchers followed pupils and staff in more than 200 schools. in half, the close contacts of positive cases had to isolate for ten days. in the other half, however, close contacts of positive cases were offered supervised daily tests at school over seven days and allowed to carry on as normal if they were negative. i think the results of this study are really reassuring for parents, as well as for students and for teachers. what we see here is that for people in schools and colleges, the chance of getting infected with covid—19,
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when there has been a case in school or college is low, it's less than 2%, one in 50. what we also see is dct is able to pick up those people who are most infectious, even when they don't have symptoms. i am confident that what this study shows us is daily testing of contacts is a safe thing to do in schools and colleges. researchers said findings would make encouraging reading for parents and teachers, especially as they believe daily contact testing could reduce covid—related absences by as much as 39%. naomi grimley, bbc news. the government's plans to end the extra universal credit payment would be the biggest overnight reduction in the basic rate of social security since the creation of the welfare state. that's according to thejoseph rowntree foundation. the government introduced a £20 a week uplift to the basic entitlement at the start of the pandemic, but that's due to come to an end in october.
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our political correspondent nick eardley has this report. for many families, the pandemic has been a time of unprecedented challenges. the government added £20 a week to universal credit payments last march. it was a big increase, but it was temporary. and the uplift is due to come to an end in october. i'm anthony. i'm a father of two. i became redundantjust before the lockdown due to ill health. anthony says the end of the extra money will mean some tough choices. for us as a household, we are going to be left with the question of food versus fuel, orfuel versus clothes, you know, just the basic necessities. there are many households which have grown to rely on the uplift money as a source ofjust functioning. the number of universal credit claimants has almost doubled during the pandemic, and some are worried that taking away
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the extra money could have a big impact. at the end of a year that's probably the worst many people have seen since the war, we're going to be hitting families right as we go into the winter. what we're going to find is that there are millions of families who are going to go hungry this winter, who are not going to be able to put the heating on. the uplift costs a lot though — £6 billion a year. in here, the treasury, the government is trying to bring spending down after the unprecedented emergency measures of the pandemic. ministers see the £20 a week extra was always due to come to an end. a government spokesperson said, "our focus now is on our multi—billion pound plan forjobs, which will support people in the long term." some employees are worried, though, including many conservatives, —— some mps are worried, though, including many conservatives, and they intend to put pressure on the government for a rethink. nick eardley, bbc news.
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some pretty extreme conditions we have been talking about. northern ireland had 31.4 celsius in armagh. there are signs of change ahead. if you are not enjoying the heat, you might be liking what i am about to tell you. let me tell you about the forecast for the next few days. things will gradually turn cooler. we are already noticing the trend in southern and eastern areas today. in the east we are seeing no plough this morning, particularly in scotland but north—east england, through the wash and a few patches of cloud in east anglia as well. in the sunshine temperatures will shoot up, one or two isolated if you
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pushing into the south—west later. temperatures today, whilst cooler in the east were still getting into the high 20s may be close to 30 degrees in the west of northern ireland. 28, 29 in the west of scotland. there could be a few isolated showers in the west to end the day. into the morning, some torrential thunderstorm is pushing their way in. a mild start to tomorrow. it could be stormy across parts of south wales, south—west england and other southern counties. sunshine develops but we could see more showers and thunderstorms later. in the north and west of the country, another day of sunshine and heat. even here they will start to feel cooler on sunday. a full forecast in half—an—hour. so as we've been hearing, the postponed 2020 olympics will finally start today in tokyo. but the road to the games has not been a smooth one.
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our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes has sent this report ahead of the celebrations. finding olympic fans in tokyo these days isn't so easy, but on this rooftop at least, it's a different story. skateboarding is in the olympics for the first time in the hope of attracting young new fans. and it seems to be working. it will be cool to watch great skateboarders at the olympics. i love snowboarding, so skateboarding is good practice for me and it's fun. at one time, everyone here was an olympic fan. on the day tokyo won the bid back in 2013, people were delirious with joy. today, the atmosphere couldn't be more different. the stadium where the opening ceremony will happen is surrounded by high fences, spectators kept far away. first, there was the enormous cost of the main stadium.
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then there were problems with the olympic logo. then there were allegations of corruption. and then covid hit and the whole games had to be moved by a year. and then this year, japan's olympic chief had to step down over a sexism row. then the composer of music for the opening ceremony was forced out because of bullying allegations. and finally, one day before the games were due to open, the director of the whole opening ceremony has been fired because it turns out he made jokes about the holocaust. it's no wonder some people here think these games are cursed. newsreel: the world's biggest city, more than ten million population - and still growing talking, tokyo... it was all so different the last time tokyo held the games back in 1964. author robert whiting had arrived injapan two years earlier. it's too bad. one of the really nice things about the '64 olympics was for two weeks, or two and a half weeks, the city was just filled with tourists and athletes mingling with each other.
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the nice thing about the olympics is that they're a global festival — it really was this festival atmosphere. i was quite nice. and, you know, now it's like the city is like a ghost town. not quite a ghost town. tokyo is supposed to be under a state of emergency, but you wouldn't know it from the famous nightlife districts of shinjuku. like many others, the owner of this restaurant is now refusing to close early or stop serving alcohol. he says he lost a quarter of a million dollars during the last shutdown. translation: i am struggling. i've had friends who have had to close their restaurants. i was short of cash and had a problem paying bills. that's why i decided to reopen. the government is not helping us, so i have to protect my own living. there are certainly those who are looking forward to tonight's opening ceremony. many of them are already lining up to take photos close to the main stadium. but overall, the mood in tokyo
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is more weary acceptance than eager anticipation. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news in tokyo. let's take a look at today's papers. the daily telegraph is reporting the story about a study by oxford university that suggests daily testing of pupils exposed to covid is just as effective as sending whole groups of children home. the guardian focuses on the fallout from the announcement that nhs staff will get a 3% pay rise, reporting that ministers will force the health service to cover part of the cost. the paper describes the move as "unprecedented". the daily mail leads with the �*pingdemic�* and reports on calls from business leaders to exempt more employees from isolating if they are fully vaccinated. and the bbc sport website leads with the start of the delayed tokyo olympic games.
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looking at team gb�*s medal hopes, explaining how the games will run during a pandemic. this is a feature about adam peaty, the swimmer, he is an extraordinary swimming machine, one above great hopes. they do an analysis of some of his physical attributes that need to prowess in the water. he has size 12 feet, big feet, which are particularly... he is a big man. relatively. his feet are very wide and create more resistance. i am not sure you are being completely complimentary about adam peaty�*s feat. second item, he has flexible knees, very flexible knees. he has
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incredible force despite keeping his body very narrow. section three, he has double jointed ankles. with that just be flexible? effectively his feet are on backwards, his coach says. such is the extent of his double jointed says. such is the extent of his doublejointed nurse says. such is the extent of his double jointed nurse and says. such is the extent of his doublejointed nurse and he can says. such is the extent of his double jointed nurse and he can turn them to extreme degrees which reduces drag in the water. peaty pulled himself through the water with incredible upper body strength. he has massive hands pushing him through the water. he is fully equipped as an aqua man. can i point this out to you, the fascinating child. say 20 years ago, when the fastest swimmer was... child. say 20 years ago, when the fastest swimmerwas... ok, child. say 20 years ago, when the fastest swimmer was... ok, this one. adrian moorhouse, another gb swimmer from 1988. how much further ahead
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with adam peaty be done now if he gave his best time? 88 and now, adam peaty in the pool would be nearly eight metres ahead in the race. that is how far he has pushed the boundaries, how much quicker he is. extraordinary. have i picked him up enough?! what more do you want? in contrast to adam peaty�*s aqua man and physique, i raise you to a sumo wrestler. ok. this is a fabulous story of a sumo wrestler, who had injured both knees. he is a mongolian sumo wrestler that he ended up using a wheelchair, he was suffering from diabetes and hepatitis. he got married, he was 29 years old. his wife put him on a healthy diet of fish fish dishes,
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and he stopped drinking alcohol, he gave up all the beer. what happened was he had been relegated right down the sumo wrestling divisions. he had lost his monthly salary and was on the verge of quitting the sport. because he did so well, he had all his victories? spectators in the grand tournament injuly. he secured victory, 13 wins out of 15 bouts. he has been promoted to grand champion after falling has been promoted to grand champion afterfalling over down has been promoted to grand champion after falling over down the has been promoted to grand champion afterfalling over down the ranks. that is the first time that has happened. he is big, he is going to be big. your information on that is that he is big. so the time now is
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6:20am. more olympics through the morning. we have correspondence in tokyo. we are all ahead of the head of the opening ceremony that happens later today. the family of a british woman who went missing from her boyfriend's yacht in the caribbean, have appealed for him to help police piece together what happened on the night she disappeared. sarm heslop was last seen in march leaving a restaurant in the us virgin islands. her parents have been speaking exclusively to breakfast�*s graham satchell. sarm heslop has been missing since the beginning of march. she was last seen leaving a restaurant in the us virgin islands with her boyfriend, ryan baine. the mystery surrounding her disappearance, the lack of information, has left her parents devastated. you would be doing something and you would suddenly feel guilty because you haven't thought about her.
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then when you think about her, tears just come. i can't help it. i wake up every morning and it's the same nightmare. it'sjust horrible. i feel guilty because i can go to sleep. i don't go to bed till late because ijust can't get to sleep. then when i did notice a plan wake up in the morning, i feel guilty i've slept, i feel guilty when i smile, when i laugh. ijust don't know — ijust feel... my heart's broken. sarm was working on ryan bain�*s yacht, seen here in the days after she disappeared just offshore. at 2:30am on march the 8th, mr bain rang the police to say sarm was missing. they told him to contact the coastguard to start a search. ryan bain didn't call the coastguard until 11:46 the next day, almost ten hours later.
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we can't understand why it took him so long, there's such a time—lapse. he saying that it was two o'clock when he realised she was missing but, you know, nobody had seen her since she left the restaurant. there could have been something happen in those hours so it would have been a longer period before he phoned the coastguard. sarm was 41 when she went missing. she'd worked as a flight attendant, travelled the world. she loved life, she was confident, loving, respectful. she liked to see places, she liked to experience different cultures, meet different people. she befriended to many people all over the place
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that she went all over the world. popular? very popular, very loving, fun loving. always made you laugh. yes. brenda and peter have been helped in the last few months by sarm's friends. it's the first time they'd been able to meet in person since she disappeared. family and friends had the same questions, why did mr bain refuse permission for the police to search his boat? why has he now left the area? the virgin islands police department told us, we would like to interview ryan bain. we cannot confirm mr bain�*s location. however we urge him to make contact with us to aid us with this investigation. ryan bane has a previous conviction for assaulting his ex—wife in 2011. officially this is still a missing persons enquiry.
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police say mr bane is a person of interest but not a suspect. the day after sarm went missing, the us coast guard wrote this report obtained by the times. it describes ryan banr as heavily intoxicated and agitated and says mr bane physically placed himself at the entrance door of the vessel's namespace, impeding the boarding team from completing an initial safety sweep of the vessel. mr bane's lawyer told that his client met with the us coast guard, answered all questions posed to him and gave them unfettered access to the vessel, as well as to sarm's personal belongings, including her phone and ipad. any reports to the country are categorically false. mr bane had nothing to do with sarm's disappearance, and remains heartbroken that she is missing. sarm's parents haven't spoken publicly since their daughter went missing. this is the first interview. and they have a clear message for ryan bane. any person, surely, any person would do everything they could to help find somebody that he was supposed to love. what sort of human being wouldn't be there to help? that's what i think he should do, he should just come forward. and cooperate.
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i would like him to come forward and talk to the police, for a start. i would like a full forensic search of the ship, a full—on one, which i hope and hope they don't find anything. if they do, thatjustice be done, if there needs to be. that's what i want. i've got no peace, i never had any real peace ever for the rest of my life, i don't suppose. i don't know whether it would help or not, to be quite honest, but i'd still like to see it done, as hard as it may be, i'd like to see it done. i hope — i still have hope. i'll always hope that she will be back through the door, always. never give up on her, i'll never give up. it is now almost five months since sarm's missing. her parents say they want, need and are demanding answers.
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graham satchell, bbc news. a spokesman from the foreign office said it "remains in contact with the authorities" on the us virgin islands and that "the uk police are supporting the investigation". time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. this is your news for london and the south east. police in sussex are warning that illegal raves could risk staff being taken away from genuine emergencies. it comes after two large unlicensed parties, including on the sussex downs. it saw thousands gathering last month and prompted a large police response with nearly 100 arrests. officers say these sorts of events put lives at risk and cannot be tolerated. meanwhile, with people taking to the clubs for the first weekend in 16 months, police in medway are launching a multi—agency operation to try to keep the public safe. officers, street pastors
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and security staff will be out in rochesterfrom tonight and over the next few weeks. the force says it's being done to coincide with the rise in reports of sexual assaults, which across the country, tend to peak during the summer months. schools in london have been awarded extra funding to keep parts of their sites open for longer as a way to encourage more physical activity. the money has helped to pay for events like this inter—school sports festival in brent. london sport offered grants of £10,000 because of the concern that child obesity rates have increased as a result of less exercise and poorer diets during lockdowns. we found that a lot of young people did come back and they were overweight and just inactive, but we also found a lot of them were nervous about coming back and starting to play sport again, so thatis starting to play sport again, so that is why we are trying to put as many activities as we can to physically get people moving again. the first major event with full capacity crowds
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at brands hatch is set to take place this weekend. it's been more than a year since the racing circuit in kent has been able to welcome spectators in the numbers it used to. round three of the british superbikes is being held there, which was pushed back from june to allow more people to attend. obviously we know there will be some of you that will be worried about coming back to major events, but let'sjust coming back to major events, but let's just make that point really clear. this is a big open—air venue, the best advice that has been given is that open—air events are the safest thing is to be at. weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. after the heat of the last few days, change is on its way. today is set to be cooler. it'll also be cloudier and breezier for most of us, too. starting off on another mild note this morning. lots of blue sky and sunshine around for the first half of the day once more, a bit more cloud that we've been used to, and into the afternoon,
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sunny spells, and temperatures this time will peak in the mid 20s, so we have lost a good few degrees there. and that easterly wind is set to freshen, particularly towards eastern coastal areas of kent, where we could see some gusts later in the day of up to 30 mph. now, through this evening and overnight, it will still feel cloudy and muggy. very mild again, there will be some outbreaks of rain moving northwards and eastwards through the night. in fact, across the weekend, there is a met office weather warning for heavy rain. some of those showers possibly thundery later on in the day on saturday, and on sunday, too, its also set to feel cooler. that's all for now. i'll have more in half an hour. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up on breakfast this morning — we're looking ahead to the olympics, which kicks off later today with the official opening ceremony. dan walker and sam quek will give us
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a tour of the bbc olympics studio which will be their home for the next few weeks. former gold medallist rower matthew pinsent is in tokyo and will take us through what we can expect from the games. and we'll be talking to linford christie about his memories of the olympics and why he's trying out new sports — fishing and wild swimming. people will be thinking, why is fishing not an olympic sport? but there are a number of new sport in this olympics. skateboarding, surfing, climbing, and you have new ones coming on like break dancing in 2024, so new sports are being
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included in the olympic family all the time. a beautiful view right now of tokyo, a gorgeous shot of the skyline, the backdrop of the skyscrapers with the olympic stadium gleaming in the sunshine. you can watch the opening ceremony live on bbc one at midday. the olympic rings sitting there. it will look very different, no crowds, a fraction of the usual number of athletes inside the stadium at today. but the hope from the international olympic committee is that lighting the flame officially, the start of the games will offer hope and light at the end of the tunnel for the world. two gold medallists from rio will be leading out team gb at today's olympic opening ceremony in tokyo. each nation has been allowed to nominate one female and one male representative. for britain, sailor hannah mills and rower moe sbihi have been picked from a group of athletes put forward
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by their sports. the action has already begun. yesterday brazil's men got their campaign underway with a 4—2 defeat of germany. everton�*s richarlison scored a first—half hat—trick. and mexico caused a shock by hammering france 4—1 in their opening game of the olympics with sebastian cordova getting his side's second goal. she was very different from the teams that play at the world cup for a lot of teams like france. in cricket, oval invincibles competed the double over manchester originals in the new hundred competition. the women's side beat their counterparts in a thrilling inaugural match at the oval on wednesday, and last night the men followed suit beating originals by nine runs in the first men's game of the new format. it's the first double header today
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as birmingham phoenix take on london spirit at edgbaston. the women's sides play first from 3.00, with the men following at 6.30. legendary aussie bowler shane warne is head coach of spirit's men. when there's not much between teams, can come down to the way you think, the red field at the right time, obviously skilled all of those things and execution, if you bowl rubbish you are probably going to lose, but if you take that everyone is going to bowl all right and bat pretty well, then the point of difference in every team will come down to fielding. but overall, it will come down to the strategy that you have a the tactical side of things, and as i said, i think we have got the best white ball captain in world cricket in eoin morgan. so it's finally here. the opening ceremony for the tokyo olympics is just a few hours away.
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it's been a roller—coaster 18 months, not only for the athletes, but for their families and friends, too, who sadly can't be there in tokyo to support their loved ones. but they won't let that dampen their spirits. getting the party started at home. the family of a rio gold medallist are not able to cheer him on poolside in tokyo this time, but they can still feel his presence. and while this might be confusing alfie the dog, showing their support with friends in the garden cannot mask some of the extra stress of having to watch their son's third olympics only through the tv. i get olympics only through the tv. i get more nervous _ olympics only through the tv. i get more nervous because _ olympics only through the tv. i get more nervous because i feel as though i have some control when i'm there, for some reason, although i am in the stands, but ijust know what is going on. you cannot see everything through the camera. i basically have two leave the room
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when _ basically have two leave the room when jack's comes around. i basically have two leave the room whenjack's comes around. i am pretty— whenjack's comes around. i am pretty nervous about the whole thing. — pretty nervous about the whole thing, i have my hands in front of me _ thing, i have my hands in front of me to_ thing, i have my hands in front of me. ., . ~ thing, i have my hands in front of me. ., ., ~ , thing, i have my hands in front of me. ., . ~ , ., , thing, i have my hands in front of me. ., .,~ , ., , ., me. to make the nerves worse for jack's family _ me. to make the nerves worse for jack's family this _ me. to make the nerves worse for jack's family this time _ me. to make the nerves worse for jack's family this time thousands | me. to make the nerves worse for| jack's family this time thousands of miles away, they don't expect to hear from miles away, they don't expect to hearfrom him much. we miles away, they don't expect to hear from him much.— miles away, they don't expect to hear from him much. we have got a family what's _ hear from him much. we have got a family what's up _ hear from him much. we have got a family what's up that _ hear from him much. we have got a family what's up that we _ hear from him much. we have got a family what's up that we use, - hear from him much. we have got a family what's up that we use, but i family what's up that we use, but jack is 14 ticking himself off—line even without as well, he just wants to get on hisjob. —— whatsapp. he to get on his 'ob. -- whatsapp. he is to get on hisjob. —— whatsapp. he is at least able to spend time poolside with his girlfriend, who is diving from the higher ten metre board at her second olympics. you see her up — board at her second olympics. you see her up there, and you think, oh, you know. _ see her up there, and you think, oh, you know. she — you know, she isjust being bonkers from _ you know, she isjust being bonkers from being — you know, she isjust being bonkers from being young _ you know, she isjust being bonkers from being young. she _ you know, she isjust being bonkers from being young. she just- you know, she isjust being bonkers from being young. she just goes- you know, she isjust being bonkers from being young. she just goes for it.
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from being young. she just goes for it the _ from being young. she just goes for it the first — from being young. she just goes for it. the first thought _ from being young. she just goes for it. the first thought was, _ from being young. she just goes for it. the first thought was, oh, - from being young. she just goes for it. the first thought was, oh, wow, i it. the first thought was, oh, wow, double _ it. the first thought was, oh, wow, double olympiah _ it. the first thought was, oh, wow, double olympian and now, and for| double olympian and now, and for them _ double olympian and now, and for them to— double olympian and now, and for them to be — double olympian and now, and for them to be there _ double olympian and now, and for them to be there together, - double olympian and now, and for. them to be there together, because them to be there together, because the romance — them to be there together, because the romance kind _ them to be there together, because the romance kind of— them to be there together, because the romance kind of started - them to be there together, because the romance kind of started in- them to be there together, because the romance kind of started in rio, i the romance kind of started in rio, suffer— the romance kind of started in rio, suffer them — the romance kind of started in rio, suffer them to _ the romance kind of started in rio, suffer them to be _ the romance kind of started in rio, suffer them to be there _ the romance kind of started in rio, suffer them to be there as - the romance kind of started in rio, suffer them to be there as a - the romance kind of started in rio, | suffer them to be there as a couple is really— suffer them to be there as a couple is really nice — suffer them to be there as a couple is really nice for— suffer them to be there as a couple is really nice for them _ suffer them to be there as a couple is really nice for them both. - suffer them to be there as a couple is really nice for them both. [- suffer them to be there as a couple is really nice for them both. [amu- is really nice for them both. i am jack's number — is really nice for them both. i am jack's number one _ is really nice for them both. i am jack's number one fan. _ is really nice for them both. i am jack's number one fan. it - is really nice for them both. i am jack's number one fan. it is - jack's number one fan. it is 'ust like jack ticking i jack's number one fan. it is 'ust like jack ticking six i jack's number one fan. it isjust like jack ticking six penalties. i like jack ticking six penalties. jack only has two seconds per dive. it's case. . , ., , it's case. their family and friends have set the bar _ have set the bar high when it comes to watching them from home. up and down the land, these scenes will be repeated in homes and gardens whatever time of day or night it might be. and in keeping with the way of doing things over the last 18 months, i caught up with others who will be feeling similar emotions from home. what a moment. he
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will be feeling similar emotions from home. what a moment. he has got the feel of these _ from home. what a moment. he has got the feel of these bars _ from home. what a moment. he has got the feel of these bars of— from home. what a moment. he has got the feel of these bars of the _ the feel of these bars of the last few days. he the feel of these bars of the last few da s. ., , , the feel of these bars of the last few da s. . , , .., the feel of these bars of the last few da s. . , , _, ., few days. he has been dedicated to the sort few days. he has been dedicated to the sport for— few days. he has been dedicated to the sport for such _ few days. he has been dedicated to the sport for such a _ few days. he has been dedicated to the sport for such a long _ few days. he has been dedicated to the sport for such a long time, - the sport for such a long time, gymnastics is not the first sport you think— gymnastics is not the first sport you think of, you think of football and those — you think of, you think of football and those sorts of sports, really inspirational for those youngsters coming _ inspirational for those youngsters coming through, i think it is so important, and he has done a great 'ob., , , ., ., ., important, and he has done a great 'ob. , , ., ., ., , job. just the dismount to go. double front half turn _ job. just the dismount to go. double front half turn come _ job. just the dismount to go. double front half turn come up _ job. just the dismount to go. double front half turn come up with - job. just the dismount to go. double front half turn come up with that - front half turn come up with that little _ front half turn come up with that little adjustment, _ front half turn come up with that little adjustment, that was - front half turn come up with that little adjustment, that was a - little adjustment, that was a routine — little adjustment, that was a routine and _ little adjustment, that was a routine and a _ little adjustment, that was a routine and a half! _ little adjustment, that was a routine and a half!— little adjustment, that was a routine and a half! even though it is a lona routine and a half! even though it is a longtime _ routine and a half! even though it is a long time since _ routine and a half! even though it is a long time since i _ is a long time since i coached laura, you still feel as though you are there with her, like i was when she was riding herfirst are there with her, like i was when she was riding her first youth event all those years ago. i’ee she was riding her first youth event all those years ago.— all those years ago. i've been teachin: all those years ago. i've been teaching in — all those years ago. i've been teaching in the _ all those years ago. i've been teaching in the same - all those years ago. i've been l teaching in the same classroom all those years ago. i've been - teaching in the same classroom now for many— teaching in the same classroom now for many years, actually, and when a new class _ for many years, actually, and when a new class comes in, i'll often say, that is— new class comes in, i'll often say, that is where adam peter sat there, and it—
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that is where adam peter sat there, and it is— that is where adam peter sat there, and it isjust — that is where adam peter sat there, and it isjust inspirational, he is like any one _ and it isjust inspirational, he is like any one of them there, and anything — like any one of them there, and anything is _ like any one of them there, and anything is possible, he is a good demonstration of that. for anything is possible, he is a good demonstration of that.— demonstration of that. for the families, coaches, _ demonstration of that. for the families, coaches, and - demonstration of that. for the l families, coaches, and athletes, demonstration of that. for the - families, coaches, and athletes, it has been the longest most difficult build—up to any olympic games, and of the last 18 months here on breakfast, we have followed some of team gb�*s top stars through all the uncertainty. with the games cancelled last summer, right up until today, continuing speculation and some doubts. all those hours of training and empty gyms at times, at home in new ways of staying on condition during lockdown. it takes a whole team _ condition during lockdown. it takes a whole team effort _ condition during lockdown. it takes a whole team effort to _ condition during lockdown. it takes a whole team effort to get the - a whole team effort to get the performance that we will need in the olympics, and you play little part in that team, don't you?- olympics, and you play little part in that team, don't you? when behind the scenes with _ in that team, don't you? when behind the scenes with the _ in that team, don't you? when behind the scenes with the athletes - the scenes with the athletes and their families as they have juggled their families as they have juggled their preparations with the issues that so many of them have faced. taste that so many of them have faced. we have that so many of them have faced. - have not done all the competitions i normally do, but i will still show
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fury. normally do, but i will still show fu . �* ., . , normally do, but i will still show fu. ., fury. before finally, today, realising — fury. before finally, today, realising their _ fury. before finally, today, realising their resilience i fury. before finally, today, | realising their resilience has fury. before finally, today, - realising their resilience has all been worth it. and the same can be said when it comes to coping for the families back home, especially given the time difference with tokyo. it has crept up on us this time with the covid — has crept up on us this time with the covid another thing, is it on, is it not. — the covid another thing, is it on, is it not. is— the covid another thing, is it on, is it not, is going to happen? i don't — is it not, is going to happen? i don't think— is it not, is going to happen? i don't think we have still quite adjusted _ don't think we have still quite adjusted to the idea of it going ahead — adjusted to the idea of it going ahead. 50 adjusted to the idea of it going ahead, , , adjusted to the idea of it going ahead. , , , adjusted to the idea of it going ahead. , , ., ., adjusted to the idea of it going ahead. , , , ., ., , ahead. so because it is going to be on at seven — ahead. so because it is going to be on at seven o'clock _ ahead. so because it is going to be on at seven o'clock in _ on at seven o'clock in the morning, it's going to be quite difficult to get that atmosphere going. i think we will have to get up at five o'clock or something, get the tea on the stove ready. its, o'clock or something, get the tea on the stove ready.— the stove ready. a bit too early for wine, i the stove ready. a bit too early for wine. ithink. _ if you want some atmosphere, watching from home seems to be the way to do it. getting into the
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spirit. thanks, mike, see you later on. you might be familiar with the group of disabled army veterans, who, over the last month, have been kayaking from lands end tojohn o'groats. it was a mammoth endurance challenge to raise money for the military charity that has helped them with rehabilitation, and we're pleased to say they completed theirjourney ten days ahead of schedule. breakfast'sjohn maguire has been following the group from the start. when they started this odyssey, they had no idea if it would be possible. could a team of five military veterans, all with life changing injuries, paddle in two—man kayaks from lands end tojohn o'groats? it would be notjust a group challenge, but also a series of individual challenges. we've all been through similar experiences. i stepped on an ied,
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damaged my left leg. we've all been through different levels of trauma. but when i got involved in this, i was like, it sounds crazy, i'm not comfortable, but i'll give it a go. it is all about putting your comfort zone, really testing yourself. i focus my time on supporting others is my way of getting what i want from it. that seems to work for me personally, i get a lot of benefit from helping others. the odds stacked against them, the distance 1400 kilometres, the weather and conditions, seasickness and strong headwinds were early problems, and their physical limitations. for some, blast injuries to their limbs sustained during their military service. and for darren, paralysed from the chest down after a climbing accident, he had to learn to adapt quickly. ifelt like i was back running or in the mountains, and really pushing myself. i actually got quite
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emotional when i reflected on what had happened, because in the 4.5 years, i have not done that. i was so in the zone and in the moment, that i kind of forgot where i am, and the fact that i am disabled, so to speak. but at the end of the day, just thinking about what had happened, i sort of realised the enormity of it, and that will remain the highlight for me. sometimes completing ten—hour days and more than 90 kilometres, their paddles seemed like wings. they were flying. out at sea, they earned an escort from fellow water dwellers. we last saw them off the west coast of scotland, tired but well into their stride. the difficult side has been the mental side, the psychological side, so being away from family, being away from my wife and my son, who is six months old, so i spend my evenings looking at photos of him and videos of him. kind of heartbreaking in a way, but then i'm looking at the bigger picture for this, what we're doing, what we're aiming
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to achieve is absolutely incredible. we have hit some conditions where we've had to basically abandon paddle for the day. you're spending quite a lot of time and quite tight confines with this lot, so it's just continuance of terrible chat, basically. but, no, morale is really high, keeping each other entertained and everything like that, and, no, it's been really good, with everyone keeping everyone else's spirits high and stuff, so it's been going really well. and finally, the finish line was in sight. after 21 days on the water, they reached john o'groats. they have done it. definitely my injuries, physically, i've struggled with. my left arm has been in tatters for definitely the last few days, but it had been a struggle for quite a few days before then. i had some down days, some days where i felt a little bit out of my comfort zone. but the next day came and i pushed on, and it felt critical.
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so now we are here, and it is a bit overhwelming, actually, pretty cool achievement. very chuffed with what we have done and how strong we finished. so far, they have raised more than 60% of their £100,000 target. the money will go to the armed forces para snow sports team, the charity that's helped all of them, and in the meantime put proving to themselves and to everyone that despite physical limitations, sheer determination can mean there are no limits. john maguire, bbc news. and we are joined now by two of those military veterans, darren edwards and carl simmons. morning, both. what an achievement. good morning. easily interesting thin . , good morning. easily interesting thing. when _ good morning. easily interesting thing. when you _ good morning. easily interesting thing, when you have _ good morning. easily interesting thing, when you have done - good morning. easily interesting thing, when you have done a - good morning. easily interesting i thing, when you have done a team event like that, and you miss your family, as we had in the report, but
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then you kind of end up missing each other as well, so it must be quite nice sitting next to each other and seeing each other again after that. —— a really interesting thing. i think we share the same opinion on this, it is weird that for the last year we saw each other more than we have seen our friends and family due to covid, so in this last year, we became a family, as cliched as that sounds. so when we finished, the next day we all went about our own journeys back to our respective homes, to not know that a monthtime or a weak�*s time we would see each other again, it was kind of weird, so like everyone is saying, really. how lovely was it seeing your families again? it’s how lovely was it seeing your families again?— families again? it's great to get back to some _ families again? it's great to get back to some kind _ families again? it's great to get back to some kind of _ families again? it's great to get back to some kind of normality| families again? it's great to get - back to some kind of normality after living _ back to some kind of normality after living in _ back to some kind of normality after living in each other's pockets for a month _ living in each other's pockets for a month. fin — living in each other's pockets for a month. ., month. on that theme, congratulations - month. on that theme, congratulations by - month. on that theme, congratulations by the l month. on that theme, - congratulations by the way, it's a given, what you've done is
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incredible and everyone can see that, the money raised will go to a great cause. i am going to ask the really silly stuff. the bickering in the boats, what was that like? who was the most annoying boat partner? one of your colleagues i think said at one point the boredom, hours and hours of terrible chat. i at one point the boredom, hours and hours of terrible chat.— hours of terrible chat. i think that was johnny _ hours of terrible chat. i think that was johnny that _ hours of terrible chat. i think that was johnny that said _ hours of terrible chat. i think that was johnny that said that. - hours of terrible chat. i think that - was johnny that said that. something that we _ was johnny that said that. something that we found, because obviously we were living, — that we found, because obviously we were living, eating, sleeping, kayaking. _ were living, eating, sleeping, kayaking, the for 26 days on top of each other, and there were some quite tense moments, there were moments where conditions changed for the worse. _ moments where conditions changed for the worse, and the safety but that was there — the worse, and the safety but that was there for our safety was in a kind _ was there for our safety was in a kind of scenario that it wasn't guaranteed we would get out of the scenario we found ourselves in —— safety boat, so tensions got very hi-h safety boat, so tensions got very high in _ safety boat, so tensions got very high in moments like that, and we all had _ high in moments like that, and we all had our— high in moments like that, and we all had our good and bad days, days
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where _ all had our good and bad days, days where we _ all had our good and bad days, days where we were nervous, especially the first _ where we were nervous, especially the first couple of days for me in uarticulan — the first couple of days for me in particular. so there were moments, i think. _ particular. so there were moments, i think. where — particular. so there were moments, i think, where tensions were high and perhaps— think, where tensions were high and perhaps there was added friction, but i _ perhaps there was added friction, but i think— perhaps there was added friction, but i think generally speaking, we pulled _ but i think generally speaking, we pulled each other through it as a team _ pulled each other through it as a team so — pulled each other through it as a team. so for me in particular, the first couple — team. so for me in particular, the first couple of days were really challenging, just from an injury point _ challenging, just from an injury point of— challenging, just from an injury point of view for me, but the guys sort of pulled me through, and carol, — sort of pulled me through, and carol, for— sort of pulled me through, and carol, for you, i guess. sort of pulled me through, and carol, foryou, i guess. —— carl. roi— carol, foryou, i guess. —— carl. for me it— carol, foryou, i guess. —— carl. for me it was— carol, foryou, i guess. —— carl. for me it was a bit later on, the nerves in my spine were not particularly happy with the paddling, so it is more a case of learning to say, i need to step back a bit, or! learning to say, i need to step back a bit, or i can push, and i think it is the same for everyone, rotating round and just working out when things are going to for you or not. and as a team, we have managed to sort of balance that out, so it has
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worked really well. i sort of balance that out, so it has worked really well.— worked really well. i know from revious worked really well. i know from previous experience, _ previous experience, and often it is something we find with service people, your ability for understatement is top dollar. what was your phrase? my spine wasn't very happy? i'm thinking you were in quite a bit of distress at times, you must have been. i quite a bit of distress at times, you must have been. i suppose i was in ain a you must have been. i suppose i was in pain a few — you must have been. i suppose i was in pain a few times, _ you must have been. i suppose i was in pain a few times, and if— you must have been. i suppose i was in pain a few times, and if i - you must have been. i suppose i was in pain a few times, and if i got - in pain a few times, and if i got quitea lot in pain a few times, and if i got quite a lot of pain, and my right shoulder didn't seem to... i lost a lot of power. so even though we might say it's, i don't know, a little bit of paying off whatever it is, you can't really hide the fact that know, we are having a moment of weakness, we can't cope with something. so we try to just make it
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that it something. so we try to just make it thatitis something. so we try to just make it that it is all right, really, i guess. that it is all right, really, i cuess. �* , that it is all right, really, i cuess. a ., that it is all right, really, i cuess. a . , guess. as charlie said, very understated _ guess. as charlie said, very understated indeed, - guess. as charlie said, very understated indeed, but. guess. as charlie said, very understated indeed, but we absolutely appreciate what you've been doing. isn't it great you came backin been doing. isn't it great you came back in the sunshine? i know you had good weather, but it is great. there is a boat right next to you, gentlemen, do you fancyjumping in? we were ten days ahead of schedule in the _ we were ten days ahead of schedule in the end. — we were ten days ahead of schedule in the end, but pretty glad that we are not— in the end, but pretty glad that we are not out— in the end, but pretty glad that we are not out in 29 degrees heat. we have _ are not out in 29 degrees heat. we have some — are not out in 29 degrees heat. we have some really good weather, but it kind _ have some really good weather, but it kind of _ have some really good weather, but it kind of sat in that middle ground temperature rise, so heat exhaustion was one _ temperature rise, so heat exhaustion was one thing if any that wasn't really an— was one thing if any that wasn't really an issue for us.— really an issue for us. thank goodness- _ really an issue for us. thank goodness. lots _ really an issue for us. thank goodness. lots of _ really an issue for us. thank| goodness. lots of challenges really an issue for us. thank- goodness. lots of challenges and issues, goodness. lots of challenges and issues. but _ goodness. lots of challenges and issues, but heat _ goodness. lots of challenges and issues, but heat was not - goodness. lots of challenges and issues, but heat was not one - goodness. lots of challenges and issues, but heat was not one of. issues, but heat was not one of them — issues, but heat was not one of them. ., ., issues, but heat was not one of them. . ., ., ~ issues, but heat was not one of them. ., ., ., ,, , ., them. darren and carl, thank you very much. _ them. darren and carl, thank you very much. it _ them. darren and carl, thank you very much, it has _ them. darren and carl, thank you very much, it has been _ them. darren and carl, thank you very much, it has been a - them. darren and carl, thank you| very much, it has been a privilege to be part of yourjourney. we are
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going to ensure thejustgiving page, because this is what it is all about. you were aiming for £100,000 for the armed forces sports team, and now 57,000, more than halfway there. lovely to see you both, thank you very much. now the weather with matt. record—breaking temperatures yesterday in northern ireland once again, and if some were today had 30 celsius in the uk, it will be the seventh consecutive day of above 30 celsius temperatures somewhere in the country. and we could get close to that, let's have a look at the forecast, because not everyone is enjoying the heat. some good news because after today we see the table just fall away as we gradually go through the weekend. some are in full sun in the form of
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thunderstorms, but some areas will stay dry, as i'm about to show you. all coming about from this pressure to the south—west of the uk, pushing up, getting closer to us, could bring some thundery rain to the south—west later. the temperature already dropping compares to what we saw yesterday, some low cloud across eastern parts of scotland and eastern parts of scotland and eastern england, too. plenty of sunshine elsewhere for much of the country, a few isolated showers, but the sunshine in the west could once again reach the high 20s or low 30s. west of scotland and northern ireland especially. but by the end of the day, more persisted thunderstorms arrive towards the south—west. getting across other parts of south wales and other parts of southern england and to the start of southern england and to the start of saturday, and temperatures dropping away a little bit today, but by night, still holding up in the team is foremost as we start tomorrow. could still be another uncomfortable night for some of you.
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tomorrow morning we have cloud generally, best of the sunshine across western scotland and northern ireland. south wales, some heavy infantry downpours, go through the day. a bit more hit and miss during the afternoon with some sunshine developing again. most areas staying dry, and across northern ireland in western scotland, still temperatures into the mid 20s here, but feeling cooler across the south and the east of the country. across the south—eastern corner of the uk, particular parts of east anglia in the south—east and east midlands most likely to see some frequent heavy and thundery showers. to the north and west, i know you need the rain at the moment in northern ireland, to stop coming until next week, but temperatures closer to where we should be for the time of year on sunday, and dropping further next week. i was just looking at this sunday map, and i went, it is going right down, isn't it? look what we've got used to. we would usually be bouncing with 22 or 23
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celsius. matt, c little, thank very much. the time is 6.53 on friday morning. —— matt, see you later. more of us are choosing to holiday at home rather than abroad this year, but it might not be enough to stop it being a difficult summer for tourism businesses. victoria's in llandudno this morning to tell us more. morning, victoria. good morning. i have lucked out in terms of outside broadcast locations for breakfast. we are here to talk about the great british holiday, the uk holiday, we are set to see a big boom when it comes to british tourism this year. in fact, we have had some figures compiled just for us for bbc breakfast, and they suggest we are going to spend about £9 billion this summer alone. that
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is a ten year high when it comes to money spent on holidays this year. that is an extraordinary amount, but why? 61% of us, over half of us, to be spending our holidays here in the uk. and that is pretty unusual, we are not in those kind of levels for are not in those kind of levels for a really long time. and if you think about what we had before the pandemic, it was more like 40,40 1%. so it is a big boost. what does that mean for the economy? well, we think it means something like an extra amount of £30 billion that will come into the uk economy. and for places like this, for north wales, that is about a £3.5 billion boost, which will mean a lot to the 40,000 or so workers who are directly involved in tourism. and one of them joins me here, thank you for bringing your ice cream van with you. what an amazing week to be selling ice cream. it you. what an amazing week to be selling ice cream.— selling ice cream. it has been su erb, selling ice cream. it has been
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superb. to — selling ice cream. it has been superb. to go _ selling ice cream. it has been superb, to go hand-in-handl selling ice cream. it has been . superb, to go hand-in-hand with selling ice cream. it has been - superb, to go hand-in-hand with the superb, to go hand—in—hand with the first week of the school holidays, i could not have asked for a better start. ., . , could not have asked for a better start. ., ., , , . start. you have been selling ice creams in _ start. you have been selling ice creams in this _ start. you have been selling ice creams in this patch _ start. you have been selling ice creams in this patch for- start. you have been selling ice creams in this patch for years, | start. you have been selling ice - creams in this patch for years, what are using in terms of sales this year? i are using in terms of sales this ear? ., are using in terms of sales this ear? . . . , , ., year? i am certainly seeing a difference. — year? i am certainly seeing a difference, just _ year? i am certainly seeing a difference, just going - year? i am certainly seeing a difference, just going off- year? i am certainly seeing a l difference, just going off those figures you're saying, you can tell there has definitely been a boom already around llandudno, people holiday in more so now in north wales. �* ., ., holiday in more so now in north wales. �* . ., , ., ., ., wales. and what are you hearing from customers, wales. and what are you hearing from customers. the _ wales. and what are you hearing from customers, the confident _ wales. and what are you hearing from customers, the confident coming - wales. and what are you hearing from | customers, the confident coming down here, are they aware of the rules, are they actually abiding by them? from my own experience, everyone has been very respectful. it has been a very successful week, and i think a lot of people have been quite surprised a lot of people who have perhaps never been to north wales before have come and been surprised. we have a lot to offer, a lot of people to see. i we have a lot to offer, a lot of people to see-— we have a lot to offer, a lot of people to see. i have discovered a south african _ people to see. i have discovered a south african accent _ people to see. i have discovered a south african accent here, - people to see. i have discovered a south african accent here, so - people to see. i have discovered a south african accent here, so if. people to see. i have discovered a south african accent here, so if at| south african accent here, so if at international place, north wales. what have you noticed about hotel
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bookings this year? i what have you noticed about hotel bookings this year?— what have you noticed about hotel bookings this year? i would say the demand this _ bookings this year? i would say the demand this year _ bookings this year? i would say the demand this year is _ bookings this year? i would say the demand this year is exceptional- demand this year is exceptional compared to other years, but bear in mind _ compared to other years, but bear in mind this _ compared to other years, but bear in mind this is — compared to other years, but bear in mind this is our peak season time, so to— mind this is our peak season time, so to experience peaks at this time of year— so to experience peaks at this time of year is _ so to experience peaks at this time of year is fairly normal for hospitality owners, hotels in particular. the difference for us this year— particular. the difference for us this year is— particular. the difference for us this year is that we don't have the same _ this year is that we don't have the same capacity as we have previously, so it is— same capacity as we have previously, so it is a _ same capacity as we have previously, so it is a little frustrating in any way, _ so it is a little frustrating in any way, because there is no doubt that the amount— way, because there is no doubt that the amount of demand is absolutely exceptional, but the challenge we have is— exceptional, but the challenge we have is accommodating that demand. problem all round. thank you to both of you, i will be buying an ice cream from you later. places like north wales have not places like devon, dorset, cornwall off the top spotin devon, dorset, cornwall off the top spot in terms of places to go for holiday makers this year. and is it any wonder when you look around you? it is absolutely stunning here. a great place for walking, full of the famous llandudno goats, they went
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viral earlier in the year when they started coming back into the town. they once roamed the plains and mountains of india, now in the streets of wales. some brilliant things about the place. victoria, thank you so much, enjoy the sunshine, see you later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. this is your news for london and the south east. police in sussex are warning that illegal raves could risk staff being taken away from genuine emergencies. it comes after two large unlicensed parties, including on the sussex downs. it saw thousands gathering last month and prompted a large police response with nearly 100 arrests. officers say these sorts of events put lives at risk and cannot be tolerated. meanwhile, with people taking to the clubs for the first weekend in 16 months, police in medway are launching a multi—agency operation to try to keep the public safe. officers, street pastors and security staff will be out
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in rochesterfrom tonight and over the next few weeks. the force says it's being done to coincide with the rise in reports of sexual assaults, which across the country, tend to peak during the summer months. hospitals in london say their wards are busier than usual for this time of year as they're treating more children with non—covid related illnesses affecting their breathing. at kings college hospital, staff on the paediatric ward are piloting new working practices based on behavioural science to help them handle the increasing pressure. they say small changes like positive messages on walls and team chats are ways of helping staff de—stress. if they are feeling stressed, they can get to a point where they are de—stressing. i think that is an important element of what we do here. sometimes the biggest part of me is listening. if you listen, you hear me.
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the first major event with full capacity crowds at brands hatch is set to take place this weekend. it's been more than a year since the racing circuit in kent has been able to welcome spectators in the numbers it used to. round 3 of the british superbikes is being held there, which was pushed back from june to allow more people to attend. obviously we know there will be some of you that will be worried about coming back to major events, but let's just make that point really clear. this is a big open—air venue, the best advice that has been given is that open—air events are the safest things to be at. weather now with elizabeth rizzini. it'll also be cloudier and breezier for most of us, too. starting off on another mild note this morning. lots of blue sky and sunshine around for the first half of the day once more, a bit more cloud that we've been used to, and into the afternoon, sunny spells,
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and temperatures this time will peak in the mid 20s, so we have lost a good few degrees there. and that easterly wind is set to freshen, particularly towards eastern coastal areas of kent, where we could see some gusts later in the day of up to 30 mph. now, through this evening and overnight, it will still feel cloudy and muggy. very mild again, there will be some outbreaks of rain moving northwards and eastwards through the night. in fact, across the weekend, there is a met office weather warning for heavy rain. some of those showers possibly thundery later on in the day on saturday, and on sunday, too, its also set to feel cooler. that's it. goodbye. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... thousands of workers in the food supply chain are told they won't need to isolate if they're �*pinged' by the nhs covid app.
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after months of uncertainty and last minute controversy, the opening ceremony of the tokyo olympics takes place later today. and coming up in the next hour, i'll be catching up with max whitlock, the double olympic gymnastics champion, whose journey we've been following through all the uncertainty over the last 18 months. covid infections among people in their 20s are at record levels, but vaccine take—up is still low. we'll ask why there's such hesitancy in some young people. after another record—breaking day in northern ireland parts of the uk stay hot today. if you do not like heat, there is a cooldown the way. more information coming up. it's friday, the 23rd ofjuly. our top story.
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from today, thousands of workers in the food supply chain could avoid self—isolation when they are �*pinged' by the nhs covid app. staff at key sites will instead take daily tests so they can continue working, in an effort to keep supermarket shelves stocked. here's our business correspondent theo leggett empty supermarket shelves. pictures like these revive memories of panic buying and shortages seen at the start of the pandemic and prompted the government to take action. the food industry, like other parts of the economy, has been suffering from a lack of staff because too many workers are isolating at home. here's the problem. if you are contacted by test and trace or pinged by the app, you're meant to self—isolate for ten days. but as infection rates rise, too many people are absent from work. so starting today, the government says it will allow workers at some 500 key sites to avoid isolation if they get pinged, provided they take covid tests for seven days. we're talking principally here, supermarket depots, distribution centres, where all of the work happens to get food out to those supermarkets. it doesn't include stores itself, because that would be a big departure from the approach we have
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now but certainly this is going to go a very long way to getting the food supply chain working properly. the response from food retailers so far has been positive but others within the sector say there are still many questions to answer. any intervention is welcome. i think we are all feeling in the food industry in particular something needed to happen, something needed to change. so any change, any improvement is welcome. we've got to see the devil in the detail here. it's been highlighted only certain companies are on the list. who's on the list? who's been identified there? what are the key workers they're talking about? what are the roles? what is the process? i hope government has put sufficient communication in place to be able to cope with the number of enquiries they get. the new programme only applies to the food business. the government is also offering limited exemptions to the isolation rules in other sectors, such as energy, the nuclear industry, medicines and water supply.
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but these will only be available for a small number of specific employees, whose absence from work would have a major impact on essential services or national security. theo leggett, bbc news. we are speaking to george eustice, the environment secretary around half past. if you have questions about which workers should be part of the scheme, let us know. we will ask some of those questions this morning. let's talk more about this with our political correspondent, jonathan blake. morning, jonathan. much clarity is there to this? we were talking about this yesterday, the pressure on the government to deliver the scheme.— deliver the scheme. there are two se arate deliver the scheme. there are two separate schemes. _ deliver the scheme. there are two separate schemes. staff— deliver the scheme. there are two separate schemes. staff and - separate schemes. staff and employers do have a bit more detail
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and idea of he will be exempt from isolation. as you had in that report, it will cover 10,000 workers at 500 sites across the uk. not supermarkets, it will be depots distribution centres and manufacturing sites. workers will not need to isolate and will take place in a daily testing programme. only if they test positive will they need to stay away from work. that is in response to empty shelves, some chains having to close shops and real concerns that things would grind to a halt. then a separate scheme for critical workers. this will only apply to named individuals in certainjobs and certain will only apply to named individuals in certain jobs and certain sectors. they will have to contact the relevant government department to get permission for individuals to be exempt from isolation and that will only be if they are fully vaccinated. we are talking about
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roles, looking at the guidance from the government, if they were not able to do theirjobs would significantly impact on security or cause a loss of life.— very much for that. we are going to be talking to george eustice, environment secretary at half past. other news this morning... the 2020 tokyo olympic games will officially start today — a year later than expected. more than 11,000 athletes from 207 countries will compete over the next few weeks, but spectators have been banned from almost all events, as japan deals with its highest surge in coronavirus infections for six months. our sports correspondent natalie pirks is in tokyo. natalie, the games will be different this year? this is the official start committee opening ceremony. it will look and feel very differently but then the sport will begin.—
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sport will begin. yes, thank goodness- _ sport will begin. yes, thank goodness. morning, - sport will begin. yes, thank| goodness. morning, charlie, sport will begin. yes, thank— goodness. morning, charlie, morning, now. the wind has got up in tokyo. this is the traditional curtain raiser, the way that tokyo will signal to the world it is ready to host. this opening ceremony will look a lot different to the one that tokyo had planned before the pandemic. the public are anxious, thatis pandemic. the public are anxious, that is bad to say and not a surprise. the infection rate is up for the highest rate since january. today there have been 19 more positive cases of people associated with the games were three athletes, number of people infected with covid to ever 100 that are accredited for the games. still some familiar touches like the parade of nations. this time there will only be a man 30, we will only have —— we will
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also have two flag—bearers. it is still an amazing thing for athletes to be involved in, still the memory they will have. we were still see lanterns and lights and dancing. bring snacks if you're going to watch it, it is three and a half hours long. more sports than we have ever had more events than we have ever had more events than we have ever had more events than we have ever had and it will certainly be one to enjoy over the next couple of weeks. one to en'oy over the next couple of weeks. ., ~ one to en'oy over the next couple of weeks. ., ,, , ., one to en'oy over the next couple of weeks. ., ~' , ., , one to en'oy over the next couple of weeks. ., ,, i. , . one to en'oy over the next couple of weeks. . ~' i., , . ., ., weeks. thank you very much. looks amazinu. weeks. thank you very much. looks amazing- we _ weeks. thank you very much. looks amazing. we are _ weeks. thank you very much. looks amazing. we are already _ amazing. we are already building with excitement. thank you, natalie. covid infection rates in young people in england are at their highest levels yet, according to the latest figures — but many are still reluctant to get a vaccine. jayne mccubbin has been finding out why people under the age of 30 are hesitant to get a jab. we are in leeds, asking a question usually considered too rude to ask. hello, jayne from the bbc. hello. how old are you? i'm 21. 21. 23. i'm 27. but there's a reason we're asking.
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17. 0k. since mid june, jabs have been available to those over 18. i'm 30. have you been jabbed yet? my first one, yes. on saturday. yes, we've had ourjab. but around a third of those under 30 have not been vaccinated at all. i haven't had mine yet. is it going to happen? yes. when? don't know. what are you waiting for? don't know. for some, it's a matter of timing. for others, like this instagram blogger, it is complicated. i know i need to have a jab. it's scary. you're scared of getting the jab? but it's scary to get a jab. why? people are saying it can track you, where you're going to go, - where you're travelling, | what you're going to do, where you have your
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bank account. - do you believe this? what's that? how much money is in your bank account. - yeah, they can track how much tax you're going to| pay, how smart you are. how big is your iq. you don't believe this. i'm trying to figure i out what's going on. all of this matters because infection rates among this group are at their highest levels yet. in leeds football club vaccination centre, they want more young people people through the doors. jamie, how old are you? 19. are you eager to get your jab or a bit cautious? how have you felt about it? eager at the minute with what has been said about needing a jab to go to the football stadium in september and so on. that was the impetus for you? yeah, yeah. i felt like i needed to get them done as soon as possible.
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amir is one of many young people working here and ellie is another. she says she is the only person in her social group who has had the jab. some of them aren't really that bothered, to be quite honest. i think the going to be more bothered when the going on about the vaccine possible and stuff. that's when they said they're going to start making efforts to come and get it done but until then they think they're invincible. you need to wait 15- minutes before you leave. all right. are you feeling 0k? yeah. that's notjust a vaccination pass, that's your ticket to the football, isn't it? yeah, yeah. enjoy. football was the incentive jamie needed to get vaccinated. for others... ..it is the nightclub. you'll need a jab to get in one from september. danielle is about to get married after covid disrupted three previous wedding dates. danielle, when are you getting married? 23rd of september. when are you getting yourjab? i've had my jab. it's done. i've decided not to have
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mine for the time being. i got severe asthma and until i can see some clinical trials that prove it is safe to me, i'm 0k. you're going to pass. yes. but you've seen evidence that covid is really bad for people with asthma? yeah, apparently. what do you mean? i'm sceptical, i'm sceptical. there is mistrust here. behavioural scientists say cool, clear data is what should be used to drive vaccination levels up. and the data shows this. long covid rates are highest among 25 to 34—year—olds and young people amongst hospital numbers. hi. show me where you are right now. i can see a hint of a hospital bed. yeah. this is my hospital bed here. oh, my goodness. jess suffered a stroke brought on by a covid infection which she caught before she was eligible for the jab. i guess, as a 24—year—old you never thought anything like this would touch you?
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no, not at all. i just think there's people that are quite oblivious to the effects and they need to wise up a little bit. the challenge for government is to convince young people the risks of covid are more significant than the risks of the vaccine. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. we'rejoined now by gp dr mohit mandiratta, for more on this. you are a gp, just so we established credentials. you have been vaccinating people right from the very beginning, haven't you? yes. very beginning, haven't you? yes, we were lucky enough — very beginning, haven't you? yes, we were lucky enough to _ very beginning, haven't you? yes, we were lucky enough to be _ very beginning, haven't you? yes, we were lucky enough to be the - very beginning, haven't you? yes, we were lucky enough to be the first - very beginning, haven't you? yes, we were lucky enough to be the first gp i were lucky enough to be the first gp practice in the world to inject people in the community. you practice in the world to in'ect people in the community. you have seen people — people in the community. you have seen people coming _ people in the community. you have seen people coming forward - people in the community. you have seen people coming forward at - seen people coming forward at different times, been requested to come forward. if there is a reluctance to come forward, what is it about? ~ ., reluctance to come forward, what is it about? ~ . , , , it about? what we must remember is this is early — it about? what we must remember is this is early days _ it about? what we must remember is this is early days for _ it about? what we must remember is this is early days for young _ it about? what we must remember is this is early days for young people. i this is early days for young people. they had not had as much time as
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other cohorts to come forward for the vaccine. last time i read 16% of those under 25 have had the vaccine so far. complacency is running to some extent. it is young people who are less likely to be affected by covid in terms of going into hospital and that is absolutely true. we are seeing a lot of people ending up in hospital in intensive care units especially with the transmissible delta variant. we have talked about long covid before. we are working hard to tackle that. people are entitled to ask questions and be sceptical about something thatis and be sceptical about something that is so new, a vaccine that is so new. we are only seven months into this. one of the big concerns has been about fertility, particularly amongst younger women, who are thinking of having children or want
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to be able to do that. can you dispel some of the myths and give thanks as to how it does or does not affect it? , ., ., affect it? there is nothing to su: est affect it? there is nothing to suggest it — affect it? there is nothing to suggest it does _ affect it? there is nothing to suggest it does affect - affect it? there is nothing to i suggest it does affect fertility. misinformation is out there. a lot of it is across social media. look for reliable sources of information. there is lot information on the public health england website. if you are sceptical, you are not going to go to public health england or a government website because you do not believe them, you do not want to be fed that. what is a credible source of information is independent for those people? i source of information is independent for those people?— source of information is independent for those people? i would ask people to beat to a — for those people? i would ask people to beat to a trusted _ for those people? i would ask people to beat to a trusted health _ for those people? i would ask people to beat to a trusted health care - to beat to a trusted health care professional. as gps we are more than happy to have those conversations. —— to speak. it is finding a trusted person. you are right, the information has been out there for months as to how safe and
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effective the and has been. i am finding more and more —— more and more, it is having the one to one conversations and finding out the reasons. there is no one blanket reason. fertility is a big one. there are so many we have worked hard to tackle. let’s big one. there are so many we have worked hard to tackle.— worked hard to tackle. let's try to tackle some _ worked hard to tackle. let's try to tackle some of _ worked hard to tackle. let's try to tackle some of these _ worked hard to tackle. let's try to tackle some of these head - worked hard to tackle. let's try to tackle some of these head on. if. worked hard to tackle. let's try to | tackle some of these head on. if a young person said to you, we are focusing on young people but it could be anyone. by now, most people have had vaccines and rates have come down a lot. the numbers of people dying has also come down. dna what? i think i will kind of believe it. i am particularly anti. what would you say to that sort of argument? you must have heard it before. , ., , ., before. the big thing would be not to ramble before. the big thing would be not to gamble with _ before. the big thing would be not to gamble with your _ before. the big thing would be not to gamble with your health. - to gamble with your health. regardless of age, we are seeing
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with the delta variant, young, fit and well people are ending up extremely unwell in intensive care units. ., , extremely unwell in intensive care units. . , ., . units. that is the point at which if ou are units. that is the point at which if you are unfortunate _ units. that is the point at which if you are unfortunate enough - units. that is the point at which if you are unfortunate enough to i units. that is the point at which if you are unfortunate enough to be admitted to hospital, your age is not terribly relevant to how sick you have become. is that what you are relating it to? the you have become. is that what you are relating it to?— are relating it to? the biggest risk factor for getting _ are relating it to? the biggest risk factor for getting very _ are relating it to? the biggest risk factor for getting very unwell - are relating it to? the biggest risk factor for getting very unwell with | factor for getting very unwell with covid is age. if you are older you are more likely to be and well and die from it. they are seeing more people ending up in hospital. those in hospital a much younger. the majority of people in hospital at the moment are either unvaccinated or partially vaccinated. i had colleagues in intensive care units, my partner works in intensive care. they are saying many of them have and are saying, i wish i had had the vaccine. there is real data now. the
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vaccine. there is real data now. the vaccine came quite quickly. research has gone on for some time but real—world data showing how safe and effective the vaccine is. and real-world data showing how safe and effective the vaccine is.— effective the vaccine is. and you had individuals _ effective the vaccine is. and you had individuals coming - effective the vaccine is. and you had individuals coming to - effective the vaccine is. and you had individuals coming to you i effective the vaccine is. and you i had individuals coming to you after they become ill and saying, i wish i had. have you had that on the counter? i had. have you had that on the counter? ., , had. have you had that on the counter?— had. have you had that on the counter? . , , .., counter? i have seen patients coming in and their position _ counter? i have seen patients coming in and their position has _ counter? i have seen patients coming in and their position has absolutely i in and their position has absolutely shifted. ., , in and their position has absolutely shifted. . , . ~' in and their position has absolutely shifted. ., , ., ,, ., shifted. really good talking to you. thank ou shifted. really good talking to you. thank you very _ shifted. really good talking to you. thank you very much. _ shifted. really good talking to you. thank you very much. nice - thank you very much. nice to see you in person. thank you. we are going to show you a gorgeous view over north wales in llandudno this morning. victoria is back and taking a look at the impact the pandemic is having on summer tourism. we wanted to take you there tourism. we wanted to take you there to show you something absolutely lovely. now the weather with matt. not a bad start to friday morning,
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is it? the heatwave continues, for some of you today in northern ireland, the met office amber warning for extreme heat last all day long. there are changes at that. take a look at the forecast. over the next few days temperatures are slowly going to ease down a bit quicker across eastern areas and we will see in the north and west. we will see in the north and west. we will see thunderstorms pushing in and they will be mainly in the south. most are having a dry day. low cloud across eastern scotland and eastern counties of england. some of that will break his sunny spells. the old isolated shower later. the temperature could get up to 29, 30 celsius later. the western parts of scotland and northern ireland will probably see the highest temperatures. we will see some thundery rain arriving later. it will be torrential in places this
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evening and overnight spreading to other parts of southern england and south wales. most other parts will stay dry. it will be a warm and muqqy stay dry. it will be a warm and muggy night with temperatures in their teens. tomorrow there will be banned to remain on and off in the south of england and wales but maybe into parts of the midlands and east anglia. that ost will stay dry. here is where the best of the sunshine will be. feeling cooler to the south and is. more of an easterly breeze. the breezes with us again on sunday. thundery rain in the eastern england and all of us will see temperatures drop back to where should be. full details in half—an—hour. thank you. the debate over the safety of e—scooters has been in the headlines once again this week following two incidents involving children. a 16—year—old boy was killed on sunday after his e—scooter collided with a car and a three—year—old girl has been left with life—changing injuries after being hit by one. now some campaigners are calling for them to be
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banned in public places. adam mcclean reports. a scheme to rent e—scooters where people have to be over 18 and hold a provisional or full licence. they can only be bidden in places where people can use bikes including roads and cycle lanes. the government says it will understand the benefit e—scooters can have. i it will understand the benefit e-scooters can have. i do not ride on the pavement. _ e-scooters can have. i do not ride on the pavement. i _ e-scooters can have. i do not ride on the pavement. i appreciate - e-scooters can have. i do not ridej on the pavement. i appreciate the scooters, they are lovely scooters. i do not want to lose the opportunity of having these for the public. opportunity of having these for the ublic. ., ,., , , ., opportunity of having these for the ublic. . ,._ , ., ,.., ., public. the law says and e-scooter is as much — public. the law says and e-scooter is as much a _ public. the law says and e-scooter is as much a motor— public. the law says and e-scooter is as much a motor vehicle - public. the law says and e-scooter is as much a motor vehicle as - public. the law says and e-scooter is as much a motor vehicle as a i public. the law says and e-scooterj is as much a motor vehicle as a car or motorbike, so riding them illegally can attract six points and a £300 fine, but the scooter being seized. , ., , ., . .,
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seized. there is no protection natural to _ seized. there is no protection natural to the _ seized. there is no protection natural to the rider, - seized. there is no protection natural to the rider, they are | natural to the rider, they are completely exposed. if they are involved — completely exposed. if they are involved in a collision with a car, van or a — involved in a collision with a car, van or a bus _ van or a bus or another motor vehicle. — van or a bus or another motor vehicle. it _ van or a bus or another motor vehicle. it is— van or a bus or another motor vehicle, it is likely that the e—scooter rider will come off a lot worse _ e—scooter rider will come off a lot worse than — e—scooter rider will come off a lot worse than the other person in the other— worse than the other person in the other vehicle.— other vehicle. while there are restive those _ other vehicle. while there are restive those who _ other vehicle. while there are restive those who ride - other vehicle. while there are restive those who ride them l restive those who ride them unsafely, like the scooter on a motorway near bradford, pedestrians and other road users are at risk. philjones was on a mobility scooter when he found his route blocked by abandoned scooter. phil when he found his route blocked by abandoned scooter.— when he found his route blocked by abandoned scooter. phil being phil, not off abandoned scooter. phil being phil, got off his mobility _ abandoned scooter. phil being phil, got off his mobility scooter to - abandoned scooter. phil being phil, got off his mobility scooter to move it, the scooter was too heavy, full steam back down on the road and it fell on top of him and broke his hip. the resultant effect was he had to go into hospital and he never came out he died 12 days later. dennis has delivered a petition to number 10, dennis has delivered a petition to number10, calling dennis has delivered a petition to number 10, calling on the government to stop the higher schemes. these are some of the sketches he has
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found abandoned nearby. to are some of the sketches he has found abandoned nearby.- are some of the sketches he has found abandoned nearby. to rub salt into the wound, _ found abandoned nearby. to rub salt into the wound, when _ found abandoned nearby. to rub salt into the wound, when we were - found abandoned nearby. to rub saltj into the wound, when we were doing my brother's funeral arrangements with them as one parked right outside the doorway to get into the funeral directors. i was beside myself. i was so angry, ijust didn't know really. the response from inside me was horrendous, you know? in from inside me was horrendous, you know? ., , ., , know? in a statement the department for transport — know? in a statement the department for transport said _ know? in a statement the department for transport said we _ know? in a statement the department for transport said we continue - for transport said we continue to engage with vulnerable road user groups to help shape rules on top of existing safety features like compulsory haunts and bells and ensuring trial areas have sufficient parking to avoid street clutter. joining us in the studio is tom walker, who has recently been involved in two near—miss incidents with e—scooters. he's campaigning on behalf of visually—impaired people, like himself, to ban all e—scooters for hire in england. and we're also joined by silviya barrett from the campaign for better transport. morning to you both.
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tom, let's start with you. can you clarify, what vision do you have? i am totally blind in my left eye and i had a small amount of vision in part of my right eye. the ophthalmologists would call it useful residual vision. i can see a bit. i can get around that it is not great. to bit. i can get around that it is not areat. ., , ., , , ~ great. to give us a sense. and i sittin: great. to give us a sense. and i sitting as _ great. to give us a sense. and i sitting as close _ great. to give us a sense. and i sitting as close as _ great. to give us a sense. and i sitting as close as we are, - great. to give us a sense. and i sitting as close as we are, what| sitting as close as we are, what are you seeing? i sitting as close as we are, what are you seeing?— sitting as close as we are, what are you seeing? i can see that you have a tie on but — you seeing? i can see that you have a tie on but i _ you seeing? i can see that you have a tie on but i cannot _ you seeing? i can see that you have a tie on but i cannot see _ you seeing? i can see that you have a tie on but i cannot see what - a tie on but i cannot see what colour it is. you have a decent head of hair but i cannot see what colour it is. i can see over in front of me, a couple of metres away is somebody else, and i know that is naga. i think you have a green top.
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it is. how have the e—scooters affected you in everyday life? thea;r affected you in everyday life? they are turning — affected you in everyday life? they are turning some _ affected you in everyday life? they are turning some towns _ affected you in everyday life? iie: are turning some towns and affected you in everyday life? "iie: are turning some towns and cities into a nobel area. are turning some towns and cities into a nobelarea. i are turning some towns and cities into a nobel area. i was coming out of liverpool central train station a couple of days ago and all i felt was a rush of air. i did not fully know what happened. i was in a world of my own, as i often am. it was only a very indignant lady a couple of metres away who explained the full horror of what might have happened. she could see that in unfolding but could not do anything about it because this vehicle was going at 15 miles an hour. it was really going very quickly. the day after i was crossing a road near where i lived and and e—scooter clipped the end of my white pain.
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how he did not come off i do not know that he did not. —— my white pain. i am fortunate, know that he did not. —— my white pain. iam fortunate, i know that he did not. —— my white pain. i am fortunate, i am pretty confident, i have no bother with going out there, i dust myself down and carry on. for lots of blind and partially sighted people and those who have recently lost their sight, you can imagine what happened to me would be completely terrifying. a lot of towns and cities are being turned into no—go areas for visually impaired people. people i come into contact with say it is scary. it is about perception. when you read about perception. when you read about some of the incidents, you can entirely understand why people are really nervous and anxious. d0 entirely understand why people are really nervous and anxious.- really nervous and anxious. do you want to pick _ really nervous and anxious. do you want to pick up on... _ really nervous and anxious. do you want to pick up on... tom - really nervous and anxious. do you want to pick up on... tom has - really nervous and anxious. do you| want to pick up on... tom has given the best possible description of how unnerving, and that is the loosest possible term for it, for someone
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like him and e—scooter is on a pavement. how did we get these forms of transport and pedestrians safe? it is about regulations and provision and safe infrastructure. e-scooters — provision and safe infrastructure. e—scooters provide another way to move _ e—scooters provide another way to move about — e—scooters provide another way to move about in towns and cities. all the way— move about in towns and cities. all the way through the pandemic many more _ the way through the pandemic many more people are using cars on the roads _ more people are using cars on the roads. we are seeing an increase in pollution. e—scooters provide another — pollution. e—scooters provide another way for people to move about in a more _ another way for people to move about in a more green way. different solutions— in a more green way. different solutions suit different people's needs — solutions suit different people's needs. ., , solutions suit different people's needs. . , , . ., needs. that is the principal. what about the practice? _ needs. that is the principal. what about the practice? what - needs. that is the principal. what about the practice? what can we | needs. that is the principal. what l about the practice? what can we do to make sure people like tom are safer from e—scooters? {line safer from e-scooters? one
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distinction, _ safer from e-scooters? one distinction, there _ safer from e-scooters? one distinction, there are - safer from e—scooters? one distinction, there are e—scooters that are — distinction, there are e—scooters that are legal and implemented in close _ that are legal and implemented in close cooperation with local authorities, working with stakeholder groups and young people and their— stakeholder groups and young people and their needs to be a conversation about— and their needs to be a conversation about where they should be used and what the _ about where they should be used and what the requirements are. you said about— what the requirements are. you said about having bells, having sound, and limiting the speed at which they can go _ and limiting the speed at which they can go for— and limiting the speed at which they can go. for private e—scooters, they are completely illegal yet and people — are completely illegal yet and people use them and all sorts of different ways.— people use them and all sorts of different ways. frankie. tom, the fact is without _ different ways. frankie. tom, the fact is without the _ different ways. frankie. tom, the fact is without the trials we - different ways. frankie. tom, the fact is without the trials we do i different ways. frankie. tom, the| fact is without the trials we do not know what problems they are. we need to see the problems in order to fix them, don't we? to to see the problems in order to fix them, don't we?— to see the problems in order to fix them, don't we? to an extent that is true. we them, don't we? to an extent that is true- we could _ them, don't we? to an extent that is true. we could have _ them, don't we? to an extent that is true. we could have anticipated - them, don't we? to an extent that is true. we could have anticipated the i true. we could have anticipated the issues. having vehicles that can travel at 15 miles an hour in pedestrianised areas, it is pretty
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obvious what the problem is going to be. they were certainly alerted to potential issues before the trial started. the other point as well, the technology to operate these things, they are very good at promising to slow them down, to geo— fence fan, restricting where they can ride and so on. only last sunday, i was walking past abc radio merseyside's office and an e—scooter again whizzed past me. they have had all of this stuff and none of it appears to materialise. it is a little bit like being in your own edition of the wacky races, only without the fund.— without the fund. thank you very much for your— without the fund. thank you very much for your time _ without the fund. thank you very much for your time with - without the fund. thank you very much for your time with us - without the fund. thank you very much for your time with us this l much for your time with us this morning stop —— without the fund. it has been said parking infrastructure
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will help to make cities safer, healthier and more sustainable for all. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. this is your news for london and the south east. police in sussex are warning that illegal raves could risk staff being taken away from genuine emergencies. it comes after two large unlicensed parties, including on the sussex downs. it saw thousands gathering last month and prompted a large police response with nearly 100 arrests. hospitals in london say their wards are busier than usual for this time of year as they're treating more children with non—covid related illnesses affecting their breathing. at kings college hospital, staff on the paediatric ward are piloting new working practices to help them handle
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the increasing pressure. they say small changes like positive messages on walls help staff de—stress. if they are feeling stressed, they can get to a point where they are de—stressing, and i think that is an important part of what we do here. and i think the biggest part of that is listening. if you listen, you will hear me. schools in london have been awarded extra funding to keep parts of their sites open for longer as a way to encourage more physical activity. the money has helped to pay for events like this inter—school sports festival in brent. london sport offered grants of £10,000 because of the concern that child obesity rates have increased as a result of less exercise and poorer diets during lockdowns. we found that a lot of young people did come back and they were overweight and just inactive, but we also found a lot of them were nervous about coming back and starting to play sport again, so that is why we are trying to put on as many activities as we can to physically get people moving again. the first major event with full capacity crowds at brands hatch is set
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to take place this weekend. it's been more than a year since the racing circuit in kent has been able to welcome spectators in the numbers it used to. round three of the british superbikes is being held there, which was pushed back from june to allow more people to attend. the father of amy winehouse says he's hoping to release some of the music she recorded before she became famous. it's ten years to the day since the singer—songwriter died, and in 2015, the head of her record label said he'd destroyed all her unreleased material. but mitch winehouse says the family kept recordings from her childhood, and hopes they'll show fans how she developed. weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. after the heat of the last few days, change is on its way. today is set to be cooler. it'll also be cloudier and breezier for most of us, too. starting off on another mild note this morning. lots of blue sky and sunshine around for the first half of the day once more, a bit more cloud that we've been used to, and into the afternoon, sunny spells, and temperatures this time will peak in the mid 20s, so we have lost a good few degrees there. and that easterly wind is set to freshen, particularly towards eastern coastal areas of kent, where we could
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see some gusts later in the day of up to 30 mph. now, through this evening and overnight, it will still feel cloudy and muggy. very mild again, there will be some outbreaks of rain moving northwards and eastwards through the night. in fact, across the weekend, there is a met office weather warning for heavy rain. some of those showers possibly thundery later on in the day on saturday, and on sunday, too, its also set to feel cooler. that's all for now. i'll have more in an hour. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. let's return to our top story — from today, some food industry workers in england will be allowed to avoid self—isolating if they get pinged by the covid—19 app. we'rejoined now by the environment secretary, george eustice.
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good man. could you possible explain for us the first part of these new changes? which are quite significant, to do but i think initially it has a certain number of sites, a certain number of workers. we have identified about 500 key strategically important sites in the food supply chain, about 170 supermarket distribution depots, and then a further 200 plus large manufacturers and a few others besides that as well. what we want to do in those key sites is make sure that where they have absences, where people are pinged or contacted by test and trace, they can continue to work, be tested every day, the provide of the test remains negative, they can carry on working. and we judge that this is important to make sure that our food supply chain continues to function in a normal way-— chain continues to function in a normal way. chain continues to function in a normal wa . ., , ,., normal way. ok, how they were some ofthe normal way. ok, how they were some of the detail- — normal way. ok, how they were some of the detail. so _ normal way. ok, how they were some of the detail. so as _ normal way. ok, how they were some of the detail. so as i _ normal way. ok, how they were some of the detail. so as i understand - of the detail. so as i understand that, from today, as we speak this
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morning, 15 supermarket depots. this measure. is that right? have they been informed, or do they have to ask some form of government? how is that working in practice? we ask some form of government? how is that working in practice?— that working in practice? we have been talking _ that working in practice? we have been talking to _ that working in practice? we have been talking to the _ that working in practice? we have been talking to the supermarkets | been talking to the supermarkets regularly since the end of last week about this. as you say, we have identified 15 depots, currently around five supermarkets where they have the most acute problem with staff absences at the moment, and we intend to rule that out today, and they already have the infrastructure in place to do the testing at those sites. then we will rule it out to a further 150 or so at the beginning of next week. —— roll it out. further 150 or so at the beginning of next week. -- roll it out. when ou see of next week. -- roll it out. when you see 150. _ of next week. -- roll it out. when you see 150. just _ of next week. -- roll it out. when you see 150, just again _ of next week. -- roll it out. when you see 150, just again about - you see 150, just again about the practicalities, say i am the boss of one of these depots, and i expected to contact you, or you have already worked out which are the places? how does this work? we
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worked out which are the places? how does this work?— does this work? we have already got the list of the _ does this work? we have already got the list of the sites that _ does this work? we have already got the list of the sites that we judge - the list of the sites that we judge to be strategically important. and we have done that working with industry, so all of the supermarkets have already provided us with a list of all of those depots, and those will be added to the list, and then what those sites just need to do is just make sure that they source the lateral flow tests, which we will provide to them, and that they put in place the ability to test staff as they arrive for work. ok. in place the ability to test staff as they arrive for work.- as they arrive for work. ok, so a few people _ as they arrive for work. ok, so a few people risen _ as they arrive for work. ok, so a few people risen some - as they arrive for work. ok, so a few people risen some of- few people risen some of the practical and immediate problems. that is to do with the depots themselves, clearly what you know full well and everyone knows is that the food has to get onto the shelves. are you confident thatjust including the depot part of this will solve the problem? because you know there is a problem with people who work in the supermarkets, all of the crucial people who put the product on the shelves, why not include all of that chain rather than just those at the depots? the
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main reason _ than just those at the depots? the main reason is _ than just those at the depots? tie: main reason is that would be significant undertaking, because you are talking then thousands of different shops, and many more people, and we still want to maintain the test isolate system. we know that what we're doing, frustrating and difficult though it is for everyone right across the economy, does serve a function in terms of dampening the spread of the virus. however, we know that the most important thing is to ensure that the main arteries in our food supply chain keep working, the lot is going from depots to get goods to the stores, and the food manufacturers continue to manufacture the goods to get it to the depots. when you get to store level, of course, yes, there will be some difficulties, they will have staff shortages, but it is easier to manage at that level. but we will keep us constantly under review. if i understood you correctly, you have been monitoring the situation for a week or so. why didn't you do it sooner? why didn't have to get to
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the point where people were literally going to their shops and things missing? if you have been monitoring and watching what was going on in a dialogue with the supermarkets, we were told for the past week or so it wasn't going to happen, and then lo and behold it has. why did it take so long to come to what some people say it is quite an obvious conclusion? it to what some people say it is quite an obvious conclusion?— an obvious conclusion? it wasn't clear, to an obvious conclusion? it wasn't clear. to be _ an obvious conclusion? it wasn't clear, to be honest, _ an obvious conclusion? it wasn't clear, to be honest, at- an obvious conclusion? it wasn't clear, to be honest, at the - an obvious conclusion? it wasn't clear, to be honest, at the end | an obvious conclusion? it wasn't. clear, to be honest, at the end of last week, where things would peak and level off in terms of people being asked to isolate. there's an of uncertainty here, and at the end of uncertainty here, and at the end of last week, supermarkets were reporting that although there were certainly pressures, and delivery times for instance were slipping, starting to get a lower fulfilment of deliveries at that point, we judge that was still manageable, the industry were reporting that there were difficulties, but we were to keep it under review. i think what really happened on monday and tuesday as we found there were further absences been reported, so we acted swiftly to put in place the provisions that we need to keep the food supply chain going. we are
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never to take risks with our food supply chain. my understanding from what ou supply chain. my understanding from what you have _ supply chain. my understanding from what you have said _ supply chain. my understanding from what you have said is _ supply chain. my understanding from what you have said is that _ supply chain. my understanding from what you have said is that you - supply chain. my understanding from what you have said is that you will i what you have said is that you will still be watching this closely, you have protected the depot part of this, but if it remains the case that when people go into their shops, they haven't got the stuff, i'm assuming the other parts of this chain, you will review.— chain, you will review. absolutely, we will keep _ chain, you will review. absolutely, we will keep this _ chain, you will review. absolutely, we will keep this under _ chain, you will review. absolutely, we will keep this under review, i chain, you will review. absolutely, | we will keep this under review, but we will keep this under review, but we think this is a sensible first step that we should take quickly, so we have acted quickly and we are rolling it out from today, as i say. we will keep it under review when it comes to others, but for now, we judge that this is the proportionate approach. because we do want to make sure that we continue to run the test and trace and isolate system, because it is vitally important to try to dampen the spread of the virus and remove that peak in hospitalisations we are likely to see in the next few weeks. flan hospitalisations we are likely to see in the next few weeks. can you take us through _ see in the next few weeks. can you take us through what _ see in the next few weeks. can you take us through what is _ see in the next few weeks. can you take us through what is called - see in the next few weeks. can you take us through what is called the l take us through what is called the second part of this scheme? i think
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it starts to get a little more complicated, if not confusing. there are 16 sectors you have identified, we won't go through them all, but it is to do with energy, digital infrastructure, essential transport for example. now, again, how is this going to work in practice? let's pick a sector, let's talk about train drivers, for example. if you're one of those operating companies, what did they have to do? they simply have to fill out a form, very simple, just stating the name of the member of staff, the reason they need to be exempt from isolation, and get in to the department for approval. what we're talking about on the second one is a much narrower of people, we are talking about key roles, such as those working on nuclear power stations who have got specific technical expertise, or in the rail network, for instance, people that you really need to keep these
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systems going, again it will be quite a narrow exemption and others are fields, not as large or significant is the one for the food supply chain. —— in those other fields. supply chain. -- in those other fields. ., , , , fields. you said this will be very simle. fields. you said this will be very simple- some _ fields. you said this will be very simple. some basic— fields. you said this will be very simple. some basic numbers i fields. you said this will be very i simple. some basic numbers here, members of train companies, there are 20,000 workers involved in train companies, which would be essential transport. nuclear power sector, there are 60,000 workers in that. utility and energy sector, some 750,000 workers. just trying to work this out in practice, are you serious in suggesting that these companies have to write in to a department, i'm not sure which department, i'm not sure which department it is, and say, frank jones works in the it department linked to the nuclear power sector. can you give us permission for this one individual to not have to be part of this scheme? is that really what you are suggesting? it is going to be, as i said, a narrow scheme i to be, as i said, a narrow scheme for a small number of people. it is
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important to recognise that every government department manages its relationship with industry, so we know all of the supermarkets in defra, we are talking to them all the time, we understand that role. my the time, we understand that role. my colleagues in the department for business will also know everybody in the energy industry, and they will have a very good working relationship and be able to process that very quickly. it will be a light touch system, but a narrow exemption for those named individuals performing certain key tasks. a . ~ individuals performing certain key tasks. 1, . ,, ., individuals performing certain key tasks. ., , , ., tasks. back to my question, when you sa named tasks. back to my question, when you say named individuals, _ tasks. back to my question, when you say named individuals, it _ tasks. back to my question, when you say named individuals, it is _ say named individuals, it is literally that, is it? it is the name of the person that is sent through, somebody in a government department will look at the individual�*s name, check their credentials, go through that system? and we know it is the middle of august of this whole system ends anyway. if i read a letter today with the name of my employer, who i think should be part of this scheme, so i read the letter today, friday,
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one of your departments get the letter on monday, maybe, how quickly before that'll be turned round? they check the name of the individual against the company records, against thejob against the company records, against the job they against the company records, against thejob they do, against the company records, against the job they do, write a letter back, when is the soonest they would know? ~ ., back, when is the soonest they would know? ~ . ., .., know? what we will have come in individual departments _ know? what we will have come in individual departments will - know? what we will have come in individual departments will make | individual departments will make this work, as they always do... know, can you help me with that a little bit more? that is a very bland answer to quite a practical issue, i am just trying to see how it can possibly work in a useful timeframe. because the problem these places have come and if anyone is getting on trains at the moment or getting on trains at the moment or getting a tube or trying to get a bus, we all know the problems, and then today, tomorrow, next week, if there is a letter system going to a department, we all know us struggling themselves with lack of staff, this is not practical, is it? those government departments agree
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with key businesses, agree with them the job roles that should be included in this, then you willjust have quite an expedited system where if they want somebody to come off isolation, they will simply provide the name, that'll agreed. so we can just have a light—touch simple protocols in place to manage these things. as you say, it will be relatively short term anyway, from that the middle of august we are going to change the approach for everyone, butjust for now, over these next few weeks, we want people to sort of abide with us, frustrating though it is, to still isolate when asked to, because it is quite crucial to make sure that we control that peak in hospitalisations that we are likely to see in the weeks ahead. i’m to see in the weeks ahead. i'm assuming. _ to see in the weeks ahead. i'm assuming, george eustice, that the government retains the right to say, we will look at everything closely end of the trains are running properly, and if there are not people to stack the shelves, you may well change the date. that could
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still be an option. it is well change the date. that could still be an option.— still be an option. it is not our [an at still be an option. it is not our plan at the — still be an option. it is not our plan at the moment, we - still be an option. it is not our plan at the moment, we want| still be an option. it is not our- plan at the moment, we want people still to isolate when asked to. but obviously, all the time, we could be everything under review, so we have acted swiftly to make sure that those critical bits of infrastructure in the food supply chain are not affected, and can continue to operate. we keep everything else under review all of the time, but we are seeking through doing this, not without purpose, we are seeking to smooth the peak in infections so that we can also control the peak in hospitalisations. control the peak in hositalisations. , ., , . hospitalisations. george eustice, environment secretary, - hospitalisations. george eustice, | environment secretary, thank you very much for your time this morning. very much for your time this morning-— very much for your time this morninu. ., ~ ,, , . very much for your time this morninu. ., ~' ,, , . morning. thank you very much. the time is 146-— here is mike with your sports news. a year to the day ago, i was in an empty gym at a distance from max whitlock on the date should have been the opening ceremony for the
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tokyo olympics. a year on, we can talk to them for real on the real opening ceremony of the tokyo olympics. five years ago, max whitlock became the first british gymnast to become an olympic champion. on a magical day in rio, he rewrote the history books, winning two gold medals in one day. and he's going for gold again in tokyo in his third consecutive games. maxjoins me now. morning, max. great to see you. i am thinking back to our day on our own and that's gym in essex. i am wondering how you feel, it is here for real, a day we may be thought would never happen. i know, it feels amazing. anyway, it kind of feels surreal, because it has been delayed, as we all know, delayed a year, but somehow it is here now, it has come fast, these last few preparation stages, and it is exciting, we are getting started, we are here in tokyo at the olympic
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games. it has started today, we compete tomorrow, first day as gymnasts, so can't wait to get going. gymnasts, so can't wait to get iioin_ �* , , gymnasts, so can't wait to get anoin. �* , ., gymnasts, so can't wait to get anoin. m , ., , going. absolutely. i have been heafina going. absolutely. i have been hearin: a going. absolutely. i have been hearing a lot — going. absolutely. i have been hearing a lot about _ going. absolutely. i have been hearing a lot about the - going. absolutely. i have been| hearing a lot about the routine, going. absolutely. i have been - hearing a lot about the routine, how different it is from your previous limits. how does it work in the bubble in terms of going to get food, even? bubble in terms of going to get food. even?— bubble in terms of going to get food, even? ., , ., , ., , , food, even? lots of protocols put in lace, we food, even? lots of protocols put in place. we are _ food, even? lots of protocols put in place, we are testing _ food, even? lots of protocols put in place, we are testing every - food, even? lots of protocols put in place, we are testing every single i place, we are testing every single day, making sure that we keep separate from anybody else. we started off as training camp, we did ten days there in a bubble, then flew straight to tokyo. we did five daysin flew straight to tokyo. we did five days in a team gb holding camp, then we went on the village, which is where we are now, obviously. everything put in place to make it as safe as possible for the athletes, for everyone surrounding it, for the japanese public to make sure that these games are going ahead successfully as possible in every single way. it is exciting to
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be here, we have to still be careful, the huge priority to make sure we stay safe because we want to get through these games safely first and foremost, but we can't wait for it to get going, and it is a surreal feeling, but illegal exciting one. i have to ask about the cardboard beds. in practical terms, anybody who fidgets at night, are you worried that they mightjust collapse? —— a surreal feeling but a really exciting one. they seem pretty study- _ really exciting one. they seem pretty study- it _ really exciting one. they seem pretty study. it is _ really exciting one. they seem pretty study. it is a _ really exciting one. they seem pretty study. it is a bit - really exciting one. they seem | pretty study. it is a bit different from what we are used to, but it is what it is, when you get into the elliptic village, things are different. you have to make sure with what you have got. it is an amazing ability, we are very lucky to have what we do. we are all in an apartment block together, the gymnasts, which is incredible. the atmosphere massively takes over, we go back to the room and recover, ready for the next training sessions ahead. but a few changes in the spillage that are slightly different but we have had to adapt to, but it is really good to be here, of
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course. i is really good to be here, of course. , ., ~ ., i. course. i remember talking to you durin: the course. i remember talking to you during the lockdown is, _ course. i remember talking to you during the lockdown is, one - during the lockdown is, one of the things that came out in positive terms was the amount of time you could spend with your daughter, and i know she watches you and she copies you now, she has started her own gymnastics. how difficult has it been keeping in contact, as you go through your training now? fihlr; been keeping in contact, as you go through your training now? only time eve da , through your training now? only time every day. i — through your training now? only time every day. i am _ through your training now? only time every day, i am amiss _ through your training now? only time every day, i am amiss and _ through your training now? only time every day, i am amiss and home - through your training now? only time every day, i am amiss and home so l every day, i am amiss and home so much already. five weeks is a long time, and especially when our country is going to do what we have been through world as well, but we know how long we have been stuck at home for, so going away and i was actually a bit more difficult than it used to be, and even more difficult now that we have got the little one. so missing them loads, but she is loving life, she is keeping busy, going to the gym which is amazing, i am getting photos and videos coming through. i am trying to keep up as much as i can, because we are eight hours in
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front here, so trying to face time as much as possible. she front here, so trying to face time as much as possible.— as much as possible. she is pretty talented, following _ as much as possible. she is pretty talented, following in _ as much as possible. she is pretty talented, following in dad's - talented, following in dad's footsteps. talented, following in dad's footsteps-— talented, following in dad's footstes. ., ., , . footsteps. that would be critical. she likes gymnastics _ footsteps. that would be critical. she likes gymnastics at - footsteps. that would be critical. she likes gymnastics at the - footsteps. that would be critical. - she likes gymnastics at the moment, so fingers crossed she continues to. this must seem quite strange, because when you started, you are one of the youngest gymnasts on the team, now you are the oldest, still only 28, but in terms of gymnastics you are the oldest. a bit of history, those two gold medals in a day, does this make the responsibility and the pressure easier to deal with because you've already got that, or doesn't make it harder, almost as the of the team? it is harder, i look back at the stages of my career, it is a very strange dynamics, a very different one, like you say, from being one of the youngest all the way through to now being the oldest one in the tomb by a few years. incredible to have that experience and have the
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previous experience of what i have managed to, the places i've been to only stuff i have done, which was incredible, that does help. but it is ten times easier chasing, which is ten times easier chasing, which is what i have realised. the pressure ramps up every single year, and the expectancy ramps up all the time with results that we bring back, which is amazing. there's no doubt there is positives, but there are definitely challenges to that, and i thrive on a challenge, i have got big targets and big games, and we all have a sit in, we are a very strong team coming out here, so hopefully we can hit our targets and make sure we keep our nerves at bay. what might take the pressure of these olympics in a way is that you are already talking about paris, fingers crossed.— are already talking about paris, fingers crossed. three years this time, it fingers crossed. three years this time. it helps — fingers crossed. three years this time, it helps me _ fingers crossed. three years this time, it helps me out _ fingers crossed. three years this time, it helps me out a - fingers crossed. three years this time, it helps me out a lot, - fingers crossed. three years this time, it helps me out a lot, a i time, it helps me out a lot, a shorter cycle. obviously i am massively proud to be here in tokyo,
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an honour to be here do my third olympic games, it feels incredible. i would love to make it four, and who knows what i can go on from there? i love the sport, i love what i do, ifeel very lucky to be a gymnast. as long as i can keep pushing that level, i still feel like i have got more in the tank, and i will keep going.— like i have got more in the tank, and i will keep going. max, thank ou so and i will keep going. max, thank you so much _ and i will keep going. max, thank you so much for— and i will keep going. max, thank you so much forjoining _ and i will keep going. max, thank you so much forjoining us - and i will keep going. max, thank you so much forjoining us for i and i will keep going. max, thank| you so much forjoining us for real this time, a year on from being in that gym on our own. good luck, and by this time tomorrow, the first qualifying rounds will have been held, ithink it qualifying rounds will have been held, i think it is two o'clock in the morning our time that it starts. it's going to be brilliant. mike, thank you so much. now the weather with matt. big changes ahead, this morning northern ireland still have the met office and the one in four extreme heat throughout today. if we take a look at the forecast, changes ahead,
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things are set to turn cool across the country over the next few days. that might be music to the ears of some who have not enjoyed the heat and humidity, but it will be a gradual process. a few thunderstorms, more especially across the south. out there today, a bit breezy across some southern areas as the changes starts to occur. some plants towards eastern scotland and eastern england, taking about a shift and break and always queue towards the eastern coast. elsewhere, temperatures into the upper 20s made even 30, and if that happens it will be the seventh consecutive day we have seen somewhere get above 30. possibly somewhere get above 30. possibly some thunderstorms later, but the real force for the thunderstorms will be to what the south—west, a thoroughly wet night to come for some down here, then enter south wales and other southern counties of england. a gusty breeze to go with it, but again, quite a one night across the country. into tomorrow,
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thunderstorms coming and going across the southern counties of england and south wales, some dry and bright moments, too. lots of close to easton ellis, best of the central west of scotland, northern ireland, northwestern would, temperatures into the mid 20s but feeling cooler for all as we temperatures into the mid 20s but feeling coolerfor all as we head towards sunday. that is how it is looking. matt, thanks so much, we will speak to you later. over the next few weeks, bbc one and bbc two will broadcast more than 350 hours of live action from tokyo. our very own dan walker and olympic gold medallist sam quek will be at the heart of that coverage. theyjoin us now with a look at the studio in salford where they'll be based. what do you think? we are not quite
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sure what to call it. i what do you think? we are not quite sure what to call it.— sure what to call it. i caught the runwa , sure what to call it. i caught the runway. and _ sure what to call it. i caught the runway, and dan _ sure what to call it. i caught the runway, and dan has _ sure what to call it. i caught the runway, and dan has been i runway, and dan has been practising his cat— runway, and dan has been practising his cat walk— runway, and dan has been practising his cat walk down the runway. we will save his cat walk down the runway. will save that his cat walk down the runway. - will save that for later. other people are calling it a rooftop pagoda. that is not that much we can show you just now. we have an area of the main deck where claire and alex will be presenting the opening ceremony from on bbc one at 11.20. downstairs, we have a koi pond, so we are _ downstairs, we have a koi pond, so we are very— downstairs, we have a koi pond, so we are very spoiled, and a good job we're _ we are very spoiled, and a good job we're not _ we are very spoiled, and a good job we're not scared of heights. we we are very spoiled, and a good 'ob we're not scared of heights. we will t to we're not scared of heights. we will try to show — we're not scared of heights. we will try to show you _ we're not scared of heights. we will try to show you around _ we're not scared of heights. we will try to show you around over - we're not scared of heights. we will try to show you around over the i try to show you around over the course of olympic breakfast. and you can enjoy your couple of off. can en'oy your couple of off. we will can enjoy your couple of off. we will still be _ can enjoy your couple of off. we will still be here to live in the odd news bulletin, but the sport will take precedence and clarity. looks great, thanks very much. we will speak to you later. lots on the olympic games opening ceremony coming up. and if we can go
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back to dan and sam, give us a little build—up, you know all about the excitement of the olympic games, sam, you will know that this year not be had for the competitors to a degree to have the same enthusiasm with all the things that are going on and focus on their sport. definitely, it is an olympics like no other. — definitely, it is an olympics like no other, but having spoken to some of the _ no other, but having spoken to some of the athletes and the feeling around the village, they are just treating it— around the village, they are just treating it like an absolutely normal _ treating it like an absolutely normal olympic games. no spectators, but they— normal olympic games. no spectators, but they are not changing anything. and we're quite glad you came back, because. _ and we're quite glad you came back, because, damn, you have had a few clock— because, damn, you have had a few clock issues — because, damn, you have had a few clock issues on bbc breakfast, and you want— clock issues on bbc breakfast, and you want to show that. of course, we have a clock- — you want to show that. of course, we have a clock. look _ you want to show that. of course, we have a clock. look at _ you want to show that. of course, we have a clock. look at that, _ you want to show that. of course, we have a clock. look at that, that i you want to show that. of course, we have a clock. look at that, that is i have a clock. look at that, that is what it will— have a clock. look at that, that is what it will look _ have a clock. look at that, that is what it will look like, _ have a clock. look at that, that is what it will look like, uk - have a clock. look at that, that is what it will look like, uk time i what it will look like, uk time and took your time as well. this
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what it will look like, uk time and took your time as well.— took your time as well. this will confuse someone. _ took your time as well. this will confuse someone. can - took your time as well. this will confuse someone. can you i took your time as well. this will l confuse someone. can you direct took your time as well. this will i confuse someone. can you direct to bring that back?— confuse someone. can you direct to bring that back? yes. we now have three clocks- _ bring that back? iezs we now have three clocks. how long will bring that back? is; we now have three clocks. how long will you guys be on air? sam, you prepare for all of dan's demands? i be on air? sam, you prepare for all of dan's demands?— of dan's demands? i have told her how demanding _ of dan's demands? i have told her how demanding i _ of dan's demands? i have told her how demanding i am, _ of dan's demands? i have told her how demanding i am, she - of dan's demands? i have told her how demanding i am, she is i of dan's demands? i have told her how demanding i am, she is well. how demanding i am, she is well aware. we start at 5.00, a bit earlier than normal breakfast, the big drug there. we are on and talk 9.00, then his 11 will bring you so much of the day's sport. tomorrow, we have a bit of the gymnastics tomorrow we will bring you some archery, day one for helen glover, you might have seen the documentary on bbc iplayer at the moment about herjourney of the last on bbc iplayer at the moment about her journey of the last five years. she has had three kids and is now backin she has had three kids and is now back in the boat and going with police swann for another gold medal. the big one tomorrow is the main's
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road race, familiar names going into that the likes of tailgate heart and geraint thomas. we will be here early on. geraint thomas. we will be here earl on. y , geraint thomas. we will be here earl on. g , . , early on. my body clock is adjusting. _ early on. my body clock is adjusting, yours - early on. my body clock is adjusting, yours is - early on. my body clock is adjusting, yours is kind i early on. my body clock is adjusting, yours is kind of early on. my body clock is i adjusting, yours is kind of used early on. my body clock is - adjusting, yours is kind of used to it. adjusting, yours is kind of used to it plenty— adjusting, yours is kind of used to it plenty to — adjusting, yours is kind of used to it. plenty to watch, you can flip around — it. plenty to watch, you can flip around from the iplayer to the red button _ around from the iplayer to the red button to — around from the iplayer to the red button to be busy one. find button to be busy one. and sam, ou're button to be busy one. and sam, you're joining _ button to be busy one. and sam, you're joining us _ button to be busy one. and sam, you're joining us on _ button to be busy one. and sam, you're joining us on the - button to be busy one. and sam, you're joining us on the sofa i you're joining us on the sofa shortly? you're joining us on the sofa shortl ? ,, , , ., ., , ., shortly? she is. only gold medals on the sofa, shortly? she is. only gold medals on the sofa. so i — shortly? she is. only gold medals on the sofa, so i will stay _ shortly? she is. only gold medals on the sofa, so i will stay here. - the sofa, so i will stay here. you said gold medal winner. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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our headlines today... thousands of workers in the food supply chain are told they won't need to isolate if they're "pinged" by the nhs covid app. after months of uncertainty and last minute controversy, the opening ceremony of the tokyo olympics takes place later today. for the first time, all family and friends of the athletes, can only watch the olympic games from home. and this is how it's done in ripon, at the home of diverjack law's family. we'll see how they're getting the olympic party started within the next hour. the search for sarm heslop. the parents of a missing british woman last seen on a yacht in the carribean urge her boyfriend to contact police. it's friday, the 23rd ofjuly. from today, thousands of workers in the food supply chain in england could avoid self—isolation when they are �*pinged' by the nhs covid app. staff at key sites will instead take daily tests
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so they can continue working, in an effort to keep supermarket shelves stocked. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. empty supermarket shelves. pictures like these revive memories of panic buying and shortages seen at the start of the pandemic and prompted the government to take action. the food industry, like other parts of the economy, has been suffering from a lack of staff because too many workers are isolating at home. here's the problem. if you are contacted by test and trace or pinged by the app, you're meant to self—isolate for ten days. but as infection rates rise, too many people are absent from work. so starting today, the government says it will allow workers at some 500 key sites to avoid isolation if they get pinged, provided they take covid tests for seven days. we're talking principally here, supermarket depots, distribution centres, where all of the work happens to get food out to those supermarkets. it doesn't include stores itself, because that would be a big departure from the approach we have now but certainly this
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is going to go a very long way to getting the food supply chain working properly. the response from food retailers so far has been positive but others within the sector say there are still many questions to answer. any intervention is welcome. i think we are all feeling in the food industry in particular something needed to happen, something needed to change. so any change, any improvement is welcome. we've got to see the devil in the detail here. it's been highlighted only certain companies are on the list. who's on the list? who's been identified there? what are the key workers they're talking about? what are the roles? what is the process? i hope government has put sufficient communication in place to be able to cope with the number of enquiries they get. the new programme only applies to the food business. the government is also offering limited exemptions to the isolation rules in other sectors, such as energy, the nuclear industry, medicines and water supply. but these will only be
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available for a small number of specific employees, whose absence from work would have a major impact on essential services or national security. theo leggett, bbc news. let's talk more about this with our political correspondent, jonathan blake. morning, jonathan. a lot of people will be looking for clarity, more clarity on how it will work in practice, especially given the timelines. the work in practice, especially given the timelines.— the timelines. the industry is desperate — the timelines. the industry is desperate for _ the timelines. the industry is desperate for detail. - the timelines. the industry is desperate for detail. as i the timelines. the industry is desperate for detail. as you i the timelines. the industry is i desperate for detail. as you had from george eustice in the last hour, their 150 sites initially identified to take part in the exemption for isolation for workers will begin today. then there will be 350 more at the beginning of next week. a total of 10,000 staff involved in this programme. it seems the sites are identified but it is
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not going to solve all the problems. the environment secretary was clear that there will still be some staff shortages, some difficulties in the feed industry even after these exemptions were put in place. he hinted that the action could be taken. here is what he said when askedif taken. here is what he said when asked if things would get worse. we will keep this under review but we think_ will keep this under review but we think it _ will keep this under review but we think it is — will keep this under review but we think it is a — will keep this under review but we think it is a sensible first step. we have acted quickly and are rolling — we have acted quickly and are rolling it — we have acted quickly and are rolling it out from today. we will keeping — rolling it out from today. we will keeping under review when it comes to others _ keeping under review when it comes to others. for now, we judge this is the proportionate approach. we want to make _ the proportionate approach. we want to make sure we continue to run the test trace _ to make sure we continue to run the test trace and isolate system because _ test trace and isolate system because it is vitally important to try to _ because it is vitally important to try to dampen the spread of the virus _ try to dampen the spread of the virus and — try to dampen the spread of the virus and remove the peak in hospitalisations we are likely to see in the — hospitalisations we are likely to see in the next few weeks. there is another scheme _ see in the next few weeks. there is another scheme the _ see in the next few weeks. there is another scheme the government is| another scheme the government is putting into place. in critical industries, sectors of the economy
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including defence, energy, water treatment works and days will be very specific exemptions for named individuals, who are fully vaccinated. it is a high bar. 50 individuals, who are fully vaccinated. it is a high bar. so far the government not bound to pressure to bring forward the date to the 16th of august when all adults who are fully vaccinated will be exempt from isolation. some critical workers in scotland can also avoid self—isolation if they've been alerted as a covid contact. under a new scheme announced by the scottish government, people working in a range of sectors — including health and social care — can continue working if they meet certain criteria. further details are expected later. the 2020 tokyo olympic games will officially start today — a year later than expected. more than 11,000 athletes from 207 countries will compete over the next few weeks, but spectators have been banned from almost all events, as japan deals with its highest surge in coronavirus infections for six months. our sports correspondent
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natalie pirks is in tokyo. natalie, the games will be different this year? i cannot help it, i am still excited about it. ~ ., , i cannot help it, i am still excited about it. ~ ., i cannot help it, i am still excited aboutit. ~ ., ., about it. me as well. i cannot wait the sort about it. me as well. i cannot wait the sport to _ about it. me as well. i cannot wait the sport to really _ about it. me as well. i cannot wait the sport to really get _ about it. me as well. i cannot wait the sport to really get under - about it. me as well. i cannot wait the sport to really get under way i the sport to really get under way and for all the athletes to join the party. what we are going to see in the opening ceremony in the next four as time but quite different from what japan four as time but quite different from whatjapan had previously planned, back in 2013 when they run the right to host the games was that the right to host the games was that the nation was overjoyed. a lot has changed since then. we have seen apathy from the japanese public. 19 more today from people associated with the games. three of them athletes by one in the village itself. it brings the number of people infected to more than 100 who are accredited for the games. we will see similarities with the opening ceremony. he still had the parade of nations. for the first
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time, countries had been an attitude two flag—bearers. we are told only around 30 of team gb will be in the stadium tonight. also the lighting of the cauldron. this time it has been lit with hydrogen in a bid to make the games carbon neutral. it will still see the lights, the dancing you would expect. when the sport gets under way, sam has started already but when everybody joins the party tomorrow, you will see more sport than ever before. neverforget see more sport than ever before. never forget the see more sport than ever before. neverforget the ability see more sport than ever before. never forget the ability of the games to uplift people. that never forget the ability of the games to uplift people. that is what we need right _ games to uplift people. that is what we need right now. _ games to uplift people. that is what we need right now. we will- games to uplift people. that is what we need right now. we will be - we need right now. we will be talking no doubt over the next couple of weeks. you can watch live coverage of the opening ceremony on this channel from 20 past 11 this morning.
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we will be talking to a number of olympians. we spoke to max whitlock and sam will bejoining us later on the sofa. here is an olympic performer right now. he is limbering up. what was that? i have no idea what that was. i had no idea either. that was the i have not had much sleep needs. 32 degrees in tokyo. they were not that far behind it in the uk yesterday. it is the third time this week northern ireland has broken its temperature record, 32 degrees in armagh. that record has stood since 1794. armagh. that record has stood since 179a. quite an extent of temperature records in ma. we are going to see the heatwave continuing in northern
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ireland at least. there are changes ahead as the headline suggests. it will be music to the ears of some of you. things will cool down. it will not be as hot. next week much more british like weather to come. a few thunderstorms over the next few days. we have high pressure in charge, bringing about the change the area of low pressure to the west of us. there will be a southern breeze helping to stop rising temperatures as he has seen over recent days. it is bringing in low cloud. temperatures in the high teens on the coastal strip. in north—west england and wales could see temperatures low 30s in some spots. if you get above 30 degrees for the seventh consecutive day that has happened here in the uk. the heaviest of rain would be towards
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the south—west corner. most other parts will be dry. any downtime showers will fade away. another warm and humid start tomorrow. —— daytime showers. if you are in southern counties of england and south wales, the threat of thunderstorms throughout the day. some will see more rain than others. the udc then the showers could be torrential. the warmth continues but not as hot as it has been. temperatures still enter mid 20s in northern ireland. with more of a northerly breeze developing, temperatures will drop down further. thunderstorms most likely in the instant part of england, particularly east anglia and the south east. staying dry in much of scotland and northern ireland. getting closer to where they should be for the time of all of us will see temperatures drop further as we go into the next few days. if this guy is looking a bit
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hazy this morning, it could be because we had the presence of some north american wildfire smoke in the upper atmosphere, transferring its way across the atlantic stop what does that? all the wildfires we have seenin does that? all the wildfires we have seen in north america have made the moon and sun look that little bit slightly more yellow and orange in colour this morning. ok. thank you for that. colour this morning. ok. thank you forthat. he colour this morning. ok. thank you for that. he is always adding something, isn't he? the family of a british woman who went missing from her boyfriend's yacht in the caribbean, have appealed for him to help police piece together what happened on the night she disappeared. sarm heslop was last seen in march leaving a restaurant in the us virgin islands. her parents have been speaking exclusively to breakfast�*s graham satchell. sarm heslop has been missing since the beginning of march.
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she was last seen leaving a restaurant in the us virgin islands with her boyfriend, ryan bane. the mystery surrounding her disappearance, the lack of information, has left her parents devastated. you would be doing something and you would suddenly feel guilty because you haven't thought about her. then when you think about her, tears just come. i can't help it. i wake up every morning and it's the same nightmare. it'sjust horrible. i feel guilty because i can go to sleep. i don't go to bed till late because ijust can't get to sleep. then when i do to sleep and wake up in the morning, i feel guilty i've slept, i feel guilty when i smile, when i laugh. ijust feel awful — ijust feel...
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my heart's broken. sarm was working on ryan bane's yacht, seen here in the days after she disappeared just offshore. at 2:30am on march the 8th, mr bane rang the police to say sarm was missing. they told him to contact the coastguard to start a search. ryan bane didn't call the coastguard until 11:46am the next day, almost ten hours later. we can't understand why it took him so long, there's such a time—lapse. he is saying that it was two o'clock when he realised she was missing but, you know, nobody had seen her since she left the restaurant. there could have been something happen in those hours so it would have been a longer period before he phoned the coastguard. sarm was 41 when she went missing. she'd worked as a flight attendant, travelled the world. she loved life, she was confident,
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loving, respectful. she liked to see places, she liked to experience different cultures, meet different people. she'd met so many people when she was away. she befriended to many people all over the places that she went all over the world. popular? very popular, very loving, fun loving. always made you laugh. yes. brenda and peter have been helped in the last few months by sarm's friends. it's the first time they'd been able to meet in person since she disappeared. family and friends had the same questions, why did mr bane refuse permission for the police to search his boat? why has he now left the area? the virgin islands police
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department told us... ryan bane has a previous conviction for assaulting his ex—wife in 2011. officially this is still a missing persons enquiry. police say mr bane is a person of interest but not a suspect. the day after sarm went missing, the us coast guard wrote this report obtained by the times. it describes ryan bane as heavily intoxicated and agitated and says mr bane physically placed himself at the entrance door of the vessel's main space, impeding the boarding team from completing an initial safety sweep of the vessel. mr bane's lawyer told that his client met with the us coast guard, answered all questions posed to him and gave them unfettered access to the vessel, as well as to sarm's personal belongings, including her phone and ipad. any reports to the contrary are categorically false. mr bane had nothing to do with sarm's disappearance, and remains heartbroken that she is missing. sarm's parents haven't spoken publicly since their daughter went missing. this is the first interview.
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and they have a clear message for ryan bane. any person, surely, any person would do everything they could to help find somebody that he was supposed to love. what sort of human being wouldn't be there to help? that's what i think he should do, he should just come forward. and cooperate. i would like bane to come forward and talk to the police, for a start. i would like a full forensic search of the ship, a full—on one, which i hope and hope they don't find anything. if they do, thatjustice be done, if there needs to be. that's what i want. i've got no peace, i'll never had any real peace ever for the rest of my life, i don't suppose. i don't know whether it would help or not, to be quite honest, but i'd still like to see it done, as hard as it may be, i'd like to see it done. i have hope — i still have hope.
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i'll always think that she will be back through the door, always. i'll never give up on her, i'll never give up. it is now almost five months since sarm went missing. her parents say they want, need and are demanding answers. graham satchell, bbc news. many thanks to the parents will talking to as. —— for talking to us. a spokesman from the foreign office said it "remains in contact with the authorities" on the us virgin islands and that "the uk police are supporting the investigation". the decision about whether to go on holiday has become complicated. this mightjust be one place he would be considering. a beautiful view, llandudno peer. it is the longest
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peerin llandudno peer. it is the longest peer in wales. somewhere down there is victoria, who is taking a look around changes to rules have changed summer tourism. you are enjoying a beautiful day. i am. i do not know if— enjoying a beautiful day. i am. i do not know if you _ enjoying a beautiful day. i am. i do not know if you can _ enjoying a beautiful day. i am. i do not know if you can see _ enjoying a beautiful day. i am. i do not know if you can see me. - enjoying a beautiful day. i am. i do not know if you can see me. 700 l not know if you can see me. 700 metres long, the longest pier in wales will stop this entire result was built in the latter half of the 19th century amid the two amazing limestone crags stop looks absolutely fantastic. loads of victorian architecture. no wonder it is a real hotspot for tourism. we are expecting a real boost. new figures compiled for the bbc and bbc breakfast show we will get a boost of £9 billion this summer alone as a
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result of domestic tourism. places like this are going to benefit stop 62% of us are going to take summer holidays in the uk rather than going abroad. that compares to 40% that would ordinarily do so pre—pandemic days. all of this means you will get extra money for the economy. something like £30 billion will flow into the economy and 3 billion will come straight here to north wales and probably into, one would hope, into some of your arms. you are the general manager of the pier. thank you forjoining us. how busy do you expect it to be? exceptionally busy. we had an exceptionally _ expect it to be? exceptionally busy. we had an exceptionally busy - we had an exceptionally busyjune and july— we had an exceptionally busyjune and july has carried on in trend. with— and july has carried on in trend. with the — and july has carried on in trend. with the amazing weather, it is as good _ with the amazing weather, it is as good as— with the amazing weather, it is as good as it — with the amazing weather, it is as good as it gets, really. gur with the amazing weather, it is as good as it gets, really. our people behavin: good as it gets, really. our people behaving themselves? _ good as it gets, really. our people behaving themselves? the - good as it gets, really. our people behaving themselves? the rules i good as it gets, really. our people i behaving themselves? the rules are different between england and wales
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and some people are getting confused. and some people are getting confused-— and some people are getting confused. , ., confused. some people are getting confused. some people are getting confused- it _ confused. some people are getting confused. it is _ confused. some people are getting confused. it is a _ confused. some people are getting confused. it is a minority _ confused. some people are getting confused. it is a minority and - confused. some people are getting confused. it is a minority and that l confused. it is a minority and that is not _ confused. it is a minority and that is not how— confused. it is a minority and that is not how by the very hot weather. people are — is not how by the very hot weather. people are grumpy sometimes. how are you coping with the extra flow? staffing levels are not as high as they should be for other reasons. everyone — they should be for other reasons. everyone is— they should be for other reasons. everyone is working exceptionally hard and — everyone is working exceptionally hard and exceptionally long hours, understanding what is required of them. .. ., ,, understanding what is required of them. .«r ., understanding what is required of them. ., them. speaking of staffing restrictions, _ them. speaking of staffing restrictions, if— them. speaking of staffing restrictions, if you - them. speaking of staffing restrictions, if you can - them. speaking of staffing | restrictions, if you can best them. speaking of staffing - restrictions, if you can best way, we had joseph mount, director of lions holiday parts. have you been struggling with the pingdemic? we have had ten days where there seems to be a lot of the pandemic, —— the pingdemic, a lot of staff, struggling with people on different shifts where they have been notified they had been in contact with
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individuals and it has been an absolute nightmare taking a lot of stuff out of work at the moment. aha, stuff out of work at the moment. a lot of people have been upset. prices have gone up everywhere. not just wales but formal, devon, all the top holiday spots. added that prices up? the top holiday spots. added that rices u - ? ., the top holiday spots. added that rices u? ., ., , , the top holiday spots. added that --ricesu? ., ., ., prices up? no, only by small increases — prices up? no, only by small increases we _ prices up? no, only by small increases we are _ prices up? no, only by small increases we are taking - prices up? no, only by small increases we are taking on . prices up? no, only by small- increases we are taking on board. we have seen a lot of competitors putting prices up to ridiculous levels. ~ ., ., ., ., �* levels. we have not done that'll. lots of people still _ levels. we have not done that'll. lots of people still very - levels. we have not done that'll. lots of people still very much . lots of people still very much enjoying the traditional summer season down by the beach. i am one of them. it has been really nice this morning to hearfrom some of you guys, some viewers over social media. you have all been in touch having a special this place has been for you. having a special this place has been foryou. behind me is having a special this place has been for you. behind me is where matt taylor's nan was born. a nice bbc breakfast connection as well. i love the fact that you know that? did
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matt message you and tell you? that is so lovely stop we are blessed with some rather amazing imagery. we have whisked you off to japan. there is you will know by now is today is the opening ceremony of the delayed olympics that that is the venue. it is simply the olympic stadium. you are seeing glorious views across tokyo and the olympic rings. let me tell you something about the stadium will stop it was used as the main stadium in the 1964 olympic games. an old stadium with a face—lift, shall we say, bathing in the
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sunshine. our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes has been looking at how the city has been preparing. finding olympic fans in tokyo these days isn't so easy, but on this rooftop at least, it's a different story. skateboarding is in the olympics for the first time in the hope of attracting young new fans. and it seems to be working. it will be cool to watch great skateboarders at the olympics. i love snowboarding, so skateboarding is good practice for me and it's fun. at one time, everyone here was an olympic fan. on the day tokyo won the bid back in 2013, people were delirious with joy. today, the atmosphere couldn't be more different. the stadium where the opening ceremony will happen is surrounded by high fences, spectators kept far away. first, there was the enormous cost of the main stadium. then there were problems
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with the olympic logo. then there were allegations of corruption. and then covid hit and the whole games had to be moved by a year. and then this year, japan's olympic chief had to step down over a sexism row. then the composer of music for the opening ceremony was forced out because of bullying allegations. and finally, one day before the games were due to open, the director of the whole opening ceremony has been fired because it turns out he made jokes about the holocaust. it's no wonder some people here think these games are cursed. newsreel: the world's biggest city, more than ten million population - and still growing, tokyo... it was all so different the last time tokyo held the games back in 1964. author robert whiting had arrived injapan two years earlier. it's too bad. one of the really nice things about the '64 olympics was for two weeks, or two and a half weeks, the city was just filled with tourists and athletes mingling with each other. the nice thing about
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the olympics is that they're a global festival — it really was this festival atmosphere. i was quite nice. and, you know, now it's like the city is like a ghost town. not quite a ghost town. tokyo is supposed to be under a state of emergency, but you wouldn't know it from the famous nightlife districts of shinjuku. like many others, the owner of this restaurant is now refusing to close early or stop serving alcohol. he says he lost a quarter of a million dollars during the last shutdown. translation: i am struggling. i've had friends who have had to close their restaurants. i was short of cash and had a problem paying bills. that's why i decided to reopen. the government is not helping us, so i have to protect my own living. there are certainly those who are looking forward to tonight's opening ceremony. many of them are already lining up to take photos close to the main stadium. but overall, the mood in tokyo
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is more weary acceptance than eager anticipation. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news in tokyo. d want to go through the list of olympic legends we may have? one, for example, from the legends that are the olympic rowers over the years for team gb. matthew pinsent. we will be speaking to him injust years for team gb. matthew pinsent. we will be speaking to him in just a minute. imagine the games he has been and his experiences. if you want to get a vibe, there is your man. was it four olympic games? i think it was at least four. the details in a moment as an multi gold winning olympic medallist. i will raise you, though, linford christie. still holds the 100 metre record for
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great britain. still holds it. him as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. this is your news for london and the south east. police in sussex are warning that illegal raves could risk staff being taken away from genuine emergencies. it comes after two large unlicensed parties, including on the sussex downs. it saw thousands gathering last month and prompted a large police response with nearly 100 arrests. officers say these sorts of events put lives at risk and cannot be tolerated. hospitals in london say their wards are busier than usual for this time of year as they're treating more children with non—covid related illnesses affecting their breathing. at kings college hospital, staff on the paediatric ward are piloting new working practices to help them handle the increasing pressure. they say small changes like positive messages on walls help staff de—stress.
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if they are feeling stressed, they can get to a point where they are de—stressing, and i think that is an important element of what we do here. and i think the biggest part of that is listening. if you listen, you will hear me. schools in london have been awarded extra funding to keep parts of their sites open for longer as a way to encourage more physical activity. the money has helped to pay for events like this inter—school sports festival in brent. london sport offered grants of £10,000 because of the concern that child obesity rates have increased as a result of less exercise and poorer diets during lockdowns. we found that a lot of young people did come back and they were overweight and just inactive, but we also found a lot of them were nervous about coming back and starting to play sport again, so that is why we are trying to put on as many activities as we can to physically get people moving again. the father of amy winehouse says he's hoping to release some of the music she recorded before she became famous. it's ten years to the day
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since the singer—songwriter died, and in 2015, the head of her record label said he'd destroyed all her unreleased material. but mitch winehouse says the family kept recordings from her childhood, and hopes they'll show fans how she developed. weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. after the heat of the last few days, change is on its way. today is set to be cooler. it'll also be cloudier and breezier for most of us, too. starting off on another mild note this morning. lots of blue sky and sunshine around for the first half of the day once more, a bit more cloud that we've been used to, and into the afternoon, sunny spells, and temperatures this time will peak in the mid 20s, so we have lost a good few degrees there. and that easterly wind is set to freshen, particularly towards eastern coastal areas of kent, where we could see some gusts later in the day of up to 30 mph. now, through this evening and overnight, it will still feel cloudy and muggy. very mild again, there will be some outbreaks of rain moving northwards and eastwards through the night.
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in fact, across the weekend, there is a met office weather warning for heavy rain. some of those showers possibly thundery later on in the day on saturday, and on sunday, too, it's also set to feel cooler. that's all for now. i'll have more in half an hour. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's on today's programme with gethin and kym. coming up on morning live — with just hours to go until the olympics opening ceremony, wejoin gold medal hopeful sprinter asha philip in tokyo. she'll have the latest on how rising covid cases in the capital is impacting training and what the feeling is in camp amongst team gb. and five years of training
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will all come down tojust 20 seconds for two—time olympic champion diver tom daley. he reveals how knitting — of all things — is helping him get in shape for his fourth olympic games. plus, no matter how good you are in water, swimming your way out of a strong current isn't easy. with warnings issued this week after a rise in drownings, we see the moment one woman was stranded at sea and how she made a lucky escape. also coming up, with news that food workers will be exempt from covid isolation from today, dr punam has the latest. plus, with half of us saying going for a walk helped our mental health during the pandemic, wildlife expert, chris packham takes us on a personal countryside ramble that he says probably saved his life. and, forget walking up the aisle, will kirk is ready to run up it. after postponing getting hitched for a year because of the pandemic, like 260,000 other couples in the uk he'll show you how to save money on pricey wedding decorations
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by making your own like this! plus janette manrara is here with a fun—filled friday work—out! see you at 9.15. so we've been hearing this morning how the olympics is getting under way today, after a delay of a year. the former rower matthew pinsent — who is a four—time olympic gold medallist himself — is part of the bbc�*s team of pundits out in tokyo. hejoins us now. good morning, matthew. this must be
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a wonderful day for you, you are there as part of the commentary team of course, but somebody who has been at many olympics before, especially under the pressure that everyone has been under, this olympics has a different feel to it, it's important for all sorts of reasons, and not without its difficulties. absolutely, i think you encompass it very well there. i think opening day is or was an exciting moment, especially for the competitors. they are all itching to get going, they are doing their last—minute training. some of them are still not in tokyo, track and field and athletics yet to arrive, but swimming, sailing, rowing, combat, cycling, they are all itching to get going if they haven't already started. so from that point of view, very exciting. from the host city, i think excitement doesn't the right word. i think there is a state of emergency, a technical state due to the pandemic here in tokyo, so
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there's less excitement in the air in the city than the night before a normal olympics, and that is definitely a cause of sadness. understandable though it might be. morning, afternoon is for you. you can't help but catch up on what the pandemic is done and the covid restrictions. can you give us a little glimpse into what everyday life is for you guys and the athletes? there are some tight restrictions on when you can leave certain areas to do yourjob and to return, aren't there? certain areas to do your “0b and to return, aren't there?_ return, aren't there? yes. we all know what _ return, aren't there? yes. we all know what a _ return, aren't there? yes. we all know what a lockdown is - return, aren't there? yes. we all know what a lockdown is like, . know what a lockdown is like, we have been through that in the uk, we know what wearing a mask is like, but travel into tokyo has been a next level. so for people who know their testing, we have had three pcr
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tests on consecutive days before we left the uk, another one on arrival at the airport here injapan, provided all those are clear, you then go into a form of isolation, three days, it was six but it does now come down to three days isolation, where you're basically in your accommodation. you then have to do more pcr testing on a daily basis, and after you get out of that isolation period, you are still in a form of a bubble. it's a huge geographical bubble, because we are talking about the broadcast centre, the media owners, you can go to olympic venues, but if you are interacting with olympic athletes, as i am as a reporter and presenter, that pcr testing happens every day. you have to submit a sample and there are thousands of those going to labs from all the people who are here to cover the games. from the athletes' point of view, they are still training, but nobody is allowed out into the city, nobody is allowed out into the city, nobody is
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allowed out into the city, nobody is allowed out socialising, and reading between the lines of what athletes have been telling me, they are very much narrowing down their contacts. social distancing is rigidly enforced both from the british team and from their own sense of responsibility to their performance, to their team—mates, the rules are such that if during competition that you should test positive or be traced as a close contact of somebody who tests positive, your olympics would likely be over. so the stakes are very high for people who have trained for years and years to get here to compete. fik. who have trained for years and years to get here to compete.— to get here to compete. 0k. on a liuhter to get here to compete. 0k. on a lighter note. — to get here to compete. ok. on a lighter note, watters, _ to get here to compete. ok. on a lighter note, watters, you're - to get here to compete. ok. on a lighter note, watters, you're not| lighter note, watters, you're not allowed to say rowing, it's the sport you are most excited about seeing, and what is the sport you think is going to capture our hearts? you know how: did, or dressage has done —— you know how
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curling did? i dressage has done -- you know how curling did?— curling did? i am excited to see the new sports. — curling did? i am excited to see the new sports, skateboard, _ curling did? i am excited to see the new sports, skateboard, surfing, i curling did? i am excited to see the l new sports, skateboard, surfing, new additions to the olympic programme, and i think the role debut really well. whether team gb wins medals in those sport is only part of the excitement for me, i like to see the olympic games growing and new sports appealing to a different audience, the sports that have been their longest, it feels like we have seen a lot of rowing, we have done very well in rowing, and i'm excited to watch it and i love it, but also seeing the olympics reinvent itself slowly but surely over the decades is also exciting, and i like these sports coming in, and that to me, i am really keen to see how the olympics is going to go, going
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forward. �* �* , ., olympics is going to go, going forward. �* �* i. ., olympics is going to go, going forward. �* �* ., forward. and didn't you do so well back in the — forward. and didn't you do so well back in the games _ forward. and didn't you do so well back in the games in _ forward. and didn't you do so well back in the games in 1896? - forward. and didn't you do so well back in the games in 1896? you i forward. and didn't you do so well i back in the games in 1896? you and steve redgrave, you had a fantastic year that year. laughter. 1996 was always considered the low point of team gb, the disappointing games of britain, because we only won one gold medal, and that always makes me go, a little pat on the back, but we managed to come through with that gold on that day, because that was a tough games as well, it had its challenges with weather, terrorism, lots of buses getting lost, so the olympics coming through adversity is not a new storyline for the olympics, but i would say that this is another level on anything that it has had before. four olympic old that it has had before. four olympic gold medals. _ that it has had before. four olympic gold medals, matthew. _ that it has had before. four olympic gold medals, matthew. it— that it has had before. four olympic
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gold medals, matthew. it is- that it has had before. four olympic gold medals, matthew. it is still- gold medals, matthew. it is still worth saying over and over again, i'm sure you get tired of it, but it is still amazing. great to see you there, a lot of people very excited to see the whole thing just about to start. to see the whole thing 'ust about to start. ., ~ to see the whole thing 'ust about to start. . ,, , ., to see the whole thing 'ust about to start. ., ~ , ., four to see the whole thing just about to start-_ four of _ to see the whole thing just about to start._ four of the - to see the whole thing just about to start._ four of the big . start. thank you. four of the big old start. thank you. four of the big gold medals. — start. thank you. four of the big gold medals, show— start. thank you. four of the big gold medals, show a _ start. thank you. four of the big gold medals, show a bit - start. thank you. four of the big gold medals, show a bit of - start. thank you. four of the big i gold medals, show a bit of respect. —— four olympic gold medals. touchis touch is the excitement, with the opening ceremonyjust two and a half hours away now. it is live on bbc one, starting at midday. i got my maths wrong, three and a half hours. it's been a rollercoaster 18 months — not only for the athletes, but for their families and friends too, who sadly can't be there in tokyo to support their loved ones. but they won't let that dampen their spirits.
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getting the party started at home. the family of a rio gold medallist are not able to cheer him on poolside in tokyo this time, but they can still feel his presence. and while this might be confusing alfie the dog, showing their support with friends in the garden cannot mask some of the extra stress of having to watch their son's third olympics only through the tv. ——can mask. i get more nervous because i feel as though i have some control when i'm there, for some reason, although i am in the stands, but ijust know what is going on. i basically have to leave the room
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when jack's dive comes around. i am pretty nervous about the whole thing, i have my hands in front of me. to make the nerves worse forjack�*s family this time, thousands of miles away, they don't expect to hearfrom him much.
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i am jack's number one fan. it is just like jack taking six penalties. jack only has two seconds per dive. it's ace. their family and friends have set the bar high when it comes to watching them from home. up and down the land, these scenes will be repeated in homes and gardens whatever time of day or night it might be. and in keeping with the way of doing things over the last 18 months, i caught up with others who will be feeling similar emotions from home. what a moment.
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he has got the feel of these bars over the last few days. he has been dedicated to the sport for such a long time, gymnastics is not the first sport you think of, you think of football and those sorts of sports, really inspirational for those youngsters coming through, i think it is so important, and he has done a greatjob. just the dismount to go. double front half turn, with that little adjustment, that was a routine and a half! even though it is a long time since i coached laura, you still feel as though you are there with her, like i was when she was riding her first youth event all those years ago. i've been teaching in the same classroom now for many years, actually, and when a new class comes in, i'll often say, "that is where adam peaty sat there," and it isjust inspirational, he is like any one of them there, and anything is possible, he is a good demonstration of that. for the families, coaches,
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and athletes, it has been the longest and most difficult build—up to any olympic games, and over the last 18 months here on breakfast, we have followed some of team gb�*s top stars through all the uncertainty. with the games cancelled last summer, right up until today, continuing speculation and some doubts. all those hours of training in empty gyms at times, at home in new ways of staying on condition during lockdown. it takes a whole team effort to get the performance that we will need in the olympics, and you play a little part in that too, don't you? going behind the scenes with the athletes and their families as they have juggled their preparations with the issues that so many of them have faced. we have not done all the competitions we normally do, but i will still show fury. i think the olympics will be won and lost on _ i think the olympics will be won and lost on whoever has handled the pandemic— lost on whoever has handled the pandemic the best.
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before finally, today, realising their resilience has all been worth it. and the same can be said when it comes to coping for the families back home, especially given the time difference with tokyo. it has crept up on us this time with the covid and everything, is it on, is it not, is it going to happen? i don't think we have still quite adjusted to the idea of it going ahead. so because it is going to be on at seven o'clock in the morning, it's going to be quite difficult to get that atmosphere going. i think we will have to get up at five o'clock or something, get the tea on the stove ready. a bit too early for wine, i think. nothing will stop them supporting their loved ones from home. in the past when we have followed athletes in the run—up to an olympic games, luckily, certainly i haven't come against those athletes, luckily it
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did not affect your game, did it, sam? ~ , , ., did not affect your game, did it, sam? . , , ., ., did not affect your game, did it, sam? ~ , i. ., i. did not affect your game, did it, sam? , ., , sam? we put you through your paces, mike. i remember— sam? we put you through your paces, mike. i remember that, _ sam? we put you through your paces, mike. i remember that, taking - sam? we put you through your paces, mike. i remember that, taking shots l mike. i rememberthat, taking shots atvou_ mike. i rememberthat, taking shots atvou in— mike. i rememberthat, taking shots at you in goal, that was fun. getting _ at you in goal, that was fun. getting your revenge. this is our last interchange, i will see you after the olympics. we can speak now to sam quek, the former field hockey player who won an olympic gold medal at the 2016 games in rio, and she's part of the presenting line—up for the olympics coverage. welcome, sam. where is your head outjust as we are officially about to start? obviously in a completely different space _ obviously in a completely different space to _ obviously in a completely different space to where it was in 2016 in rio, _ space to where it was in 2016 in rio, because we were getting ready for the _ rio, because we were getting ready for the games to start, we did not io for the games to start, we did not go to— for the games to start, we did not go to the — for the games to start, we did not go to the opening ceremony because we wanted _ go to the opening ceremony because we wanted to rest and make sure we were fresh — we wanted to rest and make sure we were fresh. now being in the studio with the _ were fresh. now being in the studio with the amazing dan walker show me the rapes. _ with the amazing dan walker show me the ropes, and to be honest, ifi could _ the ropes, and to be honest, ifi could have — the ropes, and to be honest, ifi could have told myself that back in
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rio, could have told myself that back in rio. that _ could have told myself that back in rio, that would have been amazing, because _ rio, that would have been amazing, because ultimately my dream to present— because ultimately my dream to present an olympics has come true, i am so _ present an olympics has come true, i am so grateful and very excited. you can be more — am so grateful and very excited. moi. can be more excited than you are in rio. t can be more excited than you are in rio. ~ , ., ' rio. i think it is a different excitement. _ rio. i think it is a different excitement. very - rio. i think it is a different excitement. very well- rio. i think it is a different| excitement. very well put! rio. i think it is a different i excitement. very well put! it doesnt excitement. very well put! it doesn't even _ excitement. very well put! it doesn't even seem _ excitement. very well put! it doesn't even seem five - excitement. very well put! it j doesn't even seem five years excitement. very well put! it - doesn't even seem five years ago. what _ doesn't even seem five years ago. what does — doesn't even seem five years ago. what does that feel like having that medal? ihla what does that feel like having that medal? ., ~' what does that feel like having that medal? ., ~ , ., , medal? no feeling like it will stop eo - le talk medal? no feeling like it will stop people talk about _ medal? no feeling like it will stop people talk about winning - medal? no feeling like it will stop people talk about winning gold, i medal? no feeling like it will stop i people talk about winning gold, they believe _ people talk about winning gold, they believe they can win gold, the trainer— believe they can win gold, the trainer to _ believe they can win gold, the trainerto win gold, believe they can win gold, the trainer to win gold, but when it actually— trainer to win gold, but when it actually happens, you don't actually believe _ actually happens, you don't actually believe it _ actually happens, you don't actually believe it is happening. i think we turned _ believe it is happening. i think we turned round at this point, and i remember— turned round at this point, and i remember spotting my mum and dad in the crowd _ remember spotting my mum and dad in the crowd so— remember spotting my mum and dad in the crowd so proud, and others with the crowd so proud, and others with the crowds — the crowd so proud, and others with the crowds are not there in tokyo. thats— the crowds are not there in tokyo. that's the — the crowds are not there in tokyo. that's the thing, you can only imagine. and when you're introducing all these games and everything, that is what you're kind of have to fill in, that kind of euphoria that they are not seeing in the crowd. i think it is preperly _ are not seeing in the crowd. i think it is properly more _
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are not seeing in the crowd. i think it is properly more difficult - are not seeing in the crowd. i think it is properly more difficult for - it is properly more difficult for the families than the athletes, because — the families than the athletes, because when you are on the pitch of the track— because when you are on the pitch of the track or— because when you are on the pitch of the track or whatever it may be, you kind of— the track or whatever it may be, you kind of know — the track or whatever it may be, you kind of know that you have a job to do, kind of know that you have a job to do. and _ kind of know that you have a job to do, and where it will be tough is if you lick— do, and where it will be tough is if you lick it— do, and where it will be tough is if you lick it with the podium and you cannot— you lick it with the podium and you cannot make that eye contact to the people _ cannot make that eye contact to the people who have been with you the whole _ people who have been with you the whole wav — people who have been with you the whole way. so i think that will be tough, _ whole way. so i think that will be tough, but — whole way. so i think that will be tough, but ultimately they can take that gold _ tough, but ultimately they can take that gold medal home. people will be watching, _ that gold medal home. people will be watching, and hopefully we will do the coverage justice.— the coverage 'ustice. something ha--ened the coverage 'ustice. something happened in — the coverage justice. something happened in that _ the coverage justice. something happened in that gb _ the coverage justice. something happened in that gb olympic . the coverage justice. something . happened in that gb olympic sport, didn't it? you are probably better positioned than need to track that. our expectations are high now, maybe the big one was london when it's changed, maybe that had started previously, matthew pinsent before, he was saying they were the only gold medal when he first won his rowing medal, things have changed dramatically now, we stop watching the olympics and your counterparts are performing today, there is an expectation, maybe, that for some
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time there was not.— time there was not. there's also exnectation. _ time there was not. there's also exnectation. i — time there was not. there's also expectation, i think— time there was not. there's also expectation, i think as _ time there was not. there's also expectation, i think as an - time there was not. there's also | expectation, i think as an athlete you have — expectation, i think as an athlete you have the expectation from yourself, — you have the expectation from yourself, from your coaches, and ultimately. — yourself, from your coaches, and ultimately, they want to win. that is why— ultimately, they want to win. that is why as — ultimately, they want to win. that is why as an— ultimately, they want to win. that is why as an elite athlete you participate to win, but as a uk funded — participate to win, but as a uk funded sport, especially a lot of these _ funded sport, especially a lot of these exports, there is pressure for you to _ these exports, there is pressure for you to make — these exports, there is pressure for you to make sure that you hit the mark _ you to make sure that you hit the mark that — you to make sure that you hit the mark that they set, because ultimately the funding is dependent on your— ultimately the funding is dependent on your result and the future of the sport _ on your result and the future of the sport so _ on your result and the future of the sport. so although we are uneasily proud _ sport. so although we are uneasily proud and — sport. so although we are uneasily proud and happy to have the gold medal, _ proud and happy to have the gold medal, what people don't realise, the big _ medal, what people don't realise, the big game for us was the semifinal, because we knew that if we won— semifinal, because we knew that if we won our— semifinal, because we knew that if we won our semifinal, we would also be guaranteed a medal, but then guaranteed the funding for the future — guaranteed the funding for the future of our sport. but guaranteed the funding for the future of our sport.— guaranteed the funding for the future of our sport. but now i think there is the — future of our sport. but now i think there is the expectation _ future of our sport. but now i think there is the expectation for - future of our sport. but now i think there is the expectation for us - future of our sport. but now i think there is the expectation for us to i there is the expectation for us to get more, the target has just gone out and out. and that is kind of a good thing for this country, it makes us feel as if we are serious competitors when it comes to this middle ranking.— middle ranking. yeah, because i think it is something _ middle ranking. yeah, because i think it is something which - middle ranking. yeah, because i think it is something which the l think it is something which the country— think it is something which the country that hosts the olympic
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games. — country that hosts the olympic games. it _ country that hosts the olympic games, it is not often they would .et games, it is not often they would get more — games, it is not often they would get more on the big medals after doing _ get more on the big medals after doing that. so the fact we did it in rio, everybody was like, brilliant, but it _ rio, everybody was like, brilliant, but it was— rio, everybody was like, brilliant, but it was a — rio, everybody was like, brilliant, but it was a bit of a shock. coming into tokyo. — but it was a bit of a shock. coming into tokyo, that expectation has to maintain. — into tokyo, that expectation has to maintain, because you cannot seem the athletes, after 2012 we increased our medal haul, and for tokyo— increased our medal haul, and for tokyo let's — increased our medal haul, and for tokyo let's bring it back down, because — tokyo let's bring it back down, because ultimately you want people to believe you can do well, and you want _ to believe you can do well, and you want to— to believe you can do well, and you want to do— to believe you can do well, and you want to do well.— to believe you can do well, and you want to do well. interesting how you soke want to do well. interesting how you spoke about — want to do well. interesting how you spoke about presenting _ want to do well. interesting how you spoke about presenting the - want to do well. interesting how you spoke about presenting the other i spoke about presenting the other pics being your dream after being part of the olympics. congratulations on your baby, there's a story behind her middle name. , ., , , name. yes, her middle name is doris, she is at home — name. yes, her middle name is doris, she is at home with _ name. yes, her middle name is doris, she is at home with my _ name. yes, her middle name is doris, she is at home with my husband i name. yes, her middle name is doris, she is at home with my husband who i she is at home with my husband who has been _ she is at home with my husband who has been brilliant but i have been home _ has been brilliant but i have been home and — has been brilliant but i have been home and chasing my dream. look how cuickl home and chasing my dream. look how quickly medal — home and chasing my dream. look how quickly medal looks _ home and chasing my dream. look how quickly medal looks next _ home and chasing my dream. look how quickly medal looks next to _ home and chasing my dream. look how
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quickly medal looks next to her! - home and chasing my dream. look how quickly medal looks next to her! it i quickly medal looks next to her! it probably weighed more than her at that point— probably weighed more than her at that point as well. my nan turn 100 to two— that point as well. my nan turn 100 to two weeks after she is, like, my best friend. — to two weeks after she is, like, my best friend, if we ever have a problem. _ best friend, if we ever have a problem, she has the best advice, whether— problem, she has the best advice, whether it — problem, she has the best advice, whether it is me, my man, even the carers _ whether it is me, my man, even the carers who— whether it is me, my man, even the carers who help look after her, so we thought— carers who help look after her, so we thought it was only appropriate, 100 years _ we thought it was only appropriate, 100 years difference.— 100 years difference. incredible. i read this morning _ 100 years difference. incredible. i read this morning that _ 100 years difference. incredible. i read this morning that andy i 100 years difference. incredible. i i read this morning that andy murray was talking about keeping going, because he is playing in the olympics, which is great, and he was saying he went back after he lost at wimbledon, he went back on his five—year—old daughter met at the door, i think she said, daddy, you are home because you have lost a match. which is absolutely true, thatis match. which is absolutely true, that is why he came home early. and they had a conversation, and he said that she was part of the reason he carried on a bit more, because they had a conversation about what you do when you lose, you try again. it is that are when you lose, you try again. it is
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that age we _ when you lose, you try again. it is that age we have _ when you lose, you try again. it is that age we have just tried to understand —— started to understand what daddy — understand —— started to understand what daddy does. get understand -- started to understand what daddy does.— what daddy does. get more athletes talkin: what daddy does. get more athletes talking about _ what daddy does. get more athletes talking about that, _ what daddy does. get more athletes talking about that, max _ what daddy does. get more athletes talking about that, max whitlock i talking about that, max whitlock earlier, the inspiration at home. helen glover has got three, i think she is— helen glover has got three, i think she is the — helen glover has got three, i think she is the first british product to id she is the first british product to go back— she is the first british product to go back to — she is the first british product to go back to the olympics. are you rulina go back to the olympics. are you ruling that _ go back to the olympics. are you ruling that out _ go back to the olympics. are you ruling that out some? _ go back to the olympics. are you ruling that out some? i - ruling that out some? i am presenting _ ruling that out some? i am presenting the _ ruling that out some? i am presenting the other- ruling that out some? i am presenting the other pics, | ruling that out some? i am | presenting the other pics, i ruling that out some? i am i presenting the other pics, i am a captain— presenting the other pics, i am a captain on— presenting the other pics, i am a captain on a question of sport now, dream _ captain on a question of sport now, dream job, — captain on a question of sport now, dreamjob, so captain on a question of sport now, dream job, so the way my career is going _ dream job, so the way my career is going now. — dream job, so the way my career is going now. i— dream job, so the way my career is going now, ithink dream job, so the way my career is going now, i think it will probably not happen. —— presenting the olympics _ not happen. -- presenting the olympics-— not happen. -- presenting the olmics. ., , , olympics. not completely ruling it out. we olympics. not completely ruling it out- we were _ olympics. not completely ruling it out. we were talking _ olympics. not completely ruling it out. we were talking about - olympics. not completely ruling it out. we were talking about golf. l out. we were talking about golf. saying he could go back to a different sport.— different sport. you can do anything- _ different sport. you can do anything. never— different sport. you can do anything. never say - different sport. you can do j anything. never say never. different sport. you can do i anything. never say never. and different sport. you can do - anything. never say never. and you can, charlie. always ratherfancied
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the pole vault. ok. we will leave you with that, sam. good luck with the olympic coverage. one person with great memories of winning olympic gold is former sprinter linford christie, who was victorious at the barcelona games, back in 1992. but away from the track, linford developed an interest in a slower—paced sport — fishing — and he's teamed up with a group of celebrities for a new channel 5 show. and hejoins us now. morning, linford. good morning. i wasn't sure whether we were going _ good morning. i wasn't sure whether we were going to _ good morning. i wasn't sure whether we were going to see _ good morning. i wasn't sure whether we were going to see you _ good morning. i wasn't sure whether we were going to see you sitting i we were going to see you sitting beside a river with your fishing rod, or whether we were going to see you on the track, but i am single track behind you, the perfect starting point. the olympics is starting. this was your true love of sprinting, and all the years of success that you had, what are your
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thoughts at the games are about to begin? t thoughts at the games are about to beuin? ~' , ., thoughts at the games are about to be. in? ~' , ., ., begin? i think the games are going to be pretty — begin? i think the games are going to be pretty good- _ begin? i think the games are going to be pretty good. the _ begin? i think the games are going to be pretty good. the only - begin? i think the games are going| to be pretty good. the only problem is no crowd, and to be honest, as an athlete, you want to show off a little bit, showing off how good you are, you want to do it in front of a crowd, that is part of it. but i think that is the same for everyone else, they still have to go out there and win. and i think make the best of what they are doing, especially the fact that the games is going on. that is the most important thing.— is going on. that is the most important thing. is going on. that is the most imortant thin. , ., important thing. interesting to say that about the _ important thing. interesting to say that about the crowd. _ important thing. interesting to say that about the crowd. you - important thing. interesting to say that about the crowd. you are i important thing. interesting to say that about the crowd. you are in i important thing. interesting to say i that about the crowd. you are in the line—up for the 100 metres, wheels hear about the focus, you're just focusing on what you are doing there, did you know who was in the crowd? was that part of your inspiration at the time? definitely, the crowd was _ inspiration at the time? definitely, the crowd was part _ inspiration at the time? definitely, the crowd was part of _ inspiration at the time? definitely, the crowd was part of my - the crowd was part of my inspiration. my thing is ijust told
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myself that everyone in the travel student for me. it is notjust physical, part of it as spiritual as well, so you make believe that everyone is cheering for you and that gives you that little extra lift. . , ,., y that gives you that little extra lift. absolutely does. one thing i did not realise, _ lift. absolutely does. one thing i did not realise, you _ lift. absolutely does. one thing i did not realise, you still - lift. absolutely does. one thing i did not realise, you still hold i lift. absolutely does. one thing i did not realise, you still hold thej did not realise, you still hold the record for great britain 100 metres. i didn't realise that was still held by you. why another is that not been broken yet, and do you secretly quite like the fact that it is still yours? —— why on earth has that not been broken? i yours? -- why on earth has that not been broken?— been broken? i think a little bit it is nice to have _ been broken? i think a little bit it is nice to have a _ been broken? i think a little bit it is nice to have a stall, _ been broken? i think a little bit it is nice to have a stall, but - been broken? i think a little bit it is nice to have a stall, but i i been broken? i think a little bit it is nice to have a stall, but i think| is nice to have a stall, but i think i have been the british record holder since 1986, which is a very long time. and i'm not quite sure why the guys haven't broken it yet. there i said, i don't think the trend as hard as i did, a lot of the things i was prepared to train three
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times a day sometimes, 67 days a week, and i think the training regime goes now, it is totally different. in regime goes now, it is totally different. ., ., , regime goes now, it is totally different._ i i regime goes now, it is totally different._ i did i regime goes now, it is totally| different._ i did a regime goes now, it is totally i different._ i did a lot different. in what way? i did a lot more long _ different. in what way? i did a lot more long runs. _ different. in what way? i did a lot more long runs. i— different. in what way? i did a lot more long runs. iwas— different. in what way? i did a lot more long runs. i was in - different. in what way? i did a lot more long runs. i was in the i different. in what way? i did a lot more long runs. i was in the gym| more long runs. i was in the gym all the time. and i think i was way stronger than most of the guys that are spent in now, and i think that makes a big difference. —— sprinting now. irate makes a big difference. -- sprinting now. . ., ., ., ~ ., now. we now need to talk about you chan . inc now. we now need to talk about you changing pace _ now. we now need to talk about you changing pace completely _ now. we now need to talk about you changing pace completely and i changing pace completely and fishing. what attracted you to that? since i retired from athletics, i was looking for something that would give me the extra bars that i lost from competing, so i tried my hand at swimming, which i kind of laughed, and then i draw near to the water. fishing is also very exciting. i think the idea that you
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stay out until you catch something you get excited, you jump around and forget yourself, because the fish puts up a good fight, you put in, something to get to we are just showing some of the images from the show. , ., ., �* showing some of the images from the show. i. ., �* .. . show. even if you don't catch a fish, which _ show. even if you don't catch a fish, which i — show. even if you don't catch a fish, which i don't _ show. even if you don't catch a fish, which i don't know- show. even if you don't catch a fish, which i don't know if- show. even if you don't catch a fish, which i don't know if you | show. even if you don't catch a i fish, which i don't know if you did, these places you go to, one of the things about fishing as you go to beautiful places. i did things about fishing as you go to beautiful places.— things about fishing as you go to beautiful places. i did not realise how beautiful _ beautiful places. i did not realise how beautiful the _ beautiful places. i did not realise how beautiful the uk _ beautiful places. i did not realise how beautiful the uk is. - beautiful places. i did not realise how beautiful the uk is. i've i how beautiful the uk is. i've driven a little bit around the lake district and everything else, but scotland is one of the most beautiful places i've seen. if we had more sunshine, i wouldn't travel abroad. it's amazing, i think a lot of people should go out there and explore, we went to dunkeld, we went to the isle of mull, it was just absolutely... i didn't want to come home, i would absolutely... i didn't want to come home, iwould have absolutely... i didn't want to come home, i would have stayed there a lot longer if i had the chance. feel
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free to just — lot longer if i had the chance. feel free to just iog _ lot longer if i had the chance. feel free to just jog off— lot longer if i had the chance. feel free to just jog off into the free to justjog off into the distance round the track, just to show us you still can, you could do that now. .,, ._ , show us you still can, you could do that now. , ., �* show us you still can, you could do thatnow. .,�* that now. those days don't happen an more. that now. those days don't happen any more- i'm _ that now. those days don't happen any more- i'm a — that now. those days don't happen any more. i'm a lazy— that now. those days don't happen any more. i'm a lazy athlete, i i any more. i'm a lazy athlete, i don'tjog, i may go to the gym and don'tjog, i may go to the gym and do a little bit of exercise, but running is something that so far from me now. running is something that so far from me now-— running is something that so far from me now. ., ,, i. ., from me now. good on you, you have done our from me now. good on you, you have done your time- _ from me now. good on you, you have done your time. linford _ from me now. good on you, you have done your time. linford christie, i done your time. linford christie, thank you so much. enjoy the sunshine and the olympics. you can watch fishing scotland's lochs and rivers at 7pm tonight on channel 5. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8:59.
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good morning, it's friday, welcome to bbc news, iam i am victoria derbyshire, here are your headlines. thousands of workers in the food supply chain won't need to isolate if they're 'pinged' by the nhs covid app. we are going to keep this under review but we think this is a sensible first step that we should do quickly, and so we have acted quickly and we are rolling it out from today. do you work in a critical industry? do you work in a critical industry? do you work in a critical industry? do you consider yourself to be a critical worker? are you exempt from isolation? maybe you are not and think you should be. let me know this morning on twitter or via e—mail. a new study suggests that daily lateral flow testing for pupils could be equally as effective as closing class bubbles to control transmission in schools.

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