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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 22, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be this is bbc news, the headlines... tokyo's olympic organisers say friday opening ceremony will go ahead without any major changes — despite the sacking of the show�*s creative director. kentaro kobayashi was dismissed over past comments he made about the holocaust. an investigation is launched after a number of members of the the czech olympic team tested positive for covid. a team doctor — who is said to have declined to be vaccinated — also tested positive. china has ordered an urgent review into flood safety, after twelve people died trapped in a flooded subway tunnel. more than 20 others have died and hundreds of thousands evacuated after devastating flooding in hunaan province. key parts of the food industry will be allowed to do daily covid testing instead of asking staff to self—isolate. the government said testing would be implemented at key sites,
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are broadcasters penny smith and david davies. lovely penny smith and david davies. to see you both. the i leads on the news this evening that many workers in the food supply industry will be able to subsitute isolation for daily testing — the so called �*pingdemic�* is causing staff shortages up and down the country "ping in the army" — the headline for the metro — which leads on calls by a conservative mp to get military help in order to keep supermarket shelves stocked and petrol pumps full. the mail leads on calls from business leaders to extend the end of isolation to staff in a wider set of industries, including hospitality, manufacturing and transport. the telegraph leads on an oxford university study which suggests testing schoolchildren on a daily
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basis and keeping them in the classroom is just as effective as forcing them to quarantine at home. the nhs�* 3% pay rise is the lead for the guardian — but the paper notes the health service is being forced to pick up some of the bill for the cost of its own staff's pay increase. the ft picks up on the outcome of an official review which has found that the disgraced financier lex greensill enjoyed an "extraordinarily privileged" relationship with the government despite his ideas on supply chain finance providing no obvious benefit. so let's begin... penny, do you want to kick us out this evening? lovely to see you. let's start with the metro. do you think we should ping in the army? [30 think we should ping in the army? drr you know what? i'm quite glad that i'm not in government. it is extraordinarily difficult to sort
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all this out, nowhere to go with this. now that we know that they are going to be these 16 industries where you are going to be able to actually apply to have your exemptions i wonder if there is going to sort out some of this. but it is really difficult when you've got so many people. i mean, we've been talking about it all evening, the pingdemic. a ridiculous word as well, at pingdemic. it makes it sound almostjolly. well is in actual fact it's incredibly serious. we're notjust talking about, i know in the metro they're talking about food. but we are talking about everything. we talking about police officers being off, emergency services, the staff are actually answering on 999 calls, signaler is on transport which means that you won't have any trains going at all. if you got staff off you might actually have to cut a few trains.
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if you can't do the signalling then that's the whole transportjust completely messed up. it goes on and on and on. then we are talking about food. it's ate much bigger picture here. . ~ ., ., ., here. yeah, like coco i have a little list- _ here. yeah, like coco i have a little list. energy _ here. yeah, like coco i have a little list. energy civil- here. yeah, like coco i have a little list. energy civil nuclear| little list. energy civil nuclear digital, food production spies, waste water, veterinary medicine, centre chemicals, stjude medical clinical consumer focused supplies, emergency services, border control, essential defence output, local government. mercifully broadcast and journal is out on that list. because i think would get it in the neck because we've been treated as essential workers during the pandemic. i don't think anyone could justify being able to avoid isolation if we get tamed. it's a serious question about the extent of this. 600,000 we are told in the weeks between the eighth and the
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15th ofjuly. and presumably government must�*ve known this was the inevitable consequence anyway of the inevitable consequence anyway of the rise in infections. to add in freedom day one would assume they will be more to come. you freedom day one would assume they will be more to come.— freedom day one would assume they will be more to come. you don't have to be a passionate _ will be more to come. you don't have to be a passionate supporter - will be more to come. you don't have to be a passionate supporter of the l to be a passionate supporter of the government to have sympathy for this nightmare _ government to have sympathy for this nightmare that goes on and on as penny— nightmare that goes on and on as penny has — nightmare that goes on and on as penny has said. but on the other hand, _ penny has said. but on the other hand. i_ penny has said. but on the other hand, i regret to say that some of these _ hand, i regret to say that some of these things do seem to have been predicted _ these things do seem to have been predicted and have been predictable in recent_ predicted and have been predictable in recent weeks. you get to a poinim — in recent weeks. you get to a point... this is a really, really bad _ point... this is a really, really bad week_ point... this is a really, really bad week for the government. it's notjust— bad week for the government. it's notjust the pingdemic bad week for the government. it's not just the pingdemic as it bad week for the government. it's notjust the pingdemic as it seems to have _ notjust the pingdemic as it seems to have become commonly owned. there have been_ to have become commonly owned. there have been other things that have gone _ have been other things that have gone so — have been other things that have gone so badly wrong this week. boris and his— gone so badly wrong this week. boris and his boat— gone so badly wrong this week. boris and his boat load of checkers must be delighted that the parliamentary session_ be delighted that the parliamentary session has ended this week. at
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least _ session has ended this week. at least he's — session has ended this week. at least he's not got that immediate problem — least he's not got that immediate problem on his hands. but where it goes _ problem on his hands. but where it goes from — problem on his hands. but where it goes from here and this idea of the army, _ goes from here and this idea of the army, when — goes from here and this idea of the army, when we have a big problem we say "bring _ army, when we have a big problem we say "bring in— army, when we have a big problem we say "bring in the army. whether the army— say "bring in the army. whether the army wants to be brought in is another— the army wants to be brought in is another matter.— the army wants to be brought in is another matter. obviously an army that's a little _ another matter. obviously an army that's a little bit _ another matter. obviously an army that's a little bit smaller— another matter. obviously an army that's a little bit smaller than - another matter. obviously an army that's a little bit smaller than it - that's a little bit smaller than it was 20 years ago when it was brought and then to deal with all those animal corpses. let's deal if we can with another practical side of this, david. the york shire posted saying food workers are told that you can skip isolation. judging by the list, it's a little more obligated than that, companies have to apply. yes. there's that — that, companies have to apply. yes. there's that and _ that, companies have to apply. yes. there's that and it _ that, companies have to apply. yes. there's that and it is _ that, companies have to apply. yes. there's that and it is interesting that today the emphasis has gone as penny— that today the emphasis has gone as penny is _ that today the emphasis has gone as penny is also said from talking about— penny is also said from talking about workers to about in specific industries — about workers to about in specific industries. you did listed the mail. this quote — industries. you did listed the mail. this quote in the yorkshire post from _ this quote in the yorkshire post
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from the — this quote in the yorkshire post from the local confederation of small— from the local confederation of small businesses in north york shire saying _ small businesses in north york shire saying this _ small businesses in north york shire saying this is about the survival of businesses. so the emphasis has moved _ businesses. so the emphasis has moved has — businesses. so the emphasis has moved has itjust a bit from health to busihess— moved has itjust a bit from health to business and the survival of the economy — to business and the survival of the economy. that pendulum has swung, that from _ economy. that pendulum has swung, that from 18 — economy. that pendulum has swung, that from 18 months for almost two years— that from 18 months for almost two years how — that from 18 months for almost two years now. and now the fears about the economy seem to be growing. penny? _ the economy seem to be growing. penn ? ~ ., , ., penny? while i was reading in the yorkshire post _ penny? while i was reading in the yorkshire post is _ penny? while i was reading in the yorkshire post is directors - penny? while i was reading in the yorkshire post is directors as - penny? while i was reading in the yorkshire post is directors as the | yorkshire post is directors as the most heavily used tool in here is my pen because every time i do a road i have to wipe it out again. all of this as you say, talking about businesses particularly small businesses, i think you are quoting the person who goes on to say the problem is it small businesses and micro—businesses that are particularly suffering. i know everybody suffering but those are
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particularly suffering. obviously if you've got four employees into our off status of your business. absolutely it was interesting from richard walker from absolutely it was interesting from richard walkerfrom eisen absolutely it was interesting from richard walker from eisen saying we are taking this into our own hands. we're going to hire a load of extra workers on temporary contract so we've got backup. you said that option doesn't exist for small or medium—size businesses. the telegraph has the story that companies must apply for the king exemptions. it's clearly the point that a logic to that. you don't want people using it as a kind of get out ofjail free card present even people using it as a kind of get out ofjailfree card present even in circumstances where they don't really need it. the problem is presumably how does this happen, witty apply, how long does it take was that some of these decisions, they want to know now. they want to know even yesterday ideally. when the worker suddenly rings up and says i can come in. i the worker suddenly rings up and says i can come in.— says i can come in. i know. i look at this and _ says i can come in. i know. i look
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at this and not _ says i can come in. i know. i look at this and not as _ says i can come in. i know. i look at this and not as if _ at this and not as if businesses have a got it hard enough they then got to go and do a little more red tape and try and find out that they are actually allowed to be exempted everything else. i am slightly confused here. so if you can theoretically have somebody who is double vaccinated and then taking a test every day to avoid self isolation, why can we not do it for everybody?— isolation, why can we not do it for everybody? good question. i don't have the answer. _ everybody? good question. i don't have the answer. it _ everybody? good question. i don't have the answer. it was _ everybody? good question. i don't have the answer. it was david - everybody? good question. i don't. have the answer. it was david does. i'll do my best. they are trying to minimise — i'll do my best. they are trying to minimise the number of people. imagine— minimise the number of people. imagine the bureaucracy in all this. this is— imagine the bureaucracy in all this. this is a _ imagine the bureaucracy in all this. this is a recipe for an absolute nightmare, it seems to me. and this telegraph— nightmare, it seems to me. and this telegraph story actually says that not all _ telegraph story actually says that not all people in a particular working _ not all people in a particular working in a particular company or industry— working in a particular company or industry or— working in a particular company or industry or even a majority, particular— industry or even a majority, particular firm or industry will be
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given— particular firm or industry will be given the — particular firm or industry will be given the sort of exemptions was up because _ given the sort of exemptions was up because they are trying to minimise the numbers. how could this be, how lon- the numbers. how could this be, how long it's _ the numbers. how could this be, how long it's gonna take for this bureaucracy work and this red tape which _ bureaucracy work and this red tape which penny refers you to be resolved? it which penny refers you to be resolved?— which penny refers you to be resolved? ., , , ., resolved? it was interesting hearing jeremy hunt — resolved? it was interesting hearing jeremy hunt the _ resolved? it was interesting hearing jeremy hunt the former _ resolved? it was interesting hearing jeremy hunt the former health - jeremy hunt the former health secretary saying to the government you need to bring forward this everybody who's got double the next will be able to do this as an alternative to self isolation. because if you don't do it you're going to end up in a situation where you lose public consent for these rules. �* . . you lose public consent for these rules. . ., , , , rules. and that is probably the most wor in: rules. and that is probably the most worrying thing _ rules. and that is probably the most worrying thing of — rules. and that is probably the most worrying thing of all. _ rules. and that is probably the most worrying thing of all. by _ rules. and that is probably the most worrying thing of all. by the - rules. and that is probably the most worrying thing of all. by the way, i worrying thing of all. by the way, you failed — worrying thing of all. by the way, you failed to mention that jeremy hunt was — you failed to mention that jeremy hunt was also the former candidate against _ hunt was also the former candidate against borisjohnson as hunt was also the former candidate against boris johnson as leader of the conservative party and as prime minister _ the conservative party and as prime minister. but that's another thing. it is minister. but that's another thing. it is a _ minister. but that's another thing. it is a real, — minister. but that's another thing. it is a real, real problem. the problems— it is a real, real problem. the problems are mounting up. we are going _ problems are mounting up. we are going into — problems are mounting up. we are going into the summer, the summer
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recess _ going into the summer, the summer recess as— going into the summer, the summer recess as i_ going into the summer, the summer recess as i say, it must be a huge relief— recess as i say, it must be a huge relief for— recess as i say, it must be a huge relief for some people at checkers. next story— relief for some people at checkers. next story on the telegraph, forcing his children to self—isolate needless. this is a really interesting story. just going through exactly this during the school summer term. flit through exactly this during the school summer term. of course that is riuht. i school summer term. of course that is right. i hadn't _ school summer term. of course that is right. i hadn't realised _ school summer term. of course that is right. i hadn't realised the - is right. i hadn't realised the numbers— is right. i hadn't realised the numbers had become so enormous the suggestion— numbers had become so enormous the suggestion is around 1 million children— suggestion is around 1 million children have been away from school. and then _ children have been away from school. and then there is in extraordinary statistic— and then there is in extraordinary statistic in — and then there is in extraordinary statistic in this work that's been done _ statistic in this work that's been done out — statistic in this work that's been done out of university, 98.4% of those _ done out of university, 98.4% of those children sent home never developed covid. in the basic conclusion is that daily testing rather— conclusion is that daily testing rather than sending children home would _ rather than sending children home would be — rather than sending children home would be much more effective. also there is another _ would be much more effective. i"r there is another interesting statistic that said that schools are actually tested pupils daily instead of requiring self isolation had, i
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know figures are one of those things you barely around, they had 4% fewer cases. which is entirely huge amount but actually is when you're talking about a million off to school. they are saying it's because infected youngsters are more open about the context because the consequences don't seem so severe. this rapid testing circumstance needless isolation. as you were saying earlier on on the news before you came to us, the point is, it's not just the children who end up self isolating, is the whole family, then they kick of the work so the knock on effect is on and on and the independent has a potentially worrying story on the impact covid is now having on younger people. partly presuming the consequences of young people still not been fully vaccinated but also one of the things we don't know about the delta variant, what impact that may be
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having. i was talking to a surgeon earlier here on bbc news from arkansas, he was telling me about a number of teenagers who are in hospital in his state with serious side effects from the delta variant. i can't offer any statistical international comparison but it was just a snapshot of 1's state, the scale of the problem they're experiencing which he said they didn't have in previous waves of the pandemic. didn't have in previous waves of the andemic. . didn't have in previous waves of the andemic. , ., _, . ,, ., pandemic. yes, we do come back to vaccinations. _ pandemic. yes, we do come back to vaccinations, don't _ pandemic. yes, we do come back to vaccinations, don't we? _ pandemic. yes, we do come back to vaccinations, don't we? which - pandemic. yes, we do come back to | vaccinations, don't we? which about the fact that they are the least likely to be double vaccinated. so they've got the 20 — 29, the infections going up, weekly hospital admissions going up since march. in in the independent it also says that next month could see mask wearing back on the social distancing back, working from home reintroduced. i do worry about that coming back when we've seen all those pictures in the papers of people justjoyfully papers of people just joyfully feeling papers of people justjoyfully feeling like they are getting back
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to business. ijust worry feeling like they are getting back to business. i just worry whether that will happen. i don't know, it was getting quite stressful on public transport before where some mask and some not mask and i fear angen mask and some not mask and i fear anuer. . ., , mask and some not mask and i fear anuer. . ., i. , mask and some not mask and i fear anier. . ., , ., , ., anger. david. was it really only two weeks a . o anger. david. was it really only two weeks ago that _ anger. david. was it really only two weeks ago that we _ anger. david. was it really only two weeks ago that we were _ anger. david. was it really only two weeks ago that we were being - anger. david. was it really only two weeks ago that we were being told | anger. david. was it really only two l weeks ago that we were being told by government ministers no turning back, _ government ministers no turning back, this — government ministers no turning back, this is it, we've turned the corner— back, this is it, we've turned the corner and — back, this is it, we've turned the corner and now we're heading back, this is it, we've turned the cornerand now we're heading in corner and now we're heading in one direction _ corner and now we're heading in one direction and — corner and now we're heading in one direction and then the story in the independent tells us plans being drawn— independent tells us plans being drawn up— independent tells us plans being drawn up by the cabinet office could see mask— drawn up by the cabinet office could see mask warning but not wearing, social— see mask warning but not wearing, social distancing and working from home _ social distancing and working from home reintroduced in england next month? _ home reintroduced in england next month? , ,, ., month? david egger set nhs find a half £1 million — month? david egger set nhs find a half £1 million for _ month? david egger set nhs find a half £1 million for the _ month? david egger set nhs find a half £1 million for the pay - month? david egger set nhs find a half £1 million for the pay rise - half £1 million for the pay rise half £1 million for the pay rise half £1 million for the pay rise half £1 billion for the pay rise that ministers had just agreed to
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introduce after a recommendation from the independent pay body for the nhs in england. this is the guardian's top story.— the nhs in england. this is the guardian's top story. well, you do ask yourself— guardian's top story. well, you do ask yourself if— guardian's top story. well, you do ask yourself if you _ guardian's top story. well, you do ask yourself if you were _ guardian's top story. well, you do ask yourself if you were going - ask yourself if you were going through— ask yourself if you were going through this nightmare that the government is whether you would think— government is whether you would think that — government is whether you would think that taking up public—sector workers _ think that taking up public—sector workers is — think that taking up public—sector workers is notjust the medical and others _ workers is notjust the medical and others as— workers is notjust the medical and others as well at this particular year— others as well at this particular year would be ideal and very clever politics _ year would be ideal and very clever politics. but we shall see was that basically— politics. but we shall see was that basically it — politics. but we shall see was that basically it appears that usually the treasury meets the full cost of annual— the treasury meets the full cost of annual nhs prizes. and this time they are — annual nhs prizes. and this time they are being told sorry, rishi sunak— they are being told sorry, rishi sunak whose popularity soared in the early part _ sunak whose popularity soared in the early part of the covid nightmare, when _ early part of the covid nightmare, when he _ early part of the covid nightmare, when he was handing out money and furloughing in the scheme and that scheme _ furloughing in the scheme and that scheme is — furloughing in the scheme and that scheme is out having to pull it back — scheme is out having to pull it back and _ scheme is out having to pull it back. and we will see where this leads _ back. and we will see where this leads. there is also certain groups
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of doctors — leads. there is also certain groups of doctors who were supposedly going to get— of doctors who were supposedly going to get their 3% are nope

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