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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 22, 2021 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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person she wishes who could says the person she wishes who could hear her album is prince. then you have got celeste, what a year she is having, nominated at the oscars, now she is up for the mercury prize and i spoke to her and she said she almost cried when she found out. one interesting trend, four of the albums are instrumental, perhaps a sign of what people have been turning to during lockdown and here's one to look out for, the band salt, they have never reveal their identity, they did not turn up at the announcement and if they win in september, what on earth of the organisers going to do? fix, september, what on earth of the organisers going to do? a normal ceremony. _ organisers going to do? a normal ceremony, what _ organisers going to do? a normal ceremony, what are _ organisers going to do? a normal ceremony, what are they - organisers going to do? a normal ceremony, what are they hoping. organisers going to do? a normal - ceremony, what are they hoping for? they are hoping to have it as usual in september at the hammersmith odeon with people in and they were discussing what performances they would be putting on and how much it means to them to be back playing music live. . ., , . means to them to be back playing music live-— music live. fantastic, we are all lonauin music live. fantastic, we are all longing for _ music live. fantastic, we are all longing for that. _ music live. fantastic, we are all longing for that. thank - music live. fantastic, we are all longing for that. thank you, - music live. fantastic, we are all. longing for that. thank you, colin patterson on the mercury music prize
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and that takes us to look at the weather prospects. time at the weather prospects. for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. yesterday northern ireland broke its all—time temperature record for the second time in less than a week. the question is will temperatures climb even higher today and so far in northern ireland the highest temperature we have seen is at armagh above 29 degrees and the warmest place of all so far today is aberystwyth at 31, compare that with aberdeen atjust 15 degrees. why the difference? the satellite picture makes it clear, aberdeen has a lot of low cloud, mr and mark stretching into the north—east of england, tending to retreat to the coast but lingering in places this afternoon. elsewhere, a lot of sunshine, one or two isolated thunderstorms popping up two isolated thunderstorms popping up at some of those really heavy, quite a lot of rainfall in places, highest temperatures in the west, 32 in northern ireland, would once again break that record and further east it is a bit cooler especially for the north sea coast, more in the way of cloud and we still have these
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met office extreme heat warnings in force, parts of south west england, parts of wales, the midlands, and also in northern ireland and that is partly because the temperatures are not dropping quickly at all through the evenings and dry for most as we head through this evening, a couple of thunderstorms but the temperatures by 11 o'clock in cardiff, 2a degrees, 21 in belfast and another tricky night for sleeping and more of this low cloud mr mark across the north—east and scotland, down the east of england. retreating towards the coast but it may linger in a few more places than it has done during today. sunshine for most tomorrow, 12 showers but signs of a change down to the south, heavy and thundery rain in the picture, the breeze strengthening across southern parts as well and the highest temperatures across parts of northern ireland, 28 and 29, possibly 30 degrees once again, but quite a big change, as i hinted to take us into the weekend. this
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area of low pressure drifting up from the south and this will bring heavy and potentially thundery rain, quite erratically northwards through saturday across england and wales, enough rain to cause disruption and if it brightens towards the south, that could sponsor further showers, scotland and northern ireland staying drier and brighter but cooler than it has been, 2425 parts of northern ireland and for sunday, showers and longer spells of rain, drier and brighterfurther north showers and longer spells of rain, drier and brighter further north and west, but coolerfor all drier and brighter further north and west, but cooler for all of us by this stage. this hot spell is coming to an end, but notjust yet. still pretty hot out there this afternoon. thank you very much. a re thank you minder of our top story... minder of our top story... retailers urge the government to make food workers exempt from self isolation rules, as more than 600,000 people are pinged in a week in england and wales. i think we have now got over 1000 staff off who have been pinged and
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that is double the normal right and it is rising at 50% week on week. that's all from the bbc news at one. so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s good afternoon. it'sjust after 1.30pm and this is your latest sports news... australia and new zealand have pulled out of the rugby league world cup, due to take place in england this autumn, citing "player welfare and safety concerns" related to covid—19. they've asked organisers to postpone it until next year. they're the two biggest sides in the men's and women's games and their withdrawal will also affect the wheelchair competition. the rugby football league say they've done all they can to alleviate their fears. the rugby league world cup organisers have been bending over backwards the rugby league world cup organisers have been bending over backwards for the rugby league world cup organisers have been bending over backwards for many the rugby league world cup organisers have been bending over backwards for many months the rugby league world cup organisers have been bending over backwards for many months to accommodate all of the concerns raised by the australians and the
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kiwis and we believed they were in a situation, a place where they were willing to come. so this decision is, is a huge blow and i'm sorry to say that i have no choice but to call this a selfish, parochial and cowardly decision. they are now going to have to turn round to their players, their men, women and disability athletes and say to them that because of their decision they are not able to participate in a world cup that should be the pinnacle of their career. i think thatis pinnacle of their career. i think that is going to be very difficult. the players want to come and i think leadership of our sport in our countries has taken that away from them. the olympics officially starts in tokyo tomorrow, with the opening ceremony — but the show director kentaro kobayashi has been sacked, after a comedy sketch from 1998 emerged, in which he referenced the holocaust. organisers are still deciding what form the ceremony will take. we do know that two gold medallists from rio will be leading out team gb. sailor hannah mills — on the left here —
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says she's overwhelmed to be chosen as a flag bearer, alongside rower moe sbihi. in a break from tradition, each nation has been allowed to nominate one female and one male representative. mills and sbihi were selected from a group of athletes put forward by their sports, as exemplifying the olympic and team gb values. to be selected as a rower and the flag bearer in a very olympic baseball, a sport of pride, not much money in it, doesn't create superstars, so to be front of house for the team and to be the face alongside hannah i think is such a phenomenal role. ijust hope that it will show the countries back home that a normal kid from a normal comprehensive secondary school 18 years later can be the person that is weeding out the team at an olympic games. —— leading out the
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team. andy murray was the team gb flag bearer in rio five years ago, when he went on to win the gold medal. he's been talking today about the covid situation in tokyo, after shooter amber hill was forced to pull out following a positive test. 12 new cases have been identified at the games, including two unnamed athletes in the olympic village. it takes the total number of olympic—related cases to 87. murray says he and the rest of the team are wary of the dangers. if you've been preparing for something for five years and something for five years and something like that was to happen to you, it would be brutal. i think there is a little bit more anxiousness, which is understandable. but from what i have seen everyone is sort of taking the protocols and measures in place here seriously. hopefully there will not be too many more issues. the men's football tournament is now underway, and mexico have thrashed france 4—1. the pick of the goals came from sebastian cordova early in the second half. south africa and the hosts japan are the other sides in their group. and you can watch brazil versus germany right now on the bbc sport website, as well as the red button.
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brazil leading 3—0 early in the second half. that's all the sport for now, i'll be back with more later. richarlison with a hat—trick for brazil. i'mjane i'm jane hill, this i'mjane hill, this is bbc news. a tram crash which killed seven people in croydon in south london was an accident, an inquestjury has found. more than 50 people were injured when the tram tipped over and spun off the tracks in november 2016. the tram was travelling three times faster than a speed restriction. the families of those who died say justice has not been done and want another inquest. tom edwards reports. seven people died in the croydon tram crash and their families seven people died in the croydon tram crash and theirfamilies have waited 4.5 years to find out how it
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was allowed to happen. jean smith lost her son mark that morning, he was 35. lack of the other passengers, he was on his way to work. she has found the inquest process unfair, she still has many questions. witnesses from transport for london and the tram operator tol did not appear. for london and the tram operator tol did notappear. i for london and the tram operator tol did not appear-— did not appear. i can't understand how two of _ did not appear. i can't understand how two of the — did not appear. i can't understand how two of the three _ did not appear. i can't understand how two of the three biggest - did not appear. i can't understand i how two of the three biggest players in that room, tfl, tol, not one witness from those companies, no drivers, controllers and no management. it feels at the moment as if they are hiding behind a blanket. , ., blanket. these are the south londoners — blanket. these are the south londoners who _ blanket. these are the south londoners who died - blanket. these are the south londoners who died on - blanket. these are the south - londoners who died on november blanket. these are the south _ londoners who died on november nine, 2016 when tram 2551 overturned. the
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driver also didn't appear at the inquest that he was too sick. this is where it happened. the driver leaving the tunnel briefly touch the brakes, it was too late, the tram was travelling at 73 kilometres per hour on the curve, the speed limit was 20, the court heard it was probable he lost awareness and had a micro—sleep, became disorientated in the tunnel. this is a reconstruction showing to the inquest. investigators found there were no speed limit signs on the tunnel. there are also no systems to automatically break or monitor driverfatigue. all have now automatically break or monitor driver fatigue. all have now been implemented. the court also heard that fatigue management by the tram operator wasn't thought to be a factor as the driver said he wasn't tired. but investigators found in a survey three quarters of drivers thought the company's fatigue
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management was poor or very poor. critics say there were systemic failures. just ten days before the crash, there was another incident on this corner where a tram newly overturned and the emergency brake was used. a passenger complained but it wasn't properly followed up. drivers were scared to report incidents because they thought they would be disciplined. investigators found that one of these nine occasions the emergency brake was used on this corner was that management knew nothing about it. they think you will get justice? management knew nothing about it. they think you will getjustice? hat they think you will get 'ustice? not in this they think you will get justice? lint in this inquest, i don't think. they think you will get justice? not in this inquest, i don't think. the i in this inquest, i don't think. the families still— in this inquest, i don't think. the families still think they have not got the answers to all of their questions. forthem, this got the answers to all of their questions. for them, this is not the end. that report from tom edwards. danielle wynne is the grand—daughter of philip logan who died in the accident
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an absolute shambles right from the beginning, before it even started. evidence has not been heard. that should have been heard. that evidence that hasn't been heard could have made this decision totally different than what we have got today. this was no accident. he was just going to work. it wasn't an accident. there's only one person in charge of that tram that morning, it was that driver. it wasn't an accident. i was that driver. it wasn't an accident-— was that driver. it wasn't an accident. ., ., , , , , accident. i am absolutely disgusted. absolutel , accident. i am absolutely disgusted. absolutely, still— accident. i am absolutely disgusted. absolutely, still it _ accident. i am absolutely disgusted. absolutely, still it is _ accident. i am absolutely disgusted. absolutely, still it is going _ accident. i am absolutely disgusted. absolutely, still it is going on - accident. i am absolutely disgusted. absolutely, still it is going on for. absolutely, still it is going on for us now — absolutely, still it is going on for us now. if— absolutely, still it is going on for us now. , ., , , us now. it is not the end, this is onl the us now. it is not the end, this is only the beginning. _ us now. it is not the end, this is only the beginning. and we - us now. it is not the end, this is only the beginning. and we will| us now. it is not the end, this is i only the beginning. and we will try and overturn this decision because i don't believe that the jury could have ever come back with a different decision bearing in mind the evidence that they have heard, the
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evidence that they have heard, the evidence that they have heard, the evidence that hasn't been heard is crucial. you know, drivers, other people that are part of these organisations, without that evidence we never were going to get a ruling. right from the beginning ijust do not believe that the coroner was experienced enough to do with a case like this, taken on seven this is no easy task and i do not believe she should have been in charge of this case, it needed to be in the high court in london right from the beginning. —— taking on seven deaths is no easy task. beginning. -- taking on seven deaths is no easy task-— is no easy task. danielle wynne, his -- whose grandfather— is no easy task. danielle wynne, his -- whose grandfather died - is no easy task. danielle wynne, his -- whose grandfather died in - is no easy task. danielle wynne, his -- whose grandfather died in the . —— whose grandfather died in the tram crash.
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women quarantining in uk hotels will now have female guards, when possible, after allegations of sexual harassment. the department of health and social care made the change after a bbc report in which a woman said one male guard had mimed having sex in a lift, and another had asked for a hug. if female guards are unavailable, women should be escorted by two male guards. 16 women have reported harassment to the bbc and some say complaints have been ignored or disbelieved. our correspondent, ellie price, has more details about the accounts heard by the bbc. not allowed to leave the room is apart from a short amount of exercise each day. often escorted by security guards, can have food delivered, but again that food is
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delivered, but again that food is delivered often by security guards. what we have heard, 16 of these women who had had varying degrees of quite unsettling testimony, really, that we have heard over the last few months, as you mentioned we had a woman who described a guard taking herfor her daily woman who described a guard taking her for her daily exercise, grabbed her for her daily exercise, grabbed her by the arm, asked if she had a boyfriend. and other colleagues laughed while he was acting inappropriately towards her. another suggested a guard knocked on her door and said she was fit and would she please continue to message. the other part of the story, many of the women we spoke to felt their complaints were not listened to, didn't know even what a complaint in the first place, they felt unsafe in the first place, they felt unsafe in the hotels and afterwards certainly a numberfelt the hotels and afterwards certainly a number felt that their complaints were not listened to properly. ellie price reporting. brittany dodds received 13 facebook messages from a guard on the second day of her quarantine despite ignoring his friend request.
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she told us about her experience. i had him standing at my room nonstop. the only place i am when i am quarantining is inside my room. it was not as though i could pretend i was not there because that would be illegal. he would make comments he was coming up later, late at night, and obviously being a guard he has access to my room 24/7, i think most of them do with the master key. it was constant sitting in your room like a sitting duck waiting for what if, anything could happen. brittany dodds. the headlines on bbc news... retailers urge the government to make food workers exempt from self—isolation rules, as more than 600,000 people are pinged in a week in england and wales. health unions say they may consider industrial action, after the government's offer
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of a 3% payrise for nhs staff in england and wales. and just 24 hours before the opening ceremony of the tokyo olympics, the show�*s director has been sacked. 376,000 people have been moved to safer places in china s flood—stricken henan province and officials say the death toll has reached 33, this including a dozen commuters caught in underground train carriages that filled with muddy water. and now people in the region are preparing for another day of bad weather. china correspondent stephen mcdonell reports from beijing. the debrief on flash leading is everywhere to be seen in zhengzhou. henan's regional capital was hit by a year's worth of rain in a matter of days. today the city is struggling with roads still cut off,
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transport infrastructure down and only patchy electricity. streets became brown rivers, which swept away traffic and bridges. the flooding has been deadly and as the muddy waters recede, the fear is more dead bodies will be found. rain has eased off in zhengzhou but struck elsewhere in henan. overall the situation is not expected to improve for days. in a country where people are used to say public transport, the images of commuters trapped in underground train carriages as the water rose have been unsettling. rescue teams reached most passengers but could not cut through carriages in time to save everyone. now officials in other cities are being asked if there transport systems might be as vulnerable. questions are being asked about the capacity of china's city to handle flash flooding from heavy rainfall. some have speculated that
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with the expansion of these now officials in other cities are being asked if there transport systems might be as vulnerable. questions are being asked about the capacity of china's cities to handle flash flooding from heavy rainfall. the climate change, much more unpredictable weather is expected in the future. in zhengzhou, some residents moving their cars to higher ground in case the water comes again. other such were trying to get out the city, which is still operating on an emergency footing with communication blackout and normal ameneties closed. however leaving zhengzhou might not provide immediate relief as nearby towns and cities were also moving residents in their tens of thousands to several locations. stephen mcdonell, bbc news.
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it's been ten years since the deadly terrorist attacks by far—right extremist anders breivik in norway killed 77 people, mostly teenagers. the attacks took place in oslo and at a summer camp for young political activists on utoya island some 40 killometres political activists on utoya island some 40 kilometres aways from the capital. to mark the day, a ceremony has taken place in oslo. lisa husby, who was 19 years old at the time and one of the camp's leaders, told the bbc�*s witness history programme about her memories of that day and how it still impacts her life a decade later. 50-50 that 50—50 that they, either you found a good hiding spot or did not. everything was random that they and thatis everything was random that they and that is very hard to fathom. you just realised that you got lucky. a bomb attack on the heart of norway's government, all government ministers seem to be safe but at least two dead, some reported trapped.
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the first time i realised something was wrong on the island isjust after five o'clock that afternoon we could hear what we thought were firecrackers. before we could do anything, ijust saw firecrackers. before we could do anything, i just saw this huge wall of people coming running towards me from down by the docks where the shots were coming from. you can see in their eyes that they had had seen something terrible. at that point i thought i had to get somerset because something wrong there. terrified campers were forced a run for their lives, terrified campers were forced a run fortheir lives, pursued terrified campers were forced a run for their lives, pursued by the government, some hidden these rocks, others try to swing the safety while he was still shooting at them. i could hear this one go shouting in the woods, i've been shot, i've been shot and she kept running towards
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us. we started running faster through the woods. you could hear the gunshots getting closer. then he shot through the door three times. we were sure that we were all going to die. the gunmen actually call that people and said, you know, the police is here. it's safe to come forward. once people came out of their hiding spots, he just shot them point—blank. everyone on the island afterwards have had thoughts about why didn't
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we fight him, why didn't we do anything? that's easier said than done when you have two hands and he had two automatic weapons. the first couple of weeks, we were all in shock. but i think once norway started to go back to normal, i think that's when things started getting more difficult for the most of us. ijust getting more difficult for the most of us. i just to getting more difficult for the most of us. ijust to have really terrible nightmares again, and really struggled with depression and anxiety and didn't really have any positive thoughts about the future at all. i reallyjust gave up a little bit for a while there. now i actually live on a farm on my own and they feel safe. just saying
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good morning to my neighbours. hi, guys. i go to schools and talk about the terror attack and teach people about the aftermath of the terror attack, talk about right—wing extremism. i try to use it as something positive because i realise that the more i talked about it, the less scary the actual terror attack seemed. i realised that this one friday back in 2011shouldn't seemed. i realised that this one friday back in 2011 shouldn't be allowed to define the rest of my life and to define me as a victim for the rest of my life. that was lisa husby speaking to bbc�*s witness history. nasa's perseverance rover, which landed on mars in february, is about to begin its historic hunt for signs of ancient life there. nasa has been getting its rover to test various sophisticated instruments which will start taking soil samples soon from what was once
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a suspected lake bed. the hope is that will unearth evidence of potential primitive life, as mark lobel explains. the perseverance rover landed on mars in february and is about to continue its historic hunt for ancient life. nasa has been getting its sophisticated instruments to start taking soil samples soon from what was suspected a once lakebed about 40 kilometres wide. scientists are still unsure whether this oil is sedimentary or volcanic. life would not have had much of a chance to advance any more so we always say we looking for evidence of potential microbial life.
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taking back to the bag hanging on the lunar— taking back to the bag hanging on the lunar module. nasa taking back to the bag hanging on the lunar module.— taking back to the bag hanging on the lunar module. nasa compares this art of the the lunar module. nasa compares this part of the mission _ the lunar module. nasa compares this part of the mission to _ the lunar module. nasa compares this part of the mission to win _ the lunar module. nasa compares this part of the mission to win 52 - the lunar module. nasa compares this part of the mission to win 52 years - part of the mission to win 52 years ago neil armstrong began a process what humanity knew about it, by bagging some understood as the first man to walk on the moon. the mars rover has been using its robotic arm to practice probing martian soil samples. nasa says it will take its six wheeled rover about 11 days to collect rock from the crater. that will be transferred to a revolving carousel before being placed into a tube and analysed before being sealed and stored. with the seismic scoop operation, expected to lift off in august. it may sound and look like a far—away movie, but these space scientists believe they are one step away from a leap in
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planetary science and discovery. many on earth now hoping their perseverance pays off. mark lobel, bbc news. hard to imagine things could change with temperatures into the 30s but they are going to change into the weekend. the cloud heads are way to bring some rain, but sunshine today. northern ireland still covered by the met office amber extreme heat warning valid in northern ireland through into tomorrow. the warning across the midlands, southern belles, south—west england valid through the rest of today. western area seeing some of the highest temperatures. lots of sunshine around, one or two scattered thunderstorms and low carb still affecting eastern parts of scotland
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and north—east england. western areas seem temperatures up to 31—32. more generally mid to high 20s. cool for some north sea coasts. some of the showers and storms could be quite heavy and rumble on into the evening. most places try and once again if you are heading off to bed, 23-24 in again if you are heading off to bed, 23—24 in cardiff. at again if you are heading off to bed, 23-24 in cardiff. at 11 23—24 in cardiff. at 11 o'clock, and comfortable for sleeping. small hours of friday brings the low cloud, much of it retreating towards the coast. could linger more extensively than it has done during the day. sunny spells for most, the odd shower, but the heavy and perhaps thundery rain gathering towards the south—west. the wind strengthens as well, the first sign of quite a big change from the weekend. temperatures lower for many but still high values for western areas, 28 for glasgow for example.
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into northern ireland. for the weekend, low pressure, a frontal system driving outbreaks of rain quite erotically northwards across england and wales throughout saturday. northern ireland likely to stay drier and brighter in northern ireland that might temperatures generally warmer than they have been. —— lower than they have been. sunshine, longerspells been. —— lower than they have been. sunshine, longer spells of rain, especially the south of these are, for the north and west stays dry with some sunshine, high temperatures 23—24.
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health unions say they may consider industrial action, after the government's offer of a 3% payrise for nhs staff in england and wales. we follow covid workers through a remote part of eastern india —
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to find out how they've vaccinated 80 % of adults, way

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