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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 22, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today — a 3% pay rise for nurses and nhs staff. unions say it's not enough, but the health secretary claims it will make a "real difference to people's lives." not to people's lives." only putting more money in the pockets, not only putting more money in their pockets, but showing them how much we value and respect their incredible contribution to our nation. shop owners warn their ability to keep shelves stocked and remain open is under increasing pressure because of the number of staff self—isolating. the boss of the tokyo olympics opening ceremony has been sacked just a day before it's due to take place.
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while the team gb flagbearers for the ceremony have been announced. it's sailor hannah mills and rower mo sbihi who will lead out the team. they're both gold medallists from five years ago. the met office has issued its first—ever extreme heat warnings for northern ireland, parts of england, and wales. i am at a farm outside wolverhampton to discover how they are giving their staff, their crops, and their animals safe. yesterday in northern ireland was the hottest part of the uk, it also broke its own temperature record, 31.3 celsius. today, northern ireland could once again break that record from yesterday. for all of us, it's going to be warm or it's going to be hot, a lot of sunshine after the early cloud burns away. all the details coming up. good morning. it's thursday the 22nd ofjuly. our top story. unions have reacted angrily after the government offered most
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nhs workers in england a pay rise of 3%, which is less than the treasury's predicted rate of inflation. other front line public sector workers, including teachers, police officers and soldiers, will receive no increase at all. our political correspondent helen catt has the details. it's been one of the biggest political rows of the year. how much of a pay rise should nurses, paramedics, and many other health care staff get after months on the gruelling front line of a pandemic, which has also hit the economy? when ministers in england suggested in march that i% was affordable, there was a backlash. now they and the welsh government have agreed to put pay up by 3%, backdated to april. the figure was recommended by an independent pay review body. the health secretary, who is in self—isolation, posted a video on social media giving his view. i'm sure that this pay rise will make a real difference to people's lives,
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not only putting more money in their pockets, but showing them how much we value and respect their incredible contribution to our nation. unions have called the decision a shambolic, and argued it falls far short. they had called for a rise of between 5% and i2.5%. health staff in england will look to scotland, where their counterparts received a much more generous settlement earlier this year, so not only was it more money, but it was backdated as well, so they had payments that go back to december. so staff will feel that this is falling short of what workers in scotland have already had. for other public sector workers, there was confirmation that their pay is not going up. teachers will see their salaries frozen, as announced by the chancellor in the autumn. so too will the police, although people earning less than £24,000 in both professions will get £250, and officers will still get any incremental rises which they were due.
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labour has accused the government of inflicting a real terms pay cut on the police and teachers, and on nhs pay, it says ministers have had to row back on a shoddy ill—thought—through position. the royal college of nursing has said it will consult its members on what steps to take next. a decision has now been made, but the discussion is not over yet. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is in westminster. adam, the government is facing criticism from the people who are helping us to get through this pandemic. how will they respond? what will happen announced that the unions will consult their members, that will take a couple weeks, and in theory, you could see some nhs workers going on strike if they are really angry about the size of this pay award, even though even though the government has increased it quite a lot from where its initial position was. when matt hancock was
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the health secretary, remember him? it was going to be a i% increase. it is now a 3% increase under the new health secretary. some questions about how this information came out as well, unions said they were expecting it last week, then the middle of this week, then early yesterday, then we got the health minister coming to make an announcement that we thought was the announcement that we thought was the announcement of pay, and it wasn't, and then it came out in a written statement at about 5.30. mps will be wondering why they have not had a chance to question ministers about that. also questions from the organisations that provide the care in the nhs about how this will be funded. will they get extra money from the government to now pay for a bigger than expected pay bill? and then of course, we have the process with the unions about members been consulted on where that leads. the government is also facing increasing pressure to change the rules over self—isolation because of severe staff shortages. is that likely?
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suggestions of shortages in some supermarkets. they do not have the drivers or the shelf stackers. so there is a huge number of covid cases every day, that it was about 44,000 positive tests yesterday, and that those people who come into contact with those people get pinged by the app and are told to isolated at home, they get a call from test and trace telling them they have to isolate at home because somebody they know has got covid. that means there is a large number of people not at work, it is particularly affecting retail. lots of supermarkets saying that may be one in 20 of their workforce is at home at the moment, so the newspapers are full of pictures of shops with empty shelves. we are hearing reports of petrol stations closing as well. it is and was very hard to gauge exactly what is going on nationwide, and sometimes a couple of pictures can make it look like there are
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empty shelves everywhere, but the retailers say they are feeling real pressure, and it is having an impact on their stores. then they would like the government to exempt their workers from having to isolate. the government is sticking to its position which is that, for now, in a few crucial sectors like power stations and health and social, then it may be workers will not have to isolate if they are penned by the app, but that does not apply to the workforce generally, and also the real big changes to the isolation policy for everyone will not come in until august the 16th, so it will not be until the middle of next month that you will be able to avoid isolation if you have had both doses of the vaccine and able to get lateral flow test every day instead. but i think this is just going to be a consequence of the economy opening up a consequence of the economy opening up fully, they're not being any rules any more, and restrictions on people's movements, but a lot of cases of covid in the community. adam, for the moment, thank you.
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ministers in northern ireland will meet later to decide whether to ease coronavirus restrictions next week. the northern ireland executive has previously indicated that it hopes to re—open theatres and conference venues and relax some of the rules on socialising. if approved, the changes will come into force from monday. tomorrow's opening ceremony of the tokyo 2020 olympics has been plunged into further chaos following the dismissal of its show director. kentaro kobayashi is alleged to have made anti—semiticjokes during a comedy routine in 1998. meanwhile, 12 new covid cases have been reported in the olympic village, bringing the total to 87. our sports reporter sarah mulkerrins is in tokyo. sarah, what's the latest? this news emerging in the last couple of hours is just the latest
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in a string of controversies, particularly relating to this opening ceremony which will take place on friday here in tokyo. so just more than 24 hours away. we have the confirmation in the press conference from the organisers of tokyo 2020 in the last couple of hours that the director that you mentioned there, kentaro kobayashi, have been fired from his position as director. now, it all relates to this video which has emerged in japan too much shock, and it was filmed back in 1998 when he was a comedian, and it has a skit in end and which he mocks the holocaust. he has since apologised for this, and he has been fired for his position. the organiser also said in the press conference that she was aware people may not want to watch the opening ceremony on friday here because of theissues ceremony on friday here because of the issues that have been cropping
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up. we have the other cases, didn't we come a couple of months ago of one of the creative director has been fired after suggesting that a plus size female comedian should dress up as a pig in the opening ceremony. and then also this weekly music from one of the composers removed after an article came to light in which he had joked about delaying his disabled students in classmates when he was young, so there has been a lot that the organiser has had to deal with to do with this opening ceremony, and a member she herself took over from the former head of tokyo 2020, who has to resign a couple of months ago over sexist comments made. now she says that she would resign over this latest incident, so they are currently reviewing what is happening with the opening ceremony here in tokyo, which takes place on friday. sarah, thanks very much.
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the chinese government has ordered a review into flood safety controls on public transport, after 12 people died when they were trapped in flooded underground railway tunnels. more than 500 people were rescued from tunnels in henan province, which saw a year's worth of rainfall in just three days. let's get the latest now from our china correspondent robin brant, one of the few foreign journalists in the province. robin, what's the situation there now? a bit ofa a bit of a battle to get here, but we have been here overnight, and good news for these people, this is no normality in this part of the city. but you do not have to go far to find evidence of the aftermath of the incessant rain that the city had for five days. we the incessant rain that the city had forfive days. we have the incessant rain that the city had for five days. we have seen over rivers, we have seen cars, numerous cars rivers, we have seen cars, numerous ca rs everywhere rivers, we have seen cars, numerous cars everywhere been recovered and stranded in the middle of the roads,
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or even run into a group of men who were fishing in an underpass of the highway. the death toll has gone up overnight to 33, eight people are missing, and as you said, we have had orders from the national government in beijing for governments to review their preparedness and look at how they operate underground metal networks in particular, because i switched my left, this is an intro to one of the metro stations, it is a shot at the moment, you might be able to see at the bottom some of the flood defences there. but the most troubling questions remain, how did this metro network allow those passengers to be on those carriages, and for those 12 people in particular to lose their lives? at this stage, we just don't know. we are hearing harrowing stories about people waiting for four hours, standing holding onto the rails waiting for rescuers, gasping for air. 12 people lost their lives, the investigation is under way here. i think the first sign may be locally when we have from the communist party, the ruling party, their
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disciplinary commission, but whether they will be taking any action, but thatis they will be taking any action, but that is the most troubling question here this morning, how did this metal networks come to be so vulnerable? robin, thank you very much. —— metro network. the first study to scan elite rugby players' brains suggests one in four could be at risk of small abnormalities. but the team led by imperial college london found that further research is needed to understand the long—term implications of repeated head trauma. it comes come as a parliamentary inquiry concluded that the government needs to do more to reduce the risk of brain injuries in sport. our health editor hugh pym reports. and at a rugby union players in training. it is a contact sport, and there are strict protocols relating to a concussion and head injuries, but there is a growing debate over the long—term consequences of playing the game at professional level rather than on recreational and social rugby. nick evans, a former wales international, has campaigned for more recognition of head injuries. she says she has no recollection of one of the games she played in. it
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recollection of one of the games she -la ed in. ., . recollection of one of the games she -la ed in. ._,, played in. it led to a season where i -la ed played in. it led to a season where i played with _ played in. it led to a season where i played with head _ played in. it led to a season where i played with head injuries - played in. it led to a season where i played with head injuries and - i played with head injuries and filling notions. quite significant impact on me, and i continued regardless, i didn't really think about the long—term repercussions, really. 3 about the long-term repercussions, reall. �* , , , about the long-term repercussions, reall. , _ , ., really. a study led by imperial colle . e really. a study led by imperial college london _ really. a study led by imperial college london assessed - really. a study led by imperial college london assessed 41 i really. a study led by imperial. college london assessed 41 elite level mail rugby union elite level players and three female. 22% had brain abnormalities in the shape of small tears and blood vessels. the study, based on brain scans, also found changes in volume of the so—called white matter, in effect the wiring of the brain. the scans were compared with those of athletes in a non—collision sports. organisers say more research is needed to back out if there are any long—term effects on players' health. the founder of the organisation which conducted the research says it is an important
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step forward. we research says it is an important step forward-— research says it is an important step forward. we certainly don't have the full— step forward. we certainly don't have the full picture _ step forward. we certainly don't have the full picture yet. - step forward. we certainly don't have the full picture yet. what l step forward. we certainly don't i have the full picture yet. what we need _ have the full picture yet. what we need to _ have the full picture yet. what we need to establish is whether these abnormal— need to establish is whether these abnormal white matter changes progress — abnormal white matter changes progress and we'd eventually to clinical— progress and we'd eventually to clinical symptoms. we don't know, we really— clinical symptoms. we don't know, we really don't _ clinical symptoms. we don't know, we really don't know, but there to raise _ really don't know, but there to raise significant concern about long—term brain health. —— there is enough _ long—term brain health. —— there is enough there — long—term brain health. —— there is enough there to this significant concern — enough there to this significant concern. ' . . , enough there to this significant concern. , . ., , , concern. officials said they welcomed _ concern. officials said they welcomed any _ concern. officials said they welcomed any research - concern. officials said they i welcomed any research which concern. officials said they - welcomed any research which helps concern. officials said they _ welcomed any research which helps to advance knowledge of head injuries. we want to be able to make sure we present the risks and benefits honestly, and being commissioning and collaborate in research like thatis and collaborate in research like that is part of that process. in a se arate that is part of that process. in a separate report, _ that is part of that process. in a separate report, mps_ that is part of that process. in a separate report, mps have called for the health and safety executive to be more involved in sport and help establish a national framework for reporting all sports injuries, with the long—term aim of passing on all details of all events which might
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lead to brain injury. the digital, culture, media and sport committee said it was astounded that sport should be left to mark its own homework. hugh pym, bbc news. prince george is celebrating his eighth birthday today. kensington palace has released this photograph to mark the occasion. it was taken earlier this month by his mother, the duchess of cambridge. as you can see, a very happy—looking prince is sitting on the bonnet of a land rover in norfolk. now the weather with carol. everyone wants to know, i am looking at that scene, it is going to be another hot one. it is indeed, good morning, everybody. it is a nice warm start to the day here in london, a gentle breeze. yesterday the highest temperature in the uk was in northern ireland, in county tyrone, reaching 31.3 celsius. and
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thatis tyrone, reaching 31.3 celsius. and that is the highest temperature ever recorded in the northern ireland. today, though, the potentialfor that temperature to be beaten. the forecast for the next few days, another hot one today and tomorrow, and as we head into the weekend, we are looking at some heavy thundery downpours that could well lead to localised flooding with a lot of lightning strikes. the met office still has two amber extreme heat weather warnings in force, you can see them across northern ireland. that runs until midnight on friday, and the south—west and quarter of the uk runs until midnight tonight. so this morning, we have a lot of low cloud across the north and east, with some mist that will burn away, with some mist that will burn away, with a lot of sunshine, it might linger around the coast, and temperatures could get up to 3132 in northern ireland, but it will be hot and sunny across most areas. this evening, any showers that have developed through the course of the day will tend to fade once again, all the cloud front and back in from the north sea across the north and
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east, some mist and fog patches for men, and it will be a warm night. tomorrow we will start off with all that cloud, much of it will burn away, but there will be more proud in england and we have seen in the last few days, having said that, still a lot of sunshine, cool along the east coast because we will have an easterly flow, so the heat again will be in the west, but not quite as high as it's going to be today for some. then as we head into the weekend, that is when it breaks down. but for scotland and northern ireland, you will hang onto some dry and sunny conditions, but for all of us, temperatures closer to where they should become a feel fresher thanit they should become a feel fresher than it has done. carol, thank you very much, see you later. the time is 6.18. four years after six—year—old sunderland fan bradley lowery died from a rare form of cancer, his mum gemma has spoken about his legacy. after donations from around the world, the family are building a holiday home for other children with life—limiting illnesses. gemma has been speaking to reporter
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fiona trott about memories of bradley and her hopes for the future now she's expecting another baby. i'm 22 weeks pregnant at the moment, and we are having a little girl, and we are extremely happy. gemma lowery is starting a new chapter in her life. i'm sure bradley would be over the moon to be a big brother, too. have you thought about a name? i have, but i'm not going to reveal that just yet. we have got a name, but we are not announcing itjust yet. what will you tell her about bradley? she will be told that he was very cheeky, but very happy and had the most beautiful smile. six—year—old bradley lowery passed away four years ago. he had neuroblastoma, a rare form of cancer. he was mad about sunderland football club and captured the heart of his herojermain defoe. when he died, the money raised
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for his treatment was used to set up a charity to help others, but it's also helped his own mum. i threw myself into supporting other families with the bradley lowery foundation, and i knew that i had to get up of a morning because i knew i had otherfamilies to help, so they didn't have to go through the pain that i went through. how far do those feelings go? very far. i was in a very, very, very low point in my life, and i really did not want to be here, i really didn't, i wanted to be with bradley, because the pain is that bad. however, there is a difference between wanting to do it and actually doing it. but i knew that i needed to kind of get some help. and you do start to learn to love life again, and to enjoy life. i look at photos, and i am happy, and videos, and it brings a smile. where are we going?
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scarborough! yay! this was bradley's last holiday, in scarborough, precious memories gemma wants other families to make. that's why, in the next few weeks, these gates will be opened for the developers. the bradley lowery foundation is building a holiday home for children with life limiting illnesses. going to be five bedrooms, and then the living space in the shape of an l for lowery. i've had this vision since probably just after brad passed. i had this vision to be able to put smiles back on families' faces, and ijust know how many laughs and good times people are going to have. and when you see people happy, then it'sjust the best, isn't it? this seaside town holds a special place in gemma's heart, a place where bradley's legacy will live on. how do you feel when you think about the future? i'm scared, nervous, but i'm excited.
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that doesn't mean to say that it's an easy ride. when i first fell pregnant, i thought, what if bradley didn't want this, what am i doing, what happens when the baby comes, how will i feel? but now i'm quite excited. but i am nervous, because i am probably going to be a little bit overprotective. but because of my personality, because of how positive i am, i willjust think of the positives and try to just enjoy every second. fiona trott reporting there. to the member bradley and be able to be excited about the future and accept that, and also the lovely idea that building in the shape of an l. , . , ., ., an l. some very exciting times ahead for gemma. — an l. some very exciting times ahead for gemma. who _ an l. some very exciting times ahead for gemma, who will— an l. some very exciting times ahead for gemma, who will keep _ an l. some very exciting times ahead for gemma, who will keep an - an l. some very exciting times ahead for gemma, who will keep an eye - an l. some very exciting times ahead for gemma, who will keep an eye on | for gemma, who will keep an eye on the building as it comes on, because that will be a joy for many families in the future. let's take a look at today's papers. the daily mirror
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leads on the offer of a 3% pay rise for nhs workers, describing it as an "insult". the paper asks, "is that really all they are worth?" the guardian says nurses are likely to reject the offer and may take industrial action in protest, while other unions also plan to ballot memberships over possible strikes. many of the papers lead with the large number of workers being told to self—isolate by the nhs covid app, with staffing shortages now affecting supermarket supplies. the sun says stores have warned the prime minister he hasjust 48 hours to fix the crisis, or shoppers will face empty shelves. the metro calls it "shelf isolation." it also highlights that sir keir starmer is self—isolating after one of his children tested positive for covid. despite being the world's largest producer of covid vaccines, just 6% of people in india have received both doses. with fears of an imminent third wave, there is now pressure to vaccinate more of the population.
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our south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan has this report. these are the lengths some health workers are going to to deliver vaccines across india. in this far—flung corner of the country, they're making arduousjourneys to reach remote villages accessible only by foot. in the blistering heat, we trekked through the jungle with this team. covid cases have been rising here in the state of arunachal pradesh, so they are picking up the pace of their vaccine drive. translation: we go by foot, boat, or by hanging bridges. _ there are some very dangerous places here. our main responsibility is to maintain the temperature of the cool box to preserve the vaccines. that's why we try to reach
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the villages as soon as we can. the team are pushing themselves to the limit, but here in changlang and all across india, there have been challenges. the government has been criticised for being too slow to getjabs out. in this district, they have offered cash prizes to health centres which deliver the most doses. how long have we got now? half an hour, we how long have we got now? half an hour. we need _ how long have we got now? half an hour, we need to _ how long have we got now? half an hour, we need to work _ how long have we got now? half an hour, we need to work more. - how long have we got now? half an i hour, we need to work more. another half an hour? — hour, we need to work more. another half an hour? yeah. _ hour, we need to work more. another half an hour? yeah. ok, _ hour, we need to work more. another half an hour? yeah. ok, this- hour, we need to work more. another half an hour? yeah. ok, this is- hour, we need to work more. another half an hour? yeah. ok, this is not. half an hour? yeah. ok, this is not eas . after three gruelling hours, we finally make it to the tribal village of kamlang. outside the school, they're already waiting for theirjabs. it's quite a turnaround after villagers were scared to get a vaccine. this man was one of the many who needed persuading. "there were rumours that you would fall sick or die "after taking one," he told me.
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"most villagers didn't want to come for the vaccine, "but health workers convinced us, so we agreed." it took months of work to overcome vaccine hesitancy among the district's 80,000 adults. india has just come out of a devastating second wave, and the race is now on to get as many people vaccinated vaccinated as possible. nationally, around one third of adults have had at least one dose, but here in changlang, despite the odds, they have done better. more than 80% of people have had one shot. changlang's programme is going against the grain. officials say incentives are also boosting turnout. at a nearby village, they are running a vaccination drive on the same day that they are distributing free rice rations. in this farming community,
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it is an effective way to encourage people to show up. most of the people are into agriculture. they have to spare two days, one for getting rice and one to get vaccination, so the idea behind this putting both together is that they have to spare only one day. they might be leading the way in changlang, but india's vaccination programme is making slow progress. it still has a long way to go if it wants to reach its target of immunising all 915 million adults by the end of this year. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news, arunachal pradesh. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from the bbc�*s news teams in london and the south east. the ambulance services for kent, sussex, surrey and london are reminding people to take extra care in the sun — after demand for help increased during the warmer weather.
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together the the two services are now receiving up to 11,000 calls a day — often relating to dehydration and heat stroke. people are being reminded to use alternatives such as the nhs111 service for non—emergencies. with the third wave of covid and the fact that people are going on school holidays are not surprisingly people are taking leave, and not surprisingly people in the south are going to the south—east coast and enjoying the facilities there, it is a busy time for us and all ambulance services. a private funeral for kent pcso julia james is taking place at canterbury cathedral later today. the 53—year—old died from head injuries after walking her dog close to her home in snowdown near dover. a 21 year old man has been charged with her murder. new research shows the easing of lockdown has improved some teenagers mental health. the study by the mental health foundation found that the proportion of teenagers who said their mental health was poor has fallen from 18 per cent in march to 14 percent — but loneliness and anxiety
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remain extremely common. students at the london academy of excellence tottenham are being offered counselling. an athlete from kent who suffered serious injuries in the run—up to the last olympic games says its all about �*living in the moment�* this time, as he prepares to compete in tokyo. 22 year—old giarnni regini—moran from gravesend had to learn how to walk again, but he's now back at the top competing for team gbs gymnastics squad. going through kind of all of that adversity with my knee, then my ankle, this is what i live for. i am here, and i don't really give myself time to reflect on what i've been through. because i kind ofjust take each day as it comes, and to be here, i'm really proud and grateful. time for the weather with elizabeth. it's another warm day in store
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across the south—east. warm start to the morning with lots of blue sky sunshine throughout the first half of the day and more sunny spells into the afternoon and there will be fair weather clown developing in the small chance of one or two isolated showers breaking out but for the majority of us it will be completely dry and temperatures peaking in the middle or high 20s and perhaps a degree or so down on where we have been and there is more of an easterly breeze going on so with the easterly breeze going on so with the east of —— eastern coastal areas of kent, you will feel cooler here. overnight, uncomfortable for sleeping and temperatures will remain high for much of the night and any showers we see will fade away to give us clear skies and this will be the temperatures into friday morning with friday feeling cooler and the breeze will increase a touch but it should stay dry and there is a met office warning in for heavy rain over the weekend. heavy, thundery showers and temperatures back to the seasonal average. triage back to the seasonal average. now back to the seasonal average. now back to the seasonal average. now back to the — back to the seasonal average. now back to the national breakfast team.
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goodbye. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. coming up this morning, it was a winning start in tokyo for team gb yesterday as the women's football side beat chile. we'll be chatting to one of the bbc�*s olympic presenter, clare balding a little later on. after spending years bringing the good vibes on stage, happy monday's legend bez is now making his vocal debut and will be here with us in the studio this morning. and just after 9, we'll be taking a look at a new bbc two series which gives rare behind the scenes access to firefighters on the frontline. the number of young people in england who have been admitted to hospital with an eating disorder, has risen by almost 50% according to nhs figures.
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waiting times for treatment have also increased dramatically, with community based services struggling to keep up with demand. jayne mccubbin has been to meet one family who found it difficult to cope during lockdown, when their daughter developed anorexia. she just wouldn't eat. she would just not eat. you feel like you can't win. it's like your child has been taken as a hostage. you are seeing your child die, slowly, in front of you. ijust want my child to eat. how can i make my child eat? you just felt like you were having to just wait until your child got so ill, that they were literally about to die before anything would be done. hannah's descent into anorexia began at the start of lockdown mark one. for many young people, the pandemic
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provided a perfect storm. isolation, separation, anxiety and, for an increasing number, an eating disorder. she was due to do her gcses and all of a sudden, of course, that didn't happen and she had time on her hands. and we couldn't really meet up with friends, so i was literallyjust in the house and i thought, i've got all this time to kill, why not try and change what i didn't like about myself so i started this programme, working out more. she had nothing else to occupy her mind so this had become her whole thing. and then i started to cut out carbs. doing more work hours. i wasn't really me any more. every now and then you would see a glimmer of hannah in there, but most of the time you were dealing with this other entity that had taken her over. it's so strong. it's such a strong, strong illness. take the lid off that.
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the number of under 20s admitted to hospital with an eating disorder rose by nearly 50% between april 2020 and march this year while the figure for over 20ss remained almost exactly the same. fortunately for hannah and lisa, they had somewhere to turn. there was one woman who was really there for you. yeah. which was marge oaten from seed. she was brilliant. so nice to meet you both. thank you. marge and husband denis set up an eating disorder charity after seeing their own daughter struggle. through lockdown they have offered advice by e—mail or video call, but today we have arranged a surprise. you don't normally get to do this, do you? we certainly don't. meet the people you help. it's special for us. today they are coming face—to—face with the family whose advice they believe saved their daughter's life. i know they are eager to thank you, but they think, they think, they are thanking you over zoom, so this will be something else, so thank you for doing this.
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you are very welcome. thank you. we've got somebody to see you. 0h! you are so naughty. we thought we would, i and zoom you in person. can i hug you? you do what you want. i know. the last time we saw you - on the zoom, you were in hospital. i was. it was heartbreaking for us, because we've been there. i we'd been there and we knew what you are going through. l as covid hit, inpatient beds were at a premium just when they were needed most. this is some of the very last e—mail exchanges between lisa and marge in the days before hannah was finally admitted to hospital to access help. 3rd of january, 2021. she said, she's restricting all her food now. we are hoping and praying for admission to hospital,
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but we know covid has affected emissions enormously. i am very fearful. is she having palpitations? slurring her words? is she vacant? is her core body temperature is low or less than 36, please call and please don't wait for an appointment. i've told her to tell me the minute she feels unwell. how she had any pain in her kidneys? rapid weight loss is a risk. last week she lost the most weight she has ever lost. here is keeping everything crossed they can admit her in the next few days. i am not sharing this info to frighten you but to keep you aware. please keep safe. we bought hannah to our a&e last night. her blood pressure and heart rate dropped dramatically and the crisis team moved in. thank god, thank the lord she is in the right place now. and she was. i think that... so sorry for getting emotional. this is happening across the board, and we've seen so many of these e—mails, so many and more has got to he done —
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do you want me to turn the carrots as well? - yeah. today, hannah at least is in a good place. do you feel like you've really turned a corner now? oh, yeah, definitely. you've got your girl back? oh, the minute she came back it was amazing. things are good. i'm really good right now. there is hope, isn't there? there is always hope. yeah. there is. you are proof. yeah, yeah. that is a positive note to visit —— finish on, and huge thanks to hannah and lisa and the family for taking part in the film that will help us. let's get more on this now from one of our regular gps, dr rachel ward. good morning to you. good morning. i hoe ou good morning to you. good morning. i hope you are — good morning to you. good morning. i hope you are able _ good morning to you. good morning. i hope you are able to _ good morning to you. good morning. i hope you are able to hear— good morning to you. good morning. i hope you are able to hear some - good morning to you. good morning. i hope you are able to hear some of - hope you are able to hear some of the piece and i think you were. it ends on a positive note and this is a family getting some help but we
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understand that the number of young people affected by anorexia or some form of eating disorder is a lot worse now than it has been. is that something you are seeing? absolutely. hannah's story was unfortunately quite a common situation and we know that the pandemic has been very, very tough for young people and that has affected their mental well—being in many ways and one way it has presented is there has been a significant increase in people with eating disorders and one thing i find very, very worrying is what we have also seen as a large increase in the number of people needing admissions for eating disorders which highlights the severity and the stage that people get to and this really worries me and it highlights that people are not getting the help with the eating disorder before they get to the severe level requiring admission
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like hannah did. you severe level requiring admission like hannah did.— severe level requiring admission like hannah did. you are a gp and if ou have like hannah did. you are a gp and if you have a — like hannah did. you are a gp and if you have a family _ like hannah did. you are a gp and if you have a family come _ like hannah did. you are a gp and if you have a family come to - like hannah did. you are a gp and if you have a family come to you - like hannah did. you are a gp and if you have a family come to you or i like hannah did. you are a gp and if you have a family come to you or a | you have a family come to you or a young person come to you who presents with what you think is some form of eating disorder, what confidence do you have that you can pass them through to a place where they might get help? what services are available and how is that being affected by the other issues we know are affecting care and health? we are facing this huge increase in numbers and they are just not coping. br;
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numbers and they are 'ust not coinu. �* , . numbers and they are 'ust not coinu. j . , ., coping. by direct people to charities such _ coping. by direct people to charities such as _ coping. by direct people to charities such as the uk i coping. by direct people to - charities such as the uk eating disorder charity to get extra support and we saw a smaller charity getting support but it's a real concern knowing that when somebody comes to us it will be a long time before they get the appropriate support. before they get the appropriate su ort. , ., , . support. there is a picture emerging and it aoes support. there is a picture emerging and it goes across _ support. there is a picture emerging and it goes across industries - and it goes across industries and the nhs as well in relation to the number of people required to solve isolate because they have been pinged, and it is hard to get the big picture on this. what are you seeing within your own practice or within the communities you work in? i am speaking to so many people every day who have been asked to self—isolate either through the track and trace app or because they've had direct contact with somebody who is positive for covid or somebody who is positive for covid in their household and we are seeing this very commonly and it is
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affecting many services because there is concern about supermarkets and in my practice we have a couple of people who are isolating at the moment and the rules have now changed but with very specific, careful measures, people in some front line services can return to the workplace that they obviously have to have a risk assessment and meet criteria in order to do so, so i think this is causing disruption across the country in many businesses.— across the country in many businesses. ,, , , ., businesses. the nhs is very front and centre _ businesses. the nhs is very front and centre in _ businesses. the nhs is very front and centre in news _ businesses. the nhs is very front and centre in news coverage - businesses. the nhs is very front. and centre in news coverage because of the 3% pay offer, the pay award the government has announced. can i ask you for a thought on that because the unions, the nurses unions have said that there has been dismay about what it will mean in real terms. dismay about what it will mean in realterms. firstly dismay about what it will mean in real terms. firstly i would say that this doesn't affect me because i am
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a gp partner. the this doesn't affect me because i am a gp partner-— a gp partner. the pay rise doesn't affect me- — a gp partner. the pay rise doesn't affect me- my _ a gp partner. the pay rise doesn't affect me. my opinion _ a gp partner. the pay rise doesn't affect me. my opinion is - a gp partner. the pay rise doesn't affect me. my opinion is not - a gp partner. the pay rise doesn't| affect me. my opinion is not based on that. so, yes, it's a 3% increase and we were told it might be a 1% increase and some people might think thatis increase and some people might think that is positive and a lot of public sector workers are having a pay freeze, however, we have to put this into the context that over the last decade health care workers have had a 19% pay cut because pay increases have not kept up with inflation. i think personally we have a long way to go with this and with working conditions for our health care workers who have frankly kept us all going over the last couple of years in order to ensure that we have a —— appropriate and good recruitment and retention of staff which is what we really need as we continue through this pandemic. and we will also face many years of delays and problems in
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the nhs as a result, so we need to really think about our staffing levels carefully and how we achieve that. rachel, i know you made the point that it doesn't affect you personally. point that it doesn't affect you personally-— point that it doesn't affect you personally. but we are hearing talk of industrial _ personally. but we are hearing talk of industrial action _ personally. but we are hearing talk of industrial action and _ personally. but we are hearing talk of industrial action and that - of industrial action and that clearly would have implications for everyone involved in the nhs system. obviously these things are never taken lightly and i was involved in thejunior taken lightly and i was involved in the junior doctor strike years ago now and that was a very rare occurrence. i think we are a long way off that at the moment and let's hope it doesn't come to that. rachel, have a good day and always good to catch up with you. thank you very much. we have to talk to mike, the olympic tomorrow, the opening ceremony on the games have begun we the football yesterday but it is mired in controversy.- mired in controversy. hard to remember — mired in controversy. hard to remember a _ mired in controversy. hard to remember a more _ mired in controversy. hard to remember a more troubled i mired in controversy. hard to - remember a more troubled build-up remember a more troubled build—up to an olympics ever and that is aside from covid as you have the show director now sacked for him making
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jokes about the holocaust in a video in 1998 and there will be a review of the plans for the opening ceremony but more couple of positive faces in terms of team gb. whatever form the opening ceremony takes, two gold medallists from rio, will be leading out team gb in tokyo. sailor hannah mills, and rower mo sibihi have been named as flagbearers — in a break from tradition, each nation has been allowed to choose one female and one male representative. mills and sibihi were selected from a group of athletes, nominated by their sports, as exemplifying the olympic and team gb values. shooter amber hill, said she was "absolutely devastated" after being forced to pull out of the games, following, a positive covid test. she's the world number one, in the women's skeet and was a big medal hope. better news for the 400—metre hurdler, jessie knight, who will,
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be allowed to compete at the games, despite being among those told to isolate, after a passenger on their flight, to tokyo tested positive for coronavirus. they've all been given the green light to resume training. as an athlete you did know it could happen because of the current information, so you just knew, and i'm just relieved i haven't tested positive and i'm in a good position and have not tested positive and to be honest i'm spending a lot of time in my room but i am relaxed and can focus on the one thing and the reason i am here. the new cricket competition — the hundred — got off to a flying start with the first women's match — and oval invincibles pulled off a thrilling victory over manchester originals. over seven—and—a—half thousand people were watching and our reporterjo currie was among them. lighting up the london sky, a potential new era for cricket in this country. the traditionalists said there was no appetite for a new tournament but plenty of fans made their way to the oval for this historic game to see what the hundred was all about. a women's match to kick things off, and visitors manchester originals winning the toss and opting to bat.
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after all the hype, all eyes were on that first ball. a wide. perhaps the nerves were showing early. the first wicket quickly followed, but the invincibles found it harder to remove south african batter, lizelle lee. one the big—name signings of the league, she showed how you turn up to a big match, notching up 42. india's harmanpreet kaur wasn't messing around either. this was a third boundary in a row. when you only have 100 balls to win a game, this is how to do it, before kate cross saw out the originals innings as they set a target of 136 for victory. when you are the tournament's youngest player you might be forgiven for a little trepidation, but not 16—year—old, alice capsey, this, her first ball. as time ticked on the invincibles were under pressure to hit runs. enter dane van niekerk as her half—century set up a nervy finish. with the hosts needing one run from three balls, they did it with a couple to spare.
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so there it is, the oval making history by recording the first ever win in the hundred. the question is now can they and the other teams win over fans in this format of the game in the coming weeks. jo currie, bbc news, the oval. it's one of the great sporting comebacks. alun wyn jones will captain the british and irish lions for the opening test against south africa on saturday. yet, the welshman's tour looked to be over less than a month ago, after he suffered a dislocated shoulder but his remarkable recovery means he'll become the first player in the professional era, to win 10 successive test caps for the lions. it's a side that has three scottish players, for the first time in 24 years, and a team, that against all the odds, will be led by the 35 year old wyn jones. to be sitting here now and involved in the test matches what i've worked for, and i'd be lying if i said it
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was two years, it's more like four years, and when you finish a series or tour, you don't know if you will have a lot of games going under the bridge, so to be sitting here now, it's a very special thing, but like i say, it's a very short step to what will be hopefully an enjoyable week. what will be hopefully an en'oyable week. �* . what will be hopefully an en'oyable week. . . ., ., , what will be hopefully an en'oyable week. ~ . . ., , ., week. amazing. lazarus, miracle man. words used — week. amazing. lazarus, miracle man. words used to — week. amazing. lazarus, miracle man. words used to describe _ week. amazing. lazarus, miracle man. words used to describe his _ week. amazing. lazarus, miracle man. words used to describe his comeback. words used to describe his comeback when he was on the sofa trying to recover when the players touched down in south africa. and a huge lift for the side for him to be on the pitch. lift for the side for him to be on the itch. _, ,. lift for the side for him to be on the pitch-— the pitch. got your attention, it was alun wyn _ the pitch. got your attention, it was alun wyn jones, _ the pitch. got your attention, it was alun wyn jones, that - the pitch. got your attention, it was alun wyn jones, that was l the pitch. got your attention, itj was alun wyn jones, that was a the pitch. got your attention, it - was alun wyn jones, that was a big was alun wynjones, that was a big man hug. was alun wyn jones, that was a big man hu~. . ~~ was alun wyn jones, that was a big manhu:. . ~~ , man hug. thanks, mike, we will see ou later man hug. thanks, mike, we will see you later on- — man hug. thanks, mike, we will see you later on- we _ man hug. thanks, mike, we will see you later on. we have _ man hug. thanks, mike, we will see you later on. we have to _ man hug. thanks, mike, we will see you later on. we have to talk- man hug. thanks, mike, we will see you later on. we have to talk to - you later on. we have to talk to carol about the weather and if you've been hearing a heart and unable to sleep, carol is in the perfect position. hi, cooling down, maybe maybe not a sticky hot breeze
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on the roof of broadcasting house. good morning, carol. good morning. a new absolute right, it's perfect on the roof in london. nice temperatures of 19 degrees, a gentle breeze and the sun is out but the forecast for the next few days is another hot and sunny one, especially for today and tomorrow and temperatures will then return to close to average as we head into the weekend but the weekend for england and wales is going to be a wet one with torrential and thundery downpours and lightning flashes and the chance we could have localised flooding. there are two amber warnings in force from the met office for extreme heat for northern ireland and the south—west quarter of the uk. the south—west one will run out at midnight tonight and the northern ireland one runs out at midnight tomorrow night. this morning we have a murky start to the day with cloud in the north and east and misty patches around but most of that will lift and some of the cloud is lingering along the coastline itself but a lot of sunshine and the
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odd shower popping up in the afternoon. still a hot day for most and northern ireland could reach 31 or possibly 32 degrees, higher than the record that was set yesterday. through the evening and overnight a lot of the showers will fade and there will be a lot of dry weather but you will see a lot of cloud coming in from the north sea across the north and east and it will be another warm night in prospect. tomorrow we start with all of the cloud and if anything tomorrow in england it will be more cloud than we are used to this week but there will still be a lot of sunshine as well. out towards the west, here is where we will have the highest temperatures but you will notice by the end of the day we have showery rain across the south—west and the channel islands. temperatures, the highest in the west, cool in the east with an easterly flow coming in from the north sea. and then on saturday, we have some rain moving northwards across england and also wales and that is what we were telling you about, likely to be heavy and thundery and could lead to
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localised flooding but as we move north to scotland and northern ireland we look at dry conditions with sunshine but across the board, the temperatures will be lower than they will be as we go through the next couple of days and on sunday it remains unsettled, particularly across england and wales. carol, thank you very much. we across england and wales. carol, thank you very much.— thank you very much. we will be feelin: thank you very much. we will be feeling the _ thank you very much. we will be feeling the effects _ thank you very much. we will be feeling the effects of— thank you very much. we will be feeling the effects of the - thank you very much. we will be | feeling the effects of the weather this week and perhaps spare a thought for those working outside. victoria is on a farm this morning to hear how they have been keeping staff and livestock safe. strawberries, is that right? that is harrison over there who has started picking for the day. he's only picking for the day. he's only picking till nine o'clock, why? it is extremely hot and the met office hasissued is extremely hot and the met office has issued an extreme weather warning for here but also for other parts of the country, many parts of
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england, wales but also northern ireland as well. it is expected to reach temperatures of up to 33 degrees and its in places like this, under a polytunnel, you can expect to be 5 degrees higher than that so what are the main problems? things like sunburn but also heat exhaustion and it poses quite a problem for people running businesses outside if you have lots of outside workers but also if you have cattle or pigs or crops as well, soft fruit that is suddenly ripening at the same time, so how do you prepare for days like this and we have will hear, the owner and manager of the farm. what have you done to prepare for the weather we have been seeing?— done to prepare for the weather we have been seeing? harrison will only ick until have been seeing? harrison will only pick until nine _ have been seeing? harrison will only pick until nine o'clock _ have been seeing? harrison will only pick until nine o'clock to _ have been seeing? harrison will only pick until nine o'clock to limit - have been seeing? harrison will only pick until nine o'clock to limit the - pick until nine o'clock to limit the time we spend outside. the water consumption goes up a lot on the livestock and they drink more and the free range pigs need water creating so we put there to keep the
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pig school and it's important to look after the welfare of the animals. ~ ., ., , ., ., animals. what does it mean for the workers? it's _ animals. what does it mean for the workers? it's uncomfortable - animals. what does it mean for the workers? it's uncomfortable for- animals. what does it mean for the j workers? it's uncomfortable for the livestock and the pigs, but for the workers, it's difficult because the animals don't want to move around and be prodded and poked and moved around the field? some and be prodded and poked and moved around the field?— around the field? some things we don't bother _ around the field? some things we don't bother doing. _ around the field? some things we don't bother doing. if— around the field? some things we don't bother doing. if there - around the field? some things we don't bother doing. if there is - don't bother doing. if there is work to do with the livestock that is too hot, there's no bother. the cattle don't want to move, the pigs don't want to move, the farm staff are not keen on going out in the heat so we leave it to a cooler day. i’ge leave it to a cooler day. i've been admirin: leave it to a cooler day. i've been admiring your _ leave it to a cooler day. i've been admiring your strawberries - leave it to a cooler day. i've been admiring your strawberries and i must admit i've had one already, a sneaky one, but what i noticed as a lot of the fruit is coming online at the same time and we had the cold and hard difficult spring and these were in may and this will be about the same situation with the blueberries, so how do you manage that when all of the fruit is coming online at the same time? it presents management — online at the same time? it presents management and — online at the same time? it presents management and sales _ online at the same time? it presents management and sales issues. - online at the same time? it presents management and sales issues. all i online at the same time? it presentsj management and sales issues. all of the fruit is sold direct to the
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public, so we are in control to the extent we can put special offers on and do bulk discounts on things like that as we control the whole of the supply chain almost. we are farming it and selling it. it is an issue and when you get lots of hot weather you get everything ready at the same time and we manage it as best as we can. time and we manage it as best as we can, ., ., " time and we manage it as best as we can, time and we manage it as best as we can. . ~ ., time and we manage it as best as we can. ., can. looking back over the last few ears, it can. looking back over the last few years. it does _ can. looking back over the last few years, it does seem _ can. looking back over the last few years, it does seem to _ can. looking back over the last few years, it does seem to be - can. looking back over the last few years, it does seem to be that - can. looking back over the last few years, it does seem to be that we i years, it does seem to be that we are getting more of this extreme weather pattern, whether it is heat or we have had unbelievable amounts of rain, we've had snow, so how is it changing how you are farming? it makes things more difficult to manage and predict and on a day—to—day basis, not a lot will change but the long—term planning might change and we had the beast of the east in 2018 and before covid we had the floods and it makes things difficult when you can't get on the ground to do field work or it's wet all the crops fail because there are
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drought conditions or too much rain and then the livestock, they don't want to have months of rain and they don't want to be suffering with heat exhaustion in the summer so it creates long—term issues that might change things going forward in the medium or long term.— medium or long term. really interesting — medium or long term. really interesting and _ medium or long term. really interesting and it _ medium or long term. really interesting and it does - medium or long term. really interesting and it does make | medium or long term. really i interesting and it does make it harder and more costly. well, thank you for your time. before i go, can i pick a strawberry? i will go along the lines. here we go. that is a good one here. i tell you what, i am going to bring you back a punnet. these are absolutely delicious. and they smell amazing. iam very i am very jealous. you have made us want strawberries now. we were saying thatjust now, wouldn't it be nice? enjoy them, victoria. see you later. time to get the news and travel where you are.
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good morning from the bbc�*s news teams in london and the south east. the ambulance services for kent, sussex, surrey and london are reminding people to take extra care in the sun — after demand for help increased during the warmer weather. together the the two services are now receiving up to 11,000 calls a day — often relating to dehydration and heat stroke. people are being reminded to use alternatives such as the nhs111 service for non—emergencies. if you can access your health care needs through other avenues, through nhs 111, needs through other avenues, through nhs111, your needs through other avenues, through nhs 111, your gp, your pharmacist, pharmacists have a wealth of information that they can share and support, some i ask is to help us to support, some i ask is to help us to support you when you really need us, when it is really critical and you need an emergency ambulance. dramatic footage has been released by police showing an officer entering a burning house to save an arsonist. video from sergeantjames
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cattermole's body—worn camera recorded him climbing into the building in sellindge near folkestone to help 57—year—old christopher pain to safety. ajudge commended sergeant cattermole's quick thinking and bravery. pain was sent to prison for four years. a private funeral for kent pcso julia james is taking place at canterbury cathedral later today. the 53—year—old died from head injuries after walking her dog close to her home in snowdown near dover. a 21—year—old man has been charged with her murder. an athlete from kent who suffered serious injuries in the run—up to the last olympic games says it's all about living in the moment this time, as he prepares to compete in tokyo. 22 year—old giarnni regini—moran from gravesend had to learn how to walk again, but he's now back at the top competing for team gb's gymnastics squad. going through kind of all of that adversity with my knee, then my
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ankle, this is what i live for. iam here, and i don't really give myself time to reflect on what i've been through. because i kind ofjust take each day as it comes, and to be here, i'm really proud and grateful. time for the weather with elizabeth. it's another warm day in store across the south—east. warm start to the morning with lots of blue sky and sunshine throughout the first half of the day and more sunny spells into the afternoon and there will be fair weather cloud developing and the small chance of one or two isolated showers breaking out but for the majority of us it will be completely dry and temperatures peaking in the middle or high 20s and perhaps a degree or so down on where we have been, and there is more of an easterly breeze going on so with the breeze towards eastern coastal areas of kent, you will feel cooler here. overnight, uncomfortable for sleeping and temperatures will remain high for much of the night.
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any showers we see will fade away to give us clear skies and this will be the temperatures into friday morning with friday feeling cooler and the breeze will increase a touch but it should stay dry and there is a met office warning in for heavy rain over the weekend. heavy, thundery showers and temperatures back to the seasonal average. that's all for now. i'll be back in half an hour.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today — a 3% pay rise for nurses and nhs staff. unions say it's not enough, but the health secretary claims it will make a "real difference to people's lives." not only putting more money in their pockets, but showing them how much we value and respect their incredible contribution to our nation. shop owners warn their ability to keep shelves stocked and remain open is under increasing pressure because of the number of staff self—isolating. the boss of the tokyo olympics opening ceremony has been sacked just a day before it's due to take place. good before it's due to take place. morning. today we a at good morning. today we are looking at a fair bit of sunshine, yesterday we had provisional of the highest temperature on record in northern ireland, reaching 31.3 celsius. todayit ireland, reaching 31.3 celsius. today it might get a little higher.
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for most, temperatures in the mid to high 20s orjust about 30 celsius. all the details coming up. —— provisionally the highest temperature on record. good morning. it's thursday the 22nd ofjuly. our top story — unions have reacted angrily after the government offered most nhs workers in england a pay rise of 3%, which is less than the treasury's predicted rate of inflation. other frontline public sector workers, including teachers, police officers and soldiers, will not receive an increase. our political correspondent helen catt has the details. we are the nhs! enough is enough! it's been one of the biggest political rows of the year. how much of a pay rise should nurses, paramedics, and many other health care staff get after months on the gruelling front line of a pandemic, which has also hit the economy? when ministers in england suggested in march that 1% was affordable, there was a backlash. now they and the welsh government have agreed to put pay up by 3%,
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backdated to april. the figure was recommended by an independent pay review body. the health secretary, who is in self—isolation, posted a video on social media giving his view. i'm sure that this pay rise will make a real difference to people's lives, not only putting more money in their pockets, but showing them how much we value and respect their incredible contribution to our nation. unions have called the decision a shambolic, and argued it falls far short. they had called for a rise of between 5% and 12.5%. health staff in england will look to scotland, where their counterparts received a much more generous settlement earlier this year, so not only was it more money, but it was backdated as well, so they had payments that go back to december. so staff will feel that this is falling short of what workers in scotland have already had. for other public sector workers, there was confirmation that their pay is not going up.
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teachers will see their salaries frozen, as announced by the chancellor in the autumn. so too will the police, although people earning less than £24,000 in both professions will get £250, and officers will still get any incremental rises which they were due. labour has accused the government of inflicting a real terms pay cut on the police and teachers, and on nhs pay, it says ministers have had to row back on a shoddy ill—thought—through position. the royal college of nursing has said it will consult its members on what steps to take next. a decision has now been made, but the discussion is not over yet. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is in westminster. adam, the government is facing criticism from the people who are helping us to get through this pandemic. how will they respond?
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and how can they now afford this? this is the government's response, because at the start of the year, matt hancock said the pm truce should only be 1% because a lot of the nhs could afford to stop the new health secretary sajid javid has decided to be more generous, and it is now in the hands of the trade unions who represent the nhs workers who will consult their members, and in theory if they are angry enough, this could eventually end up in strike action, but i think that is probably quite unlikely. and then there are the questions about how this is paid for, and how affordable this is paid for, and how affordable this is for the nhs, because back in march, when the government was advocating a 1% increase, they published a document which said, if the pay bill goes up by a lot for the pay bill goes up by a lot for the nhs, then that might mean you end up having to have a smaller workforce, because you don't have the money to pay for it, and also you will have to take money away from other things. so i think the debate will now move on to the knock—on effects for the rest of the nhs about putting up the wage bill.
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the government is also facing increasing pressure to change the rules over self—isolation because of severe staff shortages. there has been some toing and froing about this. and we're starting to see the real world effect of so many people being diagnosed with covid now that restrictions have been lifted and it is circulating a lot more in the community. lots of people getting covid, which means lots of pins on the app of people who have come into contact with them, and we are seeing that reflected in shops. —— pings. the newspapers are full of pictures of empty shelves today. it is a was very hard to work out how empty the shelves are on a nationwide basis, but retailers and the british retail consortium saying they are under real pressure because of the number of staff now stuck at home. they are saying the government should exempt
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their workers from the requirement to isolate, the government is saying no, that exemption is only for a small number of workers in key areas, and we will have to wait until august to 16th for the isolation rules to be relaxed for everyone. adam, thanks very much. we will be talking to the business secretary in about 25 minutes about all that. ministers in northern ireland will meet later to decide whether to ease coronavirus restrictions next week. the northern ireland executive has previously indicated that it hopes to re—open theatres and conference venues and relax some of the rules on socialising. our correspondent danjohnson is at stormont for us this morning. dan, what are we likely to hear today? there have been cautious moves here to relax the covid restrictions, things moving much more slowly than they are in england, but the executive due to meet here today to discuss moving to the next stage of
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perhaps probably from next week, so we're talking about more live events, conferences, and music events, conferences, and music events, removing the last of the restrictions on live music and potentially increasing the limits on the number of pupils who can gather in household. it is six at the moment, looks like they are planning to move to something more like ten. we could also see facemasks, the requirement for those to be worn in places of worship, perhaps in classroom to be removed as well, but the covid case numbers are quite low here but they have been increasing in the last few weeks. but i think the caution comes about because, although the number of deaths have been very low, averaging just one a day in the last week or so, vaccination rates here in northern ireland are still lagging behind the rest of the uk. so that is why there is still some caution and why things are moving a bit more slowly, so evenif are moving a bit more slowly, so even if they do approve these relaxations for next week, there will still be some restrictions in place into august and even after
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that, it could be further into the ultimate before all restrictions are removed across northern ireland. diana, thank you very much. —— dan. tomorrow's opening ceremony of the tokyo 2020 olympics has been plunged into further chaos following the dismissal of its show director. kentaro kobayashi is alleged to have made anti—semiticjokes during a comedy routine in 1998. meanwhile, 12 new covid cases have been reported in the olympic village, bringing the total to 87. the chinese government has ordered a review into flood safety controls on public transport, after 12 people died when they were trapped in flooded underground railway tunnels. more than 500 people were rescued from tunnels in henan province, which saw a year's worth of rainfall in just three days. our china correspondent robin brant has the latest.
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this is what you see in most of the parts of zhengzhou we have been driving around for the last half—hour, massive puddles of water, families strolling around, cars stranded in the middle of road, that is the car transport people doing the must business this morning, and getting them to the garages. but we know that the death toll has increased and the rain is spreading north, we have towns and villages over there who are now dealing with very severe amounts of water. the most troubling questions remain about this, the metro network here in the city. it is less than ten years old, but it was in one of these lines will be sold in most terrifying stories, 12 people crammed into one carriage lost their lives 24—hour signal. and we don't know exactly why, we don't know why they were left so vulnerable, but we do know at the very top of the national government invasion, they are running other cities and other local governments to immediately look at their preparedness and to
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look at their preparedness and to look at their preparedness and to look at their regulations when it comes to metro networks if the floods and the rains come again. the first study to scan elite rugby players' brains suggests one in four could be at risk of small abnormalities. but the team led by imperial college london found that further research is needed to understand the long—term implications of repeated head trauma. it comes come as a parliamentary inquiry concluded that the government needs to do more to reduce the risk of brain injuries in sport. our health editor hugh pym reports. amateur rugby union players in training. it is a contact sport, and there are strict protocols relating to concussion and head injuries, but there is a growing debate over the long—term consequences of playing the game at professional level rather than on recreational and social rugby. nic evans, a former wales international, has campaigned for more recognition of head injuries. she says she has no recollection of one of the games she played in.
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it led to a season where i played with head injuries and feeling nauseous. i played with head injuries quite significant impact on me, and i continued regardless, i didn't really think about the long—term repercussions, really. a study led by imperial college london assessed 41 elite level male rugby union and league players and three female. 22% had brain abnormalities in the shape of small tears in blood vessels. the study, based on brain scans, also found changes in volume of the so—called white matter, in effect the wiring of the brain. the scans were compared with those of athletes in non—collision sports. organisers say more research is needed to back out if there are any long—term effects on players' health. the founder of the organisation which conducted the research says it is an important step forward. we certainly don't have the full picture yet.
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what we need to establish is whether these abnormal white matter changes progress and lead eventually to clinical symptoms. we don't know, we really don't know, but there's enough there to raise significant concern about long—term brain health. the rugby football union, which governs the sport in england, supported the study and helped recruit players to take part. officials said they welcomed any research which helps to advance knowledge of head injuries. we want to be able to make sure we present the risks and benefits honestly, and commissioning and collaborating research like that is part of that process. in a separate report, mps have called for the health and safety executive to be more involved in sport and help establish a national framework for reporting all sports injuries, with the long—term aim of passing on details of all events which might lead to brain injury.
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the digital, culture, media and sport committee said it was astounded that sport should be left to mark its own homework. hugh pym, bbc news. prince george is celebrating his eighth birthday today. kensington palace has released this photograph to mark the occasion. it was taken earlier this month by his mother, the duchess of cambridge. it's 7.13. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it is lovely here on the roof of the bbc this morning, the sun beating down, but today the forecast is another hot and sunny one for most of us. by the time we get to the weekend, you will fine it is going to change, you are looking at some thundery downpours. we do have a lot of sunshine in today's forecast.
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yesterday, the top temperature was in northern ireland in county tyrone, the temperature reached 31.3 celsius. that provision which is the highest temperature on record for northern ireland, but today it could be higher. the met office still has two extreme heat warnings in force for northern ireland and the south—west quarter of the uk, and after a cloudy start, the cloud will push back to the coast where someone window, but most will see some sunshine. tonight, those showers will tend to fade, we will see a return to the client coming in towards the north, and it is going towards the north, and it is going to be another warm night as well, difficult night to sleep in those conditions. a lot of sunshine too, but cool along the east coast because we have an easterly flow, so the heat will be in the west where
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we have the highest temperatures, and we could see once again tomorrow, 28, 29 possibly 30 in wales tomorrow, but then it breaks down for the weekend across england and wales. thank you very much, we will see you later, carol. let's return to our top story now, and the public sector pay awards which were announced yesterday. most nhs staff in england which were announced yesterday. and wales were offered a 3% pay rise. that's worth around £1,000 to nurses and more than £500 to auxiliary staff like porters and cleaners. but unions say it's still effectively a pay cut because the cost of living will rise by more. junior doctors were not included in this review. they've been offered a 2% increase, while many other workers will get a pay freeze. that includes teachers and police officers,
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although the lowest in those occupations will get an extra £250. pat cullen is the acting general secretary of the royal college of nursing. she joins us now from belfast. good morning. your reaction to the 3% pay rise festival. the good morning. your reaction to the 3% pay rise festival.— 3% pay rise festival. the shambolic announcement _ 3% pay rise festival. the shambolic announcement made _ 396 pay rise festival. the shambolic announcement made yesterday - 396 pay rise festival. the shambolic announcement made yesterday as| announcement made yesterday as nothing short of insulting to our nasa members going on shift as we speak today. the disdain and contempt that our nurses were treated in yesterday i think it from the 1% of the government thought would be suitable earlier this year. thought would be suitable earlier this ear. , , �* , thought would be suitable earlier this ear. , , �*, , this year. it is, but let's distill this year. it is, but let's distill this down- — this year. it is, but let's distill this down. it's _ this year. it is, but let's distill this down. it's £20 _ this year. it is, but let's distill this down. it's £20 and - this year. it is, but let's distill this down. it's £20 and just i this year. it is, but let's distill. this down. it's £20 and just short of £20 per week into a nice's pay packet. but it is not all about pay. if we don't address pay and we don't actually do something to encourage our nurses from draining out of the health service, with a 50,000 nurses
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missing today from our health service, and every other day, and when we do not have the nurses to look after patients, if we were going to make any stab at trying to get back into the health service, and stop the wonderfulness as we have from leading health service, we ought to pay them a little more than just a cup of coffee every day. nurses are getting a pay rise, other staff such asjunior nurses are getting a pay rise, other staff such as junior doctors, police officers, teachers, they are not receiving pay rises. does that offer any comfort in the sense that it was nurses are being offered 3%? 140. nurses are being offered 396? no, it doesn't. this _ nurses are being offered 396? no, it doesn't, this isn't _ nurses are being offered 396? no, it doesn't, this isn't about _ nurses are being offered 396? no, it doesn't, this isn't about pitching - doesn't, this isn't about pitching nurses against teachers or police officers, all of those nurses kept the health service and every other service going throughout the pandemic, and long before it. so it is not about one against the other,
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but if we don't have health, we don't have wealth. if we do not have nurses, you do not have a health service, and you cannot provide good quality care for patients, it is not about putting money into a nice's pocket, it is as simple as that, and we must address the patient safety issues within our workplace, and to do that you must address pay. as you are aware, do that you must address pay. as you are aware. the _ do that you must address pay. as you are aware, the government _ do that you must address pay. as you are aware, the government is - are aware, the government is balancing a lot of spending demands and funding demands with a coal nationally and of course of the nhs to increase pay. —— a call. how much more do expect the government to be able to afford? i think it has been estimated that for every 1% of a pay increase, it can cost around £370 million, between 370 and £500 million, between 370 and £500 million a year to the treasury. those are the challenging decisions that government have to make. in the
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same way, every nurse on shift today is making very challenging decisions to make sure that their patients are being cared for in the most effective and safe way. that is what they are there to do. but as i go back and say, nurses run the health service, as do other health care staff. you do not have health if you do not have nurses in the health service to run it. but our nurses have made it very clear that they require 12.5%, they need that to bring their pay back to where it was a decade ago. it is not actually looking for a massive pay rise, that is what they need to bring their pay backin is what they need to bring their pay back in line with inflation and with where they were a decade ago. but what we will do now is put to the offer to our nurses, and we will consult with them next week, and they will decide what they will do nextin they will decide what they will do next in relation to this. because let's be very clear about this, if you are disrespectful towards nurses, you'rejust you are disrespectful towards nurses, you're just respectful towards patients. it is as simple as
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that. ., , ., , ., towards patients. it is as simple as that. ., , ., , ., , ., that. you brought up a couple of thins that. you brought up a couple of things there- — that. you brought up a couple of things there. firstly, _ that. you brought up a couple of things there. firstly, let - that. you brought up a couple of things there. firstly, let me - that. you brought up a couple of| things there. firstly, let me ask, you say you are consulting on one action the nurses will take next, but you're also sending professional not take this lying down —— what action the nurses will take next. —— you are also seeing the profession will not take this lying down. should we expect industrial action? the nurses will decide next week, but as a professional trade union, we will work alongside them in their decision—making. nurses will do the best thing for patients. they will make sure, whatever action they take, that their patients do not sufferjust as nurses did when the took action in the northern ireland two years ago. they will make measured and considered decisions and we will work with them to make those decisions. you and we will work with them to make those decisions.— those decisions. you have made it clear that nhs _ those decisions. you have made it clear that nhs staff's _ those decisions. you have made it clear that nhs staff's intent - those decisions. you have made it clear that nhs staff's intent is - those decisions. you have made it clear that nhs staff's intent is to i clear that nhs staff's intent is to care for patients safely and effectively. if this 3% pay rise is
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all that you get, is the final offer and to the conclusion of any action, is patient care and safety going to be compromised?— is patient care and safety going to be compromised? patient care and atient be compromised? patient care and patient safety _ be compromised? patient care and patient safety has _ be compromised? patient care and patient safety has been _ be compromised? patient care and i patient safety has been compromised as we speak. you cannot have the best effect of quality patient care with 50,000 nurses missing from your health service every day, and when you think about it the same across our independent sector, our care homes and elsewhere, so nurses are doing their very best every single day to hold the health service together, to look after their patients, and to make sure the patients are cared for in the best possible way, but in order to address that, to make sure we have a health service moving forward, we need to address pay, and we need to address the vacancies we have got within our health care service. pad: cullen commented _ within our health care service. pad: cullen commented on _ within our health care service. pad: cullen commented on general secretary for the royal college of nursing, thank you very much this morning for your time. —— morning foryourtime. —— pat cullen.
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we've been talking a lot recently about the difficulties facing employers as the number of staff getting pinged by nhs test and trace continues to rise. now the british retail consortium is calling on the government to make fully vaccinated shop workers exempt from self—isolation rules, to ease the pressure on keeping supermarket shelves fully stocked. we can speak now to the chief executive of the british retail consortium, helen dickinson. what is the situation you are seeing in regard to products on shelves? what we are seeing is limits on the availability of certain items in certain parts of the country, because retail operations are being impacted by an increasing number of staff needing to self—isolate, so absence rates are rising, and i think we most worrying thing, certainly when i talk to people, they are running these businesses, is notjust when we are at the moment, but they are looking forward over the coming hours and days, and the rules around self—isolation are
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not due to change until the 16th of august, and that right now feels a long time away, given the rises we are seeing in case numbers. what long time away, given the rises we are seeing in case numbers. what i would like you _ are seeing in case numbers. what i would like you to _ are seeing in case numbers. what i would like you to do, _ are seeing in case numbers. what i would like you to do, helen, - are seeing in case numbers. what i i would like you to do, helen, because we have been showing one or two images, these are pictures taken by individuals in individual shops showing empty shelves. now, that in itself is not evidence that there is a widespread problem, and we have to be very careful around the picture we are present in, but you just said a moment ago within the next hours or days, there are going to be real problems. can you tell me which companies, which products you are talking about? because otherwise there's danger that that is a general kind of scaremongering. i just wonder if you can break this down for me. just wonder if you can break this down for me— down for me. well, i think it is isolated into _ down for me. well, i think it is isolated into certain _ down for me. well, i think it is isolated into certain parts - down for me. well, i think it is isolated into certain parts of. down for me. well, i think it is i isolated into certain parts of the country. each business will be doing with it differently, each business will be geographically spread differently, and i think the most
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important thing is that people do not panic, there's no need to panic because there's plenty of food in the country. we heard from richard walker who runs iceland speaking over the last few days about needing to reduce hours on some of its store portfolio, and actually in the worst case to close stores, there will be many smaller businesses where they only had one or two staff, and they need to self—isolate, then that is them needing to close their doors completely. so what i can say is that everybody i am talking to is suing absence rates higher than they would normally expect, they are already taking mitigating actions including changing shifts, reducing hours, and in some cases, needing to
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close stores. 50. hours, and in some cases, needing to close stores-— close stores. so, can be absolutely clear, close stores. so, can be absolutely clear. helen? _ close stores. so, can be absolutely clear, helen? you _ close stores. so, can be absolutely clear, helen? you speak— close stores. so, can be absolutely clear, helen? you speak for- close stores. so, can be absolutely clear, helen? you speak for the i clear, helen? you speakfor the british retail consortium. if the government does not change the rules around when you to self—isolate, and the groups of people who are required to do that, if they don't change that between now and the middle of august when the rules change, what the stores? how do you see that going? the stores? how do you see that auoin ? ~ . the stores? how do you see that oiiin ? . ., , , ., the stores? how do you see that oiiin?~ ., , , ., , going? what i see is that us as members _ going? what i see is that us as members of the _ going? what i see is that us as members of the public - going? what i see is that us as members of the public will get i members of the public will get access to less choice, and less availability, across what we would normally buy, whether that is in your local convenience store, your local supermarket, online, across food or across our non—food products. so it is all about the amount of choice we would have and access to it, so it will take longer for deliveries to be made, and it
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will mean that some of the local shops to where we live might either be open for less time or in some cases need to close. {lilia be open for less time or in some cases need to close.— be open for less time or in some cases need to close. ok, so track is back for us. — cases need to close. ok, so track is back for us, helen, _ cases need to close. ok, so track is back for us, helen, if _ cases need to close. ok, so track is back for us, helen, if you _ cases need to close. ok, so track is back for us, helen, if you would. i cases need to close. ok, so track is| back for us, helen, if you would. we are speaking to a government minister shortly. wherein lies the answer? which groups of people? because if you look at the food chain, you would be presumably if you're talking about those not required to self—isolate having a different system, are you suggesting those involved in food production, the transportation, the supermarket workers, are you saying all of those groups should now be subject to a different system? because if they are not all, than any one of those groups, the same problem could occur again. it could, and i problem could occur again. it could, and i would — problem could occur again. it could, and i would be very _ problem could occur again. it could, and i would be very interested - problem could occur again. it could, and i would be very interested to i and i would be very interested to hear what the minister you will be speaking to... hear what the minister you will be speaking to- - -_ speaking to... what would you like to happen? — speaking to... what would you like to happen? well. _ speaking to... what would you like to happen? well, what i would i
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speaking to... what would you like i to happen? well, what i would like to happen? well, what i would like to ha en to happen? well, what i would like to happen is _ to happen? well, what i would like to happen is firstly for _ to happen is firstly for the government to really ensure that they are listening to notjust for they are listening to notjust for the retailer is sane, but other, if you talk to the distribution companies, the transport companies, we have had trains being cancelled, the airline operators, all of these businesses are seeing exactly the same, so i think the most important thing for the government to do is to recognise that the current situation is untenable. they have got the professors, the data, the... helen, let me condense _ professors, the data, the... helen, let me condense the _ let me condense the question, apologies for interrupting. i can guarantee you when we speak to the minister, the minister will say that they are listening. what i'm asking for you is, what do you want them to do? ~ .,, ,., ., do? well, the most important thing that they need _ do? well, the most important thing that they need to _ do? well, the most important thing that they need to do _ do? well, the most important thing that they need to do is _ do? well, the most important thing that they need to do is ensure - do? well, the most important thing that they need to do is ensure thatl that they need to do is ensure that we all continue to have access to the things that are critical to us.
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so that would really focus in on the critical parts of the economy, whether that is transport or energy orfood whether that is transport or energy or food supply, whether that is transport or energy orfood supply, and whether that is transport or energy or food supply, and that is where they should start.— they should start. special rules around self-isolation _ they should start. special rules around self-isolation for - they should start. special rules| around self-isolation for groups they should start. special rules i around self-isolation for groups in around self—isolation for groups in those categories, is that what you're saying?— those categories, is that what you're saying? potentially, but aain i you're saying? potentially, but again i come — you're saying? potentially, but again i come back _ you're saying? potentially, but again i come back to _ you're saying? potentially, but again i come back to my - you're saying? potentially, buti again i come back to my point, you're saying? potentially, but- again i come back to my point, the whole situation is... it's notjust this, but they need to look at the system we have in place at the moment. it is not tenable, notjust across those critical supplies, but across those critical supplies, but across the whole of the economy, to be ongoing at the of sort of rate of change between now and the 16th of august. so either those rules need to change, or something else in the wall of defences against the virus needs to be considered. and the government is the one that has all the data and the access to the data
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to decide which levers to pull, but i want to be visually clear that the destruction we are already seeing will only get worse unless something is done. —— i want to be really clear that the disruption we are already seeing. if i clear that the disruption we are already seeing.— clear that the disruption we are already seeing. if i say, ditch the .|ni , already seeing. if i say, ditch the ping. would _ already seeing. if i say, ditch the ping. would you _ already seeing. if i say, ditch the ping, would you agree _ already seeing. if i say, ditch the ping, would you agree with - already seeing. if i say, ditch the i ping, would you agree with that? already seeing. if i say, ditch the i ping, would you agree with that? no, i am not ping, would you agree with that? ier. i am not saying that, but maybe double vaccinated people should not need to self—isolate, maybe that date of the 16th of august should be moved much closer to now. there are some pilots for test and release for businesses, for people who middle east back into their workplace, those pilots could be extended or that could be... thank ou ve extended or that could be... thank you very much _ extended or that could be... thank you very much for _ extended or that could be... thank you very much for your— extended or that could be... thank you very much for your time - extended or that could be... thank you very much for your time this i you very much for your time this morning. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from the bbc�*s news teams in london and the south east. the ambulance services for kent, sussex, surrey and london are reminding people to take extra care in the sun — after demand for help increased during the warmer weather. together the the two services say they are now receiving up to 11,000 calls a day — often relating to dehydration and heat stroke. people are being reminded to use alternative services for non—emergencies. if you can access your health care needs through other avenues, through nhs 111, your gp, your pharmacist, pharmacists have a wealth of information that they can share and support, some my ask is to help us to support you when you really need us, when it is really critical and you need an emergency ambulance. dramatic footage has been released by police showing an officer entering a burning house to save an arsonist. video from sergeantjames cattermole's body—worn camera recorded him climbing
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into the building in sellindge near folkestone to help 57 year—old christopher pain to safety. a judge commended sgt cattermole's quick thinking and bravery. pain was sent to prison for four years. a private funeral for kent pcso julia james is taking place at canterbury cathedral later today. the 53 year—old died from head injuries after walking her dog close to her home in snowdown near dover. a 21 year—old man has been charged with her murder. an athlete from kent who suffered serious injuries in the run—up to the last olympic games says its all about �*living in the moment�* this time, as he prepares to compete in tokyo. 22 year old giarnni regini—moran from gravesend had to learn how to walk again, but he�*s now back at the top competing for team gbs gymnastics squad. going through kind of all of that adversity with my knee, then my ankle, this is what i live for. iam here, and i don�*t
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really give myself time to reflect on what i�*ve been through. because i kind ofjust take each day as it comes, and to be here, i�*m really proud and grateful. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. it�*s another warm day in store across the south—east. warm start to the morning with lots of blue sky and sunshine throughout the first half of the day and more sunny spells into the afternoon and there will be fairweather cloud developing and the small chance of one or two isolated showers breaking out but for the majority of us it will be completely dry and temperatures peaking in the middle or high 20s and perhaps a degree or so down on where we have been, and there is more of an easterly breeze going on so with the breeze towards eastern coastal areas of kent, you will feel cooler here. overnight, uncomfortable for sleeping and temperatures will remain high for much of the night. any showers we see will fade away to give us clear
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skies and this will be the temperatures into friday morning with friday feeling cooler and the breeze will increase a touch but it should stay dry and there is a met office warning in for heavy rain over the weekend. heavy, thundery showers and temperatures back to the seasonal average. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. we�*ve been talking this morning about the public sector pay awards, after nhs workers in england were offered a 3 percent pay rise. before we speak to business secretary kwasi kwarteng, let�*s hearfrom one nurse — carmen — who attended a protest outside parliament yesterday. my my name is carmen, and i am a cardiac nurse. this has been a tough yearfor all cardiac nurse. this has been a tough year for all of cardiac nurse. this has been a tough yearfor all of us, she can imagine.
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but what has shocked me on top of all of this is how the government has treated us, and the way they have acted like they were on our side when, really and truly, they have been nowhere to be seen. the pay rises important for several reasons, but for me personally, what it would mean, is a pay that is in line with the value of this job. it is a pay that would attract new nurses into the profession and, down the line, what it would mean for me is to have sufficient amount of colleagues to do myjob properly, to care for the people that we are caring for with the adequate numbers. which, at the moment, is not happening, and i cannot imagine what will happen in the years to come when we are into the tens of thousands of nursing vacancies even more and we have no way of attracting people into thisjob.
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let�*s speak now to the business secretary, kwasi kwarteng who joins us from westminster. thank you forjoining us, and i hope you are hearing what that nurse was saying. i wonder if you could tell me if you have spoken to any nhs workers who are grateful and pleased with the 3% pay award. workers who are grateful and pleased with the 396 pay award.— with the 396 pay award. look, it's a very difficult _ with the 396 pay award. look, it's a very difficult time _ with the 396 pay award. look, it's a very difficult time and _ with the 396 pay award. look, it's a very difficult time and i _ with the 396 pay award. look, it's a very difficult time and i fully - very difficult time and i fully acknowledge the incredible work that nhs workers have put in in the last 18 months. you will remember a few months ago the suggestion was that it was a 1% increase and there was a lot of concern, even outrage about that and what we did is we went to an independent pay review and it was the independent pay review that came up the independent pay review that came up with the figure of 3% which we have agreed to. people might think 3% is not a huge uplift but the unions are saying 12%, which is enormous, and given the fact that we spent hundreds of billions of pounds
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protecting jobs through the furlough scheme, we spent hundreds of billions of pounds through loans to businesses, we are in a difficult position as far as public finances are concerned and the 3% figure agreed to by the independent panel is something we think is fair. what is something we think is fair. what chanied in is something we think is fair. what changed in terms _ is something we think is fair. what changed in terms of— is something we think is fair. what changed in terms of affordability? when the government suggested 1% it was because you couldn�*t afford any more. where has the money come from to now afford 3% after you have agreed to the independent pay review? ., ., , , . ., ., review? you will appreciate it was a very difficult — review? you will appreciate it was a very difficult winter _ review? you will appreciate it was a very difficult winter and _ very difficult winter and a difficult time for the public finances. when the 1% was suggested we said it would be going to an independent review and we would see what the review came up with and they came up with 3%... mr; what the review came up with and they came up with 396. . ._ what the review came up with and they came up with 396. .. my point is that at the time _ they came up with 396. .. my point is that at the time of— they came up with 396. .. my point is that at the time of 1x. _ they came up with 396. .. my point is that at the time of 196 is _ they came up with 396. .. my point is that at the time of 196 is what - they came up with 396. .. my point is that at the time of 196 is what we i that at the time of 1% is what we were told is all the government
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could afford, and now it can afford 3%. that is what we were told by the health minister, that that was what is affordable. health minister, that that was what is affordable-— is affordable. what we said is that this is what _ is affordable. what we said is that this is what we _ is affordable. what we said is that this is what we would _ is affordable. what we said is that this is what we would revert - is affordable. what we said is that this is what we would revert to i is affordable. what we said is that this is what we would revert to an i this is what we would revert to an independent pay review and now the independent pay review and now the independent pay review has come back with 3%. the economy is actually doing better than we anticipated, certainly from four months ago, and we think we can afford the 3%. hoop we think we can afford the 396. how will it be paid _ we think we can afford the 396. how will it be paid for _ we think we can afford the 3%. how will it be paid for then? we think we can afford the 396. how will it be paid for then? as - will it be paid for then? as all public sector _ will it be paid for then? as all public sector pay _ will it be paid for then? as all. public sector pay comes through general taxation. fiur public sector pay comes through general taxation. our taxes going to rise to -a general taxation. our taxes going to rise to pay for this? _ general taxation. our taxes going to rise to pay for this? i _ general taxation. our taxes going to rise to pay for this? i don't - rise to pay for this? i don't they are. if rise to pay for this? i don't they are- if the _ rise to pay for this? i don't they are. if the economy _ rise to pay for this? i don't they are. if the economy continues l rise to pay for this? i don't they l are. if the economy continues to perform strongly and can grow, our tax receipts will grow without having to put up tax rates, so it means we can afford a little bit more. it means we can afford a little bit more. . , means we can afford a little bit more, ., , , ., means we can afford a little bit more. . , , ., ., , means we can afford a little bit more. , ., ., , ' , more. it was estimated for every 196 -a more. it was estimated for every 196 ia rise it more. it was estimated for every 196 pay rise it could _ more. it was estimated for every 196 pay rise it could cost _ more. it was estimated for every 196 pay rise it could cost the _ more. it was estimated for every 196 pay rise it could cost the treasury i pay rise it could cost the treasury up pay rise it could cost the treasury up to £500 million per year, every
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1% for the nhs could cost the treasury 500 million pounds, so £1 billion in extra revenue is what you predict is the difference between now and four months ago. what predict is the difference between now and four months ago. what i'm sa ini now and four months ago. what i'm sa mi is if now and four months ago. what i'm saying is if the _ now and four months ago. what i'm saying is if the economy _ now and four months ago. what i'm saying is if the economy grows - saying is if the economy grows faster, tax revenues will grow as well and you don�*t have to put up tax rates. that�*s what you�*re asking me about and i�*m saying if the economy is growing faster than predicted, which is what is happening at the moment, and who knows what will happen in the future, we won�*t have to put up tax rates and that is what you have been asking me about. you rates and that is what you have been asking me about.— asking me about. you mentioned that there were a — asking me about. you mentioned that there were a request _ asking me about. you mentioned that there were a request for— asking me about. you mentioned that there were a request for a _ asking me about. you mentioned that there were a request for a 12.596 - there were a request for a 12.5% increase by some of the nursing unions and over the last ten years it has been calculated that, effectively, nhs staff have lost 19% in pay because pay increases have not kept up with inflation, and this pay increase also doesn�*t keep up with the average prediction of 3.7%
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of inflation, so surely 12.5% is not a lot to ask for. i of inflation, so surely 12.596 is not a lot to ask for.— a lot to ask for. i think 12.596 iiven a lot to ask for. i think 12.596 given the — a lot to ask for. i think 12.596 given the situation _ a lot to ask for. i think 12.596 given the situation we - a lot to ask for. i think 12.596 given the situation we are i a lot to ask for. i think 12.596 given the situation we are in | a lot to ask for. i think 12.596 l given the situation we are in is a lot to ask for. i think 12.596 i given the situation we are in is a huge amount to ask for in a single year given that we have spent something like £350 billion, the chancellor has, supporting the economy, keepingjobs chancellor has, supporting the economy, keeping jobs alive, chancellor has, supporting the economy, keepingjobs alive, paying peoples wages, effectively, and also giving loans to businesses, like the future fund, all of these loans which cost money and you will appreciate it has been a completely exceptional time and we�*ve had to spend a huge amount of public money to keep the economy alive. emil to keep the economy alive. shall we talk about the _ to keep the economy alive. shall we talk about the so-called _ to keep the economy alive. shall we talk about the so-called ping - talk about the so—called ping pandemic as it is being called. if we are at this moment thing by the test and trace at, what is the rule? what should we do? the test and trace at, what is the rule? what should we do?— what should we do? the rule is very clear. we should _ what should we do? the rule is very clear. we should self-isolate. - what should we do? the rule is very clear. we should self-isolate. it i clear. we should self—isolate. it is as simple as that if you are pinged,
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self—isolate, and that is what i understand sir keir starmer has done and that is what the prime minister has done and that is what we expect people to do. has done and that is what we expect people to do— people to do. earlier this week business minister _ people to do. earlier this week business minister paul- people to do. earlier this week business minister paul scully i business minister paul scully implied it was a personal choice. why is that? it�*s implied it was a personal choice. why is that?— why is that? it's not a personal choice. why is that? it's not a personal choice- if _ why is that? it's not a personal choice. if you _ why is that? it's not a personal choice. if you are _ why is that? it's not a personal choice. if you are pinged, - why is that? it's not a personal choice. if you are pinged, you i choice. if you are pinged, you should self—isolate. we bring in these rules not for the fun of it and the rules are thought out and brought in to protect wider society and the wider community and people who are pinged should self—isolate as the rules who are pinged should self-isolate as the rules suggest.— as the rules suggest. from august the 16th, if — as the rules suggest. from august the 16th, if you are _ as the rules suggest. from august the 16th, if you are pinged, - as the rules suggest. from august the 16th, if you are pinged, will. the 16th, if you are pinged, will you have to do self—isolate for ten days question i don�*t think that is the case because that is when the restrictions will go. he: the case because that is when the restrictions will go.— restrictions will go. as i've said in these questions, _ restrictions will go. as i've said in these questions, we - restrictions will go. as i've said in these questions, we are - restrictions will go. as i've said i in these questions, we are going to decide about the 16th of august the week before and that is what happened with various dates in the road map, the 12th of april and 17th of may, and various others, we decided a week before and i cannot
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guarantee that three weeks before —— before the head of the date. we spoke to the british retail consortium.— spoke to the british retail consortium. ., ., , ., consortium. you will have seen on the front pages. — consortium. you will have seen on the front pages, various _ consortium. you will have seen on the front pages, various pictures l the front pages, various pictures of empty supermarket shelves in some supermarkets around the country. what she said was that one of the suggestions was to bring forward those who are exempt from having to isolate for ten days if they are double vaccinated, or put them on the test and release pilot. why has that not been done yet if we are seeing pictures like this and concerns being raised? the concerns are legitimate _ concerns being raised? the concerns are legitimate and _ concerns being raised? the concerns are legitimate and i have _ concerns being raised? the concerns are legitimate and i have seen - concerns being raised? the concerns are legitimate and i have seen the i are legitimate and i have seen the pictures as well. it�*s not a universal picture. i think people can shop, and we are obviously reviewing the situation we cannot get into a position where we are changing the rules of every week,
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and the rules are clear and if you are pinged, you should self—isolate. but there is flexibility offered, and there are test and release schemes and there are pilot schemes and we were told on sunday morning that the prime minister and chancellor were going to be on a pilot scheme so they wouldn�*t have to isolate for ten days and that changed a couple of hours later. so it is flexible. you are the business minister, so why can�*t you push or enact this flexibility so businesses don�*t, as the british retail consortium said, that critical supplies are going to be affected and within hours and days we might feel the effects of this simply in the first stage in the supermarkets. the rules are clear. we are reviewing the situation all the time. we are seeing, in real time, what the effects of these policies are but so far they have not changed. they are or what we have said they would be.— changed. they are or what we have said they would be. when could they chan i e said they would be. when could they chanie and said they would be. when could they change and how _ said they would be. when could they change and how quickly _ said they would be. when could they change and how quickly could - change and how quickly could you change and how quickly could you change them in reaction if reviewing them in real time?
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change them in reaction if reviewing them in realtime? mr; change them in reaction if reviewing them in realtime?— them in real time? my view is that we set out — them in real time? my view is that we set out the _ them in real time? my view is that we set out the dates _ them in real time? my view is that we set out the dates in _ them in real time? my view is that we set out the dates in the - them in real time? my view is that we set out the dates in the road i them in real time? my view is that i we set out the dates in the road map and we�*ve stuck to them as clearly as we could end in one instance we had to delay the easing of restrictions. and i am very keen on the 16th of august week lift restrictions but until then i want to keep this policy. so restrictions but until then i want to keep this policy.— restrictions but until then i want to keep this policy. so between now and the 1fith — to keep this policy. so between now and the 16th of — to keep this policy. so between now and the 16th of august _ to keep this policy. so between now and the 16th of august if _ to keep this policy. so between now and the 16th of august if a - to keep this policy. so between now and the 16th of august if a business| and the 16th of august if a business applies to be exempt from the system and be part of the test and release system, they won�*t be made exempt between now and the 16th of august? we are going to have guidance about the categories of exempt workers, particularly in relation to critical infrastructure and things like nuclear power stations and general power stations which effectively keep the lights on. i think the list will be quite narrow. very narrow because we don�*t want to get into a huge debate about who is exempt. when will it be published? i huge debate about who is exempt. when will it be published?- when will it be published? i think the guidance _
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when will it be published? i think the guidance will _ when will it be published? i think the guidance will be _ when will it be published? i think the guidance will be forthcoming | the guidance will be forthcoming soon. i can�*t tell you exactly when it will be released but we are working on it. is it will be released but we are working on it.— working on it. is a critical or noncritical? _ working on it. is a critical or noncritical? it's _ working on it. is a critical or noncritical? it's very - working on it. is a critical or. noncritical? it's very important working on it. is a critical or- noncritical? it's very important but we have to — noncritical? it's very important but we have to review— noncritical? it's very important but we have to review all— noncritical? it's very important but we have to review all the - we have to review all the information we can and we will be issuing further guidance on this. when? ., �* ., ,~' when? you've asked me when i said i couldn't give — when? you've asked me when i said i couldn't give you _ when? you've asked me when i said i couldn't give you a _ when? you've asked me when i said i couldn't give you a definite _ when? you've asked me when i said i couldn't give you a definite date - couldn�*t give you a definite date but i hope it happens soon. couldn't give you a definite date but i hope it happens soon. what do ou sa but i hope it happens soon. what do you say to businesses _ but i hope it happens soon. what do you say to businesses who _ but i hope it happens soon. what do you say to businesses who say - but i hope it happens soon. what do you say to businesses who say that i you say to businesses who say that they are struggling, for example, a tube line was closed entirely on saturday in london because signallers were pinged so there is significant critical impact. i signallers were pinged so there is significant critical impact.- significant critical impact. i fully acce it significant critical impact. i fully accept that _ significant critical impact. i fully accept that this _ significant critical impact. i fully accept that this is a _ accept that this is a difficult situation. ifully accept that this is a difficult situation. i fully accept that people are under a lot of pressure, as we have been for the last 16 months. when i was made business secretary in january months. when i was made business secretary injanuary i was told we needed a road map and we provided a road map that gave a degree of certainty and we are coming to the end of the process and we are happy we hit the 19th ofjuly in the way we hit the 19th ofjuly in the way we did and now this is the very
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final piece where we will be expecting people to self—isolate if they are pinged and i hope that restriction will be lifted on august the 16th and we can revert back to normal. all of the process has been difficult. they have been challenging situations for businesses over the last 18 months and i�*m hopeful we can get back to normality within a month. and i'm hopeful we can get back to normality within a month. between now and august — normality within a month. between now and august the _ normality within a month. between now and august the 16th, - normality within a month. between now and august the 16th, what i normality within a month. between now and august the 16th, what is l now and august the 16th, what is the legal consequences of ignoring being pinged by the app? i�*m legal consequences of ignoring being pinged by the app?— pinged by the app? i'm not saying iieole pinged by the app? i'm not saying people should rate -- _ pinged by the app? i'm not saying people should rate -- break- people should rate —— break the rules, i�*m saying we should focus on following the rules, and the rules are simple. they are that if you are pinged, you self—isolate. i�*m not going to countenance people breaking the rules or anything like that. i think they should just follow them. my think they should just follow them. my question was the legal consequence, if that was not clear. it's consequence, if that was not clear. it�*s a hypothetical question because you�*re saying about the legal consequence of not following the rules, but i�*m saying people should
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follow the rules. i�*m not here to be a law enforcement officer. myjob as business secretary is to make sure people follow the rules and we can get back to a degree of normality safely and we can get back on with normal life, our economic life, our social life in the way we did before. that is what i am focused on. . ~' before. that is what i am focused on. . ~ , ., y before. that is what i am focused on. . ~' , . before. that is what i am focused on. ., ~' , . ., before. that is what i am focused on. . , . ., on. thank you very much for your time. after a long wait, there�*s now only 24 hours to go until the opening ceremony of the olympic games, but the occasion has been overshadowed by the dismissal of the ceremony�*s creative director. it follows complaints that kentaro kobayashi made anti—semitic comments during his career as a comedian. our sports correspondent natalie pirks is in tokyo ? natalie, what does this mean for tomorrow�*s event? i have to say. it�*s wonderful to see you there in that amazing backdrop of tokyo itself and clearly this is a city and nation that has dealt with all sorts of issues and even
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controversial ones in the run—up to the games, covid related but we have something emerging that is a different problem just before the opening ceremony. there is a lot of apathy from the locals and when you look around, apart from the big rings and the bay behind me, not much evidence of the games is happening and that�*s how little the public seem to want it that the organising committee, kentaro kobayashi, this footage emerged of him in the 19905 as a comedian appearing to make anti—semiticjokes comedian appearing to make anti—semitic jokes about the holocaust. he has obviously gone and now the committee says it is going to review what happens in the olympic ceremony. the problem for them is it�*s going to look very, very different from the ceremonies of the past. no spectators, of course, and 15 dignitaries coming from around the world, but it will
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also look a little bit similar. we will have flag—bearers from the parade of nations, and it will be smaller than in the past, and for the athletes here, this really is the athletes here, this really is the pinnacle and one of them is fraser clark, and my goodness, has he got a story. we mi55ed fraser clark, and my goodness, has he got a story. we missed out in 2012, then 2016 then survived a night club stabbing and saw the london terror attacks but after winning gold for england in the commonwealth games in 2018 with his children watching at home, he is hoping to bring home a medalfor them. 2012, obviously, we had london. i was beaten to the mark by anthonyjoshua, a fantastic fighter who went on to win the gold medal and win amazing things. we�*ve had four more years, and thenjoejoyce comes along, another great fighter, he gets a silver medal for the country and then i had a big decision to make, do i stay anotherfour years? it�*s my passion and something really close in my heart so i couldn�*t look back and regret that i didn�*t want to regret the rest of my life to not give myself every chance
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to come here, and now i�*m here i�*m so glad i made that decision because it�*s been everything i dreamt of and so much more already and that�*s without even repeating it. was there a moment where you thought this could all be over because of the pandemic? i almost took it personally. it was destined to happen, the year i was going to be olympics, it was going to be cancelled, because that�*s been my look over the last decade. for some people who don�*t know your story, tell us what happened to you and how it changes your outlook on everything. i was stabbed three times on a night out. i�*m not an angel, but i didn�*t deserve to be stabbed. that could have stopped me from seeing my daughter grow up. year later, you find yourself caught up in something else in london. what happened there? we had a bit of a press day at the houses of parliament, me and the team, we had been in there, great day, we are feeling good and it was the unfortunate situation of the terror attack on the bridge where a lot of people lost their life and then
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we see the unfortunate pc, keith palmer, he lost his life that day and that was right in front of us. some of the things i have seen and witnessed, they are really not nice. but it has made my character a lot stronger, and that definitely helps me in the ring again some of these unbelievable opponents i will have to face in the next couple of weeks. you mentioned aj early and we saw what happened in 2012 on what he has gone on to achieve. is that added impetus for you to see what you could become? any boxer in the world wouldn�*t mind taking the same career path as anthonyjoshua. the coaches are fantastic. they are brilliant, listening to them telling you advice, but when it somebody who has been there and done it and took the blows and dished out the blows, it�*s that bit more real. this is my last shot, there is no doubt about it. my daughter being born, she is for now, that was a pivotal point in my career. something clicked and changed and it became more than a
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hobby, it became this is the best opportunity for me to provide the kind of life that i want her to live. i have an eight—week—old son, trent, and that is not my only drive to get a medal, but it is a huge driver of mine, to take it back to them kids, and they won�*t understand what it means now, but one day, for them to say your daddy was olympic champion, it means the world. it's it�*s incredibly hot and humid in japan today. i know it�*s hot back home but it�*s about 33 degrees and it feels like closer to 40. the humidity is high and that will be a problem for athletes and we have the consistently rising covid cases here injapan, not consistently rising covid cases here in japan, not what we consistently rising covid cases here injapan, not what we are seeing back home but enough to cause panic in the athletes�* village and we are up in the athletes�* village and we are up to about 91 cases amongst all the accredited officials including journalists and coaches coming in, and like i said earlier, there is a lot of apathy from the japanese. two thirds of the publicjust do not
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want the games here. i mentioned the flag—bearers, and for britain, the show goes on, but at the moment we need some more sports to join softball and football because at the moment it feels like it is limping and we need this to be the sporting tonic that we all need and want. natalie, thank you very much. the opening ceremony taking place tomorrow. it was hot where natalie was and of course it is hot here. carol is up on the roof. a bit of a cooling breeze on the top of broadcasting house but i imagine it�*s already heating up and you are feeling it now. . it it's already heating up and you are feeling it now. ._ feeling it now. . it is. the temperature _ feeling it now. . it is. the temperature is 90 - feeling it now. . it is. the. temperature is 90 degrees and heading to 20 in some parts. whiteley temperatures are between 15 and 18 degrees and the highest temperatures are in the south—west with cardiff and newquay and the channel islands or already at 21 celsius. the forecast for the next couple of days is one of heat for
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much of the uk until we get to the weekend. the weekend temperatures will return to normal and we are going to have some thunderstorms which could lead to localised flooding. we still have some amber extreme heat warnings in force and as we go through today it�*s going to be another hot day, starting with a fair bit of cloud in the north—east on most of it will burn back to the coast and some of it will linger, one or two showers knocking around, but temperatures could get up to 31 or as we go through the evening and overnight many of the showers will fade and there will be cloud coming in from the north sea across the north and east and it will be another warm night, so another one uncomfortable for sleeping in. tomorrow the cloud we have pushes back towards the east that there will be more in england than we have been used to for the last few days and we will have an easterly flow from the north sea but a lot of dry weather and the warmth tomorrow will push to the west and temperatures
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won�*t be as high in the east as they have been and for the weekend, for england and wales, we see a return to rain and showers, some of which could be torrential and thundery with a lot of lightning strikes and that might well lead to localised flooding issues. thank you very much. we are already chatting here with bears. you have shuffled along. you chatting here with bears. you have shuffled along.— chatting here with bears. you have shuffled along. you don't get many iieole on shuffled along. you don't get many people on the _ shuffled along. you don't get many people on the sofa _ shuffled along. you don't get many people on the sofa these _ shuffled along. you don't get many people on the sofa these days. i shuffled along. you don't get many i people on the sofa these days. we've started again. — people on the sofa these days. we've started again, like _ people on the sofa these days. we've started again, like everyone - people on the sofa these days. we've started again, like everyone else i started again, like everyone else were getting used to the relaxation of the rules and we shuffle along and you get the sofa. i get of the rules and we shuffle along and you get the sofa.— of the rules and we shuffle along and you get the sofa. i get the seat at the end- — and you get the sofa. i get the seat at the end. and _ and you get the sofa. i get the seat at the end. and i _ and you get the sofa. i get the seat at the end. and i have _ and you get the sofa. i get the seat at the end. and i have been - at the end. and i have been kindly dressed by charlie this morning, you saved me a faux pas. let’s dressed by charlie this morning, you saved me a faux pas.— saved me a faux pas. let's not worry about that- — saved me a faux pas. let's not worry about that. let's _ saved me a faux pas. let's not worry about that. let's talk _ saved me a faux pas. let's not worry about that. let's talk about - saved me a faux pas. let's not worry about that. let's talk about what i about that. let�*s talk about what you are up to. you are singing for the first time because people familiar with you in a different role. ., , , ,
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role. not exactly singing, but vocalising. — role. not exactly singing, but vocalising. l _ role. not exactly singing, but vocalising, i like _ role. not exactly singing, but vocalising, i like to _ role. not exactly singing, but vocalising, i like to say. - role. not exactly singing, but vocalising, i like to say. shalli vocalising, i like to say. shall we have a listen _ vocalising, i like to say. shall we have a listen and _ vocalising, i like to say. shall we have a listen and people - vocalising, i like to say. shall we have a listen and people can i vocalising, i like to say. shall we i have a listen and people can judge for themselves. # take the ride. # on the bus. # take the ride. # with the rest of us. # one way ticket on the flight. what is the video about? it kind of makes sense of the song, it�*s great, the animators who made the video and the flying bus is a stage i have at glastonbury that has been there for ten years. it was the acid house tent then we stayed —— changed it to the flying bus, so we made as a tribute to the stage in glastonbury. when did you record that? it tribute to the stage in glastonbury. when did you record that?- when did you record that? it was
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last summer. — when did you record that? it was last summer, actually. _ when did you record that? it was last summer, actually. we - when did you record that? it was last summer, actually. we got i last summer, actually. we got flown to ibiza and we met with the producer who i made the track with and we spent a lovely week in ibiza with him and his wife and we had a great time and the mad thing about it was being in ibiza and it was like a ghost island with nobody there, because when i go there, obviously, it�*s a full on party atmosphere but, yeah, we still felt the vibes and we came up with this track. pi. the vibes and we came up with this track. . ., ., , .,, track. a lot of people will be thinkini track. a lot of people will be thinking that _ track. a lot of people will be thinking that you _ track. a lot of people will be thinking that you went to i track. a lot of people will be i thinking that you went to ibiza, they thought, lucky you but obviously it was for work, so you could return —— record. obviously it was for work, so you could return -- record.— could return -- record. luckily we could go out to — could return -- record. luckily we could go out to do _ could return -- record. luckily we could go out to do work _ could return -- record. luckily we could go out to do work at the i could return -- record. luckily we. could go out to do work at the time and we recorded this track and we had a few days on beaches, and we had the island to ourselves. iei, had the island to ourselves. a beautiful place. i tell you what i think, when people see you this morning, you are so associated with clubs, the club scene and the music
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and all the years you�*ve been in the business. you must feel it more than anyone else that all of these places have been shut for so long. it�*s have been shut for so long. it's been quite _ have been shut for so long. it's been quite a — have been shut for so long. it�*s been quite a struggle. i've been quite a struggle. i�*ve been more fortunate than a lot of my colleagues. a lot of people have struggled through the pandemic and it is great now that clubs and pubs are all opening up and their return to normality. the happy mondays are playing again this weekend at the festival and i have my dayjob, which is djing at weekends, so everything is returning back to normal. . ,, everything is returning back to normal. ., . normal. looking back, do you want to reminisce a — normal. looking back, do you want to reminisce a little _ normal. looking back, do you want to reminisce a little bit. _ normal. looking back, do you want to reminisce a little bit. what _ normal. looking back, do you want to reminisce a little bit. what was - reminisce a little bit. what was going on there?— reminisce a little bit. what was going on there? you know what, i remember— going on there? you know what, i remember making _ going on there? you know what, i remember making that _ going on there? you know what, i remember making that video - going on there? you know what, i remember making that video and | going on there? you know what, ii remember making that video and it was such fun. the step on video. they were great days and we had such a great time. such good fun. horse they were great days and we had such a great time. such good fun.— a great time. such good fun. how did ou a great time. such good fun. how did you develop — a great time. such good fun. how did you develop your _
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a great time. such good fun. how did you develop your dance? _ a great time. such good fun. how did you develop your dance? when - a great time. such good fun. how did you develop your dance? when you l a great time. such good fun. how did i you develop your dance? when you are dancing, what do you think about? i kind of stole, i used to be like a rude boy, into ska music, so i kind of pinched everybody else�*s dance and put my twist on it and we loved all that thing with the 605, you�*d see that kind of thing with the festivals, spacing out, nodding their head, so it kind of felt that sort of style for my own dance. it�*s sort of style for my own dance. it's not 'ust sort of style for my own dance. it's notjust music that has kept you busy, spoken word, or vocalising. vocalising. busy, spoken word, or vocalising. vocalising— vocalising. you've had celebrity gogglebox. _ vocalising. you've had celebrity gogglebox, celebrity _ vocalising. you've had celebrity i gogglebox, celebrity masterchef. i�*ve had the boxing as well, i�*ve just signed up for celebrity boxing. you didn�*t have to do that. have you ever been hit with a boxing glove? i�*ve never been in a boxing ring at all in my life. it i've never been in a boxing ring at all in my life-— i've never been in a boxing ring at all in my life.- i'm - i've never been in a boxing ring at all in my life.- i'm hoping| all in my life. it hurts. i'm hoping that my dancing _ all in my life. it hurts. i'm hoping that my dancing skills _ all in my life. it hurts. i'm hoping that my dancing skills will - all in my life. it hurts. i'm hoping that my dancing skills will keep i all in my life. it hurts. i'm hoping i that my dancing skills will keep me safe and sound. i
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that my dancing skills will keep me safe and sound.— safe and sound. i think we 'ust saw our safe and sound. i think we 'ust saw your training — safe and sound. i think we 'ust saw your training regime. i safe and sound. i think we just saw your training regime. no, that - safe and sound. i think we just saw your training regime. no, that was i your training regime. no, that was last ear, your training regime. no, that was last year, messing about - your training regime. no, that was last year, messing about in - your training regime. no, that was last year, messing about in the i last year, messing about in the garden. i got my son a speedball and wanted to show him how to use it, not very successfully. braids wanted to show him how to use it, not very successfully.— wanted to show him how to use it, not very successfully. was that with a view to think _ not very successfully. was that with a view to think you _ not very successfully. was that with a view to think you would _ not very successfully. was that with a view to think you would be - not very successfully. was that with a view to think you would be doing i a view to think you would be doing the boxing? i a view to think you would be doing the boxing?— a view to think you would be doing the boxini ? ., ., ., ., , the boxing? i had no idea i would be doini that. the boxing? i had no idea i would be doing that- it — the boxing? i had no idea i would be doing that. it was _ the boxing? i had no idea i would be doing that. it was a _ the boxing? i had no idea i would be doing that. it was a company - the boxing? i had no idea i would be doing that. it was a company called i doing that. it was a company called boxster, they do professional fights. boxster, they do professional fiihts. ., .,~ boxster, they do professional fiihts. ., ,, fights. you take your fitness quite seriously because _ fights. you take your fitness quite seriously because during - fights. you take your fitness quite | seriously because during lockdown there was some attention on this. tree there was some attention on this. we did there was some attention on this. - did buzzing with bez and that was me tuning into fitness, and in the first lockdown, i spent a lot of time drinking cider and eating cake and chocolate and i got myself up to 14 stone almost and now i�*m just over 12 and a half stone now, so it�*s been good for me. the
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it's been good for me. the most important _ it's been good for me. the most important thing _ it's been good for me. the most important thing is you _ it's been good for me. the most important thing is you feel - it's been good for me. the most| important thing is you feel good, not so much the weight, but you�*re feeling better. i not so much the weight, but you're feeling better-— feeling better. i feel a lot better and i fit feeling better. i feel a lot better and l fit in _ feeling better. i feel a lot better and i fit in the _ feeling better. i feel a lot better and i fit in the close _ feeling better. i feel a lot better and i fit in the close that - feeling better. i feel a lot better and i fit in the close that i - and i fit in the close that i couldn�*t get in any more which i�*m happy about. teiiii couldn't get in any more which i'm happy about-— happy about. tell me, and you're lookini happy about. tell me, and you're looking dapper— happy about. tell me, and you're looking dapper and _ happy about. tell me, and you're looking dapper and will— happy about. tell me, and you're looking dapper and will buttoned | happy about. tell me, and you're i looking dapper and will buttoned up, so we can thank charlie for that, you will be fighting manchester united player and friend clayton blackmore. you've got into fitness in the last year a bit more and he is a manchester united player. i know, i can't is a manchester united player. i know, i can't believe it. and - know, i can't believe it. and you are going _ know, i can't believe it. and you are going to boxing. _ know, i can't believe it. and you are going to boxing. elite - know, i can't believe it. and you l are going to boxing. elite athletes and i'm going _ are going to boxing. elite athletes and i'm going to — are going to boxing. elite athletes and i'm going to pitch _ are going to boxing. elite athletes and i'm going to pitch them - are going to boxing. elite athletes. and i'm going to pitch them against me. the only thing we have in common is that we both used to play 90 minutes and used to the football training every week and and i was on stage with the happy mondays. in not quite the right frame of mind. henge quite the right frame of mind. have ou aot quite the right frame of mind. have you got yourself. — quite the right frame of mind. have you got yourself, because boxes often have fighting names, have you adopted anything —— boxers. i am adopted anything -- boxers. i am stealin: adopted anything -- boxers. i am stealing the _ adopted anything -- boxers. i am stealing the mohamed _ adopted anything —— boxers. i —n stealing the mohamed ali bunch like,
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float like a butterfly, sting like a bee. ., . ., bee. you are aiming high. good luck. ve aood bee. you are aiming high. good luck. very good luck _ bee. you are aiming high. good luck. very good luck with _ bee. you are aiming high. good luck. very good luck with everything, - very good luck with everything, and lovely to see you here on the sofa. we will keep an eye on you. just be careful. ., , , .. �* we will keep an eye on you. just be careful. .,, , .. �* .,, careful. hopefully i can't lose my teeth, because _ careful. hopefully i can't lose my teeth, because i've _ careful. hopefully i can't lose my teeth, because i've got _ careful. hopefully i can't lose my teeth, because i've got dentures| teeth, because i've got dentures now. a, teeth, because i've got dentures now. ~' teeth, because i've got dentures now. ., now. may i say, i think you have the best posture of _ now. may i say, i think you have the best posture of any _ now. may i say, i think you have the best posture of any guest _ now. may i say, i think you have the best posture of any guest we - now. may i say, i think you have the best posture of any guest we have l best posture of any guest we have had on the sofa. i also noticed you have slapped your thighs more than anyone i can remember. 50m; anyone i can remember. sorry about that. no, anyone i can remember. sorry about that. no. it's— anyone i can remember. sorry about that. no, it's enthusiastic, _ anyone i can remember. sorry about that. no, it's enthusiastic, we - that. no, it's enthusiastic, we like that. no, it's enthusiastic, we like that. and then — that. no, it's enthusiastic, we like that. and then we _ that. no, it's enthusiastic, we like that. and then we just both - that. no, it's enthusiastic, we like that. and then we just both went. that. no, it's enthusiastic, we like. that. and then we just both went to do the same thing. it’s that. and then we just both went to do the same thing.— do the same thing. it's because ou've do the same thing. it's because you've not _ do the same thing. it's because you've not had _ do the same thing. it's because you've not had people - do the same thing. it's because you've not had people on - do the same thing. it's because you've not had people on the i do the same thing. it's because - you've not had people on the settee for such a long time. that's what it is. �* , ., . . for such a long time. that's what it is. �* , ., .. ., for such a long time. that's what it is. and you called it a settee as well. i call them _ is. and you called it a settee as well. i call them settees - is. and you called it a settee as well. i call them settees as - is. and you called it a settee as. well. i call them settees as well. we are old fashion, charlie, that's what it is. ., , ., , we are old fashion, charlie, that's whatitis. ., , ., ~ what it is. lovely to see you. thank ou, what it is. lovely to see you. thank you. bez- —
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bez�*s new track is called flying bus. it's released next friday.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today — the government confirms it's drawing up a list of critical workers who will be exempt from self—isolating, as shop owners say they're under strain because of the number of staff self—isolating after being pinged by the covid app. a 3% pay rise for nurses and nhs staff. the health secretary claims it will make a "real difference "to people's lives," but unions say it's not enough. the say it's not enough. shambolic announcement mad yesterday the shambolic announcement made yesterday as nothing short of insulting to our 500,000 nursing members that are going on shift as we speak today. eating disorders among teenagers have soared during the pandemic, with young people facing
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long waits for treatment. extreme weather warnings issued for parts of wales, england and northern ireland. what does that mean if you work outdoors? what if your entire blueberry crop has suddenly reckoned on the same week? i am on a farm outside wolverhampton to discover what it means the crops, animals, and staff. today we are in for another hot and sunny day, more or less across the board. cloud currently pushing back to the coastline, some of which will linger, top temperatures could get into the low 30s. all the details later in the programme. good morning. it's thursday the 22nd ofjuly. our top story — in the last half an hour, the business secretary has confirmed on this programme that the government is drawing up a list of sectors that will be exempt from self—isolation rules. it comes as the number of employees
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getting pinged by the nhs test and trace app continues to rise, causing staff shortages across vital services. let's get more on this with our chief political correspondent adam fleming. adam, what are the government considering? the reason we are discussing this is because there are so many people who have been diagnosed with covid that lots of people are being pinged as their contacts, and are having to isolate, and so on social media and in the newspapers, you will see pictures of empty shelves in supermarkets. always hard to tell just how empty the shelves are nationwide, whether other factors like the weather are contributing to that, but the factors pressure because so many of their staff are off sick. so the government says that some critical workers in some sectors will not have to isolate if they get
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contacted as contacts of positive cases. the business secretary, classic are tensing that the list of sectors covered by the exemption will be very short. we sectors covered by the exemption will be very short.— sectors covered by the exemption will be very short. we are going to have guidance _ will be very short. we are going to have guidance about _ will be very short. we are going to have guidance about the _ will be very short. we are going to l have guidance about the categories of exemption, general power stations which effectively keep the light on and so on. i think the list will be very narrow, because we do not want to get into a huge debate about who is exempt and who isn't. find to get into a huge debate about who is exempt and who isn't.— to get into a huge debate about who is exempt and who isn't. and we also soke of is exempt and who isn't. and we also spoke of course _ is exempt and who isn't. and we also spoke of course about _ is exempt and who isn't. and we also spoke of course about this _ is exempt and who isn't. and we also spoke of course about this 396 - is exempt and who isn't. and we also spoke of course about this 3% pay - spoke of course about this 3% pay rise for nurses that has been agreed upon, or been offered, it has not been agreed by the nhs but it has been agreed by the nhs but it has been offered by the government, moving up from the i% it had recommended earlier this year. at the start of the year, matt hancock
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said the government could only afford a i% pay increase for lots of nhs workers in england, it then went to an independent pay review body who recommended 3% instead, yesterday sajid javid the new health secretary accepted that. super—centres of course more than 1%, but it super—centres of course more than i%, but it is not the 12.5% of the royal college of nursing was asking for. —— 3% is of course more than i%. they will be speaking to their members, and their boss pat cullen explained what they would be speaking to them about. $5 a speaking to them about. as a professional _ speaking to them about. as a professional trade _ speaking to them about. as a professional trade union, - speaking to them about. is — professional trade union, we will work alongside the nurses in their decision—making, because nurses will do the best thing for patients. whatever action they take, they will make sure their patients do not suffer as a consequence, same as they did in northern ireland two years ago when they took industrial action. they will do the same if they need to and any of the other countries. but they will not do it
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on a whim, they will make measured and considered decisions, and we will work with them to make those decisions. ., . will work with them to make those decisions. . , ., ~ , ., decisions. that is the workers, that some nhs bosses _ decisions. that is the workers, that some nhs bosses asking _ decisions. that is the workers, that some nhs bosses asking this - decisions. that is the workers, that i some nhs bosses asking this morning how this bigger than expected wage bill will be paid for, they want extra money on the government to make sure they don't have to cut services as a result. and of course, lots of other workers in the public sector are having their pay frozen, so a bit of a division between public sector workers and nhs workers. adam, thanks very much stop see you later. ministers in northern ireland will meet later to decide whether to ease coronavirus restrictions next week. the northern ireland executive has previously indicated that it hopes to re—open theatres and conference venues and relax some of the rules on socialising. 0ur correspondent danjohnson is at stormont for us this morning. dan, what are we likely to hear today?
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good morning. case numbers have been rising in the last few weeks, although the numbers are still relatively low. the death numbers are very low, but vaccination rates in northern ireland have lagged behind the rest of the uk a bit. in northern ireland have lagged behind the rest of the uk a hit. 50 thatis behind the rest of the uk a hit. 50 that is perhaps why there is more caution on the steps that are being considered here in northern ireland, so even if they do agree to further relaxation next week, it will not mean the complete removal of all restrictions, but we are talking about live events, conferences and resuming, the last of the restrictions being removed on the volume of live music, we are talking about an increase in the limits on household gatherings from six people perhaps up to ten. we are also looking at the requirement for facemasks being removed in places of worship and perhaps in classrooms. but even if they sexually, there will still be some restrictions in place into august, and it may be
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further into the autumn before restrictions are completely removed across northern ireland. dan, thank you. the chinese government has ordered a review into flood safety controls on public transport, after 12 people died when they were trapped in flooded underground railway tunnels. more than 500 people were rescued from tunnels in henan province, which saw a year's worth of rainfall in just three days. 0ur china correspondent robin brant has the latest. 0n the face of it, this looks like a good day for the people here in zhengzhou. the rain seems to have stopped in the city centre but we have come down to the junction to give you an idea of what is happening now. this is what you see in most of the parts of zhengzhou we've been driving around for the last hour, massive puddles of water,
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families strolling around, cars stranded in the middle of road, that is the car transport people doing the must business this morning, and getting them to the garages. but we know that the death toll has increased and the rain is spreading north, we have towns and villages over there who are now dealing with very severe amounts of water. the most troubling questions remain about this, the metro network here in the city. it is less than ten years old, but it was on one of these lines where we saw the most terrifying stories, 12 people crammed into one carriage lost their lives 24—hour signal. "24 hours ago. and we don't know exactly why, we don't know why they were left so vulnerable, but we do know at the very top of the national government, they are running other cities and other local governments to immediately look at their preparedness and to look at their regulations when it comes to metro networks if the floods and the rains come again. tomorrow's opening ceremony of the tokyo 2020 olympics has been plunged into further chaos following the dismissal of its show director. kentaro kobayashi is alleged to have
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made anti—semiticjokes during a comedy routine in 1998. meanwhile, 12 new covid cases have been reported in the olympic village, bringing the total to 87. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. do you have feel like turning round and singing? no. a couple of years ago, i was on the roof of a building in london, and you made me sing. never again. in london, and you made me sing. neveragain. but in london, and you made me sing. never again. but it is lovely up here on the roof of the bbc, sun beating down, about 20 celsius now, the study will be hot once again. in fact, the forecast of days for today and tomorrow is just that, but heading into the weekend, things change. a return to some wet weather, some thunderstorms that
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might lead to some localised flooding. some amber extreme heat warnings in force, for northern ireland running out at midnight tomorrow, and for england in the south—west corner of wales, that runs out midnight tonight. a lot of dry and sunny weather, we could see temperatures get up into the low 30s today across northern ireland and wales. we are keeping a close eye on that. most temperatures the mid to high 20s. any showers that form during the day will tend to fade, a return to cloud coming in from the north sea and the north and east, and it will be warm. that is how it starts tomorrow, the cloud pushing back through the day towards the coast, but more cloud in england and we have been used to, also a bit breezy, coming in from the north sea. tomorrow's highest temperatures once again in western areas, a little bit lower across the east. then we see some rain coming in across the south—west, and that is the rain that is going to be pushing
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northwards across england and wales through the course of this weekend. carol, it looks lovely, thank you very much and we will see you for more than half an hour. the time now is 8.14. the number of young people in england who've been admitted to hospital with an eating disorder, has risen sharply during the pandemic, with charities calling the nhs figures "deeply worrying." there were over 3,200 hospital admissions in england for the under 20s between april 2020 and march this year. that's compared to just over 2,000 the year before — a rise of nearly 50%. there's also been an increase in demand for specialist community based services, with more than 3,000 monthly referral, up from just over 2,000 before the pandemic. around half of young people referred are still waiting for treatment. jayne mccubbin has been to meet one family who struggled to cope during lockdown when their daughter developed anorexia.
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shejust she just wouldn't eat, she just would not heat. you feel like you cannot win, you feel like your child has been taken as a hostage. you're your child die slowly in front of you. —— you are seeing your child die slowly. ijust you. —— you are seeing your child die slowly. i just want you. —— you are seeing your child die slowly. ijust want my child to eat, how can i make my child eat? you just felt like you are having to just wait until your child got so ill that they were literally about to die before anything would be done. ., ., �* . to die before anything would be done. . . �*, ,. ., ., ., ., done. hannah's descended to anorexia bean at done. hannah's descended to anorexia began at the — done. hannah's descended to anorexia began at the start _ done. hannah's descended to anorexia began at the start of— done. hannah's descended to anorexia began at the start of the _ done. hannah's descended to anorexia began at the start of the first - began at the start of the first lockdown. for many young people, the pandemic provided a perfect storm, isolation, separation, anxiety, and,
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for an increase in number, an eating disorder. ., for an increase in number, an eating disorder. ,, ., , ., ., disorder. she was due to do her gcses, all _ disorder. she was due to do her gcses, all of — disorder. she was due to do her gcses, all of a _ disorder. she was due to do her gcses, all of a sudden - disorder. she was due to do her gcses, all of a sudden of - disorder. she was due to do her| gcses, all of a sudden of course that didn't happen, and she has time on her hands. we that didn't happen, and she has time on her hande— on her hands. we couldn't really meet u- on her hands. we couldn't really meet up with — on her hands. we couldn't really meet up with friends, _ on her hands. we couldn't really meet up with friends, so - on her hands. we couldn't really meet up with friends, so it - on her hands. we couldn't really meet up with friends, so it was l meet up with friends, so it was literally— meet up with friends, so it was literallyjust in the house. i thought. _ literallyjust in the house. i thought, i have got all this time to kill, why— thought, i have got all this time to kill, why not try to change what i didnt— kill, why not try to change what i didn't like — kill, why not try to change what i didn't like about myself? sol started — didn't like about myself? sol started this programme, working out more _ started this programme, working out more. ,, ., ., , ., _ more. she had nothing else to occupy her mind, more. she had nothing else to occupy her mind. so — more. she had nothing else to occupy her mind, so this _ more. she had nothing else to occupy her mind, so this would _ more. she had nothing else to occupy her mind, so this would become - more. she had nothing else to occupy her mind, so this would become her l her mind, so this would become her whole thing. her mind, so this would become her whole thing-— whole thing. then i started to cut out carbs. _ whole thing. then i started to cut out carbs, doing _ whole thing. then i started to cut out carbs, doing more _ whole thing. then i started to cut out carbs, doing more workouts, | whole thing. then i started to cut| out carbs, doing more workouts, i wasn't _ out carbs, doing more workouts, i wasn't really me any more.- out carbs, doing more workouts, i wasn't really me any more. every now and then, wasn't really me any more. every now and then. you — wasn't really me any more. every now and then, you would _ wasn't really me any more. every now and then, you would see _ wasn't really me any more. every now and then, you would see a _ wasn't really me any more. every now and then, you would see a glimmer i wasn't really me any more. every nowi and then, you would see a glimmer of hannah in there, but most of the time, you were dealing with this other entity that had taken her over. it is such a strong illness. the number of under 20s admitted to hospital with an eating disorder rose by nearly 50% between april 2020 and march this year, while the
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figure for over 20s remained almost exactly the same. fortunately for hannah and lisa, they had somewhere to turn. ., . hannah and lisa, they had somewhere to turn. ., , ., ., ., ., ., , to turn. there was one woman who was reall there to turn. there was one woman who was really there for — to turn. there was one woman who was really there for you. _ to turn. there was one woman who was really there for you. marg _ to turn. there was one woman who was really there for you. marg in _ to turn. there was one woman who was really there for you. marg in oaten, - really there for you. marg in oaten, she was brilliant.— she was brilliant. marg and dennis oaten set up _ she was brilliant. marg and dennis oaten set up a _ she was brilliant. marg and dennis oaten set up a charity _ she was brilliant. marg and dennis oaten set up a charity after - she was brilliant. marg and dennis oaten set up a charity after seeing their own daughter struggle. you don't normally get to do this, do you? meet the people you help in person. today they are coming face—to—face with the family who believed their advice saved their daughter's life. i know they are eager to thank you, but they think they are thanking you over zoom, so this is going to be something else. thank you for doing this.— thank you for doing this. you're very welcome- _ thank you for doing this. you're very welcome. you've _ thank you for doing this. you're very welcome. you've got - thank you for doing this. you're - very welcome. you've got somebody to see ou.
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very welcome. you've got somebody to see you- oh. — very welcome. you've got somebody to see you- oh. my _ very welcome. you've got somebody to see you. oh, my god! _ very welcome. you've got somebody to see you. oh, my god! i— very welcome. you've got somebody to see you. oh, my god! i wish _ very welcome. you've got somebody to see you. oh, my god! iwish i - very welcome. you've got somebody to see you. oh, my god! i wish i could - see you. oh, my god! iwish i could hut ou. see you. oh, my god! iwish i could hug you- you _ see you. oh, my god! iwish i could hug you- you are — see you. oh, my god! iwish i could hug you. you are such _ see you. oh, my god! iwish i could hug you. you are such tricksters. i hug you. you are such tricksters. the last time we saw you, you were in hospitat — the last time we saw you, you were in hospitat it — the last time we saw you, you were in hospital. it was _ the last time we saw you, you were in hospital. it was heartbreaking - in hospital. it was heartbreaking for us, _ in hospital. it was heartbreaking for us, because _ in hospital. it was heartbreaking for us, because we _ in hospital. it was heartbreaking for us, because we had - in hospital. it was heartbreaking for us, because we had been. in hospital. it was heartbreaking. for us, because we had been there, we had _ for us, because we had been there, we had been — for us, because we had been there, we had been there _ for us, because we had been there, we had been there and _ for us, because we had been there, we had been there and knew- for us, because we had been there, we had been there and knew what i for us, because we had been there, i we had been there and knew what you are going _ we had been there and knew what you are going through _ we had been there and knew what you are going through. is _ we had been there and knew what you are going through-— are going through. as covid hit, in atient are going through. as covid hit, inpatient beds _ are going through. as covid hit, inpatient beds are _ are going through. as covid hit, inpatient beds are at _ are going through. as covid hit, inpatient beds are at a - are going through. as covid hit, i inpatient beds are at a premium are going through. as covid hit, - inpatient beds are at a premium just when they were needed most. this is some of the last e—mail exchanges between lisa and marg in the days before hannah was finally admitted to hospital to access help. 3rd before hannah was finally admitted to hospital to access help.- to hospital to access help. 3rd of january 2021- — to hospital to access help. 3rd of january 2021. we _ to hospital to access help. 3rd of january 2021. we are _ to hospital to access help. 3rd of january 2021. we are hoping - to hospital to access help. 3rd of january 2021. we are hoping and i january 2021. we are hoping and praying for admission to hospital, but we know covid has affected admissions and honestly, i am very fearful. iii
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admissions and honestly, i am very fearful. . ., admissions and honestly, i am very fearful. _, , fearful. if her core body temperature _ fearful. if her core body temperature is low, - fearful. if her core body _ temperature is low, then: ambience, please _ temperature is low, then: ambience, please don't — temperature is low, then: ambience, please don't wait _ temperature is low, then: ambience, please don't wait for _ temperature is low, then: ambience, please don't wait for an _ please don't wait for an appointment. - please don't wait for an appointment. [- please don't wait for an appointment.— please don't wait for an appointment. please don't wait for an a- ointment. ., ., ., appointment. i have told her to tell me the minute _ appointment. i have told her to tell me the minute she _ appointment. i have told her to tell me the minute she feels _ appointment. i have told her to tell me the minute she feels unwell. i appointment. i have told her to tell. me the minute she feels unwell. has she had any — me the minute she feels unwell. has she had any pain in her kidneys, rapid— she had any pain in her kidneys, rapid weight _ she had any pain in her kidneys, rapid weight loss? _ she had any pain in her kidneys, rapid weight loss? last- she had any pain in her kidneys, rapid weight loss?— she had any pain in her kidneys, rapid weight loss? last week, she lost the most _ rapid weight loss? last week, she lost the most weight _ rapid weight loss? last week, she lost the most weight she - rapid weight loss? last week, she lost the most weight she has - rapid weight loss? last week, she lost the most weight she has everi lost the most weight she has ever lost, keeping up then an trustee can admit her in the next few days. i am not sharing — admit her in the next few days. i am not sharing this _ admit her in the next few days. i am not sharing this information to frighten — not sharing this information to frighten you, but _ not sharing this information to frighten you, but to _ not sharing this information to frighten you, but to keep - not sharing this information to - frighten you, but to keep your wear, please _ frighten you, but to keep your wear, please keep safe _ frighten you, but to keep your wear, please keep safe. we _ frighten you, but to keep your wear, please keep safe.— frighten you, but to keep your wear, please keep safe. we brought hannah to a&e last please keep safe. we brought hannah to me last night. _ please keep safe. we brought hannah to a&e last night, her— please keep safe. we brought hannah to a&e last night, her blood _ to a&e last night, her blood pressure and heart rate dropped dramatically and the crisis team moved in. ., ~ dramatically and the crisis team moved in. . ~ ., , , ., moved in. thank the lord she is on the ritht moved in. thank the lord she is on the right place _ moved in. thank the lord she is on the right place now. _ this is happening across the board, moore _ this is happening across the board, moore has — this is happening across the board, moore has got _ this is happening across the board, moore has got to— this is happening across the board, moore has got to be _ this is happening across the board, moore has got to be done. - this is happening across the board, moore has got to be done. do - this is happening across the board, moore has got to be done.- moore has got to be done. do you want me to _ moore has got to be done. do you want me to turn _ moore has got to be done. do you want me to turn the _ moore has got to be done. do you want me to turn the carrots - moore has got to be done. do you want me to turn the carrots as - moore has got to be done. do you i want me to turn the carrots as well?
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today. _ want me to turn the carrots as well? today, hannah at least is in a good place. do you feel like you have really turned a corner now? filth. place. do you feel like you have really turned a corner now? oh, yes, definitel . really turned a corner now? oh, yes, definitely- the _ really turned a corner now? oh, yes, definitely. the minute _ really turned a corner now? oh, yes, definitely. the minute she _ really turned a corner now? oh, yes, definitely. the minute she came - definitely. the minute she came back, it was amazing. things are good. back, it was amazing. things are tood. �* ., , ., good. i'm really good right now. there is hope. _ good. i'm really good right now. there is hope, isn't _ good. i'm really good right now. there is hope, isn't there? - there is hope, isn't there? always ho e. there is hope, isn't there? always hope- there _ there is hope, isn't there? always hope. there is. _ there is hope, isn't there? always hope. there is. you _ there is hope, isn't there? always hope. there is. you are _ there is hope, isn't there? always hope. there is. you are free. - there is hope, isn't there? alwaysl hope. there is. you are free. yeah. -- ou hope. there is. you are free. yeah. -- you are — hope. there is. you are free. yeah. -- you are proof- — you saw marg and dennis oaten there who provided support for hannah and her mum lisa. we're nowjoined by their daughter, former emmerdale actor gemma oaten, who lived with an eating disorder for over a decade. iam sure i am sure you and your parents would say you are not the point of the study like that, the point is to help somebody. but you must be very proud of the work you have done should have because they saw what
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happened to you and how it felt with your family. happened to you and how it felt with yourfamily. irate happened to you and how it felt with ourfamil . ~ . happened to you and how it felt with your family-— your family. we always say we are a t-rou of your family. we always say we are a group of ordinary — your family. we always say we are a group of ordinary people _ your family. we always say we are a group of ordinary people doing - group of ordinary people doing extraordinary things, but sadly those extraordinary things come from a place of pain, and all too often we are seeing more and more stories like this, where families, loved ones, sufferers are coming to us in crisis, to the point of nearly dying. and it is down to attain a charity like us to make sure they don't go down that path and more needs to be done.— needs to be done. your story with anorexia started _ needs to be done. your story with anorexia started when _ needs to be done. your story with anorexia started when you - needs to be done. your story with | anorexia started when you attend, needs to be done. your story with i anorexia started when you attend, so it has been very long time. when you hear those statistics and you hear that a young person has been hospitalised, presumably for somebody to get to that position, thatis somebody to get to that position, that is somebody who is in a very difficult situation. 0n that is somebody who is in a very difficult situation. on a sort of scale, where is that in terms of how they are?
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scale, where is that in terms of how the are? ., , scale, where is that in terms of how the are? . , ., , they are? early intervention is key, where we are _ they are? early intervention is key, where we are going _ they are? early intervention is key, where we are going wrong - they are? early intervention is key, where we are going wrong around i they are? early intervention is key, i where we are going wrong around the conversation and eating disorders is that we are constantlyjudging an eating disorder based on medical health, but it is a mental health illness, so intervention is key, and when some of encrusted and says i need help, i'm struggling, and they get turned away, cut to they are in crisis and on their deathbed, that is wrong and that is the story that happens to us 27 years ago. and it really is so frustrating that still today there are families and human beings, notjust statistics, going through this day in, day out. you were ten. _ through this day in, day out. you were ten, taken _ through this day in, day out. you were ten, taken to _ through this day in, day out. you were ten, taken to the doctor, because it has been noted you were not eating properly, you had a not normal relationship with food, the doctor said your weight seems 0k. yes, they can do anything about it, i could not get treatment until i got to a certain weight. —— can't do anything about it. got to a certain weight. -- can't do anything about it.—
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anything about it. surely that has chanted? anything about it. surely that has changed? i— anything about it. surely that has changed? i would _ anything about it. surely that has changed? i would never- anything about it. surely that has changed? i would never ask - anything about it. surely that has changed? i would never ask you i anything about it. surely that has i changed? i would never ask you how little you wait, we would never talk about weight because we know how that can affect people, because it is about where people are mentally and in terms of emotional stability, particularly now during the pandemic with young people. irate particularly now during the pandemic with young people-— with young people. we know, but unfortunately _ with young people. we know, but unfortunately that _ with young people. we know, but unfortunately that knowledge - with young people. we know, but unfortunately that knowledge is l with young people. we know, but l unfortunately that knowledge is not coming down to the nhs and referrals on waiting lists. we continually talk about this, and it has to come to a point where change comes. whenever this bmi threshold comes from, where some of the house to get to a certain low weight to be given treatment, it's completely wrong. eating disorders are so broad in the spectrum of the lumia and so many others that are not spoken about, anorexia only represents 10% of all eating disorders, people are nearly dying. i lost a friend. we spoke on radio five live about her. trevor phillips lost his daughter. people
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are dying, we have seen a 400% increase in new referrals this year already, the 700% increase in carers coming to us. to us, a small charity with little manpower, hardly any resource, but is trying to make a change. what we need us to all come together and start to change the narrative, because we cannotjust keep talking and saying the conversation is happening, it needs to be bigger than that and needs to be more. . ., to be bigger than that and needs to be more. , ., ., , . be more. gemma, how is the pandemic -la ed in? be more. gemma, how is the pandemic played in? because _ be more. gemma, how is the pandemic played in? because this _ be more. gemma, how is the pandemic played in? because this rise _ be more. gemma, how is the pandemic played in? because this rise in - played in? because this rise in numbers as happened during the pandemic. what is the time between those two things, what is happened? —— what is the tie? it is those two things, what is happened? -- what is the tie?— -- what is the tie? it is to do with not being — -- what is the tie? it is to do with not being able _ -- what is the tie? it is to do with not being able to _ -- what is the tie? it is to do with not being able to access - not being able to access the services as readily as we normally would, it is not pointing fingers of the nhs, but they are under extreme pressure, i understand that, with covid, but this is another epidemic, but also an eating disorder is a
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mental health disorder based around control. you take away people's control. you take away people's control of their lives, not knowing if they can work, if they are and have a roof over their head, that plays havoc, but an eating disorder thrives with that. it is such an intricate and complex illness, and more needs to be done with the understanding especially with the powers that be at government level. i wish i could get into a room with boris angelos talk about obesity strategy he has in place and all the other ramifications on the idea of focusing on the physical and we must address the mental health. i ask this of many _ address the mental health. i ask this of many charities, _ address the mental health. i ask this of many charities, there - address the mental health. i ask this of many charities, there are many charities who are working to combat this, want to help. what is the problem, what is holding them back from galvanising and getting together as one force? irate back from galvanising and getting together as one force?— together as one force? we are already starting _ together as one force? we are already starting to _ together as one force? we are already starting to do - together as one force? we are already starting to do that, i together as one force? we are already starting to do that, we together as one force? we are - already starting to do that, we are starting an eating disorder alliance. we have been speaking with
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various other charities, so many wonderful small charities around the uk, and we are collaborating together at the moment to see if we can make a change together. hagar can make a change together. how im ortant can make a change together. how important is _ can make a change together. how important is it _ can make a change together. how important is it that _ can make a change together. how important is it that there are personalities, like yourself, an actor, we have seen you talking about this when you are very high—profile, to talk about the devastating impact this can have. you three years ago suffered a miscarriage, and you put that on social media, and just to show that this is what this can do to the body, because it is notjust the immediate impact this has, it has lifelong effects. and you are not just talking about what happened to you when you were ten and what you have little, it tell you it affects you as an adult now, how important is that? it you as an adult now, how important is that? . you as an adult now, how important is that? , ,., you as an adult now, how important is that? , ., ., is that? it is so important, we are really starting _ is that? it is so important, we are really starting to _ is that? it is so important, we are really starting to unpick_ is that? it is so important, we are really starting to unpick and - really starting to unpick and understand the long—term ramifications of an eating disorder. also it is notjust happening to somebody over there. you also it is notjust happening to somebody over there. you know what? you brint somebody over there. you know what? you bring up — somebody over there. you know what? you bring up the _ somebody over there. you know what? you bring up the post—
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somebody over there. you know what? you bring up the post i _ somebody over there. you know what? you bring up the post i did _ you bring up the post i did yesterday, and the response to that was incredible. in a hopeful way, people saying thank you, i don't feel alone, people saying thank you, i don't feelalone, but people saying thank you, i don't feel alone, but also in a way that this is accepted. we need to talk about the bigger picture, or the fact that not only are people getting to a point where they are losing their life, if they get better, which i pray they do, and i did, there's still a point where i might not be able to give life to another human being. and that is a lot. i do not want people to go through that pain to understand that they need to reach out to get help, and that is what that post was about. . ., . and that is what that post was about. , . , , ., , about. gemma, there might be summary watchint at about. gemma, there might be summary watching at home. _ about. gemma, there might be summary watching at home, could _ about. gemma, there might be summary watching at home, could be _ about. gemma, there might be summary watching at home, could be a _ about. gemma, there might be summary watching at home, could be a family - watching at home, could be a family member who is anxious about something they think they are seeing in their loved one. it could be a young person who has not yet said anything. about what they think is going on. anything. about what they think is ttoin on. ., anything. about what they think is going on-- it _ anything. about what they think is going on-- it is _ anything. about what they think is going on. yeah. it is difficult territory. — going on. yeah. it is difficult territory, isn't _ going on. yeah. it is difficult territory, isn't it? _ going on. yeah. it is difficult territory, isn't it? to - going on. yeah. it is difficult territory, isn't it? to say - territory, isn't it? to say something, say the right thing, not
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make something worse.— something, say the right thing, not make something worse. yeah. we need to make sure — make something worse. yeah. we need to make sure that... _ make something worse. yeah. we need to make sure that... my _ make something worse. yeah. we need to make sure that... my advice - to make sure that... my advice is please do not bury your head in your sand, because he please do not bury your head in your sand, because be mindful and kind and caring in your approach, but do not ignore it. early intervention is so important, there are wonderful charities out there like seed. we also have an eating disorder education toolkit we are getting into schools around the uk. to make sure to your point that this conversation becomes normalised so we are not constantly walking on egg shells, and ijust play that this conversation —— pray that this conversation —— pray that this conversation continues and we keep getting resources into schools, but also that parents, carers, loved ones, everybody knows that this is a thing, it happens, and by ignoring it and waiting for the weight to change, we are not going to change what is already there.— what is already there. lovely to see ou what is already there. lovely to see you today- — what is already there. lovely to see you today- your— what is already there. lovely to see you today. your mum _ what is already there. lovely to see you today. your mum and - what is already there. lovely to see you today. your mum and dad - what is already there. lovely to see you today. your mum and dad are l you today. your mum and dad are doing fantastic work, which i know goes on. thank you.— doing fantastic work, which i know goes on. thank you. thank you for havint goes on. thank you. thank you for
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having me- — if you've been affected by any of the issues raised, you can visit the bbc action line website on screen now. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from the bbc�*s news teams in london and the south east. the ambulance services for kent, sussex, surrey and london are reminding people to take extra care in the sun — after demand for help increased during the warmer weather. together the two services say they are now receiving up to 11,000 calls a day — often relating to dehydration and heat stroke. people are being reminded to use alternative services for non—emergencies. if you can access your health care needs through other avenues, through nhs 111, your gp, your pharmacist, pharmacists have a wealth of information that they can share and support, some my ask is to help us to support you when you really need us,
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when it is really critical and you need an emergency ambulance. dramatic footage has been released by police showing an officer entering a burning house to save an arsonist. video from sergeantjames cattermole's body—worn camera recorded him climbing into the building in sellindge near folkestone to help 57 year—old christopher pain to safety. a judge commended sgt cattermole's quick thinking and bravery. pain was sent to prison for four years. a private funeral for kent pcso julia james is taking place at canterbury cathedral later today. the 53 year—old died from head injuries after walking her dog close to her home in snowdown near dover. a 21 year—old man has been charged with her murder. new research suggests loneliness and anxiety linked to the pandemic remain extremely common among teenagers. the study by the mental health foundation found 43 per cent of those surveyed are worried about another lockdown.
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but there was a slight drop in the proportion of teenagers who said their mental health was poor. the london academy of excellence tottenham is a school which offers counselling to students. their mental health at the moment is a big talking point because we have seen young people experience a lot more loss and we know that that has significant impacts on their emotional well—being and we offer one—to—one counselling for people going through the difficulties and that can be something they access through their time here. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. it's another warm day in store across the south—east. warm start to the morning with lots of blue sky and sunshine throughout the first half of the day and more sunny spells into the afternoon and there will be fairweather cloud developing and the small chance of one or two isolated showers breaking out but for the majority of us it will be completely dry and temperatures peaking in the middle or high 20s and perhaps a degree or so down on where we have been, and there is more of an easterly breeze going on so with the breeze towards eastern
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coastal areas of kent, you will feel cooler here. overnight, uncomfortable for sleeping and temperatures will remain high for much of the night. any showers we see will fade away to give us clear skies and this will be the temperatures into friday morning with friday feeling cooler and the breeze will increase a touch but it should stay dry and there is a met office warning in for heavy rain over the weekend. heavy, thundery showers and temperatures back to the seasonal average. good morning welcome to breakfast and with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's on today's programme with gethin and kym. thanks both. it's a story we've followed closely
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— the long term impact of head injuries on rugby players. today we're bringing you the brand new research linking the sport to brain damage. and with one in four elite players thought to be affected, we'll be finding out about the game—changing scans that could help protect them. and with news that 90% of all uk adults— and with news that 90% of all uk adults could have covid antibodies, we explain — adults could have covid antibodies, we explain why infections are still going _ we explain why infections are still going up — we explain why infections are still going up. he we explain why infections are still tt-oinu. we explain why infections are still also coming up, spending this summer is set to soar to £38 billion, so your wallet might be feeling the heat. so alice tapper shows us the loyalty cards and cashback sites that can boost your spending power. but if you're planning to splash out replacing old metal garden furniture or rusty pots and pans — then don't! jacqui joseph can save you a fortune with her simple ways to remove stubborn rust on almost anything — using potatoes and foil! plus if your kitchen skills
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are a bit rusty, don't worry. chef anna haugh is here with her ultimate summer cooking hacks and explains why a pinch of salt will chill your wine in no time! and it's finally time for the olympics! after a very long wait the opening ceremony officially launches the games tomorrow. record breaking olympian tessa sanderson tells us how team gb are digging deep to beat the heat and go for gold injapan. and neiljones is going for glory in strictly fitness! we'll see you at 9.15. in the last half an hour, we've heard that australia and new zealand have pulled out of the rugby league world cup, due to be held in england in october. mike's here with more. for people not aware, this is a big event to be held in england and this is in october. australia and new zealand are huge teams in rugby league. bi zealand are huge teams in rugby leatue. ~' . . , zealand are huge teams in rugby leatue. ~' .. league. 61 matches across the bbc has well and _ league. 61 matches across the bbc has well and you _ league. 61 matches across the bbc has well and you are _ league. 61 matches across the bbc has well and you are talking - league. 61 matches across the bbc has well and you are talking about| has well and you are talking about this kind of blow, it's one of the
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biggest you can get because australia and new zealand have won it each of the nine times it's been held since 1972, australia mostly, but museum with a win and when it was first mooted a month ago that they might not take part in the feeling was, what's the point of happening, put it back to 2022 and then came the announcement on the 15th, overa then came the announcement on the 15th, over a week ago from the organisers that it would go ahead, the hope being that they could persuade australia and new zealand can be held safely on the tournament could go ahead as planned and they could go ahead as planned and they could persuade them and turn things around there was a statement at the time from july saying there was a contingency plan and john dutton, the chief executive said if they pull out there was a plan to bring other nations in to replace them and they had a number of nations lined up they had a number of nations lined up ready to step up to the mark, so could that be the plan or will the organisers change in the news broking in the last hour with the
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official statements from australia and new zealand say they have called for a postponement again but would not be taking part in the autumn world cup amid fears over coronavirus and have cited border restrictions, the bubbles, and half of australia is back in lockdown again so the joint statement says they have informed the international rugby league and rugby world cup organisers that they won't be taking part because of player welfare and safety concerns. what is more, one of the reasons that greg peters from new zealand, the chief executive said, he cited stark differences between the management of the pandemic in the uk and australia and new zealand insisting it was too unsafe for the teams to take part in the tournament and also citing the way the situation is changing drastically at the moment. we've heard from _ drastically at the moment. we've heard from the _ drastically at the moment. we've heard from the new _ drastically at the moment. we've heard from the new zealand - drastically at the moment. we've i heard from the new zealand prime minister who's been critical in the last week or so about the handling of the pandemic and i imagine throughout the day we will get response. aqua and john dutton has to see if he will stand by the
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contingency plan to bring other nations into it so the show can go on. . the "long term failure" to reduce the risk of brain injuries in sport needs to be addressed by the government — according to a report by the digital, culture, media and sport committee. it comes as a separate study found that participation in professional adult rugby may be associated with changes in brain structure. let's speak now to dawn astle, who's dad jeff, a former england striker died 20—years ago after developing dementia. good morning to you. this is a story you and yourfamily good morning to you. this is a story you and your family know only too well and i wonder, give me your reaction to some of what you are hearing about the research being done on the recommendations? good mornint , done on the recommendations? good morning, charlie. _ done on the recommendations? good morning, charlie. we _ done on the recommendations? (limp. morning, charlie. we are very grateful to the committee for
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highlighting a woeful lack of recording and incidences of traumatic brain injuries in the professional game and there have been lots of sensible recommendations for better concussion management in sport and concussion management in sport and concussion research but what we need really is for the recommendations to be actioned and that is the main thing. the issue of dementia in football grew from a flickering ember to a raging inferno and i knew that would happen. as unsettling as it was for the sporting authorities, this was the reality. there were players dying and nobody gave a damn audit enough and they've rightly been criticised so to read this report, as i did yesterday, finally,
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after too many frustrating, upsetting years, to finally give me and my family hope that change will come, because no longer with the governing bodies the left, i think the committee said, to mark their own homework.— the committee said, to mark their own homework. dawn, good morning to ou, ou've own homework. dawn, good morning to you. you've made _ own homework. dawn, good morning to you. you've made it _ own homework. dawn, good morning to you, you've made it clear— own homework. dawn, good morning to you, you've made it clear before - you, you've made it clear before that sport has always been treated differently in terms of it is a job and your dad did a job, he may have loved it and been brilliant at it that he was going to work on the same protections have perhaps not been afforded to sportspeople to athletes then if it was someone who went into an office or factory or a building to work.— went into an office or factory or a building to work. that is absolutely ri . ht. building to work. that is absolutely right. football _ building to work. that is absolutely right. football is _ building to work. that is absolutely right. football is a _ building to work. that is absolutely right. football is a much _ building to work. that is absolutely right. football is a much loved - right. football is a much loved sport for millions of people around the world, me included, but for my dad and other professionals it was just theirjob and they should be afforded the same protection from
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the known risks as anybody else in anyjob the known risks as anybody else in any job and the known risks as anybody else in anyjob and that could be put right immediately and it's applicable to all football —related head injuries and by definitely declaring dimension in football as an industrial disease. i think the health and safety executive has mentioned in reply to this report about there being risk versus reward as some sort ofjustification that less application of the law is applied to sport because of that and you could argue that people have to make a living and this improves their mental health and it improves their mental health and it improves their mood when they meet people in their mood when they meet people in the workplace and there are beneficial rewards for normal work but that doesn't mean that there shouldn't be a different legal
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standards apply to sportspeople. that is just so inconsistent but it can be changed immediately. it that isjust so inconsistent but it can be changed immediately. it does feel like the — can be changed immediately. it does feel like the steps _ can be changed immediately. it does feel like the steps are _ can be changed immediately. it does feel like the steps are very _ feel like the steps are very slow and i know you get satisfaction from things changing a bit. where do you look for sports that seem to have reacted more quickly? some people point to american football, to look at one sport that seems to have adapted and actively done things. definitely. america and the nfl are ten or 15 years in front of us and the problem being that sporting authorities want to protect the product of the sport. that is what they are there to do and what they should be doing is protecting its players. the athletes. it has taken me and my family and an army of west brom supporters who dragged a 30
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foot banner about my dad to all of the football games and held 27,000 leaflets for my dad to get the footballing authorities to sit up and take note and listen and if it wasn't for them we would not be where we are now. but that shows us a really important point that it is a really important point that it is a lesson to us all that the power that ordinary people can still wield evenin that ordinary people can still wield even in the face of extraordinary odds and if i were to thank everybody who has helped us, especially the west bromwich albion supporters, every day of my life for the rest of my life, it wouldn't be enough and we wouldn't be where we are without them.— are without them. dawn, thank you for talkint are without them. dawn, thank you for talking to _ are without them. dawn, thank you for talking to us _ are without them. dawn, thank you for talking to us and _ are without them. dawn, thank you for talking to us and it _ are without them. dawn, thank you for talking to us and it is _ are without them. dawn, thank you for talking to us and it is a - are without them. dawn, thank you for talking to us and it is a story i for talking to us and it is a story we will follow more and more and see what reaction to these issues. thank you very much. surely we shall talk
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to carol and we have put her on the roof of the new broadcasting house, because it is hot out there but victoria is on a farm in a polytunnel and can you imagine how hot it is, regardless of how gorgeous the fruit being picked is? you are right. it is pretty hot and at half past eight or so it's already 21 degrees outside and another 5 degrees under this, even though this is all open. these are closed polytunnel is for the younger fruit and these ones are properly twice as hot again. it set to be another scorcher, another 30 degrees orso another scorcher, another 30 degrees or so and this is a situation replicated across the country on the met office has issued severe, extreme heat weather warnings for large parts of england and wales and northern ireland as well and it's in
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place until tomorrow. what is the problem? the major problems are obvious, heat exhaustion, sunburn and the like but it does pose problems for people who work outdoors or on the land and we so often complain we don't get enough sun in the country and how many people working outdoors take their health seriously or whether they spend more time on their animals and crops? one person who knows a lot about this is stephanie, and this comes from a particularly personal place for you for farmers welfare and you've been hanging the drum for nine years. why does it mean so much to you? i’m nine years. why does it mean so much to ou? �* ., ., ., to you? i'm from donegal in ireland and my friends _ to you? i'm from donegal in ireland and my friends are _ to you? i'm from donegal in ireland and my friends are farmers - to you? i'm from donegal in ireland and my friends are farmers and - and my friends are farmers and fishermen— and my friends are farmers and fishermen and i know families who have lost— fishermen and i know families who have lost members as a result of going _ have lost members as a result of going to — have lost members as a result of going to work on people who have lost limbs— going to work on people who have lost limbs as a result of going to work— lost limbs as a result of going to work but — lost limbs as a result of going to work but in _ lost limbs as a result of going to work but in terms of things like the other— work but in terms of things like the other elements, the medical issues around _ other elements, the medical issues around farming, the long—term health conditions _ around farming, the long—term health conditions you can have as a result
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of it, _ conditions you can have as a result of it. it's _ conditions you can have as a result of it. it's very— conditions you can have as a result of it, it's very important to be aware — of it, it's very important to be aware of— of it, it's very important to be aware of that as well. i know people who have _ aware of that as well. i know people who have had skin cancer from basically— who have had skin cancer from basically sun exposure so we need to start looking after ourselves. do ou start looking after ourselves. you think start looking after ourselves. il�*ifr you think farmers take their own health as seriously as the animals they look after and the crops they manage? there is an element of being hardy and it's almost seems to be soft if you apply sun cream. these are the basics _ soft if you apply sun cream. these are the basics and _ soft if you apply sun cream. these are the basics and they've - soft if you apply sun cream. these are the basics and they've talked i are the basics and they've talked about— are the basics and they've talked about it — are the basics and they've talked about it years in australia and it's something — about it years in australia and it's something we need to be aware of, the sun— something we need to be aware of, the sun exposure and how we can manage _ the sun exposure and how we can manage it — the sun exposure and how we can manage it. it is managing risk. that is what _ manage it. it is managing risk. that is what we — manage it. it is managing risk. that is what we are doing, rethinking the risk. is what we are doing, rethinking the risk it_ is what we are doing, rethinking the risk. �* . ., , is what we are doing, rethinking the risk. �* , . , ., is what we are doing, rethinking the risk. ~ , . , ., :: risk. at this farm they have 70 eo - le risk. at this farm they have 70 people who — risk. at this farm they have 70 people who work _ risk. at this farm they have 70 people who work full-time - risk. at this farm they have 70 people who work full-time or| people who work full—time or part—time so what responsibility do employers have to take the safety and security of their staff seriously when it comes to things like the sun? look at the health and safety at work act 1974 and you have the responsibility to give the training and education to potential
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workers. but training and education to potential workers. �* ., ~ , ., ., workers. but workers have a responsibility _ workers. but workers have a responsibility themselves. i workers. but workers have a i responsibility themselves. we workers. but workers have a - responsibility themselves. we know that over— responsibility themselves. we know that over half of farmers are aware of how _ that over half of farmers are aware of how important it is to protect their— of how important it is to protect their skin — of how important it is to protect their skin and you realise only 23% of them _ their skin and you realise only 23% of them actively apply sunscreen and it's something they almost need to reinforce _ it's something they almost need to reinforce on a daily basis. what tips do— reinforce on a daily basis. what tips do you _ reinforce on a daily basis. what tips do you have for those who will be outdoors today, particularly in the hottest part of the day between 11 the hottest part of the day between it and _ the hottest part of the day between 11 and four? you can't tell farmers not to— 11 and four? you can't tell farmers not to work— 11 and four? you can't tell farmers not to work outside so they need to mitigate _ not to work outside so they need to mitigate the risk than they need to wear widebrimmed hats. covering their arms — wear widebrimmed hats. covering their arms. those areas that are ekpose. — their arms. those areas that are ekpose. use _ their arms. those areas that are expose, use italy's factor 30 and keep— expose, use italy's factor 30 and keep themselves hydrated and protect their because retinal damage and corneal— their because retinal damage and corneal sunburn is a thing as well, so there's— corneal sunburn is a thing as well, so there's a — corneal sunburn is a thing as well, so there's a lot of things you can do and _ so there's a lot of things you can do and also _ so there's a lot of things you can do and also look out for any spots or moles — do and also look out for any spots or moles or— do and also look out for any spots or moles or anything that changes colour— or moles or anything that changes colour or— or moles or anything that changes colour or becomes discoloured that -ets colour or becomes discoloured that gets larger, and check it out with your— gets larger, and check it out with your gp — gets larger, and check it out with your gp. don't look after your livestock— your gp. don't look after your livestock and land more than you
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look after — livestock and land more than you look after yourself.— look after yourself. really good advice. public _ look after yourself. really good advice. public health _ look after yourself. really good advice. public health england i look after yourself. really good i advice. public health england is saying stay out of the sun if you can during the hottest part of the day and do not exercise in the middle of the day and stay hydrated and put on the sun cream, but it's notjust people who struggle with sunburn and skin cancer, it is also livestock and we went to have a look at the pigs earlier on today and did you know, they can get sunburn and skin cancer as well and it is the larger breeds, like the land racer that struggle the most on the youngest ones, those little piglets are most at risk, so it's an issue forfarmers and they are most at risk, so it's an issue for farmers and they have created a wallow is to give them lots of water and somewhere to cover themselves in mud which acts as a natural sun cream. i won't try it myself. i have the traditional one you squeeze out the traditional one you squeeze out the bottle, but do stay safe today and enjoy the sun when you can. i like the idea of having a place to
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wallow. �* . ., . like the idea of having a place to wallow. �*, ., , wallow. it's always something we en'o . it wallow. it's always something we enjoy it looks — wallow. it's always something we enjoy. it looks glorious _ wallow. it's always something we enjoy. it looks glorious there. - enjoy. it looks glorious there. thank you so much. and making the important point that it is hot out there so do try to protect yourself with long sleeves or suncream or a hat. carol can tell us more. how hot, carol? it could get up to 31 or more than that in parts of northern ireland in particular and if it does, provisionally, we had the highest temperature on record in northern ireland in reaching 31.3 and we might see a bit higher than that today. talking of records, on tuesday in china there was the equivalent of nearly one third of the annual rainfall falling in just one hour and that is the the equivalent of having a bucket on top of your head when it's pouring down and we have seen the devastation caused. the forecast for the next couple of days for today and
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tomorrow is a hot one and also a sunny one for most of us but as we head into the weekend we see a return to thunderstorms and some will be slow moving and it could lead to flooding and temperatures will be back to where they should be and by day and by night the temperatures will be similar to what we have had this week in the met office still has to amber extreme heat warnings as we have heard. this morning we started with a fair bit of cloud across the north and east and it will push back to the coastline and some of the sun will linger but a lot of sunshine sparking off showers across parts of the north and west. temperatures today could getjust above 31 degrees in northern ireland, something we are watching closely, 30 degrees in parts of wales and 29 in the south and where we keep the cloud temperatures will be a bit lower. as we head for the course of the evening and overnight, showers will fade and we will see more cloud coming in across the north and east from the north sea and it will be another warm one with most of us staying easily in double figures. so
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for tomorrow, we start with sunshine but all of the cloud as well and the cloud again is burning back towards the coast where some of it will stick but there will be more cloud in england than we have been used to and it will still be sunny but we will have an easterly breeze coming in from the north sea, so the warmth will still be very much in the west and it will feel cooler than it has donein and it will feel cooler than it has done in the east but it will not be cold as you can see from the temperatures. by the end of friday rain coming in from the south—west and during saturday and sunday that will be moving north across england and wales and especially on sunday, some of that will be heavy and thundery and slow—moving and there will be lots of lightning flashes and there is the risk of localised flooding. temperatures closer to where they should be this weekend in july but as i mentioned, by night, the temperatures will be similar to what we had been seen during the course of the week. so lots going on with the weather.
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here is me being nice to two people at the same time, from one broadcasting legend to another. look at carol's space. shall i do it again? was that the face that says i am blown away? have a look at carol? i mightjust do it again. from one broadcasting legend to another. i didn't know you were talking about me, so i just smiled. i think it was clear he wasn't talking _ just smiled. i think it was clear he wasn't talking about _ just smiled. i think it was clear he wasn't talking about me. - just smiled. i think it was clear he wasn't talking about me. have i just smiled. i think it was clear he wasn't talking about me. have a i wasn't talking about me. have a good rest of the way. we have given you the big build—up. idaho rest of the way. we have given you the big build-up.— the big build-up. nowi better not mess about- _ the big build-up. nowi better not mess about. let's _ the big build-up. nowi better not mess about. let's get _ the big build-up. nowi better not mess about. let's get through - mess about. let's get through some breakint mess about. let's get through some breaking news _ mess about. let's get through some breaking news business, _ mess about. let's get through some breaking news business, which - mess about. let's get through some breaking news business, which you i breaking news business, which you know all about, the rugby league. for those who don't know, the rugby league world cup due to be held here in england in october. two teams that are absolutely crucial to the sport have just withdrawn, so take us through what has happened. australia and new zealand this morning, quite suddenly and as we
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might say in sport against the run of play, in that all the messaging had been positive to that point on the chief executive of the rfl, i am the chief executive of the rfl, i am the president but i have no power, just an honorary role, but it is a sport i care hugely about and everything was gearing up to the world cup, the first time we have had men's, women's and wheelchair welcomes running simultaneously and it was going to be and is still going to be a fantastic opportunity to sell the sport but without australia and new zealand this is catastrophic and the really irritating thing is that both australia and new zealand rugby union teams are coming over later this year so what i don't understand is why the rugby league has decided to withdraw from the biggest tournament that it has stays in rugby league now when we could wait a couple of months and if they still felt that badly, let's look at it closer to the time but it seems very odd timing and i think there is
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quite a lot of work going on to repair that situation and find a solution because particularly for the women's game, this is devastating. that wipes out the top two teams and obviously affects the men's tournament hugely. they are the big cards and i've seen that sport can still go on without the big draw. the usa pulled out the moscow olympics and rushing to have the same back and these things happen but it's not the same. to put the question — happen but it's not the same. to put the question out _ happen but it's not the same. to put the question out wide, _ happen but it's not the same. to put the question out wide, and - happen but it's not the same. to put the question out wide, and there - happen but it's not the same. to put the question out wide, and there is i the question out wide, and there is obvious frustration, it is politics and covid and you will see with the olympics, that we've seen in the last two weeks with the prime minister of new zealand saying, words to the effect that we do not agree with the way in the uk is dealing with a pandemic and also australia, scientists saying they don't agree and it has filtered down in the same way to the olympics. i agree with you and maybe that is why
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it's a bigger card to say we are pulling out of the world cup than saying the touring teams are still coming. even the all blacks are coming. even the all blacks are coming and you think if that is going ahead, i don't understand. if it is a political card and can be repaired, there's been so much investment in the world cup and it's desperately disappointing and i hope things can be repaired politically if it's a political decision and there's no doubt the athletes want to come and of course they want to play in the world cup. and if in the coming weeks, and this is where they will be working every hour of the day. and it can prove it will be done safely, and we had a briefing last night ahead of the olympic games. and there is a group of broadcasters here, and it was really strict. we are still keeping two
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metres from everybody at all times because it's the only way we can guarantee personal safety and if we can guarantee that, we can guarantee i can guarantee your safety and your safety because i know i am safe. fin safety because i know i am safe. on the olympic theme, you must be looking forward to the moment where you think, here is some sport. i know there has been some already and some great sport. but there is so much around him. there must be a sense, let's see something where we can say, he is winning, she is winning. fits can say, he is winning, she is winning-— can say, he is winning, she is winnint. a �*, can say, he is winning, she is winnint. m �*, winning. as soon as the men's road race is starting _ winning. as soon as the men's road race is starting you _ winning. as soon as the men's road race is starting you are _ winning. as soon as the men's road race is starting you are locked - winning. as soon as the men's road race is starting you are locked in. l race is starting you are locked in. and the football has started with a great win for great britain and the usa getting beaten by sweden, and the netherlands scoring ten goals, that was a big deal. i love the fact that was a big deal. i love the fact that once the sport is rolling, it's an opportunity for a lot of sports that don't get attention any other time of the year to become the
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centre of focus and for a television experience, more centre focused than ever. it will be so pure because it's all about the athletes. there is nothing else to see. i’m it's all about the athletes. there is nothing else to see.- it's all about the athletes. there is nothing else to see. i'm going to disatree. is nothing else to see. i'm going to disagree- it's _ is nothing else to see. i'm going to disagree. it's not _ is nothing else to see. i'm going to disagree. it's not all— is nothing else to see. i'm going to disagree. it's not all about - is nothing else to see. i'm going to disagree. it's not all about the - disagree. it's not all about the athletes. it's about the animals as well. because one of the things i think about is how we all got into curling and we all know the name from dressage. i curling and we all know the name from dressage.— curling and we all know the name from dressage. i was asked before london what _ from dressage. i was asked before london what i _ from dressage. i was asked before london what i thought _ from dressage. i was asked before london what i thought the - from dressage. i was asked before london what i thought the dark i london what i thought the dark horse of the games would be. london what i thought the dark horse of the games would he. fits in of the games would be. as in the sort? i of the games would be. as in the sport? i said _ of the games would be. as in the sport? i said dressage _ of the games would be. as in the sport? i said dressage and - of the games would be. as in the sport? i said dressage and i - of the games would be. as in the sport? i said dressage and i got i sport? i said dressage and i got lauthed sport? i said dressage and i got laughed at. _ sport? i said dressage and i got laughed at, and _ sport? i said dressage and i got laughed at, and that _ sport? i said dressage and i got laughed at, and that is - sport? i said dressage and i got. laughed at, and that is charisma, the eventing gold medallist and mark todd rode charisma and won two gold medals, and they are all featured... in your book. 100 amazing creatures and what i enjoyed about the book is that it's something you can dip in
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and out of and there is an appearance but it is any animal, large or small, all positive influences on people's lives and society. influences on people's lives and socie . ., society. one of the disappointing thins society. one of the disappointing thin . s of society. one of the disappointing things of not _ society. one of the disappointing things of not going _ society. one of the disappointing things of not going to _ society. one of the disappointing things of not going to tokyo - society. one of the disappointing things of not going to tokyo and | society. one of the disappointing | things of not going to tokyo and i would love to be there and i've covered many olympic games at the venue and the winter olympics and commonwealth games in salford and we can still do a great programme and we will, but the joy of being in the city is you get to experience their life and the culture and the japanese are really, really keen on cats and there is a cat in the book who they made a stationmaster. look, with the full uniform and everything and an official badge and they have and an official badge and they have a cat cafe in tokyo. i’ge and an official badge and they have a cat cafe in tokyo.— a cat cafe in tokyo. i've been. it's amazing- — a cat cafe in tokyo. i've been. it's amazing- i— a cat cafe in tokyo. i've been. it's amazing. i know— a cat cafe in tokyo. i've been. it's amazing. i know that _ a cat cafe in tokyo. i've been. it's amazing. i know that is _ a cat cafe in tokyo. i've been. it's amazing. i know that is why - a cat cafe in tokyo. i've been. it's amazing. i know that is why you i a cat cafe in tokyo. i've been. it's l amazing. i know that is why you are gutted. it's really bizarre and it's fabulous and weird. you go into a cafe and have a coffee and there are cats everywhere and it's supposed to
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be therapeutic. thank you for bothering. no one else bothers. it wasn't funny. i rather like it when pets are very ordinary names. simon the stories in the book, who was an amazing ships cat.— amazing ships cat. there were a lot of incidents — amazing ships cat. there were a lot of incidents of _ amazing ships cat. there were a lot of incidents of cats _ amazing ships cat. there were a lot of incidents of cats on _ amazing ships cat. there were a lot of incidents of cats on ships - of incidents of cats on ships because they deal with rance but simon survived all sorts of attacks but cats don't like water. most cats. i but cats don't like water. most cats- i feel _ but cats don't like water. most cats- i feel i — but cats don't like water. most cats. i feel i think— but cats don't like water. most cats. i feel i think that - but cats don't like water. most cats. i feel i think that the - cats. i feel i think that the shipmates, we go back to the therapy nature of having an animal round. massively important through various wars, the relationship. the morale. i was reading the story of simon the cat and the ship was attacked and blasted holes inside of it and it
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had shrapnel. mcgrail and he disappeared for a couple of days in the cat was ok. we will be all right. don't spoil the story, both of you. i think ijust. you right. don't spoilthe story, both of you. i think i just. of you. i think! 'ust. you haven't tot of you. i think! 'ust. you haven't not to of you. i think! 'ust. you haven't got to simon — of you. i think i just. you haven't got to simon yet. _ of you. i think i just. you haven't got to simon yet. you _ of you. i think i just. you haven't got to simon yet. you will - of you. i think i just. you haven't got to simon yet. you will still i got to simon yet. you will still enjoy the chapter. irate got to simon yet. you will still enjoy the chapter.— got to simon yet. you will still enjoy the chapter. we got through a load of stuff. _ enjoy the chapter. we got through a load of stuff, rugby, _ enjoy the chapter. we got through a load of stuff, rugby, the _ enjoy the chapter. we got through a load of stuff, rugby, the olympics, i load of stuff, rugby, the olympics, thank you. clare's book is heroic animals: big and small, and she will be on olympic duty for the bbc starting, tomorrow? keep your distance. i will. back off! i was _ keep your distance. i will. back off! i was told. _ keep your distance. i will. back off! i was told. you _ keep your distance. i will. back off! i was told. you are - keep your distance. i will. back off! i was told. you are watching breakfast. it's eight 59.
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this is bbc news — i'm annita mcveigh — the headlines at 9am: unions condemn a 3% pay rise for nurses and nhs staff in england and wales — but the health secretary claims it will make a "real difference to people's lives". retailers raise concern about the growing impact of staff self—isolating in england — ministers promise more details on exemptions later today. we're obviously reviewing the situation all the time but what we can't do is get into a position where we're changing the rules on a daily basis. the rules about self isolation are clear. are you having to isolate after being pinged by the nhs covid—19 app? or are you trying to run a business with staff isolating? get in touch and let me know how it's affecting you by tweeting me
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at annita?mcveigh and using the hashtag bbcyourquestions.

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